18 Burst results for "Israeli Administration"

"israeli administration" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:08 min | 2 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Is not the latest step by beijing to hollow out space for democratic debate in hong kong the new measures for lawmakers no different to the ones in place in the uk. It's the british government in that building. They're not china. That needs to apologize. Have a hong kong excellent. Well done how so then you can have your say on. Are everything else. The show is now yours. Let's take a call from alaska. How could we resist. That david in alaska. Welcome to the show. David i've got some social media can fill in with mahama says israel wouldn't have been born without britain and wouldn't have survived without the. Us palestinians longest occupation suffering apart ethnic cleansing imprisonment blockades of anyone who stands up against them and jonathan says the israeli administration is pulling the trigger enabled by the usa and uk. And all this was set up by us in the uk another post colonial outrage freya on the other hand says the folks who started the rocket launchers hamas and free fib f. i. e. phoebe says uk gifting land which was not there to give away us giving cover and aid to continued atrocities. David is now in alaska. Long way away while com. Good morning again. George is always a pleasure to speak with you. I hope you are well. God thank you. I'm very glad to hear that. He has a what i wanted to bring. Up is rather large in scope but begins with A group of nations that starting with israel and the united states and how they may manage to put rocket base in on kodiak island and that was determined for peaceful purposes period. And that would be it. And i mean assuming years come about that. Israel is testing their rockets with raytheon now and their their rockets being used for warfare and expressly shortly on so many levels being tried out on the palestinians i in many cases but what ties in to the third country is germany which out of a sense of guilt that has gone on. For way too long has given israel nuclear missile capable sub capable submarines over the past ten years and other six of them and all of a sudden. This comes full circle back to alaska even and i'm very distressed by this much more worried about israel with nuclear weapons than i am with china russia or anybody. I just think it's a wild card that we've suddenly got to contend with but it's generally goes on spoken yes it does indeed the ira has never asked to inspect The the israeli nuclear weapons base In the in the desert which the brave isreaeli whistleblower modern vanu told us about more than thirty years ago and still they have not asked to see underneath the sand of the negative. The very place where. Israel holds more than two hundred nuclear weapons. Afraid you should be. Thanks very much david for the call. Let's stay in the united states. Go to virginia and talk to naseer in virginia. Go ahead nazir. George w salaam nice to hear from you. Glad i'm Number one very huge fan especially after watching the senate hearings which was ten years ago. But i watch it once in a while just to reset and can get anything by by The words that were said. But i guess Is a six zero. Six zero six zero match and so Thank you so much for There's got thank you so much but i just wanted to level said about israel. Just take a broader kind of perspective on. Why is it that between ten and twenty million jews on this planet Had this entitlement to the had their whole homeland if every enclave of ten or twenty million people wake up one day and say what we deserve. Our homeland the thousand. I don't know how many countries have seven billion people on this planet. And why is it that a small population that identifies themselves as jewish quote unquote more zionist. But and we won't get into the distinction here yet. Because i'm sure we don't want no serving time can do that anytime but the hour is late and that will that will definitely cut short how deep we can get into that bygone. Finish your point. So that's that's point number one point number two for a solution is why don't we just rename palestine-israel to moose on that as you know Who says word for a prophet moses and we all just say okay. The laws the prophet moses this land equally to all then neither christian nor june. Personally we have a problem with that but the problem is that no one wants to really do that right. They have their own agenda. And it's about the money as you say it's not about the prophets mussa. It's about the profits with the dollar sign or the of course. I know israel exceedingly well. I've spent a lot of time there. I'm here to tell you that. The great majority of israeli citizens never go to jerusalem is far too religious for them there too much religious extremism for them that they. It's no accident that they prefer tel-aviv. Preferred the beach the propel the mediterranean cafe lifestyle The the are not that many as a percentage of the hold is really population people demanding the right to mussa land. They'd run a mile a lot of them if forced to follow the teachings of moses. I'm every cannot have self determination because of course you can convert to religion could not possibly have jehovah's witnesses or mormons demanding the right to a state boggling hardware but there are two exceptional issues. He but must be raised first of all miserable already exists so arguments about whether it ought to have existed are ordeals because it exists. It's powerful state. It's a nuclear armed state. It's a state with the support of Almost every government in the world. So it's going to continue to exist. Therefore what now needs to happen. Therefore is a discussion about what kind of state this is to be. That's why i advance the argument for eight democratic state of israel hyphen palestine which in which the three religions coexist. They might hate each other for a very long time. But then those white people in south africa the.

David George south africa kodiak island uk jonathan virginia ten six ten years ago jerusalem hong kong alaska twenty million mahama christian jewish united states seven billion people three religions
"israeli administration" Discussed on 1A

1A

07:02 min | 2 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on 1A

"Out and hamas has been in the position now of being able to say that it it is defending the palestinian cause while a palestinian authority is standing by relatively silently the palestinian authority that was willing to negotiate with the israelis is now ineffectual in defending the capital in defending alaska mosque and so They have been arguably weakened politically by by. What's happened. And i think the delay the elections was was enough to fuel. This idea that a week palestinian authority was afraid of a rising hamas. Paul pointed out the events of these last few days allowing hamas to demonstrate It's defensive drew. Some has further weaken the palestinian authority. And how much mart support does hamas have on the ground. So it's it's it's hard to say. Think arguably has more than the palestinian authority. That the reason i hesitate is you know hamas on one hand is in charge of governance in gaza and these strikes now are leading to Civilian casualties and that was sort of a known. By launching these strikes they may made residents. They're susceptible but at the same time they are presenting themselves as advocates for the palestinian cause. And so because of the feelings on the ground right now one could argue that they have growing influence there also up against the palestinian authority that is seen as corrupt and ineffectual. And so there's certainly an opportunity for hamas influence and power and perceived to grow in a way that wasn't true arguably just a few weeks ago. Nc just mentioned elections in the palestinian authority. Paul to what extent has israel's own political instability been a contributing factor to what we've seen this week. I think the big effects in terms of these brady politics has been the the gradual and quite stock over time shift to the right in the middle of the Ground in israel has been competing hollered out. The left has been very much sidelined to the very very left. And so israel. I mean that was the time. Benjamin netanyahu was considered to be a very conservative politician in his now. He's almost centuries. There are so many more people to the right. So what we've seen is a very very hard line. Approach towards the palestinian is many many people that be. The fooled ought to be government or have influenced type of forming a government. Basically wanted to take over the whole west. They have absolutely no time whatsoever for the two state solution. So you seen. Israeli politics moved to the right. The palestinian authority is just completely unable to do anything really. They don't have the power they don't have clout. They don't even have in many ways. Support the people anymore and when we talk about the administration talking to the palestinians. They're talking to the palestinians have absolutely no control. What's going on in gaza and the biden administration isn't talking to amass. So you're kind of talking to the people. The car actually do anything about what's going on in gaza and you know what is instead of late is that there are channels of communication and israel has done more negotiating over the years quietly with and then dominate the palestinians because they know how to resolve these conflicts because they're very important to both sides to be resolved so i think the difficult things going to be within israel that israel arab israeli-arab jewish israeli kind of conflict was going to be really tough to resolve. This is real israeli administration because they're seen as being so thoughts right in the united states israeli arab. Nancy when we think about that conflict that paul was talking about it. Sounds like it's almost too soon to even be talking about a resolution when we're hearing what daniele saying about what's happening on the streets. Well the biden administration has said as much that that this is not the time for Talking about this fundamental issue which is negotiations between the two sides. I should note that in the run up to this. I think there was a perception that by doing things like reach not to regional partners by doing policies around this sort of central issue of the relationship between the two sides that these kinds of conflicts could be avoided. And i think what we've seen this week that that is not the case that these issues have to be dealt with Head on and so While the us says that this is not the right opportunity. I think part of it is because of the situation on the ground. I think also part of it is because the us is not in a position to lead them in the way that they did before. I mean to give you a sense this week. The united states said that it was deploying a diplomat to be a part of the talks on on wednesday. And we haven't even heard whether whether that diplomat has arrived and what what is happening and so How you reach a settlement. When the sort of normal broker the united states is not in the position do it and the hostilities. Highs they are i think is very. It's very hard to see at the moment and yet is essential. I think this week has taught us in terms of resolving this in any sort of enduring way that's cnc yousef national security correspondent with the wall street journal. Paul dan hard. The washington bureau chief for the bbc is also with us along with laura seligman a pentagon reporter for politico and you Ian justice was tweeting. If the white house wanted israel to stop the attacks they could threaten to cut the three point. Eight billion dollars in foreign military aid. We give them every year. How can you talk about pressure and not mentioned that laura. Is there any discussion around that. Well i think. I think certainly there's been a lot of pressure. In in recent years around particularly the the the arab neighbors the region has really been a lot of tensions. That are so just important to note that right now sort of what's going on. Is that egypt. And other arab neighbors have been pressuring both sides to de-escalate so egypt qatar and the united nations are leading these truths efforts and there have been reports that an egyptian delegation is in tel aviv. For talks with israel officials as part of these efforts to negotiate for a ceasefire Egypt often serves as a mediator between israel and hamas and it's been a key player ending these past rounds of fighting however there there has been really no progress made in in any kind of ceasefire like like nancy side. It's going to be difficult to resolve this conflict. it's also another interesting piece of his. Iran's role obviously there have been rising tensions with the us and other nations in recent years. Iran has been supplying weapons and weapons designs to hamas which has been using these more advanced rockets. This week that we've seen to strike further into israel Recently is egypt has tried to crack down on this illicit smuggling of these weapons to gaza by iran but hamas has been developing its own production schedules..

Benjamin netanyahu laura seligman Nancy tel aviv Paul Eight billion dollars two sides bbc wednesday daniele paul Iran This week two state palestinian laura both sides alaska egyptian united states
"israeli administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | 4 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

Palu robbins Palestine jason today palestine israel jewish both harani palestinian sophia d'amato pulu robbins bard college twenty twenty palestinians albert
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | 4 months ago

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
"israeli administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

03:54 min | 4 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"That is a kind of a historically intensified situation so in a way i am making a historical argument in the book by saying that really after the nineteen nineties after oslo. A huge kind of uptick and we've production by palestinian society as well as waste inundation by israeli society in the west bank and palestinian areas of the west bank the everyday experience of policy mians involves a kind of constant interaction at multiple different scales with various wastes. So you know one really iconic of a person walking on a road and let's say ramallah or on the way to qalandia checkpoint and just walking by block after block of dumpsters overflowing with waste that are then being burned to mitigate the size of that high all in the dumpster and you know that being kind of escape -able experience for someone who's living their daily life in the west bank. There's that and then there's the scale of people who are in the palestinian bureaucracy with whom i spent a lot of time in municipalities and in the palestinian authority who are trying to trouble shoot at a policy level either at the skill of the city or village or at the scale of the west bank as a whole what to do essentially with the accumulations of waste. I do wanna say that. I'm really interested in the multiple scales. The person with the trash fire next them as they walked to school. And also the bureaucrat. Who's thinking about the future of palestine being inundated with wastes. Yeah there are so many different ways in which we can take this. I think that part of what's at stake here is the way in which waste helps us to conceive of the situation in israel and palestine. Kind of speaking. How is it that waste helps us to think through kind of really big issues about the nature of what's been taking place in israel and palestine both recently and also over the course of the past generations if i can answer that kind of diagonally. I'll just say that. The way that this project came about was that i was thinking a lot about the way that people responded to hamas winning the two thousand six elections the legislative elections and what we were hearing primarily from people who are kind of on the center or to the left was that palestinians had voted even palestinians who were not in particular supporters of hamas or of political islam. Were voting for what thomas representative in terms of welfare and infrastructure provision because the lead. Pa had failed to provide certain forms of welfare an infrastructure. And you know it really struck me that there was such a quick easy move to say that people voted on the basis of what they thought about infrastructure and welfare. And i thought you know that's really not the way we tend to think about the developed world to put it bluntly or you know the global north that usually they're more factors at play when we think about politics and electoral politics and then the thing that really struck me to that. You really can't make that move so easily in a place like palestine. I mean in particular the west bank or gaza where there hasn't been the experience of a state in the long term so that you don't have the accumulation of experience of holding accountable essential government when things go wrong in fact you have multiple governments and of course since the mid nineties you have international donors playing a really huge role and then you have the kind of layer cake of the israeli administration the palestinian authority and and municipalities and other ngos et cetera..

israel thomas west bank islam qalandia palestinian six elections palestine two thousand gaza both nineteen nineties oslo mid nineties israeli israeli administration palestinians one Pa
"israeli administration" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:27 min | 9 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Four in paris. Seven forty four here in london. Let's continue today's globalist with the newspapers. Joining me as asking abdomajid sudanese australian writer broadcaster and regular voice monocle twenty four. Welcome back yes thank you. Would you like to start while. Let's talk with the financial times Which reports that the us stock futures slip as as global rally stumbles. And i think this is a kind of across the board where global stocks so. We'll blame the chinese currency is weakening as the tight. Us presidential election set investors on edge and investors. Love a certainty and. I don't think this week has been much certainty for anyone. Really the us futures for the s and p five hundred and the nasdaq fell on point five percent asian trading so. I think this is something. Obviously we'll see what with the presidential election. It's still i mean friday. Hopefully we'll see a little bit more sutton depending on what happens with current president donald trump and his legal actions. I think this will probably be something that continues. The piece on an financial news came in the south china morning. Post which. I found quite interesting. There's a piece on china. Semiconductors which in semiconductors mind not be the most exciting thing that you know this time of the morning. but what's quite interesting. Is that the the seems to be a sentiment. That even if joe biden is elected as president that the shift towards china's trade policy during the shift towards china on literally policy what be as as strong strong so this currently export controls. Us export controls on emerging technologies in. Semiconductors is specifically deemed essential to use national security and surprisingly will. Perhaps if. I don't know how interested people aren't semiconductors but we find them in everything and so the the chinese have slightly concerned that even if abundant administration was elected they would be unlikely to immediately all unilaterally. Lift trump's controls because the democrats have supported the measures that we introduced a couple of years ago pushing back against semiconductor imports into china. Should i continue. Yes i just a little an explanation as to what does heavy conduct series. It's it's it's it's neither it it it basically semiconductor it helps it helps 'electricity pass through. Doesn't it and you're right. it's absolutely everywhere and it emphasizes perhaps china's What we've had in the last couple of weeks from the plenum last week. When they mentioned that they are going to be more self reliant yet focus on trade with the outside world joe biden cannot hope to unpick all the masters has been created with trade woods with with the united states in the last few years. But there's still a sensitive to he and he's he is still very strong against china. Yes and that's i think another it's one of the things that even if there's joe biden presidency not everything that has happened over. The last four years will be rolled back. It's not like we're gonna go straight back to a two thousand and fifteen Global trade landscape. And it's even if. I could build on that actually in the arab news which was also reported in the jerusalem. Post another thing that Joe biden would not be able to automatically go back to is the iran deal and the israeli minister Ones of wall. If biden returns essentially using really strong words a violent confrontation between the two countries. Because you know biden would biden has said that he would go back to the nuclear iran agreement But of course the current israeli administration is very supportive of donald trump and so it is quite interesting to think Even though there is a sense that there'll be a huge shift if there's a democrat president it's not exactly. It's not that straightforward. It's definitely not that simple. Let's move onto what appears to be an existential rift between Fox news and The current president donald trump. it all stems To the declaration that arizona had gone to joe biden and this happened on election night. Didn't it and and fox quickly quickly retracted it. But there's widespread covers financial. Times has done a piece and it developed in. Germany has done a piece on once. You stop the schism between donald trump and his favorite favorite news station. I think he's done more interviews with them than he has with anybody else. Then you know the trouble in and it's also quite interesting. I was looking at some sort of the history of fox. And i think we tend to forget that. Actually there was a moment early in trump's presidency when Folks did push back a little bit against donald trump and he essentially went to warn them. Megan kelly ended up leaving the station of you know Listen year afterwards. And so on. And so you'd like i think it was a little bit of a surprise perhaps To see folks push back a little bit. But they've i probably redeem themselves slightly. Because i think it was last night when donald trump was doing a press conference and making all sorts of claims. A number of new stations actually cut aways nbc abc. And so on whereas folks and actually cnn. Like ed the whole press conference but it will be interesting to see even whatever happens with the presidency what the relationship between folks and trump continues to be because he does not take kindly to being to being told that he's wrong being shown as not to be winning and so on and also has quite a bit of a a. I would say somebody who might hold a grudge and so it will be interesting to see how this plays out. It's interesting that you mentioned that. Several television networks halted live coverage of trump's address yesterday because of the concerns that he's spreading. Disinformation we've also seen on twitter as well several tweets by donald trump Having the warning that they are inaccurate and misleading in front of them one one does now in this world where i think a lot of people have sort of a focusing their attention on how the media is handling such a difficult difficult situation where effectively the words of the current president and the man fighting to stay in the white house simply cannot be trusted trust in the media suddenly becomes a really important issue. Yes i think it's an incredibly fascinating difficult challenge for the media. Generally and there was a lot of self reflection. I think also the two thousand sixteen election. Because you know i think. Many media's stations and companies gave trump a lot of eh time and didn't think that was actually free advertising and when now in a position where it's not only just the media stations but media companies. But it's also social media platforms. Which in the last year. Oh to have been a lot more active in an interventionist probably because of pushback from. I mean we've seen congress. We've seen the even the antitrust. My god my word. Sorry a there's been all sorts of pushback. I think not only from a legislative point of view but from a public pressure point but it does make it incredibly difficult for media companies. I think when the folks who was supposed to be telling the truth ultimately old Leading effectively lying and so who do the on the media the arbitrators of the truth and this is the question that we are seeing shifts on an and i guess i personally think it's vital because if if individuals can't trust what they see on on cnn or on new york times or on the sort of major platforms then they'll end up going and looking themselves and and that's an even more difficult challenge Yes man thank you very much indeed. We'll have to leave it there. You're listening to the globalist..

donald trump joe biden china Us president cnn fox paris writer london Megan kelly new york times donald trump. iran sutton
"israeli administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:36 min | 11 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The Europeans are doing their best to cast dispersions at this peace deal because the Europeans would much prefer there to be conflict in the released a piece in the Middle East so long as they can uphold their own moral integrity. In ripping on Israel, it seems, but the change that are being made right now it'd be very difficult to reverse, given the fact that the changes were really effectuated as a direct response to the complete malfeasance and failure of the West, siding with Iran. Yeah, And I guess sort of. Obviously, I want the president to be elected for, you know, I just think it's very important and I'm in an official capacity, you know, accidentally do a hatchback violation of Anything political, But what I will say is that you know the president his his value. His efforts to get up to today are hard to overstate like it would have been impossible to do both feel yesterday if not for the president's leadership for his stance against Iran for his Work with Israel, bringing our ally closer and making them feel and know that we will have their bac in a very difficult region, and it's sort of a source of of fear in the sense that should somebody else you know, Beginning the reins on this file, things could unfortunately go in in a bad direction, and so You know, President Trump leadership here is necessary. And I think if he you know if the American public is the honor of getting to work on this file her, you know the next four years. I think we will be in a tremendously positive situation as it relates to both Iran with their having tremendous problems and wanting to come and make a deal on. I think you know, with certainty that President Trump is not going to make a bad deal, right? Nothing to him. A bad deal is worse than you know. The note. So you know, we need that. We're speaking with the RV. Berkowitz, assistant to the president, Special representative for international Negotiations. Final Load here. One of the nostrils of the left in the United States has been that only left wing Israeli regimes only left wing Israeli administrations would ever make peace deals. It seems to me that the vast majority of the time in right wing Israeli Administrations that made peace deals ranging from Menachem Begin Tio Arial Sharon Tio Benjamin Netanyahu. The going wisdom was that because Benjamin Netanyahu was not going to make concessions to Palestinian terrorists, therefore could not make deals with other Arab regimes that obviously was proved to be untrue. Yeah, your 100, right? And honestly, I'd like to think Prime Minister Netanyahu and Ambassador Ron Dermer both of whom are really just extraordinarily smart and great people, and they worked very, very hard to get through today and And you know, Prime Minister Antonya speech yesterday..

president President Trump Iran Sharon Tio Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Middle East assistant to the president Prime Minister Ambassador Ron Dermer Berkowitz United States Menachem official representative
"israeli administration" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:51 min | 11 months ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The prime minister. Mr Netanyahu. He is in Israel to help me understand? This flood of good news that's coming out of the Middle East air in a very good evening. Good morning to you. You and I are not used to so much good news in a row. I begin to be suspicious. This looks like good news. That the kingdom is permitting overflights. What does this mean for Israel? What does it mean for the whole of the Gulf? Good evening to you. Good evening, actually is it's great news. This is a huge breakthrough, in fact, really a new era of peace here in the Middle East on in this case, it's good news, and I think that will be followed by more good news on more good news. The good news is that the Gulf countries Are not only warming to Israel, which they have been for quite some time, thanks to the work of the prime minister here on their coming out on DH. Now the is making Full form, abuse a normalization with the Jewish stick. So earlier today we had the announcement of Saudi Arabia, allowing quote unquote all countries, meaning Israel now Israeli commercial flights to fly. From Israel to the USA over Saudi airspace and back this after the show already made is now making peace. We made an announcement for abuse with the Jewish state. No, actually, this is this. The idea is the greatest advancement toward peace between Israel in the Arab world in the last 26 years, in fact, it actually amongst the third formal. Peace between Israel and the Arab nation. And it's the first peace between Israel and an Arab country that was not previously at war with the Jewish stick In the past, Israel made peace with Egypt. And then after that, with its neighbor Jordan, I mean the GPS is going to be a warm up use. We're already seeing it. You can see the celebratory videos coming out of Israel coming out of the Everglades throughout. In fact, the marriage with Children teenagers of bulbs Celebrating with Israeli flag singing the Israeli Ah national anthem, even some of them learning Hebrew Online. It's unbelievable, and actually, USC Is one of the world's most advanced nations. And, as you know, Israel is also one of the most advanced nations. So this is a piece anchored in actual peace and mutual interest in the economy and security and technology and energy and health care and culture, the environment, mutual interest in Corona And, of course, mutual interest in fighting regional extremism and specifically exciting the mutual enemy Iran. The puzzle about the U. A from consuming. The news here is this looks like it was a long time coming. However, the prime minister has made remarks suggesting there's more to this conversation in frothy oma throughout the Arab world, and I believe the prime minister indicated. That his travels recently might have something to do with this. I think the nation's mentioned in the reporting I read Oman. Chad and Somalia. I hope I have that list. Correct. Are we looking at lane? Lengthy conversations Are we looking at Ah collective celebration throughout the Arab world. Certainly the kingdom thou saving overflights tells all the other Arab states that it's OK Tio Tio go into the water again. This the U. S and Israeli administrations of both expressed on confidence, not just hopeful confidence. That more more peace. More normalization will follow between Israel and other Arab countries, especially in the Gulf on and other countries that the prime minister here has made great advancements in relations with includes Sudan. You mentioned Chad, also Oman, Bahrain, other nations in the Gulf. Netanyahu himself has talked about trips that he has personally taken to different areas. Something that perhaps he's been in some of these countries on Let me tell you that today's Ah, Saudi overplay and the larger you a deal. This is results of the Netanyahu doctrine aside, I like to call it And Netanyahu doctrine, which can be summarized basically has peace in exchange for peace. Instead of the tried, tested and failed paradigm of Israeli territorial concessions in exchange for promises of peace that don't ever get kept, and then it's like no doctrine is also peace from a position. Of strength now. The foundation's definitely were laid very recently by Trump's historic decision to move the U. S. Embassy to Jerusalem to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital to affirm Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights and the Trump peace plan. The Revolutionary Peace plan, which is the most realistic piece for it has ever been presented for Israeli, Palestinian and wider Israeli Arab used absolutely were On fueled the e deal, But I'll tell you, the seeds were really also planted over the last decade or even more than a decade. The Gulf Nations witnessed the prime minister tirelessly worked isolate Iran, by the way, add a times when other Western nations Let us to say did not read to isolate Iran did not work too hard Hold Iran's nuclear ambitions. The prime minister for many years was alone. The Gulf Nations watched that I think that some of the combination of that a crescendo was when the prime minister went to a joint session of Congress in the United States. Alone stood there sounded the alarm about the impending disastrous nuclear deal. And then when Trump comes in Netanya was fully vindicated. When from keeps his campaign promise to withdraw. The U. S from the nuclear deal on day puts a sanctions regime on Iran and, of course, the prime minister here in Israel ordered the daring January 2018 raid on a secret Iranian facility, which on Earth Unknown nuclear sites. So the Prime Minister Benjamin Yahoo, at times single handedly, and by the way, sometimes when even some opposition politicians here in the Middle East opposed him on this issue, the prime minister stood Many times along the Gulf Nations understood that they witnessed the bravery, the heroism of the prime minister, especially with regard to confronting Iran, and I think that that really set the seeds For what you saw in the last few days on. I think there's something seems forwhat we couldn't see in the coming weeks and months. I'm hoping sooner between Israel and other con Gulf nations, Erin, I misspoke. I said Somalia, I'm in Sudan a senior moment, Erin, it comes up a lot these days. Okay, fine detail. We have just a couple of minutes. Where are the Palestinians in this? I believe I saw a headline saying they were not participating. Is there more to it than that? The Palestinians time and again have on rejected it. Talks with Israel walked away many, many times. 1 6007 allegedly 2014 Trump came with this historic plan on which I actually just recently reread the entire thing yesterday. If this plan would revitalize. In fact it would we make the entire Palestinian economy it would take the Palestinian economy and put it on steroids on this is an excellent plan not just for Israel, but also for the future of the Palestinians. And yet, unfortunately, the Palestinians rejected even this plan. So it seems that the Gulf nations they obviously care deeply about the Palestinians, but they are not going to sit around and wait. For the Palestinians, I guess, come to their senses and accept the Trump plan or except negotiation with Israel. And so now we see a very different situation in the Middle East tectonic plates are have shifted. The Gulf nations are now trending toward Israel. And this actually, by the way, vindicates what Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also repeatedly argued. We have 30 seconds 30 seconds. Aaron, go ahead. Continue along, argue that piece with the Gulf would have to come first. And then hopefully that would know to the Palestinians to end their rejection of Israel and come to the bargaining table. Aaron Klein, my colleague, now strategist to the Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, he's in Israel. Good news in the Middle East. I'm John Bachelor. This is the John Box Russia. Balance of nature changing the world. One life at a time. I just had a baby and I'm tired, but I could tell you this without balance of nature..

Israel prime minister Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Gulf Nations Middle East Gulf Iran Trump Somalia Oman Sudan Saudi Arabia Chad United States USC John Bachelor Aaron Klein Everglades John Box Russia Jordan
"israeli administration" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"We have to prepare ourselves for an avalanche of disinformation in September October coming from Russia and russian-backed individuals that is amplified by the Republican Party and by people even like Lindsey Graham, who casts himself as some some rational hawk, so I'm glad they were calling that out. And hopefully we have antibodies in the media, the media that so gleefully and greedily reported on wikileaks dumps. There were Russian hacked documents as if they were news when it was just kind of Clinton campaign gossip they. They shouldn't be repeating the mistake of essentially being a mouthpiece for Russian disinformation. We've seen other countries. Do this the French before macron's election the French media not that they're all supported mccrone, but they said we're not gonNA release in report on the macron leaks right, which was an effort to replicate what was done here where we're much less prepared is the executive branch is not going to try to defend our election, and that has two dimensions. Worry US one. We don't know what we don't know and when Rick Grenell was running intelligence community. And he's been replaced by WHO's not quite as big a hack, but is a hack. He took steps to limit the number of people reportedly who could have access to any information about Russian interference, including not reporting this information to Congress. So clearly what you're seeing is the US government is going to be a willing partner Russian disinformation. They're going to try to keep it from getting out. That Russia's interfering in our election i. mean it's astonishing to think even it's totally predictable in a way that that's where we're at where we are. I think the most extreme scenarios are. There were some concerns in two thousand. Thousand Sixteen. The Russians did hack the results of the election, but in this has come out in some of the congressional committee reports. The Russians were gonNA probing election infrastructure. The absolute worst case scenario is that the Russians tried hack the actual election in that the US government isn't trying to defend that from happening now I think we'd see that because the states hold elections, but but we need to have our antenna up and I'm glad the Biden campaign. And Democrats in Congress are already trying to get ahead of that yeah. I think that all our friends who worked on the Clinton campaign in two thousand sixteen felt like when they talked about potential Russian involvement in these hacks early on, they were looked like looked at like. They're wearing. You know Tinfoil hats, but today you have a report out by the U.. K. Government that basically says their governments. Several governments in a row warnings about interference in their politics, and they basically haven't really investigated or dug into the impact that Russian. Interference might have had on major issues like Brexit, so it's like. Despite the fact that propaganda from Russia from the US from all these countries has been happening for decades. It does seem like. The recent iteration has really caught people by surprise, and no one has figured out how to deal with it. Yeah, and everybody should anticipate that. The Russians won't just do exactly what they did. Last time you know the Russians evolve their tactics, and they learn from what they did in the past they try new things, and so this could take all manner of different forms and the hack. We saw for instance of twitter, right? There's part of me that seriously. Doubt said that was just somebody seeking. Get some bitcoin. No chance like having the keys to everyone's twitter account is so much more valuable than a hundred thousand dollars in Bitcoin. Give me a fucking break. Yeah, so that's another. Russia could do different things they could hack twitter accounts on the day, the election and try to spread chaos and disinformation. They could put out deep fake videos of Joe Biden. They could do all manner of things that are new right, so it's both about yeah, they're going to flood social media with bullshit and try to turn people against each other poses Bernie brose and Try to attack. Joe Biden left and the right and from conspiracy theories, but they could be doing other shit, too, and we just need to have our antenna up here and again. This isn't just on. You know elected officials. It's on the news media to be wary of the sources of information right. because. We know it's coming and we shouldn't fall in the same trap again. Yeah, I was very glad to see the the Biden campaign has really trying to get ahead of this. Congress working with them to. Talk? About Iran for minute because I, think last show we talked about some mysterious explosions in Iran specifically at sites linked to their nuclear and missile program. Those mysterious explosions continue last week seven ships at Iranian port caught on fire. There's like gas storage tanks or mysteriously blowing up. There's literally dozens of fires and explosions happening across Iran so you and I obviously have zero information that isn't publicly reported about what's happening, but most security experts believe this is a sabotage campaign by the Israeli government in the US, either aware of it in okay with it or actively participating and I guess the question that I come back to is why now? Last week Ben the there was this Yahoo. News report that said the CIA has been given much greater authority to wage covert warfare cyber warfare against adversaries like Iran without approval by the NFC without having to go back to the White House for more approval. That'd be a big deal if it's true. Some people are speculating that you know those conducting these attacks say these rallies want Iran to respond and then get drawn into a broader military conflict. The. Washington Post editorial in this today. They tend to be pretty conservative. On these issues. They called the maximum pressure strategy of failure and talked about how Iran's stockpile of enriched uranium is now five times greater than it was. When trump withdrew from the Iran, nuclear deal, our former colleague at the White House Dennis Ross, told the Post what the Israelis have seemingly done is create space for diplomacy if Biden comes in now I think I. Know What Dennis means there. He's saying that like. Like this sabotaged set back Iran's nuclear program, and would give Biden more time to negotiate, but I think it's the Orwellian. Suggest that blowing stuff up leads to diplomacy. I'm not sure we'd feel the same way if the situation was reversed. So then that's a bunch of background back to the central question like why do you think this is happening now? Do you have a theory and like I don't know how we understand this well I. One theory right is that trump may lose. And so the Israelis. Administration coming in. That is not going to want to go along with their cyber war..

Joe Biden Iran US Russia Congress twitter Clinton wikileaks macron Lindsey Graham Rick Grenell White House Republican Party Washington Post executive trump K. Government Brexit
"israeli administration" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

16:56 min | 1 year ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Grievances of government. That's not responsive corrupt, not serving them. Why do we not see that kind of eruption among Palestinians? It's an interesting point I mean we saw. We've seen seeds of rebellion also in two thousand eleven. As in other Arab countries, but of course, the situation in Palestine is completely different. There is no central place that Palestinians congregate. They are all in des Cantons in the West Bank in Gaza in Jerusalem, no way to unite, there is no way to focus on the Palestinian Authority. As long as people perceive the occupation as the bigger problem, so it's it's difficult to rebel against your own people or your own leadership. If you think that actually the main problem is the occupation, and not not the leadership, and the leadership is a secondary problem, it's an instrument of the occupation and not the patient itself so. Those are two reasons I think are more, but the situation is different in other countries right well. If that sounds complicated, I think your analysis of Hamas is even more complicated because you explain a new documentary, even though Hamas. Considered to be the sworn enemy of Israel, you point out a number of areas of indirect cooperation and I think you even assert that that serves Israel in a way doesn't Israel wanted to destroy Hamas or does it? Not What are the? What is this indirect cooperation that you have observed? I don't that Israel wants to destroy him. I think Mussos the purpose for Israel, and it is exactly the situation bear Israel and Hamas don't recognize each other as legitimate governments or as having the governments. But the state still deal with each other. I mean Israel still accuses the defacto government in Gaza to do this and that, and they hold them accountable for observing certain red lines, and the other way round, and as you know currently negotiations going on more or less direct talks between Israel and about prisoner releases, so there is a defector recognition of authority between the two. And I think Hamas. It's even more startling in the sense that you have this strong on rhetoric of Resistance and Liberation on one hand, but then you have an authoritative very well that the population in Gaza does not want another war does not want to see more bombs, so they work on ceasefire arrangements with Israel. They work on preventing radical routes from launching rockets. They do patrol the board offense so as to prevent infiltration into Israel. They suppress on Salafi. Jihadi groups in in the Gaza Strip and in that sense. They render a security service to Israel. Now. They don't do this because they. They are a friend of Israel, but in their own interest. And the interest that is once again that maintaining power over the tiny strip of land is more important to them than fighting and trying to liberate that land, so they cooperate in directly with Israel. Okay now we have to touch the toxic third rail of the conflict at this moment because I think we haven't really discussed it on our show at all. Which is the trump plan? You've been thinking about the trump plan for much longer than the trump plan has actually existed. You wrote a report about it. Last April the plan was only published. This January and you had anticipated quite a bit of it What are the things that you thought that you that? Stand out for you about this plan that you believe are reflective of the American. Administration or the Israeli administration, certainly somebody's interests. What does this plan do? Whose interest does it advance? I think there is two major issues that stand out with the document. One is the the framing the wording. This is a narrative of the Israeli right. There is no place whatsoever for the Palestinian narrative for the Palestinian interests for Palestinian rights or emissions, and if anybody wants to pursue conflict resolution in any place, this is definitely not a document that could be basis for conflict resolution, only even looking at the wording of the document. And the second one is to content and content I. Think turns the idea of a two state solution upside down in everything it basically. Takes up all the elements that were discussed in earlier visions for Tuesday touch amount. And it turns them on the head that goes with regards to Palestinian sovereignty debate. That sovereignty is limited in that document means that if that were implemented, definitely, there wouldn't be any meaningful. Palestinian state rod what we would see is. Of Occupation Open ended occupation plus annexation of some thirty percent of the West Bank. than the document violates basic principles of international law, and of course, first and foremost, the principle of inadmissibility off the acquisition of territory by force, otherwise known as annexation. Right well. We have some disputes over terminology here because you know many many of the Israeli leaders, including the prime minister, and most of his ministers are talking about extending sovereignty, and they don't use the word annexation so I'm just. Putting that out there as part of the debate here in Israel but what you're talking about acquiring territory by force is annexation. Do you think there's any difference between those two terms of reference? I'm not sure if there is a legal difference between the two. It seems to me when we had this discussion last year. When a the trump administration recognized annexation of the Golan, Heights they even further than Israel had gone before right because Israel also said they hadn't next Golan Heights. They head just extended sovereignty over the Golan Heights I think the the letter of the law is extended Israeli law and jurisdiction so Israel's very cautious about that because they don't even say extent sovereignty, the the Golan Heights law from nineteen eighty says lawn jurisdiction book. Facto annexation because Israel governs there, and it used to be Syria. Absolutely and the. The signal is very clear. The signal is this is not open to negotiation. This is not open for anybody else to govern here. Leaving govern that. which in Brecca doesn't mean that in the future? Somehow you could negotiate about it right because even after annexation of the Golan Heights, the renovations with Syria over it. But I would say not really in good faith, right? Wing that a site this is about annexation. Yes, but that's that raises an interesting point. I mean the trump plan. Okay, you think it's problematic in many ways, certainly for the two state solution. Is it reversible? If any of it is implemented and you know the government is currently discussing beginning legislation on July first just coming right up. If Israel moves ahead with that in some sense. Could these processes be reversible in a future peace process? In theory s on in practice I. Don't see it because. Every step. You take to entrench. Control over territory transferring population into the territory building your infrastructure in a way that it links up to your territory in doesn't integrate into the territory. You're talking about you. Increase the cost full making for taking the back. And I would say that has been the whole approach to the settlement building issue all along since nineteen sixty seven that step by step. You have increased the cost for taking it back. You don't create facts on the ground to take them back afterwards. You create on the ground to entrench your presence. So in theory, yes, everything can be taken back later, but it's not GonNa Happen, and the costs bill be enormous for any Israeli government to fall back behind what is promised in the trump plan, and it would also be normal any American administration to fall back behind what has been trump promised into trump plan. You're saying even if there is a democratic victory in the US, they want to change the policy. That trump is laid down..

Israel Golan Heights Gaza Hamas Palestinian Authority West Bank Gaza Strip Palestine Syria Israeli administration des Cantons US Jerusalem prime minister Brecca
"israeli administration" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

16:56 min | 1 year ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Grievances of government. That's not responsive corrupt, not serving them. Why do we not see that kind of eruption among Palestinians? It's an interesting point I mean we saw. We've seen seeds of rebellion also in two thousand eleven. As in other Arab countries, but of course, the situation in Palestine is completely different. There is no central place that Palestinians congregate. They are all in des Cantons in the West Bank in Gaza in Jerusalem, no way to unite, there is no way to focus on the Palestinian Authority. As long as people perceive the occupation as the bigger problem, so it's it's difficult to rebel against your own people or your own leadership. If you think that actually the main problem is the occupation, and not not the leadership, and the leadership is a secondary problem, it's an instrument of the occupation and not the patient itself so. Those are two reasons I think are more, but the situation is different in other countries right well. If that sounds complicated, I think your analysis of Hamas is even more complicated because you explain a new documentary, even though Hamas. Considered to be the sworn enemy of Israel, you point out a number of areas of indirect cooperation and I think you even assert that that serves Israel in a way doesn't Israel wanted to destroy Hamas or does it? Not What are the? What is this indirect cooperation that you have observed? I don't that Israel wants to destroy him. I think Mussos the purpose for Israel, and it is exactly the situation bear Israel and Hamas don't recognize each other as legitimate governments or as having the governments. But the state still deal with each other. I mean Israel still accuses the defacto government in Gaza to do this and that, and they hold them accountable for observing certain red lines, and the other way round, and as you know currently negotiations going on more or less direct talks between Israel and about prisoner releases, so there is a defector recognition of authority between the two. And I think Hamas. It's even more startling in the sense that you have this strong on rhetoric of Resistance and Liberation on one hand, but then you have an authoritative very well that the population in Gaza does not want another war does not want to see more bombs, so they work on ceasefire arrangements with Israel. They work on preventing radical routes from launching rockets. They do patrol the board offense so as to prevent infiltration into Israel. They suppress on Salafi. Jihadi groups in in the Gaza Strip and in that sense. They render a security service to Israel. Now. They don't do this because they. They are a friend of Israel, but in their own interest. And the interest that is once again that maintaining power over the tiny strip of land is more important to them than fighting and trying to liberate that land, so they cooperate in directly with Israel. Okay now we have to touch the toxic third rail of the conflict at this moment because I think we haven't really discussed it on our show at all. Which is the trump plan? You've been thinking about the trump plan for much longer than the trump plan has actually existed. You wrote a report about it. Last April the plan was only published. This January and you had anticipated quite a bit of it What are the things that you thought that you that? Stand out for you about this plan that you believe are reflective of the American. Administration or the Israeli administration, certainly somebody's interests. What does this plan do? Whose interest does it advance? I think there is two major issues that stand out with the document. One is the the framing the wording. This is a narrative of the Israeli right. There is no place whatsoever for the Palestinian narrative for the Palestinian interests for Palestinian rights or emissions, and if anybody wants to pursue conflict resolution in any place, this is definitely not a document that could be basis for conflict resolution, only even looking at the wording of the document. And the second one is to content and content I. Think turns the idea of a two state solution upside down in everything it basically. Takes up all the elements that were discussed in earlier visions for Tuesday touch amount. And it turns them on the head that goes with regards to Palestinian sovereignty debate. That sovereignty is limited in that document means that if that were implemented, definitely, there wouldn't be any meaningful. Palestinian state rod what we would see is. Of Occupation Open ended occupation plus annexation of some thirty percent of the West Bank. than the document violates basic principles of international law, and of course, first and foremost, the principle of inadmissibility off the acquisition of territory by force, otherwise known as annexation. Right well. We have some disputes over terminology here because you know many many of the Israeli leaders, including the prime minister, and most of his ministers are talking about extending sovereignty, and they don't use the word annexation so I'm just. Putting that out there as part of the debate here in Israel but what you're talking about acquiring territory by force is annexation. Do you think there's any difference between those two terms of reference? I'm not sure if there is a legal difference between the two. It seems to me when we had this discussion last year. When a the trump administration recognized annexation of the Golan, Heights they even further than Israel had gone before right because Israel also said they hadn't next Golan Heights. They head just extended sovereignty over the Golan Heights I think the the letter of the law is extended Israeli law and jurisdiction so Israel's very cautious about that because they don't even say extent sovereignty, the the Golan Heights law from nineteen eighty says lawn jurisdiction book. Facto annexation because Israel governs there, and it used to be Syria. Absolutely and the. The signal is very clear. The signal is this is not open to negotiation. This is not open for anybody else to govern here. Leaving govern that. which in Brecca doesn't mean that in the future? Somehow you could negotiate about it right because even after annexation of the Golan Heights, the renovations with Syria over it. But I would say not really in good faith, right? Wing that a site this is about annexation. Yes, but that's that raises an interesting point. I mean the trump plan. Okay, you think it's problematic in many ways, certainly for the two state solution. Is it reversible? If any of it is implemented and you know the government is currently discussing beginning legislation on July first just coming right up. If Israel moves ahead with that in some sense. Could these processes be reversible in a future peace process? In theory s on in practice I. Don't see it because. Every step. You take to entrench. Control over territory transferring population into the territory building your infrastructure in a way that it links up to your territory in doesn't integrate into the territory. You're talking about you. Increase the cost full making for taking the back. And I would say that has been the whole approach to the settlement building issue all along since nineteen sixty seven that step by step. You have increased the cost for taking it back. You don't create facts on the ground to take them back afterwards. You create on the ground to entrench your presence. So in theory, yes, everything can be taken back later, but it's not GonNa Happen, and the costs bill be enormous for any Israeli government to fall back behind what is promised in the trump plan, and it would also be normal any American administration to fall back behind what has been trump promised into trump plan. You're saying even if there is a democratic victory in the US, they want to change the policy. That trump is laid down..

Israel Golan Heights Gaza Hamas Palestinian Authority West Bank Gaza Strip Palestine Syria Israeli administration des Cantons US Jerusalem prime minister Brecca
"israeli administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Steps not come never go to the post office again and welcome this is the Ben Shapiro show so president trump has now announced his big peace plan for the Middle East it is now endorsed by a bevy of middle eastern Arab countries which is a sign that a lot of the Arab countries are beginning to recognize that their innate goal of destroying the state of Israel is not a feasible one nor is a priority for them I mean that's really big news your because let's let's face this no matter what peace deal from what's on the table they could include Jerusalem right all of Jerusalem it could include virtually everything Palestinians are wanted and Palestinians are turned down because the Palestinian leadership is dedicated to the destruction of the state of Israel has nothing to do with the idea they want a Palestinian state they do not want Palestinian state unless it encompasses full scale the entire state of Israel this is why in every go chase in the valley and the Palestinians have insisted on the so called right of return which would amount to millions of the Palestinian Arabs flooding into Israel and then presumably voting for its destruction of the Jewish state thousands of never accepted the existence of a Jewish state they do not plan to accept the existence of a Jewish state and that's why any plan that is proposed is obviously can be turned down and any plan that has been proposed including virtually everything the Palestinians ask for in both two thousand and two thousand eight were turned down without a counter offer from the Palestinians and violence was lunch so let's just set the stage here the Palestinians don't want to say they want Israel destroyed Israelis want the Palestinians to have a state they can be left the hell alone every every Israeli administration since the Oslo Accords has endorsed the idea of two states has endorsed the idea of the Palestinians being given to states that the Israelis do not have to control this territory if you think the Israeli government is desperate to control Nablus you're out of your mind if you believe that the Israeli government is like our well you know we really would love is to sacrifice our blood and treasure controlling Ramallah you're crazy Israeli forced to do that because they have a major security risk on their borders in the presence of a vast bevy of terror groups in that region the Palestinian authority is itself a terror group it is run by a Holocaust denying terrorist who hands out goodies to the families of people who kill themselves in order merges the Gaza Strip is run by Hamas in over terrorist group to any peace plan put forward is gonna be a bunch of garbage anyway so what was the point of this the point of terms peace plan is really to get the Arab nations on board signaling but they are now going to demand from the Palestinians the Palestinians get over their crazy adherence to the idea that you're gonna disappear into to point out that any future western and Arab alliance is going to be a reliance on a recognition of bass reality so here is what is in it trumps actual peace plan what in trump actual peace plan is a proposal that the major Jewish settlement so called settlements in January which are perfectly legal don't believe anybody who tells you that Israeli settlements are illegal they're not illegal Israel.

"israeli administration" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Be talking in this portion of the program with Michael Friedman us co founder and executive editor of the media line news agency, a veteran reporter of the Middle East to take a look at the visit of secretary of state, Mike Pompeo to Israel, and the timing of this is the most interesting question, I suppose here some could say that this is merely consultation with a key ally in the region, and Michael I guess others might say, well, it's American interference in the Israeli elections with the Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rather embattled at the moment, your thoughts. Well, some say so more than that some say, it's actually that secretary Pompeo is part of the Netanyahu reelection campaign. There's a lot of interest in it always is always tremendous interest in all things American. But now it's gotten to the point where the marcation line of bipartisan is gone. The debate has broken out on both sides of the ocean of whether Democrats are less supportive of Israel than Republicans is indeed the prime minister of Israel, the Republican head Republican or Representative of the Republican party in America. Having happens to has a position running the country in Israel. Everything is is completely intertwined up for debate. And it's gotten kinda hot the elections here. Just for those who aren't aware is April ninth. So we're we're in the homestretch gotten pretty hot and heavy and Netanyahu, of course, says out of leadership in Israel for it seems like decades Netanyahu is a serious. I guess what scanned? Charges would be a fair way to put it wouldn't it? Yeah. Well, he he was investigated in four separate investigative cases. The prosecutor had determined that. They were going to actually indict there's been a big debate here. Whether a prime minister who is indicted can continue to serve until there's a some sort of. And in the case or some kind of resolution to it or whether he has to step down. And of course, those who are his critics want him to step down. And he doesn't intend to interestingly though, there is more interest or more coverage or more talk about the involvement of the American administration and the relationship of the American and Israeli administrations than there is talk about the legal. Oh city has. That's. I find that the remarkable that that the mirror. The mere presence of of the secretary of state would be that big a deal. I mean is this our opponents of Netanyahu actively campaigning on the American interference platform? Well, it's interesting. The one thing that the fifty Isreaeli people won't let their elected officials get away with the guy who has his finger on the button, the prime minister is messing with the relationship the American people and big state of Israel that is sacrosanct. And that is the most important aspect what we're seeing with the Pompeo. Visit is only half of the case because at the same time. Prime minister Netanyahu had reason to be in America. So not only were we seeing the warm fuzzy love fest between secretary Pompeii and the Israelis under the nose of the Israelis inside Israel. But at the same time, the prime minister was in America and talk about bells and whistles there was nothing that. The President Trump and his people missed in greeting greeting warmly getting the keys to the mansion and just letting the Israelis use that platform and many, of course, as you said arguing that using the platform to help the reelection campaign. Although let's face it. The argument would have been made if Mike Pompeo hadn't gotten within a thousand miles Tel-Aviv. No, absolutely, absolutely. But from the Israeli perspective everybody was watching the how it played out when the prime minister was was in America, and of course, because of the fighting in Gaza and the rockets while rocket landing right near Tel Aviv right in the heart of the country in the heart of the population belt. Anesthetic cut short. And and go back. Laid play out really in the prime minister's favor. Despite here, we go back again to legal woes, despite the fact that he's involved in four seven investigations, and will they will be indictments handed down. It really is not affecting the normal course of his reelection campaign says this would be as if this time he had a time in office, and he was out in the early nineteen nineties, but he's been in office continuously for a decade now is this July. He's going to become the guy who served the longest beating out to the legendary David Ben Gurion, George Washington of Israel. So it's it's it's no small thing. The fact that he is in the accent again and his campaign if indeed it did sputter is now picking up speed. And it looks like his is his closest critics score over a former army chief of staff whose put together a party headed by a total of three former army chief of staff, it's not doing as well as people thought it would and again. Who is showing a great deal strengthened, probably despite the legal stuff will be real life. Good now going back over the years. There's always been very vigorous politics in Israel and itself had a host of of parties. Some you could convene in a phone booth. And they've been known to bring down governments. And I'm wondering in the past it tended to be pretty much, and I'm not a person who has studied Isreaeli politics. I've followed it in passing as it flares into the headlines, and then I go onto something else. But it seems in the past it has tended to be along the lines of the conservative Likud group at least from prime minister Menachem Begin on. And somebody representing the the labor party is that breakdown still a fairly accurate representation of the crazy quilt that is is rarely politics. These days. Well, Linden Israel. He goes into the voting booth that they talked about the high tech country and all the great scientific advancements. But when a person goes into the voting booth they had a paper ballot. And there's a tray of little slips of paper each party has their own symbol. With letters of the alphabet and. The voter except the slip of the party that they prefer put it puts an envelope seals the envelope. And then drops it into a ballot box, Bill fashioned way. There are over twenty parties that are in the mix. Individuals can get their own parties if they can get enough of a percentage of the population to to sign a petition. You can really pretty much have your own party and many are single issue parties Keough. Here's here's what people need to understand about is really politics. It's not that kid can can go to the top know wake up and my little kid can be prime minister to be prime minister. The first thing is when the parties run in general election, the party has to have the most number of seats in the parliament one you win a proportion. If I get fifty percent of the vote, I get fifty percent of the seats in parliament there. One hundred twenty seats. Nobody is going to get enough to run the country in one party. So they have to have coalitions. So what has to happen is number one party has to get through the most number of seats and number two which people overlook the president, which is largely a ceremonial role. But here he plays a big big day grow. The president has to believe that that party. They've got the most number of seats is also capable of forming a coalition that means. If they can get other parties to join to the minimum number of sixty one and if the president in his own judgment feels that the guy who got a gal who got the most number of seats can't do that. He can go onto somebody else and give them the opportunity to form the government. So what Netanyahu's opponents have to do is get more seats in the election than Likud party of the prime minister. It's the party not the man the party. And then the president also has to believe he can make the coalition now for a while. The polls showing that Netanyahu was pretty strong again, in terms of public opinion, and would therefore get the number of seats. He needed in order to be number one in that category. The teddy couldn't put the coalition together. So the feeling was that the opponent. We actually get that opportunity. That's changed. Now as Netanyahu always manages to do or has always managed to do in his. Well. He manages to come up and be strong and give off the belief that he can number one get the most number of seats and put that coalition together, which right now, the opposition doesn't really seem to be able to do they come up with about fifty five seats in now who. There's several ways they could come up with at least sixty one. Netanyahu. I should former former guest on this program. In studio with me, very impressive individual one on one. I was was quite impressed with with him as a as a capable if nothing else the person who handled interview questions, we're gonna come back and talk some more with our guest. Michael Friedman co founder and executive editor of the media line news agency, he covered the Middle East. And it is certainly interesting how the United States that seems to be becoming an issue if you will in the Israeli election. And of course, if the elections were held today in the United States to a certain extent Israel would be an issue here. One eight six six five O, JIMBO back in a moment. Sarcoma..

prime minister Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Israel Mike Pompeo president Likud party America Republican party Middle East Michael Friedman secretary Linden Israel co founder executive editor parliament United States secretary Pompeii Tel-Aviv
"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's rarely Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu got stuck in a part Yehuda market with his favorite candidate zave Elkin the Israeli right-wing fills the wind in its sails powered by President Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital the nationalists who bulk at the Palestinian vision for their capital in east Jerusalem like to talk of a unified city meaning under Israeli administration. Leo Szilard is a former Israeli government advisor turned think tank director the way, we walk in modern democracies are days is that when there is a representation there is also a support and attention of the municipality to what's happening. What's happening in Jerusalem? Is that one third of the city does not have those representatives that wake up in the morning and make the phone call to the mayor. Some polling suggests a large number of east Jerusalem. It would be prepared to vote for the local authority. There's been some new is rarely government investment in the city's east. But the boycott is likely to stick says the Palestinian academic multi Abdelhadi today after fifty one years the are using when stinian who claim as a citizen of Israel. Run for election. People will not vote because this is Israel. We are not considered as people at all. They are taking our history. Our culture our heritage and claiming this land and not the land the political horizons city councils may rarely go beyond schools and street lights in new pavements, but Jerusalem goes to the heart of the Israeli Palestinian conflict and so two questions over today's election. And the report is by our Middle East correspondent, Tom Bateman? Now, it's more than a footnote voted in a presidential election held onto the presidency is being there since nineteen two but the opposition is protesting. It's it isn't happy with the result. Or the way the election was held a number of protesters were arrested over the weekend. The lectures, followed months of values in English, speaking, arisen Amnesty, International estimates four hundred people have been killed in the past year and one sixty members of the security forces of date since late twenty sixteen tens of thousands of crossed the border into Nigeria and hundreds of thousands are internally displaced one priest father under a sewer is asking the United Nations to organize a referendum. I think if.

east Jerusalem Israel Israeli government Leo Szilard Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Middle East zave Elkin President Trump United Nations advisor Nigeria Tom Bateman director fifty one years
"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But that takes a long time five years ago i proposed to the president of finland that our digital prescriptions would work across borders and it said going to go into effect next year so that six years basically uh the the technology side of this uh would take a couple of days i'd say but getting it done politically takes a long time legally and the regulatory side of things now that's it's actually a fairly unique accomplishment this does not exist anywhere else where in the world uh is out to get from there to all of the eu's gonna take a while now it may appear odd that the government slowly disappears when this transition to a virtual government is complete but need kinney said a straight i mean surely the real estonian government can't just disappear what happens to it though an and its authority mug amine israeli administration we're talking about in the european says the government is the elected cabinet um and the in the administrative side is what becomes increasingly uh transparent but also decreases in size is kind of the bureaucratic give version of the state withering away karl marx when once pro envisioned it uh but i mean think of the most of the things that you deal with in your personal interaction with the government as your case of proving where you live i mean they're simple decisions that don't require human intervention the my own country after you ah do your driver's test you don't go to the dmv even if you have to update your you know i do and i test you go to a high dr but the idea ctar sends in the information that ninety glasses urgently while we there's no need for all of that brick and mortar and flesh and bone bureaucracy when the decisions are are things that.

president finland eu kinney karl marx five years six years
"israeli administration" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Hey that you have changed your place of residence i mean you don't have to do that but if you do then the you have that proof now sounds nice and sense icl it is your goal to bring the system to other eu states well guess it is i mean it would be a this entire system becomes much more powerful and when it works crossborder but that takes a long time five years ago i proposed to the president of finland that are digital prescriptions would work across borders and aid said going to go into effect next year so that six years basically uh the to the technology side of this uh we'll take a couple of days i'd say but getting it done politically takes a long time and legally and the regulatory side of things now that it's actually a fairly unique accomplishment this does not exist anywhere else where in the world uh is out to get from the they're to all of the eu's gonna take a while now it may appear odd that the government's slowly disappears when this transition to a virtual government is complete but need kinney said a straight i mean surely the real estonian government can't just disappear what happens to it though and and it's a thority mug amine israeli administration we're talking about in the european says the government is the elected cabinet um and the in the administrative side is what becomes increasingly uh transparent but also it decreases in size is kind of the bureaucratic go version of the state withering away karl marx once pro envisioned it uh but i mean think of the most of the things that do you deal with in your personal interaction with the government as your case of proving where you live i mean they're simple decisions that don't require human intervention the my own country after you a do your driver's test you don't go to the dmv eve.

president finland eu kinney karl marx five years six years
"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have and through your research you realize there are other people like him but they are being sent the to other countries right so there are two main groups of asylumseekers who made their way to israel um he had the air trans but then also cohort of sudanese of especially survivors of the genocide in dark were so the air trans are sent to rwanda in the sudanese are sent to uganda and and you've honda when the sudanese arrive there being faced the exact same system he said they're being encouraged to either go to south sudan or even back to sudan itself on which can be incredibly dangerous from any of them as their know escapees of of a genocide some of them are seen as political enemies of the regimes still in khartoum so long derby what the a risk by by the system so in all your reporting you found a whole bunch of africans who have been through this process in slight variations but but essentially the same thing what is the evidence that this is an organized program and the israeli government knows about it so that's the real crux of the issue um i spoke to officials in israel rwanda and uganda an in all of them deny any knowledge of this system existing but i also managed to track down as some people who were involved in the process of pressuring the african asylumseekers to leave uganda on including one man seem to have been hired by the ministry of internal affairs in uganda in documentation tonight that up for helping encourage the sudanese refugees to leave the country he helped organize their flights you either south sudan or sudan on and he was adamant that there was highlevel government involvement in that this process as basically could did exist did without ugandan officials not just being aware of it but also participating in it the question of israeli complicity is a little bit more difficult to nail down but these reports have now filtered back to the israeli administration they're they're aware of these claims and they really near they claim that they've investigated them but.

rwanda sudanese uganda honda khartoum israeli government south sudan israeli administration israel
"israeli administration" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"israeli administration" Discussed on PRI's The World

"So so in all your reporting you found a whole bunch of africans who have been through this process in slight variations but but essentially the same thing what is the evidence that this is an organized program and the israeli government knows about it so that's the real crux of the issue of i spoke to officials in israelrwandauganda an in all of them deny any knowledge of this system existing but i also managed to track down some people who were involved in the process of pressuring the african asylumseekers to leave uganda on including one man who seemed to have been hired by the ministry of internalaffairs in uganda and had documentation to back that up for helping encouraged the sudanese refugees to leave the country he'll to organize their flights you either southsudan or sudan on a he was adamant that there was a high level government involvement in this process basically could exist did without ugandan officials not just being aware of it but also participated in it the question of israeli complicity is a little bit more difficult to nail down but these reports have now filtered back to the israeli administration they're they're aware of these claims and they really you know they claimed that david vested them but they've really done nothing to stop this from happening i mean this this process still continues is this on its face illegal that's the key question in that's where organizations like you nec are and other human rights groups are looking into it so on its face if the asylumseekers were given what their promised uh which is you know refugee citizen the 3rd country a right to work and all the other uh in all the other promises are met.

israeli government uganda internalaffairs israeli administration sudan david human rights