15 Burst results for "J Allen Hynek"

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"He's trying desperately to regain the controls and such. And these objects essentially escort him for certain period of time. Before they eventually break off and fly towards a volcano. And he is so frightened by this incident that when he is eventually able to land, he actually has to end up he ends up like circling the airport like 11 times because his landing gear, the doors to his landing gear were damaged, but he finally got him open. He lands the plane. He jumps out of the plane before the engine even shuts off. And he's just absolutely freaked out. And eventually he ends up having these, it ends up making the press in 1978. And he has these Men in Black experiences after that, in which he is kind of harassed by a few groups of people twice, he, in the first one, he was actually going to make a TV appearance in this car kind of just cuts off off in the middle of the road. They approach him in his vehicle and they say, you're not going to the studio. You're not going to talk about this. So after that happens, he goes home, eventually people catch up with him and tells him what happened. And they decide that, no, we'll have a private meeting in a hotel. So he goes and he meets with J Allen hynek of all people. He has a I think like an 11 hour meeting with him. It was very long, but they were going to make plans to meet again. And while he was going back up to that hotel room, he encounters another group of men in this lobby that says you're not going to talk about it, stop talking about it. So yeah, there's a lot of interesting cases between interactions with pilots and UFOs. You mentioned a few things in there that circle right into my next question. It's in season 5 episode 13. And in that episode, we see a UFO in Kazakhstan in the former Soviet Union. And with the popularity of Hollywood, a lot of movies and TV shows produced obviously in the United States, X files included. So it stands to reason that a lot of the U of four reports in the U.S. get a lot more spotlight in pop culture than those outside of the U.S., but you mentioned some of the flights that you just mentioned. We're not in the U.S.. Do you think there are more reports in the U.S. or is it that incidents like Roswell or Kenneth Arnold, you're talking about because those get publicized more in things like movies and TV shows like the X files, do you think that's a reason why they're for lack of a better term more popular than the events that we are outside the U.S.? I think what's interesting and I've had guests on and we've talked about cases that aren't as well known that should be as well known. A lot of the times that they're not known far and wide is because they weren't printed in English.

J Allen hynek U.S. Kenneth Arnold Kazakhstan Soviet Union Hollywood Roswell
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

07:13 min | 8 months ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Paola also let us know that we were in this very small audience. Accompanied by royalty or at least, I don't know, royalty adjacent. Harry and Meghan. She said that he's so great. You just turn around. You're making her there. That would be, wow. They're like, we're just really into your folks. That's interesting. I can imagine so many people at the conference who would consider them blizzard people, just because they're right. Connected to actual royalty. So Paolo was saying that a couple of years ago, she was contacted by Demi Lovato. Oh, okay. Or, I don't know, the way Powell kept saying it sounded more like dummy. Oh no. She bridged the distance halfway from Demi to dummy. The way she's saying it. Demi had reached out because they were interested in aliens UFOs and Paolo's research and wanted to learn more and they had like a three hour conversation and Paolo was saying that dummies now I'm just saying dummy because it's funnier than Demi. No, no aspersions on Demi. Demi's request was to get books. And so she sent a bunch of books to read up on. So anyways, Demi Lovato was not here. But their mother and sister were there in the front row. Oh, wow. Apparently Diana and Dallas. Okay. So Paola had them stand up and waved to the audience. We all clapped for them. Like, yay. Demi Lovato's family. And that's fun. Paolo was just like so impressed that a young person like Demi Lovato was interested in aliens and UFOs. And again, she told us my own children don't even read my books that I write. They just say, you know. Same lady, yeah. Okay. Oh, we're happy for you, mom. That's great that you're into that. Not interested. I don't want to talk to her kids now. Yeah. Definitely. We can find her kids. And then we found out that Paul heineck was also in the audience sitting right behind them. So Paul heineck is, again, adjacent because his father was J Allen hynek, who is connected to both Jacques vallee and Paola Harris because Paula had been like a research assistant for him for many years. Okay. For Jay Ellen heineck, but jaylen heineck is another one of those people who's well regarded within the UFO community. He's now deceased, but he was attached to project blue book. In the day. And he was also considered a legitimate researcher. Someone of worth paying attention to no dummy, if you will. I will. And also, he was actually in close encounters of the third kind. Oh, okay. You seem very briefly, but Steven Spielberg wanted to include him. So you see a little shot of guys kind of sitting in sort of a mission control sort of situation and he's one of them there. Nice. Yeah, pretty fun. Alien lore there. So his son, Paul heineck, got up and everybody clapped for him. He waved to the audience and he said, I have read my dad's books and I've read yours. So it was a nice little way to boost her self worth there. So then the tech folks had been working on getting this little video promo for their book, the best kept secret. Trinity the best kept secret. Yeah, and so we played that. Yeah, it was just a little dramatic set of pictures related to the site and the investigation. This is a podcast I can't show them to you, but I'm very excited to show you one piece of this, Gary. Okay. We'll get there. So, okay, let's talk about this crash. Yeah. Again, this happened in 1945 and the area was on the gordo, New Mexico. There's many different ways to refer to the general area, either by the military base or the county, or the city nearby, but it's kind of southern New Mexico. I checked like a 117 miles from Roswell. Okay. West. So it's kind of like lower, middle of the state. And this was the site of the Trinity nuclear test. Okay, yeah, 'cause that's a name we hear. Yeah, that's a big deal because that was us. The U.S. trying out a nuclear bomb above ground before it was used in World War II as a weapon. And so the nuclear test was on July 16th, 1945. And as many may recall, the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, that happened on August 6th. 1945. So just essentially weeks before the U.S. Military used that. Yeah, okay. And so yeah, this is a well-known site, and of course this was top secret at the time. So what's happening here in 1945, but that's why this area is significant. And our main characters in this narrative really the people from whom this whole story comes are these men who were boys at the time, Remy and Jose. So Remy was 7 at the time and Jose was 9. Okay. And they lived within miles of that nuclear explosion. Two Disney names. Oh yeah, Remy, Jose, yeah. A rant and a parrot. Yeah. All right. Disney's made a lot of things. Coincidence. Yes. Apparently Remy is short for Remington. Remedio. Oh, wow. Okay, cool. Remy Joe baca and Jose Padilla. So they're kind of our main characters upon whom all of this hangs. Everything you're about to hear is really fun. Okay. Their recollections of what happened to them when they were kids. Oh, right, how old are they? 7 and 9. No. 7 is just barely how old you are when we can trust you to remember things. Before 7, like all of your memories are pretty confabulated. And let's start collecting their stories in their 70s. You're already, you're already sensing the problem. Yeah. Oh my God, okay. So they had personal stories about, for example, they had stories like one of their moms, had seen the flash go off and was curious and looked out the door and lost vision in that eye. Oh, wow. Yeah, that's the story, and that's wild. That's a story, and that's why. Well, I mean, let's assume that's true. Right, right. That sort of thing could happen. Yeah, sure. Looking at an atomic explosion. Of course, no one was properly warned about this, though, obviously the government tried to keep people from actually being within the blast radius. But yeah, the brand new thing, this nuclear explosion. So yeah, lots of stories about that. But about a month later, that's when they experienced a totally different event. So this happened on August 14th, 1945. I think that was the date. So almost exactly a month after that nuclear test, the boys say that there was a similar explosion, like something very loud and they thought, oh, it's happened again. Yeah. But then they go outside and they realize that there's a craft that has hit a tower and then crashed into the ground, so they go toward it. Well, actually, I think the story was something to do with one of the boys had been told to go looking for a cow that was about to cav..

Paul heineck Demi Lovato Paolo Demi Paola Allen hynek Jacques vallee Paola Harris Jay Ellen heineck jaylen heineck Remy Meghan Powell New Mexico Jose Harry Diana Steven Spielberg Paula
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

06:04 min | 8 months ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"So they were leaving late from that last panel, and this talk was going to be about Trinity, the best kept secret. Oh shit, okay. The best kept and you're just gonna blow this wide open and tell our listeners. I guess their goal is to make it not the best kept secret anymore. Okay. They're on the side of, let's have more people know about it. Right. But let's call it the best kept secret. The so far best kept secret but not for long. The as of the moment of this publication, the best kept secret, but we're hoping that this book gained some traction and then it is no longer an accurate title. Yeah, yeah. Subsequent printings will just have less and less impressive titles. That would be amazing. The third reprinting is like a pretty well kept secret. Not even really a secret anymore. By Jacques valley. Secretor than it should be, ideally. Sort of hush huh operation. On the DL project. I'll give you the same summary that we got from the conscious life expo. Picture this Carrie. Okay. Here we go. In 1945, a UFO crashed in San Antonio, New Mexico. Okay. Now are you impressed already? Yes, I mean, yeah, a UFO is a big deal. But the year is important here, 1945, because, sorry, I'm in a room. World War II? I'm interrupting the copy. This is not this conversation is not in the booklet. Yeah, World War II, end of World War II, but everybody thinks of the first UFO crash as being Roswell. Oh, sure. Which happened in 1947. So essentially what we're saying here is there was an oh, you know what? They do mention that. Why am I giving you this one sidebar? Okay. I'll get back to the copy. It was one month after the first atomic bomb test at Trinity. Join Paula Harris and Jacques vallee as they reveal the earliest evidence of U.S. government's UFO recovery exclamation mark, evidence has existed since 1945, two years before the well-known incident at Roswell in 1947. Over several site investigation surveys, they reconstructed the historic observations by three witnesses, two of whom are still living, who described to them the circumstances of the crash and recovery of a nearly intact flying vehicle, and its extraterrestrial occupants. Oh wow, they were in there, okay. Buy an army detachment. Yeah, see, this is shaping up to be a big deal. Combining their long experience in field research around the world, Harris and valet have documented the step by step efforts by the military to remove the craft weighing several tons from where it crash landed during a storm. Be sure to attend this event and learn about Trinity the best kept secret, so there we go. And Paola Harris is listed as an investigative reporter, widely published author. Okay. Her master's degree in education is from Lesley college in Boston. Okay. And Jacques vallee, here we go. He studied at the sorbonne and received an MS in astrophysics at Lille university if I'm saying that right? His early writings earned him the Jules Verne prize for a science fiction novel in French, coming to the University of Texas as an astronomer, he co developed the first computer based map of Mars for NASA, then moved to northwestern university where he earned a PhD in artificial intelligence and served as a close associate of doctor J Allen hynek, the U.S. Air Force scientific consultant on unidentified flying objects under project blue book. Okay. Pretty fancy. Yeah, pretty fancy. We haven't checked any of that, but I wouldn't don't have particular reason to think it's not true. All right, guess who introduced this discussion? You've got two options. Okay, Jimmy church. Almost, it's Allen steinfeld. Our buddy. The other guy who introduces everybody. He pumped us up, told us about how important this was. This is a guy who goes around to these kinds of places and does new agey stuff. He's everywhere. I counted 36 people, at least this was starting three of them were wearing masks. Okay. Ken, this is early February. Not a 12. Wow. Quick math. I'm like kind of a mess. Yeah. Well done. Yeah, thank you. So now that huge of a draw 36 people. No, it wasn't. And it was a really big room, too. It was built for more. Definitely. So Paula, one of her first comments was that this is being live stream. You know, kind of invoking this larger audience. This is so important, it's so great that we're getting this message out of the conscious life expo. But later on, maybe in a different episode, I'll tell you a bit about the talk I heard in that same room by whitley strieber, and he was saying like, wow, ten years ago, this place would be full. Oh, interesting. Yeah. I wonder what he sees as the difference there. It was weird because simultaneously he was trying to make the case that this is more important than ever and that people are paying less attention than ever. I don't know, it felt like he was trying to have it both ways that somehow this movement is growing and yet he's got this empty room. You could blame the pandemic, but he didn't. He had some other circuitous route. Anyways, yeah, Paula introduces this and says that really she was the one who started on this case before anybody. Oh. That this was a 9 year investigation for her. Okay. And only a 5 year investigation for Jacques. Okay. She was on the beat. And this was a good thing because one of the two primary witnesses died after she interviewed him. Okay. So she got the ball rolling with these kind of eyewitness testimonies about this crash. And then Jacques got interested when physical evidence of the crash became part of the narrative. Oh, you know what? In a way, we've kind of got a Ross and Carrie situation here. Oh yeah. Yeah. You're right. Yeah, okay, cool. You could be off on some investigation for like four years, and then I'd finally be like, oh, you got something physical? Okay, maybe. Let's talk. Maybe we've reached the end of the metaphor, but yeah. But I'm liking this picture. But you know, I mean, he seems like the hard science guy. I got you. Yeah, yeah, don't worry. I like it. Okay, I'm superimposing our faces onto them. Okay, go on. Good..

Jacques vallee Jacques valley Paula Harris Trinity Paola Harris Lesley college Lille university J Allen hynek Jimmy church Allen steinfeld Carrie Roswell San Antonio New Mexico U.S. government Jules Verne valet northwestern university U.S. Air Force Harris
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:37 min | 9 months ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"This has become the most important thing in my life, this contact experience. So he was kind of glad that he dove in to what was really dark and negative experience for him and turned it into something positive that is revolutionized his life and his consciousness. And of course he has to end this with something that will stick in your mind. So he says, it's about learning how to do this. And we can. Are people clapping at this? Sometimes. Okay, yeah. Do you feel that rhythm and you're like, I'm supposed to clap Eric comes clap, wait, what did that mean? It's just so funny. You know, he'll talk for a minute and then he just knows like, I gotta wrap up with this important statement. Yeah. Okay. You did it. So then Serena, the moderator she wanted to know about project Galileo, I wasn't aware of this, but it's actually from Harvard. And it's an attempt to look into the skies and see what they can find out, potentially about alien life. Like I said, anything? Yeah. I guess so. I only briefly looked at their website, but it was legitimately from Harvard. I'll read their ground rules. One, we do not work with classified information or unreliable past data to our analysis of the data is based on known physics. Three are data and analysis will be freely published documented and archived for no results will be released except through scientifically accepted channels of publication. All right. The little slogan for the Galileo project is daring to look through new telescopes, so there you go. So the ground rules. Now, can you read the sky rolls? I'll read this as well. And they say, the goal of the Galileo project is to bring the search for extraterrestrial technological signatures of extraterrestrial technological civilizations from accidental or anecdotal observations and legends to the mainstream of transparent, validated and systematic scientific research. Cool. Complimentary to traditional SETI, so yeah, that's cool. More power to you all. I wonder if John Mack was ever involved in that? Wasn't he Harvard? Yeah, but it feels like this is brand new. So I started. It also feels totally not in the spirit of John Mack per se. Oh, right. Who is more about the personal stories? Yeah. And regression and stuff, yeah. Jacques vallee was given this question. He said, well, I'm not involved with the project. I don't want to speak for them, but he did agree that we need to do a better job of documenting and kind of reinforce that earlier point. You know, one person with a camera phone isn't going to convince the skeptics. Yeah. Then he went off on this really long segue. He wanted to pick up on what whitley had said about us not thinking of the government as bad people. And so he gave this protracted history of his own involvement with the government and how he realized at a certain point on Jay Allen hynek, the famous researcher kind of helped him realize this that, you know, the government's just made out of people and they don't have perfect knowledge and they're trying to do the best with what they have and we really shouldn't judge them as individuals, which I appreciate. It's more pragmatic and just the understanding of human psychology, but also is kind of contrary to this whole thread that we see of people picturing the shadowy cabal that has everything figured out. So he was trying to introduce that. But the way Jacques vallee talks is I think so difficult to pin down. I would try to take notes and he'll just sort of say a little snippet of something and they'll add a little another snippet and a little bit of backstory in history and he'll get off on a tangent. And at no point can I say like, well wait, what point are you making? What are you trying to say? And it was so really struggle with this. I hear it. It's so frustrating. It's like, now I'm just I'm fascinated with your sentence structure that you're so evasive in saying so little while talking constantly. And he's kind of like Linda Moulton. How just in that he'll just keep going and going, and also, you know, he's the oldest person on the panel. Besting Linda Moulton Howe there. So, you know, it's hard to fault him, but he just kind of goes back and forth, and he's talking about 9 11. He named drops, Carl Sagan, and he tells all these other little stories. And he goes on for I had to check 23 minutes. On a two hour panel, the Yale falls was given an impossible job that no other agency wanted, which was to keep the records of the public, there was a point back in the late 50s when the study of UFOs in the United States diverged. One branch which was initially classified that we know about it now was dedicated to instrumentation and classified gathering of data about UFOs. And the thought was that we don't need reports from ordinary people because our people don't know anything, what we want is calibrated data from instruments, including the early satellites. And including a number of things that would be deployed around the world, which they were. In the meantime, the public wants to report because the public is worried and somebody has to take those reports and catalog them and that job was given to the air force. And it was an impossible job. So oh my God. One 6th of the panel is just him like addressing this one question..

Jacques vallee Harvard John Mack Jay Allen hynek Serena Eric whitley Linda Moulton Linda Moulton Howe Yale falls Carl Sagan government United States air force
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

07:58 min | 9 months ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Let's have this more interesting conversation and stop trying to establish if they're actually there. Yeah, that's center on the particular issue that, you know, makes me excited. And Jacques vallee, by the way, I should mention that he was also the inspiration for the French UFO investigator character in close encounters of the third kind. Oh, I've never seen it. Okay. And in that movie, you can actually see J Allen hynek, who was a famous UFO researcher. And again, one of those more legitimate people who came from a real astronomy background who was quite taken with the whole UFO story. So he actually shows up in the film. Oh, fun. And Jacques vallee is represented by this character who's kind of modeled after him. So yeah, that's a fun little bit of history. Anyway, so he's in agreement that this should be a mainstream topic, but eventually we'll get to the place where more legitimately we can talk about abductions, materials, from UFOs, and not just sightings. So they're all kind of frustrated that this hasn't really taken off as a study. And then he was talking about a paper that he co wrote with a doctor Nolan that was on materials recovered from spacecraft. And he said it was published in an actual journal. And I meant to look that up, but I haven't yet. But he said it took three years of approval to get published in a journal, but he said, well, now we've done it though, because everybody else who's tried to write one of these papers for a series journal has been rejected. So we've broken through that feeling. That was like a real hurrah moment. We've passed the torch under the next generation now. It's up to them to get to the next landmark. And did he say what the article was about or? Yeah, like materials recovered from UFOs. Oh, okay, what they were made. Material science, yeah. Got it. Okay, it looks like the paper is called, what do we know about the material composition of UFOs? Okay. Based on a report from Paris in 2017, presents three categories of UFO related materials, metallic samples recovered from molten masses that were ejected by aerial objects, implants, ranging from bits of wire to small structured devices, sometimes encapsulated in an organic material, and thirdly, large structural pieces claimed to have been found at the site of catastrophic crashes of craft, so okay, that was their paper, I guess, and okay, I also see one that they were on in January 2022. Okay. Improved instrumental techniques, including isotropic analysis, applicable to the characterization of unusual materials with potential relevance to aerospace, forensics. Okay. Oh yeah. I was in progress in aerospace sciences, volume one 28. There we go. Okay, that must be the journal publishing he's talking about. And I guess that took him three years to get approved. Wow, okay. I wonder if they had to tone down some of the UFO language. Yeah, that's kind of how this looks. Yeah, from that title, aerospace sciences, relevance to aerospace forensics. Okay, yep, that's interesting though. That's kind of like that creation textbook that they changed to intelligent design. Just to try to get it past the sensors, so to speak. Okay. And thus launched a new branch of thought. Indeed. Or at least an old one repackaged. Right. Okay, so then Caroline Corey, who's had her own personal experiences and has her tear in the sky documentary coming out in just a couple months. She had dark hair, but she kind of reminded me of Phoebe from friends. Oh, okay. Sort of like just a similar sort of attitude and way of holding her face and, I don't know, just reminded me of her. So she's also happy about these panels and the public attention to UAP. She says it's nice not to be labeled as crazy. But she says, still, government admissions aren't close to what should be done. We're still like this whole unexplained phase. She's like, it's not an explained. We all know. And so she said, you know, we have to take it upon ourselves. We're the real ones moving this forward. So what I did, me Caroline is I got a group together and we had all this equipment. $700,000 worth of equipment. Okay. 8 fleer. Turkey baster. No, she lists them. We have 8 flir cameras. That's the forward looking infrared. Right. Regular cameras, night vision, magnetometers, spectrum analyzers, acoustic detectors. She has to think, well, what else? What else do we have? Oh yeah, we had a radiation detector. Yeah, so. DVD player. We went to cell phone charger. We went to three sites over 5 days and we just filmed nonstop. Like we just essentially sounds like they just pointed these devices at the sky. Okay. And just captured a bunch of raw data. Okay. And she said, we were able to capture anomalous events. Okay. Okay, still sounds like you're just pointing devices at the sky like ghost hunters. And she said, we found all kinds of correlations. And she said, okay. So, you know, it's not enough to prove anything. If you're just some person with a cell phone that you point in the sky, if you can have multiple devices that are giving you different readings on the same object. Okay. This will be far more convincing. That is better. So we would capture something visually, but then we would register 42 MeV with a different detector. And so that tells you this is something special and it's not confirmed it's not like an airplane. It's not anything from NASA. It's not a solar flare. So what we have a real. And that's also a bird. I mean, you still have an eliminated so many things in this world. Right, and that's all she can refer to it as is correlations and anomalies, but she's so excited. She says, no, we have hundreds of hours of data that we've collected from all these devices. So it's going to take us a long time to get through it. But we're doing the work. Oh, goodness. Let's just keep him busy. I hope you didn't really pay $700,000 for all that. Well, I'll give her this. It does mitigate one factor, which is the artifact on the lens phenomenon where someone shows you a picture. There you go. Look at this. I see a ghost in this picture of my bureau. And then you have to wonder like, okay, well, it's just this one camera. So am I dealing with something actually in the space? Am I doing with something on the lens? Am I doing this something with the light hitting this lens? Yeah, oh, absolutely. So she's helping to eliminate that. And conceptually, I totally agree. Like if you have multiple cameras multiple videos capturing the same thing from different angles, that helps a lot. It gives you a lot more data. It gives you the parallax of the different perspectives. Also, it's harder to fake. If you're going to have fake one, faking two is at least twice as hard. Yeah. So I went to look at the website for her, tearing the sky documentary. And was dismayed to see that it features William Shatner. Oh, wow. She interviews him. And michio kaku. He does this. Oh, I know that name. I feel like all the time. Like, physicist of some note who shows up on a lot of documentaries. And I think he just likes to be on screen and they can get him for these kind of more pseudoscience documentaries and he doesn't put up too much of a fight. I shook my head at both of them. But she told us that with this footage, she was able to capture actual tic tac like objects. I saw tic tac like objects at the gas station recently. We were about a dollar for a little pack. Well, for anyone who listened to my interview with Mick west, you may remember there was a famous tic tac UFO video that was one of the ones released by the navy, had this object that was just kind of long and roughly oval in shape, and yeah, kind of looked like a tic tac. Gotcha. So she's like, well we caught one of those. And we also caught anomalous events that look like a wormhole. It's like, oh, come on. Okay. Just pointing stuff with this guy..

Jacques vallee French UFO Allen hynek Caroline Corey UAP Nolan Phoebe Paris Caroline Turkey NASA michio kaku William Shatner Mick west navy
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"This episode of based on a true story was produced by me, Dan lefevre. And me, Mackenzie Davis. I'd like to thank David O'Leary and Shaun de blonsky once again for taking the time to give us a peek behind the creation of the history channel's project blue book. I'd also like to thank carsten cre corco from save blue book for helping to make this episode happen. If you want to learn more about the campaign to save season three of project blue book, you can visit, save blue book dot com, or sign the official petition at change dot org slash save blue book. As always, you can find those links in the show notes for this episode as well as on the show's home on the web based on a true story podcast dot com. Okay, now it's time to answer the two truths and a lie game from the beginning of the episode. And as a refresher, here are the two truths and one lie. Number one the real project blue book did not investigate the Roswell crash. Two. David and Sean each had UFO experiences of their own. Three. Project blue book investigated doctor J Allen hynek's involvement in the 1978 movie invasion of the body snatchers. Did you find out which one is a lie? Let's start with number one. The real project blue book did not investigate the Roswell crash. That is true. As Shaun explained, the incident at Roswell took place 5 years before the real project blue book started. So they had to be creative to cover Roswell in the series. Continuing along to number two, David and Sean each had UFO experiences of their own. That is also true. We heard both David and Sean share their own experiences on the show. I've never had an experience myself, but they're fascinating to me. So if you have had an experience with a UFO, I would love to hear it. You can find my contact info at base on a true story podcast dot com. That means number three is the lie. Project blue book investigated doctor J Allen hynek's involvement in the 1978 movie invasion of the body snatchers. In truth, the movie, the real doctor hynek was involved in was close encounters of the third kind. That's the one we saw depicted in the project blue book series as well. That just about wraps up our time together today. Before we go, the last thing I like to do on each episode is to share how much time and effort when you're creating this episode. Today's episode took a total of 27 hours to create. Now, that 27 hours is only my time for this one episode. It does not include my guest time or any of the overall things that I have to do to keep based on a true story going. Like maintaining the website, social media and finding new guests and so on. There are a lot of things that take time and cost money that go beyond things associated with this one episode or any single episode, but there are all things that are required because if I didn't do them, there wouldn't be any episodes of based on a true story at all. In a nutshell, this podcast may be free to listen to, but it is not free to create. And that's why I'm so thankful for the sponsors whose ads you've heard on this episode. You can find more information about them over at based on a true story podcast dot com slash advertisers, but they're not the only ones helping to keep the show alive. There are wonderful people just like you who are helping to keep this show financially going. So, if you found value in today's episode, if you enjoyed it, I really hope you'll consider helping to support the next episode over at based on a true story podcast dot com slash support. Once again, that's based on a true story podcast dot com slash support. Until next time, thanks so much for listening and I'll chat with you again. Really soon..

J Allen hynek Dan lefevre Mackenzie Davis David O'Leary Shaun de blonsky Sean David hynek Roswell Shaun
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"In Heineken. What we found a way to do, I think, rather, hopefully, rather well, was take those kernels of truth and then weave them into a narrative yarn that was hopefully enjoyable entertaining emotionally evocative. But also encouraging people to be like, hey, like every week was a case that really happened within an episode. We'd have little Easter eggs of things that were really going on at the time. We'd explore other things that were sort of in the social fabric of the 1950s, bomb shelters and paranoia and the people Tapping your phones and all that stuff. Russia is interested interest in UFOs. All that stuff. So yeah, we also had Paul heineck, who was, you know, J Allen hynek son as a consulting producer on the show. And, you know, that felt like any time we were doing something that made us a little squeamish or whatever, he was he would always say, which wonderful, he'd say, I think my dad would love this. And so that really gave us a lot of permission, it felt like to kind of run with it and get a blessing. Just for that topic, are you talking about UFO? Is it unexplained, right? And then government cover ups where obviously we don't know a lot of stuff that's going on there. Did you find blue book to be more challenging to fill in some of those gaps than completely fictional? Because there is just a we don't know. The thing we talked about very early on was that we're writing a line between we can never say they exist or the show goes away. Because the whole idea is they're searching for the truth, right? So that was always a hard line to kind of deal with and something we were very aware of every episode. And one of the challenges too, was like, you realize, it's not a it's not a cop show where you show up and there's a body. Our guys show up and somebody saying, no, no, no, I saw it in the sky. You know what? It's like, so how do you tell those stories in give it all of that sort of energy and interest and revelation every act kind of thing? That's right. And the thing we realized was that we had to thrust our leads and our audience into the case. We had to thrust them into these events to some degree. So things would happen to Quinn as they would investigate. A case that would often start with a civilian witness or a military witness or multiple witnesses seeing something that couldn't explain. It wouldn't the case wouldn't be over. It would lead down a rabbit hole of more revelations. But as Shawn said, it's exactly right, we would always want to walk that line like we'd always have like a plausible other answer. No matter how deep in we went. I mean, there's an episode early on where we go to operation paper clip. We go into the sin base and there looks it's like they're staring at what looks like an alien in a tank. But there's an alternate explanation there that's given as well. So that there was always this sense of which truth are you going to believe? Because I think one of our goals too is obviously we wanted to attract audience members who are interested in this subject matter. But we also want to we were also very cognizant that half the population, you know, doesn't think there is much to UFOs. And we wanted to make sure that we presented an interesting sort of dilemma where both sides could be like, oh, maybe maybe the, you know, the Lubbock lights were plovers, you know, or like, or maybe it was temperature inversions in episodes. In one ten, you know, in the season one finale or things of that nature. So that there was always this balance because like, yeah, as soon as you just say, it's real definitively. It's the mystery is gone. The truth is, you know, the quest is over. Part of blue book like from history was to come up with some of those stories some of some of the plausible explanations for that. Can you give an example, maybe a plot point in there where you did depart from the history that they maybe the example that blue book gave and had to kind of come up with your own? Oh, God. I mean, we listen, you know, I mean, well, there were certain threads that we, you know, as far as we know the Hynix were never infiltrated by a Russian female Russian spy. Paul heyke would say, I don't know. I don't think that ever happened. You know, so certainly we were adding certain narrative drama. But what is well documented was that Russia was very interested in not only their own UFO programs at that time, but in what American knew about UFOs at that time. Because they were like, is this top secret technology, things of that nature? That we have yet to release. And we always were excited by the idea that oh, the Heineken family can be a soft target into sort of an intelligence gathering mission from Russia about that. And then things obviously complicate from there because even our Russian spy character is sort of become sort of morally torn about which sides you should be fighting for and all those wonderful things. I think from a case standpoint, though, I think we always try to reverse engineer what became the official explanation. Like the plovers like temperature and versions with the stuff over D.C., even hopkinsville, where as crazy, it seemed with the there was like a monkey that was dressed up in the space outfit that that's all based on fact actually. One of the guys in the family worked at a circus and there was like monkey, train monkeys there. Because in a way, that's almost too absurd to make up. I would be embarrassed to like bitch that in a room. So I think we always started with something, but we'd kind of reverse engineer it. And again, to go back to your very first question, try to sort of honor what was the initial truth of the actual story. One of the joys of the show for me was when it would air, I would like live tweet the show and I would beforehand kind of put together the list of all the things all the cool little truth nuggets that we had pulled from here and there and maybe throwing them in a bit of a blender to tell a cohesive compelling drama. But really to invite audiences to go like research this. Like, hey, this really was a real thing. Or like, you wanted this case is based off this event so that there was always these sort of like footings that audiences could have. And okay, great. And then they can go off. They can go off and see the case. And then even at the end of every episode, if you watched it on history, there was like a two or three minute documentary piece about the case that inspired this week's episode of blue book. And that was sort of concede from the very beginning once we landed in history to draw a line in the sand so that we could clearly be like, listen, we're not trying to just see if we want to tell a cool story compelling narrative. But here's the root of where this comes from. Now go off, you know, do your own research and come to your own conclusions. So it was nice to have that other sort of piece that would help plant it in historical context. Yeah, I like what you said, Sean, but the monkeys being yeah. And that's one of the things I love about the show that I do being able to dig into some of that. Because knowing that that's based on fact, that's something that somebody could easily look at and be like, oh, obviously, that couldn't have happened, but well, yeah, actually, some of the crazy stuff does happen. Yeah. You know, I think Chernobyl is probably what like the gold standard in terms of trying to tell an accurate story based on a historical event. And, you know, we, again, had to sort of decide early on that there's got to be a slightly different version of the show and also just we knew too that, you know, and David had put it in there. There's so much family in soap going on too that we could also sort of lean on that. Well, you mentioned a couple of them earlier, some of the stories that you got to cover like the Lubbock lights and operation paper clip. But Area 51, even got Hynix involvement in close encounters of the third kind. What was your favorite episode in the series? Oh, gosh. I mean, I would say I'm torn between three. I think both Sean and I share a deep, deep love of the close encounters episode, which in many ways in some ways feels almost like the culmination of the show. You can almost like click end it there. Because we end obviously in a very different way..

Paul heineck Allen hynek Russia Hynix Heineken Paul heyke Lubbock Quinn Shawn hopkinsville D.C. nuggets Sean David
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Blue book. I'd like to start by asking about the idea of making a show about UFOs. There are some people who immediately switch off when they hear the term UFO mentioned. Either they just won't believe what you say or they'll simply watch it to find a way to tell you that you're wrong. I can only imagine how difficult that is when you layer that onto the normal difficulties of trying to pitch and create a show that's based on UFOs. So my first question is simply why project blue book? Why did you decide to create a show around UFOs when you could create a show that doesn't have nearly as much controversy surrounding it? David as the creator, we start with you. Yes, sure thing. And hey everybody, and Dan, thanks for having us on. Yeah, you know, I mean, listen, for me and for Shaun as well, UFOs have been sort of a life long obsession interest. I've always always had a deep interest in this subject matter going all the way back to when I was a kid, I'm not sure why, but I just like was always fascinated with the unknown and it always rang true to me. I would watch unsolved mysteries in the 1980s or scare the hell out of myself and read whitley strieber's communion when I was like 9 or ten years old. And it just, it always felt authentic and true. Especially some of the more famous cases. In terms of blue book, as I became an adult and moved out to LA and pursued a career in writing and all that kind of stuff, this was sort of right before end of 2017 and UFO's kind of really hit the news again. And there wasn't actually, frankly, a lot of UFO stuff on TV X files had sort of come to its end. And I've become a bit of a UFO history buff and project blue book always just felt like such an interesting right sort of world for TV in that it was period. You know, it had all these other interesting elements in the 1950s in terms of the Cold War and the rise of the atomic age and all that kind of stuff. And then just a plethora of incredible places and then really just a focus on the characters who sort of led that effort with doctor J Allen hynek. And captain Edward peltz sort of the first director of project Lubbock, both who basically shifted sides and became adamant believers that there was something worthy of rigorous scientific study here. So I think it began with that idea of can we tell a story, you know, sort of historical drama through the lens of these characters. And I was fortunate that I guess there wasn't a lot of UFO stuff at the time. I think project blue book presented a certain natural engine with sort of a kind of a different case every week with a really interesting backdrop of getting the kind of tell it in this sort of noir, 1950s sort of shadowy sort of way. And we were just very fortunate that, you know, it took some time, but that eventually it found a home with a and E studios and history. Competition, how did you get it involved in this? I came a little later once David had, you know, sort of researched and written the script and had connected with Robert Zemeckis. And I think they had had a series order by that point. You know, I've been in the television business for it's like 25 years plus at this point, I think. And so every TV show needs to have a showrunner at some point. And David is talented as he is. Had not been in that position before. And so if you're going to start any business, you're generally going to want somebody who has that experience to sort of be in there and help guide the process and understand what's coming up in front of you and how to run writers room and just all of the things you're not going to know if you haven't done it. So I essentially interviewed for the job, which began with meeting with David at a diner. We realized very quickly that, like him, I kind of been obsessed with UFOs, my whole life. It's been something that, since I was a kid, I remember seeing one when I was ten years old, were to God. And so it's just something I've always been fascinated with. So we were trading stories to the point where we stayed so long I got a parking ticket, and then of course you've got to go, you've got to go through the gauntlet of meeting the studio and the producers and the network and all that stuff. And it just felt like such a very sort of natural match. And then we just sort of move forward from there that, you know, we really connected on having the same passion in terms of that. But so I'm just happy to have had the opportunity to meet someone who shares that and you know, in terms of how I look at just even the phenomenon and want to tell those stories. I feel like, I mean, it's very much in vogue right now for people to be talking about UFOs in a very serious way. And I think like any new science and it is a bit of a science now because we're just starting to discover it because we have the minds that are being applied to it and science and the technology and the credibility of the people who've come forward. But for people to go back to your earlier point for people who can, you know, when you talk about, is there controversy around UFOs or why stir that up or when people say that? You know, my first question is like, well, what do you know about UFO? I would ask, like, what do you know about the history of UFOs? Because a lot of people want to throw it off as something tinfoil hat wearing silly. Like if they were here, they'd be landing on the front lawn of The White House and blah blah blah. But when you really understand the history and the amount of cases in the amount of credible people that have come forward, physical evidence, you know, visual evidence, all of this. It is without a doubt something that exists, and I count myself as true believer. And the second question I would ask somebody is, what do you believe about it? What do you have to believe to believe that it doesn't exist? You know, and oftentimes people will sort of stumble and go, well, I just think that this would happen if there would be this. The aliens would have said something by now. And then when you dig into that, you realize, it's just sort of a belief people have that sort of based on a feeling, right? Which is just like, oh, I don't know. I just feel like it wouldn't happen this way. And it's like, when you sort of dig into that, I would imagine the way people would have felt before, I don't know, we discovered bacteria when we didn't have a microscope. You know, it's demons inside your body. You know, that's what it's gonna be. And then when the science caught up, and we were able to see what was actually going on, there's still a bridge that has to happen where people have to get on board and understand that the facts that are there. And the people that are studying it are not crazy. And then all of this stuff gets worn out. So I feel like that's a very important pursuit right now, especially in a world where truth is such a malleable concept and so I love the idea that David and I again, I think found a path and caching towards wanting to get those ideas out there. That it's be part of that notion of getting the truth out to an audience. You said you had an experience at ten,.

David J Allen hynek captain Edward peltz whitley strieber Shaun Robert Zemeckis Lubbock Dan LA White House
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Two people who are perfect to offer a fantastic insight into what it takes to create a TV show that is inspired by true events. David O'Leary is an executive producer and was the creator of project blue book. And Sean jablonski, who isn't executive producer as well, and was the showrunner on project blue book. Before we start today's discussion, though, let's set up our game. Two truths and a lie. If you're new to the show, here is how it works. I'm about to say three things. Two of them are true. And that means one of them is a lie. Are you ready? Okay, here they are. Number one, the real project blue book did not investigate the Roswell crash. Number two David and Sean each had their own UFO experiences. Number three project blue book investigated doctor J Allen hynek's involvement in the 1978 movie invasion of the body snatchers. Got them? Okay, now as you're listening to our story today, your challenge is defined the two facts scattered somewhere throughout the episode, and by a simple process of elimination, you'll be able to find out which one is a lie. And of course, we'll do a recap at the end of the episode to see how well you did. All right, now it's time to connect with David O'Leary and Sean jablonski.

David O'Leary Sean jablonski J Allen hynek Sean David
"j allen hynek" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"Five after falling down the stairs in his home in south carolina falling right during his life who harake managed to amass over fifty patents related to the medical field and electromagnetic wave emissions if there is any validity to the information he is alleged to have received from the nine and as with the other worldly communications received received by doctor. Dr john dee. This strongly suggests the existence of at least two opposing contigents of tinge contingents engaged in theology. The influence of human affairs by diviner supernatural forces. So why do you think this suggests to opposing because the nine speaks of the opposition notice. They won't they won't use the name that when they asked that right yeah they would not use the name devil. Yes referred to it as the opposition. Yeah okay on may twenty seventh in one thousand nine hundred four housewife from elliot maine named francis. Swann began communicating with extraterrestrial intelligences via automatic writing. This came to the attention of retired rear. Admiral herbert knowles. Who happen to be swans. Next door neighbor. A member and future board director of nightcap. The national investigations committee on aerial phenomena phenomena. This information soon reached the fbi who conducted an investigation so fbi documents. State mrs swans data. That there were two spaceships from which she had been receiving messages. They were described as one hundred and fifty miles wide two hundred miles in length and one hundred miles in depth. These ships are designated as em- four and l. eleven and they also contain motherships which measure approximately one hundred fifty to two hundred fifty feet or two hundred feet in length. There were approximately five thousand of these mother. Ships oughta or appa. Is the manager or commander of the ship. 'em four which is from the planet urine us and peignoir is the manager of the commander of the ship. Eleven which is from the planet hotton the messages from off and are were warnings of the potential destruction of earth caused by the detonation of nuclear weapons which they claimed disrupts the magnetic field around the planet and these beings were presently working on the floor of the pacific ocean repairing faultlines. That were in danger of shifting. Furthermore appa would physically appear to officials from the office of naval intelligence or would make contact by other means on a particular date in the summer of nineteen fifty four prior to the world ending events to come in one thousand nine fifty six. As noted previously apocalyptic messages such as these are not unusual and obviously never seem to pan out as promised but behind the scenes the cause for concern by government officials was the fact that mrs swan lived only one hundred and thirty miles from dr andrei pu baharak. So according to a classified report prepared by project blue book's major robert friend which j allen hynek showed to jock belay..

harake Dr john dee Admiral herbert knowles national investigations commit mrs swans fbi south carolina Swann elliot francis maine office of naval intelligence appa pacific ocean mrs swan
"j allen hynek" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"Look isn't this the problem. I mean i. I've been following a lot of this news around this aid tip in the ua peas and all the different terminology and the people who were pushing this agenda getting the government to officially report on this. And i guess the thing is it's like there's videos coming from the navy and these stories here from the air force. Nobody's going to general quarters. Nobody's sounding an alarm. Nobody's like putting everybody an alert. Nobody's firing like you know it's like you've got a few people who happen to have the authority of government job. You know talking about this stuff and the entire. Ufo community is leaching relevance like. They're they're like pulling all the importance because people within the government talking about it but the government's huge is not a monolith. It's it's all these different compartments and departments in in in so of course when you've got hundreds of thousands of people you know in government positions. Some of those people are going to be ufo enthusiasts of the kind that skeptics are annoyed by. You know I find it. I find it really disturbing how the media lately latched onto this This lease late late. The recent themes around around these press releases the new york times story. That kind of stuff but in your in your show. You're going back and looking at the historical use of the government's research into this. And so you talk about how. There's these different government programs to investigate the the the question. Now i know some people may think well that's flying saucers. That's not the same as what we have now. But it's still the same kind of scenario and i. I really think you do a good job of Contextualising that and looking like this really nice historical Look at these different approaches. And i can't wait to see where you're going next. But can you talk a little bit about Some of those early government programs to try to find out what was going on or whatever their agenda may be because a lot of people knew afo community would argue. Those weren't sincere investigations. Talk a little bit about that. And i realized that was a rambling question. So please state your question in a question form. Yeah exactly. Can you tell me about project. Blue book the condon report grudge those programs. What is the blue book so project. Blue book is the one that's best known. It was the first one in nineteen forty seven Let's take a step back as listeners. May nineteen forty. Seven is sort of the kickoff of the modern ufo era. It's kenneth arnold seeing a bunch of flying sort of that wing type things around mount rainier than a couple of weeks later. It's roswell even though that doesn't sort of pablo to public attention for a few more decades but in nineteen forty seven against there's enough of that stuff that The air force starts a small project to try to figure out what's going on Is call project sign that becomes renamed project grudge couple years later and then finally becomes project blue book around nineteen fifty and so the idea there. Is you know it's late forties early fifties. So what's going on the skies a lot different than what's going on in the sky now just in terms of you know there arm satellites wide fewer planes and i can't remember what book i was reading but somebody who's making the interesting point that people just you know you didn't look people didn't look up in the sky is much there just wasn't as much there to concern you and so suddenly people are seeing things in the sky and it's like what it. What is it in an edge. You would imagine the early days of this of this kind of thing. Things are pretty easily explained. Whether it's it's planets that people are seeing or or birds or you know whatever whatever kind of natural phenomenon you can think of that debt. Now we would say well of course but about twenty percent of things that they're having a little harder time figuring out exactly what they were put together a panel called the robertson panel in the early fifties to kind of take a look at what they found Suitors anything that's interesting. They sort of come to the conclusion that there is not and that really the big concern. Is that the russians might use your foes to kind of freak us out General panic that's what they're most concerned about and so they suggest that we do better job of educating our students about about science critical thinking so it continues it continues goes on until about nineteen seventy. I kind of focus on j allen hynek who was the consulting scientists for project mubarak is served this interesting character in that when he he signs on very early. Nineteen forty seven and and he's initially a skeptic and just figures you know he'll be able to solve these things pretty quickly and as time goes on he does a lot of investigations and again. He's find that most of the stuff is very easily explained but there's a small percentage that that's harder and there are specific. Case is that he kind of runs into that he you know he has a hard time coming up with a satisfactory answer. For and by the time project blue book starts to wind down. So in the late sixties he's starting to waver a little bed and he's starting to think that maybe the air force is in is interested in finding out which really behind these things as it is just sort of explaining them away so the other thing. That's interesting about high. Nick is that more than you'd expect from a guy who's a scientist. He's also really into paranormal stuff. So from an early age he's been interested in serve esoteric topics and in the sixties and seventies gets interested in sort of out of body experiences and psychic photography and Different things like that and he starts have these ideas that maybe. ufo's are actually actually extra dimensional They're not they're not extraterrestrial they're from another dimension that we can sort of interact with them every once in a while so.

authority of government air force kenneth arnold navy mount rainier the new york times pablo allen hynek government robertson mubarak Nick
"j allen hynek" Discussed on The Best of Coast to Coast AM

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on The Best of Coast to Coast AM

"That one of those programs amniocentesis is what we would think of it now and sticks this needle in her abdomen and No she's wearing this dress and the famous betty dressed is in the archives special archives at At the university and so we Obtained permission with kathleen there to bring the dress out. And i had the idea of of taking a black light. Uv light which. I wasn't sure this ever been done. We took it into a dark room. And i found some stains now. Kathleen had had a few stains Tested before which indicated Some sort of dna that was betty but what we discovered. Was we turn the lining of her dress inside out. Okay so if you imagine if you were having an exam and they poke the needle through you You're gonna have bodily fluids coming out and contacting the inside of that. Lining the curious thing was this stain did not go through to the outer side of the dress so initially i mean you know right off the bat where we were able to say. Well that's not. It's not wine. It's not food. It's not something like that Because it would be on the outside going in and we had this analysed We did have a sample already of at dna before she passed. It comes up that it is her organic Material they're not able to determine. Though if it was you know bil- or intestinal or or blood but to me. The implications are quite big It was an area directly over where her naval would have been in one thousand nine hundred seventy one ben. I had a chance to interview. Dr benjamin simon their psychiatrist. I asked him if they were telling the truth and he said they're not lying. I don't know what happened to them but whatever happened to them they both believe it is true and that was an amazing revelation all by itself. And that's what you consistently here and that's what you want to hear your professionals who have nothing to gain by this. It's an objective statement. That says i believe they believe and that is huge because Other people come on and say well they concocted it they host it everything from those sessions. Everything from those tapes is he indicates would tell him this. This was a traumatic and real event. Now could they have imagined at all he leaves that possibility open but now we have Physical corroborating evidence to what she says that there was some sort of biological fluid You know right in the abdomen region. That is hers only on the inside so indicating she was wearing the dress now. She hung the dress up that night after she she got home the next day and never touched it again She felt dirty. They showered and and you know left. That dress as it was and as it is now in the museum. So i mean these little discoveries it it just excites me so much. Because we're you know still adding to these cases we thought had gone cold witness which you can see streaming on discovery. You looked at the j allen. Hynek case of dexter michigan did you where he talked about swamp gas so Ufo witness and that haunted him by the way it. Did you know and and one of my regrets. I met so many of my very favorite People i'd read about and unfortunately never got to meet him and As people know The dexter michigan case was something of a turning point for him where he finally kind of had enough and he felt like he'd been patsy For the air force forced him to say something like we precisely. So we spoke with Sheriff harvey okay. Now sheriff harvey went with hynick to frank manners farm which is where a lot of this. The ufo flapping occurred And dozens of witnesses In dexter and he goes to the farm he spends all day with hynick hynix interviewing frank manner And getting Statements and looking at at you know where the the object had flown He goes back now on the drive back to the police station. Sheriff harvey asked Hynek and he says so. What do you think you know. What do you What what do you make of all this. And he looks at him. And he's he's puzzled and hynick tells him i have no idea. I absolutely don't know what's going on. they get there and all of a sudden there's there's a press conference and I don't know if they were expecting their but the press is waiting for hynick to come down with his decision on this case and His staff of the police department chief staff comes in and says hey Mr dr hynick you have a call from washington and he goes into the back room and he's only in there for about a minute and he This sheriff told me he said when he came out hynix face completely changed any looked at him and he said it was swamp gas and he said what did just a minute ago. You told me you had no idea what this was. And he says. I just talked to dc swamp gas geez and when he goes up to tell that to the press of course. There's that kind of famous point you know where they're ridiculing him even the press on accept this and He knows that he's he's kind of become a patsy to the the whole thing and of course then you know this kind of changes his mind on the whole phenomena the one case that really changed his mind was the lonnie zamora police officer case in sikora new mexico and after talking to zamora that totally convinced. Hynick there's something else going on here. And he became a believer all of a sudden. Yeah i think And i love these stories because so many researchers all you need is an open mind but he even knew from the beginning. It seems that he was supposed to quote unquote solve these cases to quell the public. Fear during that series. We had Jenny zeidman who met him at University where he was teaching and jenny Unfortunately she passed away. You know during our filming but she was just a wealth of knowledge I remember talking to her and she she would just little you know every meeting. She leaked out a little more information. It would blow us away so she Eventually told us hynick Would get once a week. Van would arrive at the observatory with a file. A currier would come out and would give him the cases that he was supposed to solve. Okay so this delivery person was very mysterious well She asked him about it. And one day hynick opened up and said you know that you're you're really not working for the air force right and on project blue book But a contractor. Now she thought this currier was coming from right field from the air force base. There you know right in that area but one day she looks at the license plate of this guy who's dropping off the stuff and she was able to get someone to look up Who the vehicle belongs to. She got a name looked up in the phone book and she learned that he was working for but the battelle institute. Listen to more coast to coast. Am every weeknight at one am eastern and go.

Hynek betty Dr benjamin simon j allen Sheriff harvey okay sheriff harvey frank manners frank manner Sheriff harvey kathleen hynick Kathleen michigan Mr dr hynick hynix patsy lonnie zamora sikora dexter air force
"j allen hynek" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Are you? Don't you pick your topic here? I've got a few things I wanted to say right at the Getting to the broadcast. Do you want to hear what I watched on television last night? Do you want to hear my idea for New kind of format for TV weather casts. Do you want to hear? Something important about trucks. What would you like to hear? Go on. What else I don't have any other choice is at the moment. Maybe later. Right now, That's all I got. What would you watch on TV last night, Bob, let's do that. I watched That celebrity autopsy show again. I think it's just called autopsy. It's on the reels channel. And I know it's it's very addictive. I turned it on, and they were doing liberation. These autopsy And I thought, Let me watch this for a couple minutes. This is his interesting and then an hour later. I see the See the message on the screen. Stay tuned now for the Frank Sinatra autopsy, So I watch a little bit of that. And then I thought I can't keep watching this stuff. And then the Dean Martin, one came on. So it's a big We're autopsy in the entire rat pack. Pretty much. Yeah, This is a theme night on on the reels channel and I kept thinking I'm going to switch back to the home run Derby, and I never made it back to the home run Derby. Have you ever seen this show? It's uh And then they'll run some nights. They just run one autopsy after another. And They've got this. Young Doctor. He looks like a typical Hollywood doctor, you know? Very cool looking, and he The script is like he's reading a script, but he makes it sound like he's not really reading. But you can tell. I mean, he's looking off camera, the whole narration. He's looking off camera. And obviously a teleprompter or cue cards or something. And they have devised this show. So it really It really keeps you teased. And they end every segment and the doctor will say something like And so The official cause of death was so and so, but I needed to look further because I believe something else was at play here. And then in the next segment starts and They kinda The kind of answer the, uh the tease. Kind of, but then they leave you with another one. And before you know what you wasted an hour on this show. In my case, yeah, kept I kept, uh, waiting for the next hour. So did Frank Sinatra die of an alien. No live fell asleep before I get to the conclusion of that one. But they did go through. They do go through a bit of the career of the person, too, and you know they'll have a few interesting things, maybe in the first few minutes and then it's all medical stuff. And it turns out basically that everybody on the show drinks too much and smokes too much. Yeah, that'll do it. That'll kill you. Yeah, but, you know, the doctor could just come out at the beginning of one of these shows and just say that, but instead they kind of string you along. Oh, let me know if, uh am I the only one who watches this show smile the only one in this studio. Yeah, I know. But listen, I feel for you because there are a couple of shows on TV that you just can't turn past. It's like passing of wreck on the expressway. Yeah. You know, you shouldn't write anything with like a celebrity in trouble. You have to stop and watch. Of course. Uh, sure. And anything for me anything about UFO's I have to stop and watch. Yes, See, I'm over my UFO. Uh, addiction. I don't know if I was ever addicted, but I'm over my interest in that because look UFO stands for unidentified flying object. It doesn't stand for anything that Would indicate. Aliens from outer space. It just means you don't know what it is. It doesn't mean that it's a flying saucer. So So it doesn't that doesn't interest me anymore. I was really hooked on finding Sasquatch. And then after three seasons of them, not finding Sasquatch gave up. They're just not going to find Sasquatch. Yeah, well, and I used to like that guy. I think it was at Northwestern Professor Hynek. Was that his name J. Allen Hynek, Right. He was always talking about UFOs. He was pretty interesting. And as a young kid, I I was You know more interested in that? I think. Outer outer space and aliens and all that. You like those science fiction movies and everything? You could never get in his classes at Northwestern. By the way. He was very popular. Oh, yeah, He was very pop. Did you? Did you ever meet him? No, I never did, And I never could get in his class. You tried to everybody tried. Uh, yeah, there's a celebrity. There's a doctor. There is actually a drama, and I think it's on TNT. Maybe. Or maybe it's on USA. It's called Project Blue Book. And I think it's going to be back for a third season. I could be wrong about that. But there's definitely two seasons where he is the featured, uh, star of the show. He and the Air Force guy are out looking for UFOs, and it's actually really well done. It's All drama. It's not. It's based a little bit on his, you know, actual cases. But if you get a chance to go and find that it's pretty good Project Blue Book, I'll look for that. And I'll also Be awaiting the celebrity autopsy of J. Allen Hynek to 5 18 right now, and we'll give away a prize to call her number one. Now is the time to try and and I'll pick something good from.

J. Allen Hynek Frank Sinatra Dean Martin two seasons Project Blue Book third season Bob TNT last night first USA Hynek an hour later an hour Sasquatch three seasons 18 Professor hour Northwestern
"j allen hynek" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on WTVN

"Back then, though, this is more of a government project to debunk they basically, they didn't want the public to be scared. So they tried to find was this excuses to be able to tell the public? Hey, that was nothing. It was this It was that what was that project? That that basically appears what it was. I mean, I've looked at a lot of the actual blue book information. And another. The reports are very superficial. And when you get really dig down in a lot of it seemed like the time they're trying to find an explanation for things. The gentleman he talked about the Ohio State was Allen Hynek. Yes, yes, And he was the one who made the swamp gas comment that they took Get best. We say it's out of context. They applied it to the situation where he was just like really kind of like throwing remote possibilities to explain certain events. Well, they tended to do that, Maura and I mean they were sewing labels like Venus on things. It. Really? There is no solid evidence in some cases, a show it was Venus. They were looking. Then what this is. We're looking at. Satellites. But you weren't seeing the satellite data and the other stuff. They're to really support from those explanations. Like Thomas Thomas, if I could my my apologies for cutting you off the recent videos. We've been seen by our Navy pilots for the past few years over the East Coast, Jacksonville, for example, Virginia Beach. How do you personally explain those any thoughts real quick? I think we've got little bit of all the above. You may have some explainable things in there. Who knows It could be some balloons. Because I've tracks on myself. Could be drones could be aircraft. But then again, When you get like a tick tack off the coast of California. And then you hear David fragrance from the pilots talking about. I mean, that's a very, very compelling story. There's a lot more to this that we don't know. And I thought Luis Alexander's comet was really interesting the other night when he says They They're not necessarily alien, but they may be of some other origin were not aware of Wow. That was really an interesting comment by him. I just got goose bumps. Thomas Warden, I could go hours with you. State Director of Move fought Ohio Please come back soon. And I would imagine. After this report comes out a couple of weeks. We could maybe have you back on that be great. No problem. All right, Thomas have a great week. Thanks So much appreciate your time this morning heading to Jerusalem Now where Jordana Miller, ABC News correspondent is standing by. We continue to see the images on TV with Israel and Gaza. Georgiana. What do we know at this point? Well, we know that the rocket fire from Hamas is continuing on southern Israel sirens going off really every hour just a few moments ago. In the cities that are located a little further north from the Gaza border. That is Escalona stood there Sheva kind of increasing the range of Israelis that are in danger from these rockets. The death toll here is still 12, including a five year old boy 16 year old teenager on the other side of the border, Israel is pushing forward. With heavy airstrikes. On what it says are mass military targets. Their network of tunnels that they used to move arms and militants a swell as rocket launchers, rocket manufacturing factories, homemade rockets factories per se Enable size military intelligence centers on the latest We're hearing from the prime minister is that Israel is not, you know, putting. They're not, as he said, quote holding a stopwatch. Not giving a kind of timeline or deadline for ceasefire talks. But we are hearing behind the scenes from sources who won't go on the record that Israel is now considering a ceasefire but no commitments. No agreement yet and on both sides. The fire is continuing. Hamas also saying they're interested in a cease fire. But they're also obviously not holding their fire. Yeah, that's interesting. You know, despite international calls for a cease fire, you know, Israel I know is right yesterday isn't interested in any of that. So far. Have you heard anything new about the conversation between Prime Minister of Israel Netanyahu and President Biden? Apparently it got a little more intensive speed reported then. What we were led on to know originally. Well. The Israeli prime minister didn't put out a readout from that third call, which raised suspicion here among reporters that somehow is intense call a difficult call. My sources Tell me that is not true that President Biden is giving Israel some elbow room T o wine this operation up when they see fit. But he it appears that the president doesn't want this to go on for that much longer, But he's not putting pressure on Israel to immediately declare a ceasefire. The overall assessment is that Israel will likely Go to a certain ceasefire, agreed on the ceasefire in the next couple days. There is one Egyptian deal on the table, which would start ceasefire tomorrow at six a.m. local time. We don't know if his role going to agree to that. So far. We haven't heard Georgiana Miller from ABC in Jerusalem with us this morning, Jordan if I could ask you one last thing real quick. The vibe over there. What is it is far as they are. They are. They wanted something more from the US to get involved, You know? That's a good question. I don't think they want necessarily. Too much involvement from from the United States from the White House. Um, but I think among the political and military leadership they want to make the decision to end the fighting when they see fit. But that's usually not how it works here. And as we see the civilian casualties now, that's another major pressure point. On and you know Israelis here. Also, they want to see this wrapped up. The public isn't interested in a long drawn out war with Hamas right now, either. So unless there's some unforeseen event, which there's always the possibility could you could take us to another place? It looks like this will wrap up and we're hearing indications from the military that a ground invasion is kind of off the table now. Wow, ABC News correspondent Georgiana Miller from Jerusalem. Thank you for your time this morning. Stay safe. Thank you. A 20 traffic and weather together from temp start heating and.

Jordana Miller Georgiana Miller Thomas Virginia Beach Thomas Warden Jerusalem Thomas Thomas Hamas California Allen Hynek Jacksonville 12 ABC News ABC Luis Alexander yesterday East Coast third call David United States
"j allen hynek" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"j allen hynek" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Brought in law the major conspiracy tropes that era was like around the late eighties early nineties when it got going and especially the montauk stuff in fact metheny actually wrote a book with one guy peterman. I think his name is who was really big for spreading the montauk mythos started incorporating love the montoc stuff and the ong's hat thing along with a lot of the other means some references like to the shaver mysteries to a lot of the big new age. Troves in some the mind control things on the remote viewing stafa so on and so forth and matthias stunning all this. And he started to notice that you would have people drawn into. Ong's hat with personalities could be turned into unstable flights of fancy through this kind of stove so on the one hand. You know you can draw in people who are highly intelligent who might be asking questions and you can basically send them down this endless thread of false leads and so forth so that they achieve nothing on the flip side of the coin. You can also rope in people who can be pushed towards very antisocial if not outright dangerous ends as well certainly i mean just this sort of bizarre blending of fantasy with conspiracy theory You know canned really really a mess with people in a profound psychological way on an import globals. Yes again yes again and it makes me start to wonder. Where is the truth if any to these paranormal sagas. These mysteries like shaver. These things that. I'm really interested in compelled by maybe by design. But it seems like there's some truth in there somewhere but i don't know are these just glob onto by the intelligence community. Are they just used as bait. Are they cutting around the truth to form their own narrative or is it made completely out of whole cloth by these people. When it comes to some of the deeper mysteries that we would consider isa teric or paranormal these legends of lower in the paranormal coast-to-coast space. How much truth is there an end. These stories d think women. I would say yeah. I mean a lot of the stuff especially since the nineteen eighties is highly questionable. I mean you know. This is especially obvious in the vo field. for instance. I mean a lot of the big tropes that are now intersocial significance in ufo circles. Roswell the dulcie mythos majestic twelve all of that stuff really emerged very quick succession in the nineteen eighties largely being promoted by a handful researchers and many of these guys turn were being fed. Information by an informal network of some of them were former intelligence. Officer some are still working. But they'd been dubbed the vieri allegedly because of the bird names and so forth that these guys used and interestingly a couple of these guys had ties going back to stop it you know the remote viewing experiments. And what have you in the nineteen seventies which is interesting in light of the guy was talking about joseph smith. The team was a good friend of robert anton wilson and certainly as. I'm sure you're aware robert. Anton wilson's book. The cosmic trigger was enormous for bringing to light a lot of the remote viewing stuff to the public for the first time in the mid nineteen seventy s. So in a wilson. Do all these guys as well. You know. some of these guys ended up in the aviary spreading a lot of this stuff with doll save with majestic twelve and one half you at the same token you had sort of the beginning of these early. Argh the joseph matheny was doing. And i should emphasize. I don't know that there was a coordinated conspiracy in fact. I really don't think that there was but you know. Certainly these guys have rubbed elbows before. And there's kind of this odd threat. I think of like russia cruzan. Ism the really runs through. This seems to be an obsession with a lot of these guys. And for those of you unaware. Russia cruzan ism essentially started as a lar- in the early seventeenth century. There's just absolutely no evidence at all that there was a real rosicrucians society when not there's none was kind of an informal network around tobias has and the guy. Johannes van dry partly butchering that. You guys have heard my prior interviews on my podcast. You know. I can barely speak english and german so anyway. There's no evidence that there was any kind of rush crucial society it was alarm and specifically you know this johannes guy the main author of them described the russia collusion manifesto specifically as a game for the curious and always. That's basically what modern day a are are as well their games for the curious. But yeah i mean basically you know he brought in all of this hermetic. You know cabela's traditions. The whole process of theology which was really popular in these inner circles. Coming out the renaissance since the early lightning and they turned it into this manifesto which is essentially targeted originally parasol doctors. I mean there's really no evidence that it was ever supposed to be released to the public at large either and basically it was to try to get them to reimb- as the spirit of parasols as the concept the truth session treated the body in the spirit and essentially renew mutual cooperation among positions that had really been torn down by the reformation the dispute between the protestants and the catholics. And that type of thing and that was completely lost when the manifestos were released to the public at large and sixteen fourteen because tons of people who had no reference point for his type of material started read them and they became convinced. That you know the rosicrucians really worth thing. And ironically enough. The whole russia crucial ideology would have a profound influence on speculative freemasonry so in several years later. I mean you could argue that something very much like the raw chretien's had come into existence in no small part because of the influence of the rosicrucians manifestos. But yeah i mean. It's important to emphasize you know. There was no rosicrucians society. There was alarm. That effectively became a reality. And i mean the thing. Is you know when you get into like modern times. You see a lot of these guys talking about their interest in rosicrucians crucial. That were active in some of these circles. Allen hynek colleague. Jacques volaille has acknowledged interest rosicrucians Jacques delays also interested in russia. Cruzan ism marion zimmerman bradley. The author of the mists of avalon walter breen's wide one of the co founders of the society for creative anachronism 's or so active in whole san francisco seeing was interested in russia. Crucial resum a lot of these guys at an interest in russia crucial. Then i think honestly when you see people talk about russia as in these kinds of circles it's basically an acknowledgement of how diction and fantasy can be used to shape reality.

Jacques volaille Jacques joseph smith Anton wilson robert anton wilson robert joseph matheny mid nineteen seventy s. nineteen seventies early seventeenth century english san francisco one guy marion zimmerman bradley peterman german Allen hynek nineteen eighties twelve several years later