27 Burst results for "Ivory Towers"

Is Western Civilization finished? Thomas D. Williams with Sebastian Gorka on AMERICA First - burst 03

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | Last month

Is Western Civilization finished? Thomas D. Williams with Sebastian Gorka on AMERICA First - burst 03

"Have to ask you. This is going to be a subject for discussion as we move forward. But let's let's hit on it right now in this in the midst of the cancel culture. They're not very many professor philosophy or professors at all. Bureau chief breitbart dot com. Have you paid any price professionally or amongst the the beautiful people. The class of beautiful people in enroll more in the ivory towers for your affiliation with a truly a website that statistically is the most influential conservative websites in the world. Today we'll absolutely. I mean Prior to working breitbart. I did some years working as a correspondent for nbc covering the vatican for them which is obviously on the opposite end of the cultural and political spectrum. And i have many friends who were more left-leaning and they were and we had a good relationship but as you know with cancel culture any sort of with something very conservative. Like breitbart is can lose you. A lot of friends in that has definitely been the case. There are people that just kind of dropped off the radar. People who don't want to deal with meeting more. I've had it affected me also in academically. I won't say the name of the university. I was teaching for university in the us at their wrong campus. And when they found out that i was simultaneously. Breitbart room bureau. Chief i was unceremoniously dumped from there Despite the fact that my teacher evaluations were very positive and things were going very very well. I had a great rapport with the students and nobody ever complained. It was just literally the affiliation the association with breitbart than up costing me that job. But you know in this life as you know is better than i. Do you have to be willing to take a few hits. You have two principal and just you know you know you're going to suffer for it but that's the way it

Breitbart NBC United States
Navigating Cancel Culture as a Conservative

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | Last month

Navigating Cancel Culture as a Conservative

"Have to ask you. This is going to be a subject for discussion as we move forward. But let's let's hit on it right now in this in the midst of the cancel culture. They're not very many professor philosophy or professors at all. Bureau chief breitbart dot com. Have you paid any price professionally or amongst the the beautiful people. The class of beautiful people in enroll more in the ivory towers for your affiliation with a truly a website that statistically is the most influential conservative websites in the world. Today we'll absolutely. I mean Prior to working breitbart. I did some years working as a correspondent for nbc covering the vatican for them which is obviously on the opposite end of the cultural and political spectrum. And i have many friends who were more left-leaning and they were and we had a good relationship but as you know with cancel culture any sort of with something very conservative. Like breitbart is can lose you. A lot of friends in that has definitely been the case. There are people that just kind of dropped off the radar. People who don't want to deal with meeting more. I've had it affected me also in academically. I won't say the name of the university. I was teaching for university in the us at their wrong campus. And when they found out that i was simultaneously. Breitbart room bureau. Chief i was unceremoniously dumped from there Despite the fact that my teacher evaluations were very positive and things were going very very well. I had a great rapport with the students and nobody ever complained. It was just literally the affiliation the association with breitbart than up costing me that job. But you know in this life as you know is better than i. Do you have to be willing to take a few hits. You have two principal and just you know you know you're going to suffer for it but that's the way it

Breitbart NBC United States
How to Make a Big Decision

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

01:55 min | 4 months ago

How to Make a Big Decision

"Today. We're looking at how to make a big decision and to help us do that. I'm joined as usual by dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing. I'm really good. And this is one of my favorite topics yuccas s. I think there's a saying in medicine. Good judgment comes from experience and experienced bad judgment. Experience might sometimes have fostered some improvement in my judgment. And i'd love to kind of share that with you. And i know this forest also is a topic that you have really engaged a lot in your own life including putting it into practice. Boy sure brought these principles down out of the ivory tower. And you know one thing. I was really interested in what you said. Is the tension between playing it. Save with the known versus taking a chance on the unknown. And i wondered if you could talk more about that. Yeah i think that there are some big themes that tend to come up inside of these conversations inside of these choices. When we're making decisions and something that i was kind of reflecting on prior to this conversation we were just talking about it a second ago before we started recording is how all of these decisions are different one school or another one person or another place deliver and other whatever but if you drill down deep enough they kind of all become very similar in terms of the process you can go through around making choices and these big themes tend to emerge over and over again and i do think that one of them is absolutely this tension between what you now in what you don't and they're kind of these different biases that are at play here. I talk a lot about bias on the podcast and one of the big ones survivorship bias which tends to tell people toward believing that things are going to work out. Okay if they take one of those big swings kinda like history is written by the winners yeah histories absolutely history is written by the including your personal history absolutely

Dr Rick Hansen
"ivory towers" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

08:00 min | 7 months ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Of nonprofits, right and and again, both in both of these examples There are genuinely good things like objectively good things, But let's go. Let's go. Let's shift a little or as they say, in corporate America, let's pivot to the world of academia. Ah, we're going to find somewhere. Synergies here. Yes, yes, yes, it Czar wheelhouse. Oh, gosh. Uh, we probably mentioned it before. But for for years, uh, Matt and I have been like compiling and collecting these various corporate corporate terms. Uh, lovers of your favorites. We just stop for a second and just talk about this. I love caters. I love when people say Kate, it's Yeah, You know, I've actually that comes up a lot with us because we talk about episode count. And when it comes out all the time, So we talked about it. You know, it feels like a good Kate. It's uh, toe have Tuesday and Thursday or whatever. Oh, and signal signal is a relatively newer ones like we have signaled the blah, blah, blah. Oh, God. I've been using that a lot to you. He goes around, man. It goes around. Don't beat yourself up the other one. The one that still missed advised me, though, is somewhere along the line and the past few years, a specific kind of question just became an ask. Mm. That's a big ask. That's a big ask, ask. Yeah, she's let's Yeah, speaking of Let's get into academia because my vocabulary certainly stems. In the beginning from stem understood there is but from my my education, that's where it begins. And it was furthered when I went to college College is a fantastic thing, in my opinion, and it should be available to every Human being on the planet. If you know, however possible, especially if you live in the United States. It should be. You should be paid for by the government, I think. Oh, man, Hot take sorry. Don't get mad at me. I think that would be smart. If we pooled our money and sent all of our you know, younger Kids to college. I think they'll be smart. I would say, you know, I'm with you there. I would take it a little further. I would say a higher education in general is a good thing because you know The past decade or so more than the past decade. There's been this narrative perpetrated on the American people, which says that One must attend a universe one must attend to college in that that is simply not true. We have a great need. For the trades. We have that and that is absolutely higher education. You know what I think we're I think we're thinking about it incorrectly. I think the trees should be College is a part of a college like it should be as seen as an equal pursuit because you could become a master of really anything and like you said, there's trees are highly necessary needed right now. We just need to think about them as though it is truly higher education and something to be lauded. Yeah, absolutely. 100% agreed. And With that being said. Let's visit the ivory Tower. Let's travel. You know what man? Let's go to Georgetown University's specifically I've heard of that place is when the country's most Well known Prestigious centers of higher Learning. This is a place where if you if you attend there, you have massive advantages after your education simply because of the name that networking the association with this institution. Family members that probably went there. Perhaps Yeah, yeah, product, Probably. Well, I mean, they're definitely legacy hires, and and it's a difficult school to get into. It has very high standards. Not for nothing. Is it considered a world class institution? Today. It's known for turning out students shooting them straight from the lecture hall boot to some of the highest positions in the world of nonprofits and Wall Street. Private industries, the U. S government. If it were a business, then we could say that business is booming. And you're right, Matt. Many of these alumni go on to send their kids to Georgetown or they participate in the feedback loop, and they keep the money in the influence spinning in a circular fashion, they donate large amounts of money or they assist With construction for the school. Things are looking pretty great for Georgetown, you know? Yeah, they are. I'm just gonna put forward here that you know all those donations were talking about probably have a lot to do with why the kids get in. That's my opinion anyway. Moving on, Um The thing is Georgetown University. This thing wasn't always an organization of this high esteem. It was built. It had to be created. It had to do good and and have students who were successful to have that reputation to build that reputation there. Here's the deal. The school didn't have a bunch of money. It didn't have. It was lacking a lot of things, and it almost got shut down in 18 38 like we said, it's been around for a long time. And, you know, let's say you're a university in college. What do you do to get extra funds have some kind of fund raiser? You know, call up those alumni and say, Hey, I know you're You're in Congress. That would be great to get a little something. Something over the university for the generations next. Um, well what Georgetown University, unfortunately did in 18 38 when they were in trouble. Is they sold human beings. Tuesday. A flipped Yeah. So Georgetown was founded. In January of 17, 89 and Thing. The road to success was rocky for the institution. They did participate in the slave trade, and they did it more than once. It wasn't just 18 38. We're on such a. Here's where it gets worse mission today, man. S O. They had conducted individual slave trade transactions before, And it turns out that more than a dozen universities, including Ivy League, players, like Harvard and Columbia have publicly recognized their ties to slavery and to the slave trade. But the 18 38 Transaction. From the people who were running Georgetown. It stands out due to the sheer number of human beings involved. Ben did. Did you mention already that? The group. The Jesuits helped out in this pursuit. Oh, no. Yes. Very good point. Speaking of another institution was skeletons in the closet. Yes, The Jesuit order ran Georgetown at the time of this transaction. This Crime and they were instrumental. And in the India Syria's of events, and just so you know, we have a whole episode on this group. The Jesuits called the Justin What's fact and fiction. You can find it. I believe in many places. It came out a long time ago in 2014. So what now? So you may have to wait for the classic to come out. If you're an apple podcast only listener, but otherwise you can find it on another podcast outlets like I Heart radio is that Oh, okay. All right. I didn't mean.

United States Harvard 2014 Ivy League January of 17 Matt Thursday Congress Columbia 18 38 100% Tuesday ivory Tower U. S government Wall Street Kate Today Georgetown India Georgetown University
"ivory towers" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

08:12 min | 7 months ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Example from the world of medicine. We've got another example from the world of nonprofits, right and and again, both in both of these examples There are genuinely good things like objectively good things, But let's go. Let's let's shift a little or as they say, in corporate America. Let's pivot to the world of academia. We're going to find somewhere synergies here. Yes, yes, yes, it Czar wheelhouse. Oh, gosh. Uh, we probably mentioned it before. But for for years, uh, Matt and I have been like compiling and collecting these various corporate corporate terms. Uh, well over severe favorites. We just stop for a second and just talk about this. I love caterers. I love when people say Kate, it's Yeah, You know, I've actually that comes up a lot with us because we talk about episode count. And when it comes out all the time, so we talked about, you know, it feels like a good Kate. It's uh, toe have Tuesday and Thursday or whatever. Oh, in signal signal is a relatively new or what? It's like we have signaled the blah, blah, blah. Oh, God. I've been using that a lot, too. You. It goes around, man. It goes around. Don't beat yourself up the other one. The one that still missed. Advise me, though, is somewhere along the line and the past few years. Ah, specific kind of question just became an ask Mm. That's a big ask. That's a big ask, ask. Yeah, she's let's Yeah, speaking of Let's get into academia because my vocabulary certainly stems. In the beginning from stem understood there is but from my my education, that's where it begins. And it was furthered when I went to college College is a fantastic thing, in my opinion, and it should be available to every Human being on the planet. If you know, however possible, especially if you live in the United States. It should be. You should be paid for by the government, I think. Oh, man, Hot take sorry. Don't get mad at me. I think that would be smart. If we pooled our money and sent all of our you know, younger Kids to college. I think they'll be smart. I would say, you know, I'm with you there. I would take it a little further. I would say a higher education in general is a good thing because you know The past decade or so more than the past decade. There's been this narrative perpetrated on the American people, which says that One must attend a university. When must attend to college in that that is simply not true. We have a great need. For the treats we have in that, and that is absolutely higher education. You know what I think we're I think we're thinking about it incorrectly. I think the trades should be College is a part of a college like it should be as seen as an equal pursuit because you could become a master of really anything And like you said, this train's air highly necessary needed right now. We just need to think about them as though it is truly higher education and something to be lauded. Yeah, absolutely. 100% agreed. And With that being said. Let's visit the ivory Tower. Let's travel. You know what man? Let's go to Georgetown University. Specifically, I've heard of that place is when the country's most Well known Prestigious centers of higher Learning. This is a place where if you if you attend there, you have massive advantages after your education simply because of the name that networking the association with this institution, the family members that probably went there. Perhaps? Yeah, yeah, product, Probably. Well, I mean, they're definitely legacy hires, and and it's a difficult school to get into. It has very high standards. Not for nothing. Is it considered a world class institution? Today. It's known for churning out students shooting them straight from the lecture hall boot to some of the highest positions in the world of nonprofits and Wall Street. Private industries, the U. S government. If it were a business, then we could say that business is booming. And you're right, Matt. Many of these alumni go on to send their kids to Georgetown or they participate in the feedback loop, and they keep the money in the influence spinning in a circular fashion, they donate large amounts of money or they assist With construction for the school. Things are looking pretty great for Georgetown, you know? Yeah, they are. I'm just gonna put forward here that you know all those donations were talking about probably have a lot to do with why the kids get in. That's my opinion. Anyway, moving on, Um The thing is Georgetown University. This thing wasn't always an organization of this high esteem. It was built. It had to be created. It had to do good and and have students who were successful to have that reputation to build that reputation. Here's the deal. School didn't have a bunch of money and it didn't have. It was lacking a lot of things, and it almost got shut down in 18 38 like we said, it's been around for a long time. And, you know, let's say you're a university in college. What do you do to get extra funds have some kind of fundraiser, you know, Call up those alumni and say, Hey, I know you're You're in Congress. That would be great to get a little something. Something for the university for the generations next. Um well what Georgetown University, unfortunately did in 18 38 when they were in trouble. Is they sold human beings. You stay a flipped? Yeah. So Georgetown was founded. In January of 17, 89 and thing, the road to success was rocky for the institution. They did participate in the slave trade. And they did it more than once. It wasn't just 18 38. We're on such a. Here's where it gets worse mission today man s O. They had conducted individual slave trade transactions before, And it turns out that more than a dozen universities, including Ivy League players like Harvard and Columbia. Have publicly recognized their ties to slavery and to the slave trade. But the 18 38 Transaction. From the people who were running Georgetown. It stands out due to the sheer number of human beings involved. Ben did. Did you mention already that? The group. The Jesuits helped out in this pursuit. Oh, no. Yes. Very good point. Speaking of another institution was skeletons in the closet. Yes, The Jesuit order ran Georgetown at the time of this transaction. This Crime and they were instrumental. And in the India Syria's of events, and just so you know, we have a whole episode on this group. The Jesuits called the Jesse. What's fact and fiction. You can find it. I believe in many places. It came out a long time ago in 2014. So what? Wow! So you may have to wait for the classic to come out if you're an apple podcast only listener, but otherwise you can find it on another podcast outlets like I Heart radio is that Oh, okay. All right. I didn't mean to derail us there. No, no, no, It was perfect. I've just I've been all I think you win this the if I did If I did.

United States Harvard 2014 Matt Thursday U. S government Congress Columbia Ben 18 38 Tuesday Today India 100% America both Ivy League Kate ivory Tower Wall Street
2021 Super Bowl Ad Review

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

07:48 min | 8 months ago

2021 Super Bowl Ad Review

"Like there's two ads. I've really want to get everyone starts on I think they're the most polarizing we'll certainly talk about our picks for the best. Although i will say this year it was not exactly like a plus plus it was like you know pretty good lead like the the best ones were all pretty good And none of them were were tremendous home runs But that's the two that were kind of late editions. we already talked about only in passing But then also the two minute. Gps dot with bruce springsteen. Let's start with that nicole. I think we all know what what they were. Attempting you know like cheap wanted this rousing halftime in america type ram farmer. Type spot fill. It really fell flat. I actually kinda surprised that they released that one early because it was a two minute long spot. I thought at least it would be a two minute surprise So that was a little shocking to me. But yeah then when i saw it i was like oh man two minutes okay. Let's get cozy. Let's see what this is going to be like. Am i going to be laughing like last year. Because last year was such a pleasant like fun. Add to watch and this one. I just kinda felt like. Oh they're going like the safe route they're going like the middle of the road route. They're going to do the call for unity and also like to me. I as a consumer from the consumer perspective. I didn't love that. Because i feel like if i want to see a brand lean into its purpose i wanna see them. Take a side not do the middle of the road thing. I know that that's where a lot of Like i guess politics wise lot of people doing calls for unity but it still felt like a little too early for the brands to start doing the calls for unity. Like i'm still waiting for purpose from brands rather than middle of the road right now. I guess my question would be in. Jameson a. You and i talked about this many times. But i can't think of a brand that has ever succeeded by being like can't we all. Can we just come together. They learn anything from gap putting up that tweet that it was like a hoodie that had like read into on it and it's like a collie unity shoot rented after election day. Jeep is like we're going to spend twenty million dollars gap bruce springsteen in here and do the same exact thing in front of a hundred million and hope it works. I mean it was a touching message that i felt ill timed and i saw one tweet from at its kenya summit. A perfectly like what they displayed in that ad fundamentally goes against lead. Diversity inclusion is in america right now. And i think right just did didn't didn't showcase what america is today showcase a unity of one america used today. And you know what. I would have actually appreciated if they just re-run last year's groundhog day ad and donated that money to a cause that actually supports you know unifying missions I think that would have been funny and understandable and Yeah that that really fell flat a lot of the ads this year. Celebrities team to kind of try to force things like the cuts. The storylines is just we. I felt like the in this kind of i guess my last real thought on jeep is just the it's the kind of add that cmo's and and if i'm just being honest here because it's late i'm tired League basically wealthy white folks and and and just affluent people in general kind of ivory tower folks are gonna be like what a brave message like wouldn't important message. I'm so glad they used their storytelling to do this. You know what i mean. And and that's but to everyone else on the ground like who who has survived this past four years and knows how much farther we still have to go. It's just like oh there's a small church in kansas. That's that leaves their doors open. Okay cool then. Never mind like we're all good and you know it's just anyway. That's that's my. But i i also wanna make sure we say plenty of time talking about oatley because who wants to start us off one. No we haven't gotten to talk realism curious. I loved story. edited the story By katie lindstrom and No they wanted to go with something else in there. Trying to come up with With all these eight years and ended up like the ceo was kind of forced into the spot because he was like well. I guess i have a better idea. And he brought back an idea that he had and it was just him trying to come up with a jingle and From i saw you know it. It definitely caused a stir In terms of using a simple melody and a simple backdrop and like a shaky table with you know that lovely oatmeal gone. They're really worried about that class. Like nobody take this down from production. Okay we're going to go with it. But i thought it was so so on brand you know it. It was not expected and A little endearing. And you know i am. I am a consumer of that brand. And you know they. They also laid that message with you. Know the mission of. Let's also be sustainable and talk about. Let's let's take a quick pause to listen to the song for anyone who might have missed it in all of its glory It reminds me of like kind of like nineties weirdo alternative Kind of punk music. I don't know there's this weird vein of like intentionally bad dead dead milkman. style was. let's give it a listen made for you. Who moves like male but made for you. Well no no no no bill nicole. What did you think of the okay. So here's the thing. I actually when i was first watching it. I thought to myself like oh. That's actually kind of cute. I don't hate this. And then everyone i was in the room with just got quiet and they all just started like laughing at the same time. They're like oh. This is terrible terrible. We hate this. We all hate this. So i actually think that i'm one of the few. Maybe i'm i'm the right consumer here or something. I like the brand also personally but yeah. I didn't hate it right away. I get the cornyn est. And i get that like i don't know maybe maybe now that i've listened to not while i'm also editing and distracted by other things i get it but i listen. I was kind of like oh cute. Okay i have to say. Maybe one of my favorite advertising tweets of all time. And i won't name him because he's a great dude and Good on him for his transparency but so someone tweeted that oatley dropped the ball and then a few minutes later shared his own. Tweeden's i've been informed that my agency created the and and so it's actually fantastic

Bruce Springsteen America Oatley Nicole Katie Lindstrom Jameson Kenya Bill Nicole Kansas Tweeden
"ivory towers" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:25 min | 8 months ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Virus recently, and that's why you know, Christmas was so dangerous and New Year's Eve, they said, was more dangerous because we saw a big spike it Thanksgiving. Private gatherings. People weren't requiring people to wear guest toe where mask sort of distance and I can't see that ever being the way it is, If you're going to invite someone into your home, and then everybody's going to sit around in masks that that there are some that are doing that it would just be very strange for me. If you're a guest in my home if you're someone that I have no well enough to be in my home. I know you shouldn't matter That trust doesn't have anything to do with how well you know somebody, but you know, that's the feeling from people that people are not going to, Um, ask someone that's a guest in their home and feel they always strange about them and that they want them to wear a mask. Um and then I didn't think he would comment and he said he wouldn't. But I guess he did. In a way, the CDC saying You shouldn't cheer and clap during the game. I don't know. I'm not gonna come back. We'll see that There are a lot of people in public health center in Ivory Towers. And that sounds like an ivory tower kind of suggestion. And it is it's one that's unrealistic. People are going to cheer and people are gonna have a good time at their at their Super Bowl parties or gatherings. If they have them. I do think people have learned a lesson and I've seen what's happened. And so there are they are distancing a little more. You notice that people even in private homes or not. Sitting on top of each other. They are being a little bit more respectful of space. And you know the awkward thing When you see someone is are you shaking hands or bumping elbows? Even if you're wearing masks? What are you doing? I think people are starting to understand that we are getting closer and closer to being vaccinated and herd immunity is around the corner. And it would be very strange and very It would be sad for a lot of people to go this far into this to remain covert free to be close enough to getting a vaccine to find out they're going to get Cove it. It doesn't make a lot of sense. So people are are being cautious as they should be there being very cautious. So coming up in a couple of moments we are going to do. Did you hear this? If you're new to listening to the show, we always say thank you. I appreciate you checking us out, but what we're going to do in the next segment we do every day at 11 20. It gives you an opportunity to catch up on the biggest news stories of the morning while you're at work, not being able to listen and get caught up. We'll catch you up in one segment, so stick around. Ford is coming up in just a couple of moments. You know, um, the people that listen to this show that have heard me talk about Carol Roy's Kala Williams Realty East Valley, Your Valley wide team for years and years and years. That's the person they call when they're ready to sell their home when you want to get the absolute That's the goal, right? I want to sell my home for absolutely the most amount of money that I can and I want to sell it quickly. Well, Carol has found ways to do this. She has seven unique home seller systems. That she has developed over her time in this business, these air, not gimmicks. These are unique time tested trusted systems that help sell your home quickly and for top dollar No one that I know of, can make the claims that she can make selling homes twice as fast as the average agent and getting her home sellers more money, and she does that for her clients. That's why I recommend her for 80776 50 to 31. That's 480776 50 to 31 480776 50 to 31 or online at Carol has the buyer's dot com. Trump on.

Carol Roy Um CDC Ivory Towers Kala Williams Realty Ford
"ivory towers" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on WSB-AM

"George's recount will work. The Trump campaign requested it as you know, over the weekend, although George is voting systems manager gave, Sterling says the audit conducted last week has already confirmed Joe Biden's nearly 13,000 vote win over President Trump Here. The people who sit in ivory Towers you don't actually have to administer elections can they always tend to sit in the at the Side and criticized and snipe it. Look for the details of some of these things, and we had a lot of people in the room who are also experts missed opening audits who said. We did a really good deal. In particular, Sterling says voting machines did not switch votes per conspiracy theory. And, he says both parties long ago agreed to signature matching procedures now under criticism from some Republicans. The FBI in the G B, I continued to investigate threats made against members of the secretary of state's team voting implementation manager gave Sterling tweeting out Saturday during the Ug, a Mississippi state game has annoyance at attempted email hacks and threats that are requiring police to guard his own. As far as how he feels, he tells CNN. He's more concerned about the people around him than himself. Been a Republican my entire life and it's frustrating, but one of the things touchdown for me if you follow the law, Darling says he'd rather have the threats come against him than any of the states 159. On the elections directors or stressed out trying to make this latest recount happen. Michelle right, 95.5 ws face. A board of elections passed an emergency rule, which will allow processing of absentee ballots two weeks before Election Day, main effect that will be to speed up counting during the January Senate runoff for which 762,000 absentee ballots have already been requested. Board also passed a rule requiring counties to keep surveillance video of Dropbox locations for 30 days after election and hopes this could help alleviate questions of fraud. The top local news.

Sterling George Joe Biden ivory Towers FBI President fraud CNN Michelle right Mississippi Darling
"ivory towers" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:15 min | 10 months ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"A friend of Pam Vandersloot Founders Lease or slicer, Slew ease, And you just heard her name announced you better Call her and tell her to call. Yeah, if you know, Pam and you heard this and you didn't call her, you're going to be persona non grata and Panelist family on though. Exactly all right now, Holly. Let's say, why don't you sling some dirt at us, and we'll watch the phones. Okay, Fantastic. Let's talk about this exclusive story and people dot com Today. Lori Laughlin is daughters are struggling with her jail sentence. A source says it's a nightmare. Please discuss amongst yourselves. Discuss amongst ourselves. I mean, is it a surprise, and also are they really struggling? I mean in their ivory towers. I mean, here's the thing. I just have such a hard time with like now The time is here. Their mother and their father are now doing their time. And now they're struggling with this. Like we've all been preparing for this for quite some time. And your adults. Right? They're also adults who have it had to be adult. Yeah. So maybe we shouldn't be surprised that they're having a hard time. But you know they're going to survive this So for sure, because people have survived far worse. Yeah, but they will get their pound of flesh. They will get their pound of celebrity flush, I should say. In the form of tabloid headlines, by the way that the story Holly was referencing is an exclusive in People magazine, which means they're talking directly to people that keep their story alive because I means not entirely dumb. The idea that this story is going to be attached to her for a while, you might as well make something of it well, and that's the thing is That's where the true test will be. Is to see how the Masum O'Laughlin's turn. Bassem Alaa Flynn's turn this story around so that it benefits them. Right? Because they will rest assured they will find a way to. At least they will attempt to, um, rewrite the story, Pamela just 100 yet. Oh, my God. Hannah. Congratulations..

Holly Pam Vandersloot Founders Pam Bassem Alaa Flynn People magazine Lori Laughlin Pamela Hannah
What is psychological strength?

Building Psychological Strength

07:39 min | 11 months ago

What is psychological strength?

"Everyone welcome back to the building. Psychological strength podcast. My name is april. And i'm your host. I am so excited that you tuned in this week. I'm absolutely freaking out am completely giddy. Because this week is episode number drummer. All two hundred. I'm so excited before we jump into what the content of the actual episode is. I want just give a little shoutout and a little. Psa to anybody who is thinking about starting a new project and feels apprehensive about your ability level. You may be. Don't feel comfortable. Maybe you feel like you're comparing yourself to other people who are further down the road than you I'm just gonna tell you start. Let's go all the way back and you can actually do this. You can go on your podcast app. All the way back to episode one to three. They are still out there all the way back then. This podcast had a different title. It was called women inspired. This podcast had a different focus. That was actually very unfocused. Which is something. That i did wrong right so didn't even really think about my title wrong. was not focused on a particular topic wrong might cover art. I spent about fourteen seconds designing it. I think in powerpoint wrong wrong wrong. Wrong wrong I didn't really research how. I should set myself up on itunes or anything like that about how to make the podcast successful wrong and i had terrible audio quality. I edited myself all of these things. I did all of them wrong. And yet here we are at two hundred episodes with a growing thriving audience. It happened because i made every mistake and just committed to trying to figure them out so for you if there is a project that you wanna take on whether it's gonna create a website or a blog and you don't know how to start if it is. You wanna learn how to watercolor paint or snowboard this year or whatever it happens to be get out there get started and go suck for a little bit. It's gonna be fine It's so exciting to see where we've ended up the focus that we have in a topic area that i am so incredibly in love with and so passionate about and frankly a topic area that can help one hundred percent of people who stumble across this podcast. And that's why you know. We call the podcast building psychological strength. Because we want to teach you how to use some really rigorous tools and techniques to help yourself thrive and live better and for this exciting celebratory. Two hundred episode of the podcast. We wanted to dive in a bit to what we mean by psychological strength. Because i'll be super honest. We made it up. It's not a thing it's not an actual thing. We made it up and the reason why we made it. Up is because so much of the field of psychology is very academic focused. It's very behind the closed doors of a therapist's office it is i've tower academia and all of those things are very important and they play a role but they are not mechanisms for getting information out to a wide audience. So what we wanted to do with this. Podcast is talk about some of this really cool rigorous stuff in a way. That's a bit more approachable. And we came up with the term psychological strength because it really encompasses all of the facets that we think about and this is you know even in the ivory tower even in academia in therapeutic settings all of the facets that we think about that go into a person's mental wellbeing and the two hundredth episode. We want to dive into that. So ashley's here with me. We're having strength today and what it is and what it means and why you should care am so excited in before we do april. Just congratulations two. Hundred episodes is a big deal and i remember the beginning. I remember when you first. But do you know what i remember. It was seeing it and then having the thought. Oh my gosh. I really wanna be a guest. That would be so amazing. And then they were in the early day you ask at. It was like one of the coolest experiences i've done. Because i just felt so awesome and then here we are and i love getting to be a side kick and regular guest on with you and to senior podcast grow and evolve and become really laser focused in see this audience grow to and we have such a cool community around peak. Mind in in this concept of psychological strength. So let's get busy. Let's dive in. I love it so we do all this setup right because we talk about psych strength as though. It's a thing that everybody should understand and realistically you probably have a pretty good idea as to what it is. It's exactly what it sounds like. But there may be more detail and more facets to it and what you might not or than what you might realize so we want to go through in particular four different facets of psych strength to help you understand how important of a we'll call it skill this is in your life and how impactful it can be in so many different ways so we'll dive into these four along the way we'll talk about why they matter and give some really concrete examples so right out of the gate. We'll go with the most obvious one aflaid do that kind of on a soapbox for jag. Okay so ask a mental health professional and one the soap-boxes determine mental health I do it. I said right vad. Okay but here. Here's here's the reason why. It's a very real thing and are dedicated. Almost twenty years to improving mental health. But the issue. The reason why. I don't like it is because then we talk about mental health and physical health like they are separate things in really think that the data show the research shows your lived. Experience shows that we need to be looking at health and wellbeing as just this holistic kind of thing and i don't mean holistic like woo crystals in in whatnot. I mean whole person. Every facet of it but part of the reason why i really gravitate toward the term psychological strength is because it does draw those parallels to physical health. That people are used to thinking about. We're used to thinking about our health. And taking steps like exercising and different kinds of exercises in different goals of like cardio versus stretching versus weight trading in we talk about eating habits and sleep and all of these things to help us feel better and to really to do better in our bodies we need to in the exact same thing with our brains

PSA Ashley
"ivory towers" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on 790 KABC

"And they all they all resist getting pigeonholed on these key issues. You know, the court packing. It is something that came up. Amy Cockney. Barret owns a gun. But she says she can set aside our beliefs to rule on the Second Amendment fairly. So all of these hot button issues get trotted out to cause concern among voters that Oh, my goodness, you're going to have this 5463, You know, multi decade conservative tyranny in the United States, the the Robert Bork's America. Or they were back alley abortions and so on. I think that's the message of the Democrats were trying to deliver last question before you go. How important is it to have a voice in that room that wasn't educated at Harvard or Yale? She went to Notre Dame. You know, that's that's been something that people are concerned about, because for decades, virtually everybody on the U. S. Supreme Court has come out of Yale or Harvard, And it just seems like such an elitist ivory tower approach. On the other hand, you know the conservative majority that's gradually developed. They're all out of Harvard and Yale as well. But I think nowadays especially with the whole trump here and the populism. Yeah, I think people are ready for Ah, for us to have a little diversity on the U. S. Supreme Court is supposed to be coming out of some access of just a handful of Ivy League law schools and the only people that hate Notre Dame or SC football fans. Well Oaks K. B c legal analyst host of the two many lawyers podcast You could get that and all the places where you download your favorite podcasts. Royal, Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you, John. Let's go ahead and take a look at the roads. ABC. Dependable Traffic..

Harvard Yale U. S. Supreme Court Barret Notre Dame Amy Cockney Robert Bork ABC United States Ivy League analyst John America
Paul Finebaum reacts to Michigan president's comments

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:55 min | 1 year ago

Paul Finebaum reacts to Michigan president's comments

"Was some very important news yesterday. Out of the University of Michigan where the President Dr Mark Schuessel? Who has an immunologist by training? Not The most common thing you see for a president a State University made a lot of news by tapping down some of the positivie about college football talking about how there would be no college football unless students were on campus. He referred to his training as a medical doctor. Phd In relation to doubting seriously that there could be college football fans in the stadiums and they also broke down the importance of college football but in the context of the University of Michigan overall. Dowse a little water on that as well saying that the university stand on its own. This comes in some contrast to what Jim told us last week on on get up when he said he would be okay with football. As long as he didn't he said he would. He would prefer fans but it would be okay without fans who better to talk to you than Giannis. Bacon was written callous books on the University of Michigan and certainly among the very leading experts in the world the on that subject John. Thank you Happy Memorial Day and first of all great to have you on with us and we hope you've been safe and well over these last couple of months Always a pleasure Paul and so far so good. The only we need is forty hours of daycare for weeks. My four and a half year old kid if you've got a babysitter send them up For All you've done for us I'll I'll give you some good recommendations Thank you. Let's talk about the this. I thought was a really fascinating comment first of all. Let's talk about President Schnitzel in terms of who is he what his credentials are then. They're incredible but have someone like that. Move into the presidency at school at the University of Michigan. Well his background is Brown University And California cal Berkeley so the pedigree and all that he's got a PhD in some former science probably immunology say as well as an MD. So you couldn't call them stupid He's probably also not the biggest football fan in the world. I think he probably loves the Brown model. Where you play. But it's not Nearly the importance as it is in the big ten or the SEC and so on But also knows where he is that Hundred Thousand People Disagree and they love it quite a bit so he is definitely on a high wire there But clearly his roles immunologist took over in his latest. Talk as you said if you days ago and I guess yesterday sorry And Yeah you say is very clear about this that if all the students aren't on campus. We're not going to have intercollegiate sports of any sort at least at Michigan which is not to say the big ten goes along with that or the rest of college athletics. But it's pretty hard back back down from that once you've said that and as you pointed out Paul that goes counter to what Jim Harbaugh said a few days earlier that he'll take football and almost any form Fans in the stands or not. Some graduated schedule some sort of Not Black or white but Modified approach would be fine with Jim. Which I'm sure is almost all major college football coach so I see a conflict there and I'm pretty sure I know who's going to win it. Yeah I mean there may be some school football coaches that have the clout to go head to head with the president. I doubt Jim Harbaugh wants to do that. Unless it's twenty minutes after beating. Ohio state I I I WANNA ask you. I WanNa ask you about about his comments about the budget. You know the school inside and now obviously I mean. I don't want to translate for him but he seemed to be saying that you know we we would this football but we're going on with or without it. Yeah and Miskin can right now Now the catch that is not all the big ten can goes out football Sunday. The MAC you can't. I mean look at Eastern Michigan Kent State places like that Miami of Ohio so the separation between haves and have-nots stronger not weaker. Now its biggest. Cost Ball is of course nationwide and gets all the attention at Michigan. The budget for the entire Athletic Department is around one hundred and eighty five million dollars which is almost doubled in ten years which says something right there and yet the budget for the whole university assist seven billion with a B. dollars so and half of that as a medical school on the health system so the football budget is big. It might beat us That's what they spend on rubber gloves at the hospital. So it's not that big a deal to the president. John you have a pretty good pulse on the The Michigan Fan base. I asked gently what has been the reaction about what the president said yesterday. Some folks feel yeah. Maybe there's mixed generous maybe it is It is going to be hard to argue though without students on campus having football. You're talking about exploiting the students who are in your student athletes who are not paid etc. I was become a hot button. Issue the last few years as it always should be I think That becomes greater when you're perhaps risking their health When you're not risking the other students health To play football. So that's one point of view. The flip side of course is that stadium is both the hold one hundred ten thousand people and if not for nothing of course so obviously people wanNA play football In any way she performed they possibly can Go Back Paul and nineteen eighteen when Michigan played the first game during the pandemic early October. And it flared up nationwide thereafter so they did not play again until November The team went five that your politics and on the big ten which counts as big ten champs and yes five Cowan as national champs. If only if only we're talking to John Bacon The New York Times bestselling author. He's written countless books on the University of Michigan. I WanNa take a break here because there are many issues beyond what the Michigan President feels. Although his comments probably going to be heard pretty loudly and other ivory towers around the country. I WanNa talk to John when we come back about what college football faces in trying to open up more comments from the esteemed author John U

Football University Of Michigan President Trump Michigan Jim Harbaugh Paul John Bacon Eastern Michigan Kent State Ohio Brown University John State University Dr Mark Schuessel Giannis SEC Cowan Miskin John U
"ivory towers" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"And in the state of Texas four thousand cases seventy dead yes since December. That's a great point. Since December one million people have had it fifty. Five thousand people have died out of the closed cases at the twenty percent. Death Eighty Twenty which is pretty much on par with what Mike was talking about this morning. The active cases in the world. You have seven hundred thirty. Seven thousand seven hundred and three people have it in a mild condition. Thirty eight thousand of those seven hundred. Seventy six thousand are in serious condition at ninety five ninety. Five percent of people have a mild condition or don't even know five percent in serious condition in the world. Thirty eight thousand in New York City Not Thirty eight thousand in Los Angeles. Not Thirty eight thousand in Austin thirty. Eight thousand seven hundred eighty in the entire world are in serious or critical condition. Five percent of the population. Right now let me say this and has clearer manners. I came five percent of the population. As of this moment in the entire world are in serious or critical condition not five percent in United States. Not Five percent in your state not five percent in your town. Five percent. Globally are in serious or critical condition. This is according to World Meters Dot Info Perspective. Ladies and gentlemen. We need to have this perspective. Because right now you've got emperor Fauci who has apparently emerged. He's like he's like a genetic creation of the deep state to come out and say we need a nationwide locked down in the United States. I don't know why we don't have nationwide lockdown because foudy thirty eight thousand people in the world are in serious or critical condition ninety five percent of the people that get this guy mild symptoms and you. WanNa shut everything. Because he's got a paycheck and a pension. I'm telling you anybody. Now that is advocating for lockdowns or the continued struggle of the economy or the Dean continued. Shut down of the economy. You cannot trust them going forward. I'm talking to teachers I'm well. I'm not even truckers. Grocery store workers because they're just working. They're not advocating for right anybody. That's receiving a paycheck. That's telling you to stay home. You can't trust them and let's listen to foul she again on CNN. Who LOVES HAVING HIM ON? Talk about why we need why it's just so it's so crazy. Why haven't we done this yet? Let's take a listen. Some states are still not issuing. Stay at home orders. I mean whether there should be federally mandated directive. For that or not that I guess that's more of a political question but just scientifically doesn't everybody have to be on the same page with this stuff. Yeah I I think so Anderson. I don't understand why that's not happening. I as you said you know the tension between federally mandated versus states rights to do what they want is something. I don't WanNa get into but if you look at what's going on in this country. I just don't understand why we're not doing that. We really should be so. I'll I'll tell you why I'll tell you why. Out of active in currently infected patients in the world thirty eight thousand of them are in critical condition in the USA. Who have of course. Journalists can't can't hold back their ecstasy and reporting that the United States has the most amount of cases because compared to Spain Italy Germany China. Who's not reporting the numbers correctly? France Iran? We have three hundred and thirty million people more numbers. I'm not a numbers person. By the way I got a history degree so I didn't have to take math in college. But even I'll tell you three hundred and thirty million people. Two hundred and fifty seven thousand. Three hundred thirty three hundred seventy three people have have it. Member have it does not mean Liquid filling your lungs and your dying on the table with the ventilator which anybody that goes through that once again. My heart breaks for you or your family okay. I'm doing a decade of the Rosary. Every MORNING FOR EVERYBODY. That's been afflicted with it asking. God to intervene and if it is his will to to heal them. So don't come at me like I'm some cold hearted idiot. I'm just the idiot. Three hundred and thirty million people two hundred less than three hundred thousand cases Thaci. That's why we're not doing a nationwide locked down. You know why we're not doing a nationwide lockdown out of those two hundred and fifty seven thousand cases in the United States which by the way cases does not mean death just means cases four thousand are in Texas out of twenty five million people. Yes the state of New York is suffering. Yes it is terrible that the people in New Yorker suffering it is also true they have dumb leadership that Bill de Blasio at the beginning of March even up to March tenth told people to go to restaurants. Go on the subway. Hug a neighbor lick the floor. Do all this other stuff in. Cuomo was too busy with his orange man bad nonsense and making sure that every baby had the opportunity to have itself be butchered by some Wacko feminists. Okay everybody wants to blame trump and yet trump didn't do everything right but where was Cuomo? Where was the blasio where was newsom which by the way? La's actually gotten under control. Give them credit for that right. How's La got everything under control but New York is still a hot spot right? We had to ask these questions. We have to talk about these things once again. Fao G is given has been given airtime and even my local reporters here. Oh valgy he is our leader in this crisis No He's not. He's not our leader in this crisis. He is actually the exact opposite of what you want. Because he is gone one hundred percent the other way. I don't want any K I'm not. I don't WanNa lift the lockdown until they are zero cases. Excuse me I would rather I can't say that but It's absolutely nuts that this man is allowed to speak at the.

United States Los Angeles Texas New York Cuomo New York City Mike Austin CNN Fauci Bill de Blasio Dean Fao G Anderson trump USA. newsom Spain Italy Germany China
An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:25 min | 2 years ago

An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

"Economics as a field it can have the reputation of being kind of abstract cerebral yes that's true if matty lots of CIGNA's you know complicated financial instruments ivory tower stuff Michael Creamer our newly minted Nobel laureate says he here's this from people all the time people have a view of economic says only about the stock market talks next. That's the question that you get when you sit makes people on airplanes there like is the stock market GonNa go up hopefully classic questions going to the I I also much place on that one now is a Nobel prize so you really want to know if he thinks. I got this doctor from a Nobel Prize winner and the response he might give to somebody who asks him for stomach that look development economics is something different branches mixed focuses on improving conditions in developing countries so Michael's research is looked at different ways to improve health care education agriculture social conditions all these different things in those developing countries Michael got started in this kind of economics when he was visiting a friend who was teaching in Kenya his friend was working for a nonprofit and had been put in charge of a bunch of local schools and they were trying to figure out how to best run these schools and where to invest their very limited resources we weren't sure uh what the best approach was they had several different ideas that they were interested in China and as we were talking I suggested that perhaps they could try some approaches in some schools and other approaches and other schools and they did that systematically they could learn what was what was working best and evaluate the impact of what they're doing much isn't Medical trial much as in a medical trial real world trials are used in many of the sciences but applying them in economics was groundbreaking in some of the most noted work of Michael Kramer and his colleagues they looked at where to best allocate resources impoverished schools in Kenya so for example would students benefit more from free textbooks or from free meals it turned out neither of those things actually made a huge impact for the students what did make a huge impact for the students another study uncovered a pretty unexpected answer to that hyphen free access to de worming medication. Hookworm whipper roundworm worms that actually used to be in the southern United States. take the medication to treat worms was quite cheap but it did still cost some money and there were a lot of parents who are still not getting it for their kids what made a huge difference was when kids were given free access to de worming medication Michael says the impact it had on their education was extraordinary we found that topic for much more like quitting school absence from school what by one quarter reflect when they had access to the medicine Michael and his colleagues followed the students for years all the way through school and into the workforce and they found that free access to de worming medication just kept paying off this was a while ago Alga young adults we see that they're actually earning more and consuming more and the girls are more likely to onto secondary school so huge impact relative to the really tiny costs lose medicines cost really pennies per does investing in De worming medication as it turned out had a much bigger impact on the educations professional lives of kids than textbooks or school meals and economic mixed figured that out the solution was not obvious it emerged after a series of rigorous experiments that were systematically trying different approaches until they found the most active efficient solution Michael and his colleagues presented that information to the Kenyan government you want to help kids and keep them in school put your money here in best in de worming medication and it will affect major change it will move the needle they were excited about it and they decided they wanted to launch an national program and then Indians state governments heard heard about it and then the national government of India introduced a similar program so now Aw Th Indian program is reaching more than one hundred million children every year and I think I remember reading that The program actually did a pain for itself through increased tax revenue because people did become more productive when they were healthier is that is that right that's exactly right recent follow up work we've looked at the economic impact of us now that students at the time of original de worming are now in the labor force and see the people are earning more Ah The free just do the calculations turns out of the extra tax revenue alone would have been more than enough to pay the cost of the program. It's estimated that the work of Michael Creamer in his fellow laureates this year has changed the lives of hundreds of millions of people around the world and Michael Says he's very glad to see that a more hands on kind of economics is being acknowledged invalidated in such an important way we're trying to do work that is very rigorous that is using the Ah Tours of of economics but that is also engaged with practical problems it's easy to see the problems of global poverty and to think that there are intractable that we can't make a difference but actually there's been huge progress there will be more progress as economics is applied to different problems in the developing world he thinks he can help find simple practical solutions that can actually make a big difference. Michael says he is incredibly excited to see economics being used this way and of course peace excited about winning the Nobel yeah maybe we'll even figure out how to celebrate it properly congratulations thank you so much and I think you should upgrade to regular coke for at least a week paid lip balm yeah there you go there now we're talking we're talking

Michael Michael Creamer Nobel Prize Cigna Michael Kramer Kenya China Kenyan Government United States. India One Quarter
The Climb: Auburn Athletic Director Allen Greene

The Paul Finebaum Show

11:17 min | 2 years ago

The Climb: Auburn Athletic Director Allen Greene

"We walk me back to reach the final hour of the program and shout out to our crew here. Uh in the last thirty minutes we have gone from being outside inside outside and inside again all all because it is summertime. No it's actually the fall but it feels like the summertime here in Auburn Alabama. Let me also welcome the Director of Athletes Alan Greenspan Alan considering. You're wearing snazzy so you're probably lucky to be inside outside one hundred degrees all day and I think I'm just going to throw all my calls away on the way home. I'm glad you've worked your weather magic. Yes nice being inside. It's great to have you in when you were introduced. not that long ago as as AH Athletic Director it was a significant moment historically and sometimes people look the other way when when we talk about the first this for the first step but I think it's also worth talking about Allen because we're what fifty the fiftieth anniversary of the integration integration of of integration in this thing and so many significant moments and there was this series that we have on Tuesday and a lot of attention has been paid to that glad that we've talked to Congress hallway other day was the first black quarterback in the SEC and he talked about the struggles even thinking about going to one school but he said coach Bryan told them Alabama may not be ready for that. These sound foreign to young people who don't know a world like that but it is. It's important to remember. It is thank you bring that up Paul. It's not lost upon me. I'm the first Black Catholic director Albany has ever had and although I see myself as just another aid like my colleagues I do have to at least understand that my skin's a little bit darker. I got a little more of a Tan than everybody else but we are celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of integration in Auburn Athletics Alexander. I'm really truly humbled to be at Auburn at this time to be able to help celebrate this milestone and so all we can we're going to celebrate the integration and it just speaks volumes in my opinion of Auburn family and gives us a chance to just celebrate something. That's really important as we move forward in our country. Particularly I remember that time. You're too young and it was difficult because coach. I said something a minute ago. You said it was politically they difficult but for him growing up on a farm. It was not difficult at all but I'm I'm interested Allen in you. Have Young children seven seven seven year old senator in you have another one to have a twelve year old son Sammy and for for for Sammy Seneca what what does this mean to them because I don't remember well about one more who's fourteen and she's a freshman. Her name is Ryan and we try to help. Educate our kids about the differences the struggles that people of color have had throughout our country and it's not just people of color but those who are in the minority of those who have had a difficult time in navigating society diety across across the world and so we it's important that they understand that will drive through Birmingham or Montgomery there's a history their job to sell them for the summer for the first time in drove over Edmund Pettus first time a couple of weeks ago and the people that were gracious incredibly emotional for me and those are just things that we have to consider remember I'm from Seattle Washington so getting in and having that experience experienced down southbound. I watched it on TV and I watched it on the Internet and so but being here at Auburn his has helped me understand the real true through hearts of people in the south and we couldn't be we couldn't be happier to be here. I remember early in my career. I became very close. Translate with Tom. Ghassem who was one of the first to to be down here and he told me the stories of some of his friends one. I think it was a trailblazer basketball that had a tough time right and it was such an education and it still is it is it is but but I again like I gotTa tell people the I've told this to our fan base Auburn family has embraced Christie myself in our kids so much more when I ever thought and it's a it's a great community to be in. We are thriving. Everyone asks all the time. How you and your family doing work great. We love it here. In the family's van been very very welcome and embrace us with open arms and things seem to be going pretty well. You can just go right down the list of Sports Baseball Paul last summer basketball on and obviously things are looking up. I I realize good so it's funny. Someone told me Stat last year we were only the fourth school in Division. One history to winnable game goes to the final four college world series and one year and I said the fourth this year and they said no the fourth the fourth ever so we had a tremendous season last year. We had a national champion. Gymnastics are women's golf team went to the final four for we've. We've had a lot of success to build on and we certainly got enough to a hot start in football this year and we're really excited about that and robs. You really excited about what the future has force the rest of this fall since our really hot button questions ask you about personnel. I do want to ask you about the student athletes of today so much going on especially with the legislation in California mark talking about that today and and you know you because you talk to athletes every single day you go to practices you. Keep up with it. What do you hear from young people about where their sports are going yeah. It's it's interesting Paul. A lot of the concern for our student athletes is mental health in time demands. Those things haven't changed. I think we're we're a little bit of a different world now where student athletes and I guess millennials so to speak haven't really had to deal with coping right and and having to figure the things on their own and so we see that and you see that in our student athletes are member about five years ago. I didn't believe that there was actually mental illness. Why can't the kids just toughened up like we and we just battled getaway but it's a different environment and so we do all that we can try to to wrap our arms around our student athletes help give give them the skills necessary to be able to to cope and go through adversity and then also certainly from a time perspective helping them understand that in order to have a great student athlete experience they have to be more than just athletes they have to be students have to engage in our campus life and try to do something that's going to push them out of their comfort zone and just get to get to experience all that their universities have to offer. I was struck. I'll tell you I had the opportunity to speak to a journalism. I was in class and I've done this before and sometimes I walked away going. I'm not really sure about today's students. Today I walked away blown away by by everything about the young people in terms of their knowledge their awareness and I just I I I'm I'm really just so thrilled in the opportunity because I sometimes we don't give enough credit and and and I'm particularly interested in the coping part. I know this sounds a little heavy for a sports show. Why do you think having played intercollegiate athletics a couple years ago a couple of why why. Why do you think it is it? Is it different than it was when I don't know that things are any well yes. It's different social media media. We didn't have email back then. I'm dating myself but so social media's out. There are students in our young people in society ninety. Today in my opinion are a lot more a lot smarter right. They have so much more information but Tom Goss said this during lunch today just because they have all the information on their phones doesn't mean they have all the answers and I think it's our responsibility as adults to help them find those answers when they have when they have some sort of a struggle Ogle to help make the decision for them but to help guide them so that they can make the most appropriate decisions and allow in this tough for us because we're in such a competitive environment armant but people need to be allowed to fail and sometimes it happens on the field of play when you don't want to but we are so interested in preventing our young people from failing because we don't want to hurt them. They're actually probably do a little bit of a disservice so trying to find those environments where they can fail or they can learn. They can grow that will help also make them better people. That's that's what we're trying to do. What I sit here and listen to this you sit in these ivory tower positions TMZ which sometimes we we are in the director and say well he he'd better view this or that because the program is not being competitive you often forget. There is a a huge underbelly of all of this so what no there's no answer to these issues but How do you work on a daily consistent basis to deal with them? You've got really deep Paul one of the things I think what our coaches do. A great job of is really getting to know our student athletes elites and getting to know them as people whether it's doing ropes courses or just having them over their house for dinner really understanding where they came from what what makes them tick what makes them what do they respond to and then more importantly. Paul I think is the coaches understanding how they coach. One of Bar Coaches Mickey Dean our softball coach was talking to us as head coaches and said he takes the test so he knows how he coaches and he also takes has as their student athletes take tests and he realizes that there's sometimes when personalities don't match up and if the student athlete doesn't either move toward the coach or the coach doesn't doesn't more to move toward the student athlete kind of there's not much of twenty four success there so I think having some self awareness really really important and those types of things that we talk talk about as as head coaches and as administrators finally what you engine to lunch what what else is on on the schedule for the for the weekend. It's been a long one. Campus is a buzz right now funny enough. I actually saw some people. They weren't tailgating yet but they were setting up. It's an o'clock this this morning to get ready to set up for their tailgate. They said they were sitting in sweating this morning but we've got a ton of dedications a couple of dedications today. We dedicated eight at our barn today which was fantastic event. WE'VE got a couple of events this this evening to honor and celebrate the fiftieth anniversary surreal integration. We're going to have a little soiree at our house this evening with some special guests are gonna come over and then we meet with recruits all day tomorrow some more more celebrations and

Auburn Director Paul Tom Goss Allen Auburn Alabama Sammy Seneca Alan Greenspan Alabama SEC Bryan Gymnastics Edmund Pettus Congress Mickey Dean Ghassem Ryan
"ivory towers" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And I heart radio station. The fact that these guys never Trumpers thought they were gonna come up with a primary challenger for Trump from there. From their neck of the woods from their Bailey week. The. I really don't want to mention the names. It's not about picking fights with people. I'm I'm just focused here on the ideas, this piece. And there's there's many of my even shouldn't just say this one because every every now and then you can find a very long treatise that attempts to define the various types of conservative out there, and what these people that write these things, and then comment on them and usually laud, the author and agreem- sometimes disagreed what they're sitting in an ivory tower. They're looking out there at you. And they're defining kind of conservative, you are based on the way you speak and based on how you vote based on where you live. And then you become that kind of conservative, and then define another group of conservatives that believe this or that don't believe that they come to live at Wall Street, is that in the meantime, you who have been defined as a certain type of conservative, haven't the slightest idea that that's what you are. You've. Just been called that and identify. And then these people sitting up there in their ivory towers are now analyzing American politics based on what you, do where you live, who you are, and how you vote, and they're categorizing you as a certain kind of conservative, and then they're making predictions on elections based on what you and your type of conservative is going to do versus this other group of conservatives, what they might do. And meanwhile these groups that they've defined the people in these groups don't even know it. You're just who you are. And you're either conservative or not. You're either a liberal or not, you're either a moderate or not, and some of you might not even know but you know what you believe you know what you're in favor of, you know what you're opposed to. And but if you if you ever read some of these species, and found out what you really are. You'd be scratching your heads. I have this doesn't apply to me. I don't look at life this way, this is not why vote the way I vote, this is not why I live. Where I live. This is not why I drive a car, I drive and that's not all of our never Trumpers that do this. But it's just it's this this this this way.

Trumpers Trump Bailey agreem
"ivory towers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"That these guys never Trumpers thought they were gonna come up with a primary challenger for Trump for their. For their neck of the woods there, Bailey week. The. I really don't want to mention the names. It's not about picking fights with people. I'm I'm just focused here on the ideas, this piece. And there's there's many of my even shouldn't just say this one because every every now and then you can find a very long treatise that attempts to define the various types of conservative out there, and what these people that write these things, and then comment on them unusually law, the author agreem- sometimes disagreed what they're sitting in an ivory tower. They're looking out there at you. And, and they're defining kind of conservative, you are based on the way you speak and based on how you vote based on where you live, and you become that kind of conservative, and they defined another group of conservatives that believe this, or that don't believe that they can live in Wall Street that in the meantime. You who have been defined as a certain type of conservative happened. The slightest idea the death what you are. You've just been called at an identify, and these people sitting up there in their ivory. Towers are now analyzing American politics based on what you do where you live, who you are, and how you vote, and they're categorizing you as a certain kind of conservative, and then they're making predictions on elections based on what you and your type of conservative is going to do versus this other group of conservatives, what they might do. And meanwhile these groups that they've defined the people in these groups don't even know it. You're just who you are. And you're either conservative or not. You're either liberal or not, you're either a moderate or not. And some of you might not even know. But you know what you believe, you know what you're in favor of, you know what you're opposed to. And but if you if you ever read some of these species, and found out what you really are. You'd be scratching your heads. I have this doesn't apply to me. I don't look at life this way, this is not why vote the way I vote, this is not why I live where I live. This is not why drive kind of car. I drive. And that's. Not all of our never Trumpers that do this. But it's just it's just this this this way up there looking down.

Trumpers Trump Bailey agreem
"ivory towers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ivory tower of in the nineteen fifties into the real world out there and just all of the grid. That is the reality of America. It was a huge leap from the old world of art where everybody was supposed to be bango only a couple of generations later doomed isolated Saint Louis, and he just got it and liked everything that was out on the streets. And that was an enormous change in the history of culture and history of art in the Whitney show room after room of his take on that reality. The flower silk screens Mao paintings images ripped from the headlines influx political work films. All making familiar images unfamiliar. The show presents cleverly selected evidence that Andy Warhol did create authentic art in his different technique, and all and powerfully closes the case. It's fish, go files. I'm Sarah fish, go. The exhibition at the Whitney museum. Andy Warhol from a to b and back again closes on March thirty first for links and information, visit fish profiles at our website, WNYC dot org..

Andy Warhol Whitney museum Sarah fish Saint Louis America
Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'

Dennis Prager

02:37 min | 2 years ago

Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'

"The annual Templeton prize which recognizes outstanding contributions to quote, affirming. Life's spiritual dimension unquote was awarded today today. Wow. Today to Brazilian Marcelo. A theoretical physicist. My field theoretical physics. The the reason it's by feel is that I I know physics, theoretically, I don't know any physics or theoretical physics. But theoretically, I know it if you radical physicists dedicated to demonstrating, science and religion are not enemies. He's a physics chemistry. Professor who's specializations include cosmology, sixty year old glacier was born in Rio de Janeiro has been in the United States nineteen eighty six. Ooh, that's a long time and agnostic. He does not believe in God. But refuses to write off the possibility of God's existence completely. Atheism is inconsistent with the scientific method licensor told a f p on phones past Monday from Dartmouth College. The New Hampshire university where he has taught since nineteen ninety one atheism is a belief in Non-belief. So you category deny something you have no evidence against. I'll keep an open mind because I understand that human knowledge is limited. He added. Then I go down to the end of the column for glacier. Who grew up in Rio's Jewish community. Religion is not just about believing in God provides a sense of identity and community at least half of the world's population. Is that way he said it's extremely arrogant from scientists to come down from the ivory towers and make these declarations without understanding the social importance of belief systems. When you hear very famous scientists making pronouncements like cosmology has explained the origin of the universe and the whole and we don't need God anymore. That's complete nonsense. Because we have not explained the origin of the universe at

Rio De Janeiro Brazilian Marcelo Old Glacier Templeton Dartmouth College RIO Physicist Non-Belief New Hampshire University United States Professor Sixty Year
"ivory towers" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"You mean there's been millennia of thought. That has has been put into me feeling great that about myself. So we actually see the split between mind and body start. Even as far back as Plato Plato said the soul in the body or distinct from each other and the sole is good in the body is bad. Right. And then we see our friend Paul and his Pauline theology. Pick this up and talk about the flashes bad who who grew up in the church. There is an extra narrative to contend with. Which is like we have been told that our flesh is where our sinfulness is and even more. So is women women have been told over and over. It's your body that led everyone astray. It's your lost is it's right. So bad bodies bad. And then we see even further Descartes Descartes Rene Descartes. Philosophers say that the mind is closer to the soul. The mind can leave the body. The is bad bodies were pain as bodies where last is body desire is an end that there was also this kind of. This gendered story to were men were able to leave. This is a very like hetero normative story, historically, but men were able to leave the house and go to the ivory tower think Duthie Allah g and women because of the cycles and the rhythms of the body and taking care of children had to stay with the daily tasks and the lived experience of the body. And so in addition to there being this story about minds being good and body being bad women were associated more with the body in the needs and the desires in the less of the body. And so there is a there is a patriarchal component to this. But what's interesting about embodiment is it's a construct that comes out of continental philosophy within that existentialism or phenomenology in the idea is that maybe we are bodies. And that as. Bodies that we can live with more dimension of dimensions of existence instead of just being in our thoughts that we could be in our senses that we can be in our connection to the earth and to the rhythms of the hottie, and we can feel goodness in the body. And we see with different theological ideas. The site of transcendence in theology which was about leaving the now that God is far away and big and distinct and very human, but in feminist theologies in liberation theologies. We see the construction of God is being here. And now in in the very present moment as close as our breath, perhaps even our breath itself. So embodiment is this beautiful spiritual philosophical idea that says we're missing out on the fullness of life when we try and get away from the body that there is there is something. That we learn about God. There is something. We learn about beauty. There's something. We learn about pleasure when we are in the body. And that those things are not bad that it's good that it's really good. So I'm writing a book right now for the popular audience about embodiment is and how we can be friend and fall in love with our bodies again, including even if we've had a marginalized body, if we've experienced chronic pain, if we've been in trauma and our body bodies been the site of our trauma, like I do not believe that that excludes us from experience. Goodness experiencing goodness in the body. It just kind of makes someone a crime is out. It's so. It's we're so tired all just so tired of this. And I mean, I am thinking back to what you said amend ago. Just I can't even put a number on hell much..

Descartes Descartes Rene Desca Plato Plato Duthie Paul
Rap song causes a stir in Thailand

Correspondents Report

04:35 min | 3 years ago

Rap song causes a stir in Thailand

"In thailand. A controversial rap song has become a huge talking point as the kingdom prepares for a return to democracy after years of military rule. The police threatening charges against the rappers and officials from the prime minister down have criticized the song bought it's being a heat with the public southeast Asia correspondence. Liam Corcoran reports from Bangkok. The film clip is in black and white a young rapper looks down the camera as a proud. She is behind him. And he starts spinning out rhymes in time. Thing. Why is saying the country where the black lipid was slain by the rifle he country that preaches morality, but has a crime rate higher than Eiffel as in the ivory tower, and on it goes with civil rep is taking turns to tear into the current military Gionta corruption scandals and social problems in Thailand, the song's called quartet goot me, which literally means what my country got. But the word is extremely polite. So it's actually something more like my effing country. It's strong stuff especially for a nation. Living under military rule with his usually little room for the saints. Bye. Made the song our collective known as rap against dictatorship pay released the track on YouTube where attracted no, great interest, and till type police and the military government, criticized it which was about bist publicity. The rappers could have hoped for video now has around twenty five million us, you can almost hear the director smiling when he tells the Bangkok Post I need to thank police in governments overreaction, which helped people see our work. Police say the video might have breached the computer crimes act government officials issued vague but threatening statements accusing the Rapids of slandering the military in the nation warning people not to share the clip or they too maybe uninsured. But that d'amico Mayer hate them. Right on cue, this rep passes the country where government is on touchable. The police used the Lord of threaten people though your enlighten. We have to pretend to sleep. It's been more than four years at the time military ousted the elected government of being luck. Shilowa's elections aren't tentatively scheduled for February. But they have been postponed civil times before a ban on political gatherings is still technically in effect. For the junior has loosened. The rain slightly to allow political parties to meet to elect candidates registered for the upcoming vote rap against dictatorship is open about its goals to fire up young people when the working class to get engaged in politics for the group. Also takes aim at governments of the past. Continues. There's a slow reveal it becomes clear that the crowd cheering laughing and waving their fist in the background. And not there for the music. It's a reconstruction of one of the ugliest moments in Thailand's history day in October nineteen seventy six when police and militias attacked protesting students at Thomas at university, the music video recreates, the office thing the man who's been lynched hanging from a tree another man hits his lifeless body with a follow chair special effects are pretty good in the video is hard to wash brew. The lyrics criticized the divisions entice -ociety, but not surprisingly the song itself has been divisive. It's certainly got people tweaking night taking about free speech and politics about history and Thailand social ills, the song is unusually direct and aggressive rep is clearly wanting to prick the bubble of apathy in which many Thais live. It feels like testing the waters is Thailand prepares to return to politics after four years of military rule. Mike I've been coughing in Bangkok. This is Liam Corcoran correspondence.

Thailand Liam Corcoran Bangkok Bangkok Post Prime Minister Youtube D'amico Mayer Asia Rapids Shilowa Director Mike I Thomas At University Four Years
"ivory towers" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Plus the idea that I'm seeing my parents and hearing my parents become different people. Sure was so empowering, and it made me have such great affection for the place, but it also felt like a surreal out of body experience. Like, I don't know this. I don't know any of your yet. You know your of it in a certain way, but you're not actually know. And so when my cousins and there are so many cousins Catholic families, my dad is one of eight. My mom was one of seven, right? You have fifty cousins and they're all in their own literal own languages. And then you see if they have the ability to switch back and forth. And I am just left on one side of the curve. Right? And so all of that is a lot to process, but, but in the context of the states. Yeah, I I was sort of given or. Or forced for sound so hard. But I was given the opportunity to grow up as if I was was just whoever. Well you weren't. I mean it's important to state at in these times you weren't American? Yes. And so and so all of the right, thank you. All of the category kids. That's what you were got passport was I'm stuck yet veteran four, your fucking American. And so and so that's basically not until later on can get to college and all of us we will, but but in high school. So in high school, you didn't feel the sting of being considered as as much? No, because it was a small school. The kids I went to school with smart, and it was a Jesuit school in everyone. Was there teaching liberation theology right there at teaching post modern God. So I got a such a remarkable and I think unique approach to it that I was Pagel's racial theology that woman Ellen Pagel was the name who wrote. I'm pretty sure that's her name. I took a course on that. I'm going to nod and say, yes, because that's where we made me truly expose ourselves. That's really close to, right? Yes. So anyway, we did Christian service trips to Ecuador in the summer and we did all that sort of stuff. So the notion of being ushered in high school was so muted for me because we were actually having pretty high level discussions at that age about contemporary social and political issues, which was literally the name of a class I took. And so not till later and not so college and certainly and I went to Harvard, so that's it's own to borrow now the allegation lobbed at it. That is the ivory tower that is the elite that its own bubble, admittedly, on whatever level just above though. I know I didn't go to Harvard, but I for fares reasons. Something of a study of it, but I think there's a drinking game people play. If they listen to podcasts very time, I mentioned my son and Harvard. So I'd hand but wrong guest for eleven, say this. But. But I do know that it is a highly stratified invoice more than people think way more than even the social network the shows will network made. It seem like there were cool kids in losers went in fact, there are sliced after slice of no slice of cultural power and cultural impact. Yes. And. All these organizations we've all heard about. There are levels of. It's all categorized and it's and you're judged. So you go there and you're a high achiever. You got to art, it's amazing, but, but with to your point within prep schools, there is such a tremendous ecosystem in which the biggest fish. You know the end over Exeter's whatever. You know, there's a food Shane, and so I went to a Catholic all boys school in Manhattan, which sounds on the surface like, yeah, I should be ready to be punched as they call it by the poor Cillian. Yeah, which I was. I got an envelope under the door had no idea what it was. And by the way, this is the perfect example of being inside or outside, or. Right. I am being invited to come to a cocktail party to join this finals club, which is the single final club final club finals club? I have, no. Which is the. Poor selling is the one that they're talking about early ending already talking about at the beginning of the social network? Yes. It's the one with the president's were members at the time. Of course you're in..

Ellen Pagel Harvard Ecuador president Exeter Shane Cillian Manhattan
"ivory towers" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"This is something we deal with in the meteorological and climate world as well. This whole what I call one study mania you and I understand how the pure view literature works in the process of peer review in vetting. And the fact that one study comes down says, one thing and two studies may come out in the how in this is a tough question. You may not have an answer about how do we. We're in a world associate social media now, and I want to get your thoughts on that as well. But how do we get people to understand and consume science in the way we a'scientific consume it rather than consuming and headline or the latest tweet mode? Right? And I think the answer to that is to break down the walls between scientists and non scientists. The traditional path, the traditional path operated for decades was if a scientist university had some interesting result, they would submit that result to the university press office. The press office would decide if it's if it's worthy enough to push out there, they would put their tweaks, they'd spin they make some release. They would send it to journalists, journalists would add their own spin, their own hype, their own tweaks, and this was how scientists communicated with the public. And then every once in a while, scientists write a book or something and talk to to the public. I think those. Walls are crumbling where there still is a place for traditional media. Absolutely. In there still is a place for university press offices, but there's nothing stopping any scientists in any discipline from opening up a Twitter account or a Facebook account, or an Instagram account, or a YouTube channel, or whatever. In talking directly, one on one with people in the public in sharing their journey of discovery, sharing their interpretation of results sharing how they do science. And I think it's through that slow process that the the game of education will change the way that science society views, science and scientists is through these fine grain interactions through these Migro interactions in as they get a view into the scientific world. I think that's the ultimate thing, and I'm on a mission to encourage other scientists. Is that even though you're not incentivised by, even though it's not gonna help you get a grant, even though it's not how how help you write papers or get tenure, you absolutely have to communicate with the public because that's the only way to ensure the long term survivability of science as a profession. And I completely agree with you, which is why I do things like the weather geeks podcast, the television show before that, and I even contribute the Forbes. So I kind of buy into exactly what you're saying. We've into the. Yeah. I've often said that if if we are those of us in the ivory tower in academia are not out there, communicating the accurate science, those were the genders or with inaccurate information or happy to fill the gap that we are leaving behind or the vacuum. If I should put it in space terms. Speaking speaking of social media, though, which is one of the mechanisms that you mentioned that scientists can bridge the grant gap. What is your experience though? Like I mean, of course, there trollers out there. How do you deal with trollers people that you know offer these sort of theories that aren't right or inaccurate or based on their ideology? Our opinion, I'm sure you deal with them. We deal with them in the weather and climate world. How do you deal with them? My personal strategy to dealing with with people who troll with people who put out false information, there's major, there's major YouTube channels that are one hundred percent garbage that. What? What are some of the water some because I can tell you a host of the the garbage weather and climate stuff, the south. They're just give the weather geeks, list sense of what are some of the just really bad science stuff out there and social media in your field that you can think of just the sort of top to say, there's a lot of alternate theories of cosmology that that don't stand on any physical grounds whatsoever. There's a lot of mixing..

YouTube scientist ivory tower Twitter Instagram Facebook one hundred percent
"ivory towers" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"With one of your graduate students or even a for or anyone beneath you in the ivory tower or who could reasonably worry about their professional advancement should things go badly is that an algorithm we can just run everywhere and spare everyone a lot of pain i'm not sure that that's desirable that seems like a very feelingly legalistic way of thinking about it but you know and i know that that we have tender now we don't really have to flirt in the workplace but come on most people don't have a whole lot of social outlets outside of work we're also especially in an academic setting okay well then in the absence of that in the absence of a clear policy something like the the pence rule to remind people of this how far he takes it is you know it shouldn't surprise you meet many people in business you know who who are certainly not religious they're not you know christian theocrat but they follow the pencil that it just you don't have a meeting alone with a woman at this point or a lunch alone with a woman and that's its own professional harm it seemed i'm not the first time yeah i think and i think that that that needs to be worried about more that again my own background is i've i spent some years working in russia which in some ways a more guilt her in society in some ways as much more sexist society than than than the us but one of the great impediments to my work was my lack of access to bad houses because so many important conversations among men take place in the bath house and male reporters could go to the path has i couldn't at that to me is is is an image in that like it floats to the to the surface of my consciousness immediately when i when i when i hear about people in business not having not taking meetings with women alone surfing that creates lots of meetings when their mental on or two men together is is kind of bath house phenomenon ryan while at least in russia they had an alibi they were naked and sweating and endured water so the women could hardly be invited but in our context we have no alibi it's just going to be a nakedly harmful policy i know we're getting to the end of your time here masha or anything we haven't touched on in the area you would wanna explore for a few minutes by know we've been all over the place but it's been great to have you here thank you new it's some i've been falling yearly don's been very interesting so if there's something else you wanna talk about i guess i would just flag the the novelty of of some of the points we've hit here because we talked about how difficult conversation is and how on the topic of me metoo it's it's reliably breaking down and and people are being harmed on both sides and even people who might be getting what they want the reckoning they want are going to be harmed in in ways that they are not quite expecting him the we just mentioned one that you know if people decide that this reckoning so compelling that they need to be so careful as to never have on chaperone meetings with women then that's that's a bad reckoning but you and i taught when we're talking about islam and christianity i was aware of us encountering a difference of opinion that our mutual audiences would perceive very differently i mean i don't know if you were aware of what a tight rope walk that was mutually so fringes to fully spell it out given you know how concerned i've been about jihadism and and islam ism over the years there many people in my audience that would perceive your equating christianity and and islam at this moment in history as a kind of disqualifying level of non engagement with a with a huge problem and i'm aware that there are many people in your audience who may or may not know my mom my in my history of engaging with that topic who would view my concern about the differences perceive it between public opinion in the muslim communities say in the uk and other communities as a kind of you know xena phobic level of fox news.

"ivory towers" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Probably Science

"I'm i'm patriot morgan freeman because ivory tower would have to be in black face halls michigan that it was pretty racist thought fantasia right now on the third guy who owned a lodge waste to pump all of that the team transferred sixteen thousand liters of soil hippo walter into their official mike water wastewater pump guy by the way and tank owning guy must how did he persuade them to so you just pumping wall to yeah yeah there's going to be like hip ocean oh no no just regular hippo shit we'll have to these these guys do what the messiah because the loss to the law scientists i lent my stuff to filled my gay with hippo shit and i just want to know that you'll clean it up it's good water okay cool cocoa here i'm going to drink from it right now which is transplant sixteen thousand to the soul hippie walser into their official when they release the sandbags they found the oaks jn levels didn't plummet in the wall to downstream bizarrely this is the second study to be published this week on how hippo poop affects river environments kenan stays from the university of california santa barbara did similar work in tanzania's great ruhollah rua river unlike the mara that rivers being heavily drained by upstream thumbs during the dry season it stops flowing together and hippos confined to isolate polls stairs found the pulls with lots of hippos have much less oxygen than those with a b sarah as such they had halted diversity a fish and invertebrate species and just full percent the numbers of fish own in the wet season wall street and flew between the pools to the fish invertebrates bounceback as long article.

morgan freeman ivory tower tanzania ruhollah rua river sarah michigan official university of california santa sixteen thousand liters
"ivory towers" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

12:50 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Ideas

"In two thousand seventeen. She on both the prestigious holbert prize considered to be the equivalent of the Nobel prize humanities in the million dollar groomed prize for her career in philosophy and public service. Are you interviewed Norah O'Neill for the Sunday edition last November. The focus of much of your public work in research is on this whole question of trust, and there's been a lot of hand-wringing over the last few years in decades about the lack of trust in society in declining trust in institutions, and governments and experts and all that. But you argue that the real thing we should concentrate on is not trust, but trust worthiness. Can you explain that? What? What is the difference there. Trust is my response to of people institutions claims and what I want to do is to target my trust. So this I trust trustworthy people an ident- trust untrustworthy people take an example which I've used before that will known finance him. Misdemeanor of made off with a lot of people's money. I will forgive you the on. Okay. Giving your states in Lawrence. You won't end up trusting Mr. made of, do you know absolute want to mistrust him because he's untrustworthy and it seems to me that if we put the question, should we have more trust the central? How can we restore trust? And this is quite often dumb. Then we have the problem. It seems to suggest more trust is always a good thing. But as the example, I just gave you shows it's not always a good thing. It's only a good thing. If you can direct trust to people and institutions trust with, then it's important, but indiscriminate trust is not clever can can one empirically assess the trustworthiness of person or an institution. It can often be hard after all the con- autists the made of this will try to dupe into thinking that trust with that's how it works. So the central. Question it practical question to buy mind in this area is how can we judge trust with us? I think the three things we often look full. We look for the question is on the person will the institution competent, but what it's doing is honest and what it says and is it also reliably honest and competent. That's stripping it down to basics. But I think that's what we look and of course, that's much easier in everyday life than it is in complex institutional settings. And my guess is that what the reason that people nowadays say that they don't trust that less trust has a lot to do with the fact that over the last thirty or forty years, we have made our institutions extremely complex and is very hard for most of us to John what people doing highly complex technical rules or people who are institutions carrying. Elaborate tasks or for that matter of transnational corporations doing because judgment is difficult that placing trust is hard, but if we if we cling to those criteria, competence, reliability, honesty, how does that explain then the trust that. So many million people have placed in Donald Trump the US or the Brexit tears in in the UK? Well, it a deep mistress minute. YoM. I think some interesting work going on among the psychologists who are looking at the extent to which we know the distinction between thinking fast and thinking slow. We make a lot of intuitive judgments which are quick and may not be wholly reliable. They work well enough much time. And then of course we make more reflective careful time consuming judgments. And I think one of the things that has happened is that people have found things so complex. They're making quick intuitive judgments into Maine's where they really couldn't explain the thinking that lies behind on should lend credibility those judgments. You said, I think it's pretty much accepted that that the least trusted people nowadays are politicians and journalists. I'm glad you brought that one up because it seems to me we didn't spend enough time thinking. About what I misplaced mistrust, where people don't trust some who is actually, in fact pretty trust with and it's very upsetting for people when them is trusted in spite of being trustworthy is sometimes it undermines the concern and motivations remain trust with it. But it happens. You say the trust is in one of your talks, you said it has to be earned. If you want someone to trust, you can't just walk up to them and say, trust me, you have to demonstrate that you're trustworthy. But what if somebody doesn't trust a immigrants? Not because immigrants are untrustworthy, but because the person is bigoted or is it a phobic? Those a lot of that. That's why I think trust is a matter of judgment as mistrust is amount of judgment. It's not very brilliant to be a very trusting person, but always to make the wrong judgements about whom to trust and not trusting the con artists at cetera equally. It's not very brilliant to be so suspicious and cynical that you end up mistrusting everybody EG mistrusting immigrants regardless of who they are without any evidence, both ways, real practical obstacles to ones life. Is that the element that the or the driving force behind the the fact that so many people are distrustful of governments and institutions and receive. What's interesting is that people say that mistrust LA institutions and then they rely on them. I'm sure you have just the same phenomenon Canada. People will say, don't trust X ally on the hand, they do expect everything to work properly. Right? I think we all do that. And so I would say I reserve. I don't trust sense of cases where I think I've got some particular reason for thinking this particular agent, this particular institution is not living up to its word or on a hand is not doing what it's committed to doing. Or one could say, you can't trust lawyers these days, except of course, I trust my lawyer implicitly that, of course, is one of the wonderful things that we all find us. Oh, saying drawing exception of Indus case a nice exception for case. A very common example of this is people say, you know, I didn't trust the schools. Terrible. Nowadays, of course, my children, a very good school. Do you worry about people insulating themselves in their own in social media news bubbles consuming, entrusting only news sources and opinions that confirm their own. It's the bias confirmation argument. I worry about that a great deal, and I think that we have made it very much out of people routinely to encounter challenges to some of set beliefs and instead of meeting variety of people in everyday life. Some people spend a great deal of time, be it with social media, be it with favorite websites. And then indeed they find themselves in echo chamber, but then not with its echo chamber. It is possible constantly to receive messages that are conformed what fund has revealed oneself as liking preferring all ready interested in. So the confirmation pies. Is hugely exaggerated by the ways in which day to opt packaged and presented to us online, people have said to me, well, you're a journalist must be some expert and we don't trust experts anymore. Do you think that's true? I don't think so. I mean, when you go to a doctor, you probably want to go to Dr Who my goodness as actually studied medicine, knew something about it and it's a bit of an expert. People want the experts. All right. But I think they didn't like Sutton salts of expertise, also insults of arrogance with which expert opinions of presented. You've said that human rights and democracy are not the basis of trust. On the contrary. Trust is the basis for human rights and democracy house. Oh, my mom thinks of the basic political ideals that we have, for example, democracy. For example, human rights. I think on also realizes that some more fundamental than of those, I would take it in any society. The most fundamental thing is old. If you've got a state of Anneke civil, you're not going to be in a position to secure human rights, democracy. If you've got older, then perhaps you can think about the rule of law. I think root of law is probably more fundamental than either human rights about percent. If you've got the rule of law, that's terrific, but you could still spy to have the rule of law with human rights and with democracy. And my guess is that the entry rights of the person of the third masterful thing by which I mean, for example, freedom from arbitrary arrest and detention fill panoply, and then you can start thinking about democracy. But I think we have done also sometimes disservice by trying to imagine that democracy is the. Fundamental thing doesn't have presuppositions, but couldn't you pervert the idea if the cardinal virtue is order, there have been many who in the striving for order have vitiated the whole elements of democracy democracy, the have on the on the other hand, if you don't have older than Plato, did tell us if you have croissant without audit, you get more brutal. That's a question. Not that democracy is dispensable on the country. It would be terrible to dispense with it, but that you can't treat as foundational. We live in fractious times and the cacophony of politics and noise and terror. All kinds of Konami people say, what should we do? And I'm wondering if a philosopher has an answer to that. I do think the crucial thing is to ask that question that is. The central question. We do. It's the classic question of ethics. You can't ons writ as an individual, but undo make at it wrong, or you may find yourself as perhaps some societies do at present in a situation way. Fetichism 's have determinate gone full something that you don't think is five boil or chief -able or is fantasy lead. Well, Emily struggle against it in reasonable and Catholic as and that may not look, but it's worth trying. Let me ask you finally, do you foresee a time when a philosopher perhaps could become a great political leader? I guess the last one was Marcus Aurelius. I don't think it's terribly likely I'm those assault of way in which was thinking gets Taifa into other tracks into philosophy, but I have to say a lot of a lot of loss of Sino also to of things that. Are pretty practical ranging from one friend who spends a lot of time on the regulation of gambling to Cambridge colleague who spends a lot of time on the development of artificial intelligence that that pretty varied. That was part of my conversation with the politician and renowned moral philosopher. Norah O'Neill. It was originally broadcast on the Sunday edition last November.

Norah O'Neill Nobel prize Maine Marcus Aurelius Donald Trump LA Canada US Lawrence Mr. Fetichism Konami assault Plato UK John Emily Sutton salts
"ivory towers" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"ivory towers" Discussed on Ideas

"Oh, yeah, of course. And I was one of the ones who reviewed Allan Bloom's book quite critically when it came out largely because I thought, well, I thought the argument was mess actually. But I thought in many ways he was invoking the authority of the ancient Greeks without understanding their ideas very well. So that was my emphasis. But you know, bloom in the end of the day, although he used the name of Socrates quite a lot in that book, he he was in favor of a much more authoritarian style of education than I am. So I think he did feel that the new, the introduction of new studies like women's studies study of race and so on that those were in some way damaging students. Now what I said in my earlier book called vending humanity was that we shouldn't these new studies as a form of identity politics. It's just wrong to think that only African Americans should study race. Well, also zooms need to understand this. So the best rationale. For these new forms of studies, this is something that every citizen should understand. We should all be talking about these issues together. Everyone should understand the history of women in America because they can't make responsible decisions about discrimination and so on, unless they understand that history. But to suggest that a classroom should be African Americans only or women only that that that to me is is repugnant. And so so I would agree with bloom up to a certain point that these studies, if they're introduced as divisive forms of density, politics could be quite damaging. But as forms of study for everyone, then it seems to me they're quite essential and and really the leading African American educators skip gates. For example, we're always taking the line that I was taking. In fact, he he said quite sarcastically to to say that you have to be blacked, do African American studies would would be like saying to read Milton, you have to be elderly and blind. You know, why would you wanna say that? These these for everyone to learn from? I've talked to propel university professors who are so cynical of now about the incoming classes for first university that the they're just waiting to retire thing. How do you turn back the tide? How does the parent or the student or the administrator or the or the teacher turn the train around that you say is is endangering our democracy? Well, I think you have to do it by cultivating a spirit on the campus of what places is there for, you know, I think depending on what kind of university it is, you can certainly say, well, fine. You can major in marketing. You can major in whatever seems likely to lead to a job in your region, but we're also going to ask you to take some courses in philosophy or critical thinking, whatever. And we're gonna ask you to take world history and it in cultivating humanity. I interviewed quite a lot of students who had come to the place thinking, well, you know, all these things are required. I gotta do it, but I'm really going to study advertising or whatever. But then they got excited and they saw that this was giving them something. And one of them said to me that he had never understood that you could actually defend a political position that you didn't hold yourself. Then he was asked to produce arguments against the death penalty, but he actually believes in the death penalty. How could I do that? Well, he learned in other words how to respect the opposition and that's a pretty essential skill for democracy to have. That was some of my interview with the American philosopher legal scholar, Martha Nussbaum. It originally aired on the Sunday dish in in September, twenty ten applying philosophy to the most profound issues of contemporary society and politics is the life's work of Baroness O'Neill of Ben garb or if you encountered her in another context, you might know or as professor own aura O'Neill renowned Irish philosopher Baroness. Neil is the author of eleven books and is best known for her work on the nature of trust. In fact, the TED talk she gave on trust has been viewed one point five million times. And as you may have guessed her title Baroness o.'neil is a member of the British house of lords in

Allan Bloom Baroness O'Neill Baroness o.'neil Martha Nussbaum Neil America Milton administrator professor Ben