27 Burst results for "Israel Palestine"

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"That's dominant that is that is that ultimately You know You know ultimately not not occupying Another state and denying people's human rights and a lot of other issues and they can still love appreciate at some level but there's that their connection to it is not romanticized anymore right. It seemed very very different. And you add that in layer that and everything else and i think there is a the idea that we can support rights here but not support there is is that i don't think that's acceptable. And so you can i. I believe that you can believe in the importance of the state of israel and the importance to have a jewish homeland. And the pride in that but also not find a lot of things acceptable to it and if you spend time in ramallah and you go through checkpoints and you do that stuff. He just realized there's an the the the people that are living there. Deserve devastate observed have their rights. And they deserve be able to do that. And israelis deserve to be able to live in peace as well and and there are a lot of factors that are getting along with it but at the fundamental part is is what is the leadership that takes in the movement around that stuff. I mean the way that you summarize it. It does feel until before. I got a before. I twisted germany's on arm to do this with me. I was on with the palestinian leader to uruguay and she kept saying like it. Like we just have to route this in my basic human rights. Like just feels so simple right like again. Everything feels when you look social issues from thirty thousand foot perspective. It's like these are all no brainers and ninety nine point. Nine percent of humanity is on the same page but yet you described the nuances of the things that have to move within the parliament in in tel aviv. And then what the palestinians have to do to be able to make sure that their votes are being counted and that they're put it just seems i. Yeah but i think. I think the other thing. I think that it's it's a complicated issue in the thing i think about it. This is what. I learned most from seeds of peace and experience. There is how we bring empathy to this and look the reality is we were sitting here and we were wondering rocket with landon. Our kids here a house right. How would we feel the the constant since of fear around that stuff for the fear that for years. You've felt boarding buses. Whatever may be and then what you would feel about. You know the anyone who is doing that how you feel about making it happen and at the same time. Every time. our kids went to school that he goes through. Checkpoints that deal with humiliation i. We didn't have the ability to work can do those things and so we. How do we bring that sense of empathy and perspective. Because i think what allows these conflicts to happen is the demonization is the other. And so even. I think about the narrative around the stuff. It's like you know it was interesting to see congressman to leave. talked about. Joe biden is a personal story. It's a personal narrative right. This is her experience. It not theoretical. It has lived and so i think being able to speak to that i think is important at the same time. I think i think people feel like they have to go to their corners because no one appreciate both sides and i think we gotta realize actually we gotta read. Cut the lines here. It's not israeli palestinian. Who believes that people can live together in peace and believes that and he was against that. And let's separate that. Lets redraw those lines. A little bit. Jared that was that was awesome. I go. I mean the biggest she bought for me. Maybe by the way..

Joe biden ramallah tel aviv Jared Nine percent uruguay thirty thousand foot both sides ninety nine israel landon palestinian jewish israeli israelis germany palestinians years
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:40 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"Can you describe what that what that status quo was pre trump. Well basically you had. I think one of the things. That's interesting to think about. Is that you have this kind of. It was a bipartisan consensus. That existed to About how israel is the only democracy really the In in in the middle east They've been an ally for us. That does alignment is a strategic alignment that's existed for years and and so The so you. I want to add that. That was kind of a bedrock of american foreign policy for years and the other narrative that you had that the generation i guess more my parents generation but will certainly here as israel. Was this week or power that was under threat. Attacked sixty seven and seventy three right in and loanable but all the things that are happening. And what's happened is is that one on on the kind of political dimension for the first time you sing a fracturing of that consensus. That's one of the things that the republicans and trump tried to drive a region around that stuff. This became an issue. The republicans are for this right. And that's and so all of a sudden people started dividing bernie sanders in remember in the primary campaigning Clinton was one of the first candidate came out started challenging and bringing us as an issue that was up and so you started slowly slowly. Had people starting to challenge that. We're all of a sudden as much as we are politically divided here. That political division is starting to fracture a challenge some access of the aspects of the consensus around the relationship with israel and also just people really struggling with it face this as well which is i can love israel but i have to love it and appreciate all its complexity and also because of that love. I can also criticize it and not find acceptable. What's happening in terms of the values. That i believe in what i stand for as well i at the same time. I can also consistently love palestinians to believe in their the justice and righteousness in the cause for for a palestinian state. So i think that that is opening up a space of debate and conversation. You're seeing that. The conversations that are happening politically are very different. It's a very different dynamic especially the progressives and others that are coming up and saying wait a second. This is an acceptable for things. Here we gotta fight for things elsewhere so that that is one of the things that's a challenging dynamic. That's new may create different kinds of pressure on on how the administration others deal with this and within the jewish community. There's also a big shift where you have a lot of folks that are dealing with the complexity of you. Know what we're not gonna uniformly accept what's happening in israel and again we can love it and appreciate it. So there's there's some people that are saying hey like me. I want to engage. But i want to engage in ways that feel like i can help realize the aspirations. You have a population of Younger a population that's grown. That's all true orthodox. That is not willing to the. That doesn't want to question israel that's like we can't we can't question it and then you have a lot of people that are just apathetic that are through intermarriage and everything else..

Clinton trump bernie sanders republicans first time jewish first candidate this week one sixty palestinian years american seven things israel of people seventy three orthodox palestinians
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"There's strong believers in palestinian of palestinian nationalism international. Inspirations but at the same time fundamentally understand that we've got to figure out how to live our lives and get past this and make this happen. And so i i i. There's seven thousand plus seat to be graduates over the years that are in various kinds of institutions apparent influence. Right and i believe a few of them could make a difference here Not to mention kind of the broader thing. So i think the issue is when you have the kind of setback have the dynamic of the violence that skepticism and cynicism takes hold and so the stuff that was happening on tiktok and things in the immediate narrative and everything else she was shifting opinions and ideas and so can young people harnessed that can. They influence that. There's certainly a human infrastructure for that to happen and the real question is systems willing to open up to allow that to happen right. Are they willing to open up on the palestinian side of their elections of their things that can channel that and on the israeli side as their awaited that government opens up. And i should say all my opinions are my own and not the organizations but what i agree with the israelis Baltin that is that it's going to happen because of people right even if you have people signed pieces of paper it's necessary and it's not just about making sure that pieces is delivered on. It's actually at this point. Making this happens and you know. I have a lot of faith You know we have close connections to see who Who is like it'd be joining the family and you just think about the can't talented capability that he or other people like him. Bring are all the seeds that i've known for years and i'd bet on any day but can just hopefully get you can call them the dinosaurs out of the way i mean just i see you bailey. There's an active seed on right now. So here's that's israel palestine if you're talking about a democracy in palestine like what. What's the voting situation. Why does hamas. How is awesome. How are how does hamas. Get out of. Power would cost completely dissolve. If suddenly there was one state solution. So i wouldn't. I wouldn't claim to be as close to some of the latest dynamic. But i think the one thing to say is must have emerged not emerged as a power in gaza because they were you know effective at running a state where the state itself was not affected before and they managed the strangled Of that is when you have corruption inefficiency and people are looking for people who can live basic services and capabilities in hospitals anything else. and so. that's what emerged or that's what has emerged You know You know Within within those areas i think in the case of hamas they. There's not elections that they can access. They've been struggling right. Because at some point you have massive unemployment gaza right the things that they've done have led to the got blockades right rocket attacks terrorism attacks and everything else so so their own actions have contributed to that but at the same time. They're also when you when people are living in a blockade. Anybody can give you food and shelter and things like that. You're too so there's this dynamic where at some point it felt like we're housings in gaza exhausted if there are elections would have been displaced. Are there alternatives to that. And then you you've had an They've had a stranglehold on that civil society to really make it hard to imagine how that will merge and and again.

one state one thing israelis palestine palestinian israel seven thousand plus seat years Baltin gaza israeli
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

03:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"People been ahead of their publics. they have led. They paid personal consequence for that to be able to do that. The ireland situation. If be looking at it was very different. It was women often leading the way popular protests youth that were pushing their governments that that created the pressures that led to the change. Right so the question then becomes what is the model that leads to the middle east. What we we don't have leaders with founder stock with the right kind of credibility or taking chances are they're making political calculations they're never going to be out front trying to lead the way so it's good to be in my mind probably a popular movement the kind of pushes it says enough is enough hollis right hollis like we got we got it got it to to gonna get two different reality inevitably to go around and we we can't just ignore right. That's the one thing like you can't ignore them. As someone talking about biden their other priorities you can ignore the middle east but the middle east is ignoring you and on the us side. The biden stuff is really interesting because his perspective on foreign policy is very personal. Driven relationship driven. He knows netanyahu will right and my son says he both appreciates netanyahu and fills bedeviled by him at the same time but he knew he knew how to deal with netanyahu here to give him the space to allow that to happen and the boehner ability had and as much as he took a lot of heat publicly for and what he was trying to say and what he was doing and what he was trying to do privately around this heat intimately knew what it took to create the space ultimate. Allowed us to happen and then the real question is is does. Does he actually believe that. There's breakthrough here. I think the one thing you've seen about biden with afghanistan else. He's a realist. In terms of what can be accomplished. In what how..

netanyahu both afghanistan ireland one thing two different reality biden
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"I think thom brennaman was a correspondent in. Beirut was monday in jerusalem and so was from richard jerusalem and i think the perspective he has Having spent time with him as his daughter went through seeds a piece tucker in years. And and and you know. I think what is an interesting observer. What happens there often has a good way of framing it. So yes i for my buddy interesting commentary. But but what i'm hearing you say this is where like i. I wanna make sure that. I'm not summarizing. I wanna make simple vying for the sake of like my desperation. To sort and organizers information are you suggesting that netanyahu i i'm assuming is not somebody that most folks are enthusiastic about having in power. He's very right. he's very conservative. he'd be comparable to trump but maybe not as bad. I don't know if that's accurate. But are you saying that there was more diversification within the political voices including from the arab israeli. Is that there had to be There had to be a bit of like air cover in general or sort of a distraction. From what might have been happening within the israeli government soon as i say the timeframe and obviously you can read the common. How he he. I guess what. I've read and what is probably do that. Yes and in the sense that are there legitimate issues. The fact that if you're non yahu near the israeli government and there's concerns over tunnels infiltration and the rockets and all the things and violence to the one hand. They may have looked at those circumstances. On on the other hand you could also say the actions of that government You know whether it was the kind of police action in april with al aqsa mosque and subsequent You know the the court kind of a process that's been playing out with the Are so there's a lot of things that are happening. That's part of the ideology part of the perspective connected on. And maybe also some legitimate security concerns that they may have had but in addition all that you also have the political calculation that not only is there prospect of a new coalition government where he's at a power but in his case in particular if he's out of power he subject than to Prosecution and investigations that are going on so right right and so it's not. I don't think the one thing in the middle east is never anything anytime. You're dealing with black and white you probably in the wrong territory There's lots of grays lots of shades shades. So in this thing thing is when the free suggesting is is a coalition government is about to happen. you have all these events that are going on and certainly then the question is is that coalition government likely to happen now and the interesting thing now. A coalition government as what does that mean so israel. The israel the united states. We have really two party system right. Republicans and democrats. And then you've got a couple of independence like bernie sanders or like angus king. So but in israel what you have is a is a is a democracy. That is Taking a parliamentary based democracy. And it is. It's it's there's lots of little party someone ends up happening. Is this parties to form a majority. I'm have a lot of weight and so it ends so small parties that could be a settler parties right wing parties could be in this case You know party Arabs read the party. Whatever whatever those those those things are have an outsized influence over this and you ultimately have all small splinter parties that you have to kind of organized around that. So what. Netanyahu is trying to form a party of the right wing..

thom brennaman trump Netanyahu bernie sanders april jerusalem Beirut netanyahu monday Republicans democrats richard israeli government two party system angus king Arabs lots of shades shades one thing arab israeli one hand
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"So when you have this pause you can maybe eliminate the immediate a pain that the people are experiencing. That's important will you do with the space is the real question in. Unfortunately that requires leadership And encourage in You know that's what we need. Okay so what is happening right now like what is happening in this space. What is happening. What should be happening with. What isn't happening that we might be able to help pressure to happen. A few things about it one is. I think we've seen in the united states as an example What what happens when you know A good example of this right when people raise up in they used their voices and they they marched and they protest do those things how that creates pressure accountability within our leaders in doesn't work perfectly but ultimately it can drive and leave those things challenge you have in the middle east is one What had how do people. How do you create the kind of movement to drive the change when the leaders aren't themselves able to do that right and and you know on one hand on you know on the palestinian side. One of the things you see is they're having election in many many years There's there's not there's not really ability to access and influence that that that situation Former cease graduates that are one of them in particular. I think is running for president and the people that are that were trying to access influence that system. But you've got you've got a lack of access within that democracy you've got a lot of political corruption that have limited those opportunities so the real question is is. How do you ultimately influence the systems and try to be part of that. Or how do you more importantly have a broader movement. That's that's that's shifting demanding change not just in palestine but as a whole and the same thing on the israeli side where were you have a democracy literally them. Try to form a government for times right. There's a lot of dysfunction. Within the the way that the democracy's functioning right now and ultimately the question then becomes is what is. What is the pressure that's happening. And and what. What are the ways to think about the dynamic. The past number of years is in the israelis they basically have lived in their own world. Right they have gone on about their allies in their existence in challenges and everything else and yet the status quo as i said there was a slow in deterioration where became less and less likely for the possibility of a two state solution existing open on the palestinian side. I think at the same time They've they've continued to go through and have their own issues and challenges and We haven't been able to make the progress on issues. Okay so you said a couple of things that i would love to just get a little bit more clear on and if you want mine indulging me just simplifying as musher awesome okay. So the dow does palestine democracy. Well when you say that who is palestinians terms are there some people within palestine. That would probably say that right. But they haven't had if you're if you're saying the attributions democracy would be to have open and fair elections consistently They've been Legislations at certain levels for quite a period of time and you also have a fracture between what's happening the west bank. What's happening in gaza randomly moss running gaza and in the palestinian authority running on the west bank. So so you've got that dimension and the other thing is when you talk about palestinians you have palestinian citizens of israel arab israelis and in their case. They would also say okay. We're part of a democracy but we're not full participants in democracy. Some people described it. As what would it be like to be black in the nineteen sixties. Or you're part of the american democracy system that are full participants able to fully realized..

palestine israel united states One palestinian nineteen sixties bank two american arab palestinians israeli one israelis
"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

03:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"But i am curious. And i would love to understand. And i'm specifically interested in the subject related to What ceasefire actually means what it's meant in the past how pleased on them in your own What what it means in the what it's meant in the past means for today like things. So what does ceasefire your. What is what does he is. Fire me these boss but like what does it mean so first of all. It's great to talk about this. And it's great to have some Referees here as well we next this she go live. I feel like they would work out well for me But i i mentioned i work. Misleads a piece for years. On the board their muslim border search for common ground and and the good fortune of working for lots of folks that have worked in the region for years and more importantly people that live in the region that you know the thousands of seeds that kind of educated inspire me over the years so two pieces. A leadership development program really focused on kind of empowering leaders in conflict Really focusing on helping to create the conditions for You know going to be economic and social and political dimensions For for people to come together and ultimate hopefully have peace or at least absence. It's basically a camp in the middle of in the middle of. Meanwhile they bring. I say us from conflicting borders together. Arab-israeli indian-pakistani kids northern ireland There's a global mentioned. They do stuff in the us now. But that is to bring people out of the region identified for their leadership potential and fourteen or fifteen and create an entirely different environment where they can create an understand each other's narratives and build relationships and then take that perspective As they develop in the leaders in their lives and hopefully maintain both that that that understanding but but those relationships. So i i also you know a lot of my perspectives in the region was informed by aaron miller probably not watching..

aaron miller fifteen fourteen two pieces thousands of seeds today both Arab-israeli northern ireland first indian-pakistani years muslim
"israel palestine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:40 min | Last month

"israel palestine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I've really fucked up yet. Time to swiftly. Defenestrate yourself though. We should note that being israeli was not a prerequisite for posting a mealy mouth. Both sides ism kind of statement on social media to name a few other famous folks who also fell into this category. Anne hathaway your fav- jamila djamil joe biden Yeah that's true very true but not every celebrity was as mealy mouth as the ones we just listed there have been a few who have actually done pretty good statements and largely because they aren't afraid to take aside including none other than member of fifth harmony fourth harmony. No i guess. Anyway lauren regi. Who did a really great tweet thread. I really liked this thread because it reads to me. It doesn't feel like it contains buzzwords but it isn't just purely buzzwords moment. Where she she says we are all right here on this fucking earth. Witnessing the cycle repeat itself consuming digesting propaganda like it feels our empty souls. And i just something about her saying we all right here on this fucking earth. I'm like oh you're talking like a human a human who has done research and taken time to learn about an issue and is now trying to talk candidly because that's the only way forward here right. No definitely it. Sounds like she has done the reading and has synthesized it in her own voice. So i mean i guess kind of helpful at this point to kind of get into. How do you know the difference between a good post and a bad one on an issue that you may or may not feel qualified to talk about. Because i really feel like. That's where a lot of people kind of come down on. Because i mean cancel culture. It's fake but the into not unforgiving. And so i do think people mean well but also just don't really know how to post cincy. Typically that's really important at this point in time like social media is kind of irrevocably part of activism at this point and raising awareness. And so it's not kind of shallow question to ask. It's an important question. An important question to ask and i think that bad actors have taken advantage of that kind of fear fucking up by saying you. Don't use donate to comment on it and that's not the right way to go about it. That's not the answer that actually makes me think there was an influence or follow..

lauren regi Anne hathaway jamila djamil joe biden Both sides harmony earth fourth fifth harmony israeli
"israel palestine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:21 min | Last month

"israel palestine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Through with these. It's quiet quiet but like if you comes through in like deeds you've got some air maxes out here you got some jordans homeboys getting that like oh why did you make me remember that i forgot. We need a brief moment of levin. Bella hadid bellied supermodel and also daughter of palestinian-born. Real estate mogul. Muhammed hadeed has been very vocal about palestine. Not just in recent weeks has been for quite some time but in recent weeks she shares this info graphic. Her sister zhijie likes it. They get a lot of shit for lack of a more nuanced description for being vocally pro-palestine which to be clear. They have been for years at this point. There's this moment where existing right now where being vocally pro palestine is. I think maybe less dangerous than it has been in the past but yeah they have been doing this way before and in a time when they could have an probably have lost opportunities because of it and so bella post this info graphic and everyone's favorite news source the daily mail the daily mail. They do this whole kind of article. Fact checking info graphic. And in case. You can't tell by my voice. There's heavy quotes around fact checking because one of the things they say is she is incorrect in describing the region as being under apartheid because israelis and palestinians are free to choose their own leaders and live under their own rules which the united nations describes palestine as the occupied palestinian territory. Do with that what you will the hadeed sisters sharing this and getting backlash for it kind of illustrates just how far this info graphic has gone. And the effect that it's having in fact writer aleksey green tweeted the fact that one i g slide show of the two cartoon women chatting has effectively undone a decade of zionist propaganda. Sorry which the kind of sorry hints this ambivalence that. I think a lot of people who are very smart about these issues have about infographics. Like this where it's like could be better but also like they are effective. Could be better and like everyone needs a starting point. And if that's starting point literally happens to be the place where you sit and scroll while drinking your coffee like that's stupid cartoon woman. If that's the thing that motivates a person to then go do more research into actually learn more about this thing that let's be real and this is this design feature not a bug. Sorry i hate that phrase but it's what it is gets gets described as being show so over complicated and nuanced which it is but so overcomplicated and wants to the point that like why bother trying to understand it. Because you won't be able to. You're not smart enough. You don't have a master's or a phd. You didn't go to divinity you know and that that's how pernicious things fester right..

Muhammed hadeed aleksey green palestinian Bella hadid two cartoon women zhijie bella one palestine things one of jordans years palestinians united israelis
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:03 min | Last month

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Let's talk about new york city. King kong's favorite place to whole dance for most of the country. Election season isn't happening until next year. But for america's biggest and most apple like city. The mayoral election is already in full swing. And there's no shortage of candidates trying to fill bill de blasios freakishly large shoes so now the race to become the next one hundred tenth mayor of new york city a large diverse group running for the open seat mayor to blasi of course is term limited entrepreneur. Andrew yang joins a big field. That includes bro president. Eric adams controller scott stringer former hud. Secretary shaun donovan and former citibank executive ray mcguire. New york has never elected a woman mayor. This time around. Maya awhile kathryn garcia. Diane morales are hoping to change that. We have waited four hundred years to break this particular glass ceiling. You've never seen a candidate. Quite light paper boy love prince there. An artist rapper an activist as well and the owner of the love galleria in bushwick. One of the things that i've wanted to establish is a love ticket so we can have more positive reinforcement in the community. That saying that if you're out bear and you're helping an old lady across the street in cops doing. Hey you're helping lady cross the street. I'm writing you a ticket. A love ticket for one hundred and fifty dollars for doing something positive. Keep going okay. Okay this is a nice idea but if you ask me. People shouldn't be doing random acts of kindness to get money all right. They should be doing it for instagram. Likes but this is a story still. Don't get me wrong. I mean now we're going to get to the chief of police be like your day. Our love patrol give a man a love ticket for picking up some but when the suspect failed to comply the officer had to shoot him now. Only paper boy love. Prince is not doing very well in the polls in fact even though there's more people in this race than masturbaters inside the authority bus terminal there is one candidate who's been on top since the very beginning. Andrew yang is by far the highest profile candidate in the race for mayor he dominated the polls and the headlines by most standards he does tack more moderate. He wants to grow some parts of the nypd. He seeks corporate partners. Like jet blue any discourages higher taxes on the wealthy at the same time. He proposes a basic income for the porsche. New yorkers of two thousand dollars per year in city at people's being for those with limited to no access to banking. He has more creative ideas one that made headlines. He wants to bring tiktok hype. Houses basically creator collectives to new york city. Yes a tick tock high-powered. This is the perfect policy for everyone in new york. Who's gone. i love the city. I just wish my neighbors were loud now for our viewers who may not know what a tiktok high pow is. It's basically a place where influences make videos while they live together sort of like on the real world and for our younger viewers The real world was a popular reality show back in the ninety s where people lived together in a house and now it's making a comeback for our viewers who play for the jets a comeback as when a team is losing but then they actually win. The game now might not come. As a surprise that enter yang has been dominating this race. I mean after making a name for himself with a presidential run last year. He's one of the only candidates that most people had even heard of and it's just the fact that name. Recognition can instantly catapults you to success. I mean to be honest. I don't know if i would have even been considered for the daily show with. Trevor noah if my name wasn't already trevor noah help people imagine me in the role you know because the name or that was And it's always great to have major name recognition and major poll numbers. But you know what always comes next major backlash as the front runner. He's getting extra scrutiny. Yang admits he hasn't voted in recent local elections. I.

Trevor noah kathryn garcia trevor noah new york Andrew yang instagram shaun donovan last year Diane four hundred years Eric adams next year bushwick Yang ray mcguire King kong citibank america Secretary One
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:15 min | Last month

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Help you remember how to summer. They've got animal welfare. Certified meet sustainable while caught seafood and all the cherries nectarines. You can eat so go ahead summer on. Hey what's going on everybody. I'm trevor noah and this is the daily social distancing show. Today is tuesday may eleventh. And i just want to say congratulations to ten tibo on getting another shot at the nfl. He tried quarterback for the broncos. He tried quarterback for the jets and now he's back in football as a tight end because the important thing is that tim tebow gets as many chances as he needs so. If it doesn't work out as a tight end he can try running back a wide receiver. Or how he can just be the actual just as long as that bowl isn't throwing by colin kaepernick anyway on tonight. Show crypto currency is soaring into space new york city. My joined the yang. And for some reason we wade into the israel palestine conflict. So let's do this people. Welcome to the daily social distancing show from trevor's couch in new york city to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the daily social distancing show with trevor noah. All right let's kick things off with the big entertainment news about the golden globes a great honor for actors and a huge insult to flat earth. You might remember that. The awards ceremony has been under fire for its lack of diversity and alleged corruption and with the hollywood foreign press association. Dragging its feet about making changes. People have started ramping up the pressure. The golden globes off for now. Nbc announced it will not air the award show next year. Another major blow to the globes following months of criticism from movie stars and hollywood insiders directed at the hollywood foreign press association after an la times report revealed among other things. None of the group's eighty seven. Voting members are black. Netflix and amazon studios have both threatened to cut ties with the association winner. Tom cruise now three time golden globe winner. Tom cruise is joining the growing boycott returning statues to the organization. He has three golden globes. And he said now you can have these back that that's a signal to other prominent white people in power in this industry to step up and fight the fight with us. Oh boy you know you screwed up. If tom cruise is distancing himself from you personally. Personally it doesn't bother me if the golden globes go away because the purpose of full isn't about pleasing snobby critics with golden statues. No it's about figuring out how to set at least one scene of your movie in china to increase box office revenues. But this doesn't change. How crazy it is that the hollywood foreign press doesn't have any black members. I mean think about this. Your group representing the entire world. And you can't find a single black person. Africa has like hundreds of them. I mean one of them will come over and watch your movie moving on to cryptocurrency the preferred money of the worst dude in your group chats. If you've been on the internet at all this last year you know that the dream of critical traders is to send their coins value soaring to the moon and now some people are taking that literally. The crypto currency based on the beam of aid chubby. Either dog is paying for a trip to the moon. Spacex is accepting a popular crypto currency as payment for an upcoming moon mission. The geometric energy corporation said it paid spacex in doj coin to secure a spot for an eight hundred pound satellite on a mission called doj. One it's slated to take off in early twenty twenty two and will obtain lunar spatial intelligence from sensors and cameras. Toge coin is a digital currency founded by two software engineers in two thousand thirteen as a joke. it's now one of the most popular crypto currencies on the market. Yup that's right you can now use the crypto currency coin to pay for a space x trip to the moon which means it's time for another.

Tom cruise tom cruise amazon colin kaepernick Netflix china eight hundred pound tuesday may eleventh Nbc trevor noah Today trevor Spacex next year tonight tim tebow hundreds two software engineers three time last year
"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"The idea that a two state resolution to the israel palestine conflict is no longer possible is not really a new one. It has been after all a quarter century. Since the oslo agreements and pessimism seems to rain but lustick offers too powerful but potentially controversial ideas about the failure of the two state solution. I he places the blame directly on israel's settlement project and its territorial maximalism which has its roots in the history of the entire twentieth century conflict. For instance he points to zev. Jabotinsky is notion of the iron wall. The idea that would only negotiate with jews after they had been defeated which has had the paradoxical outcome that the repeated israeli victories over the decades have emboldened the israeli leadership so they have been less likely to come to the negotiating table. He also emphasizes the collective memory of the holocaust as a profound factor in israeli society. And the pro israel lobby in the us both of which emboldened israel's hawkish parties and make the israelis less likely to negotiate a two state solution. And secondly lustick who once was a proponent of the two state solution now says that it's a distraction from reality. He argues that there is and has long been just one st between the jordan river and the mediterranean sea the pursuit of a two state solution. He posits is an unrealizable dream when the real need is to push for rights and citizenship for all people living in this territory which is effectively one. St

two state Jabotinsky jordan river twentieth century thomas one st mediterranean sea two state solution lustick israeli both zev israel one oslo once israelis palestine conflict jews quarter century
Is a Two State Solution Possible in Israel/Palestine?

Jewish History Matters

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Is a Two State Solution Possible in Israel/Palestine?

"The idea that a two state resolution to the israel palestine conflict is no longer possible is not really a new one. It has been after all a quarter century. Since the oslo agreements and pessimism seems to rain but lustick offers too powerful but potentially controversial ideas about the failure of the two state solution. I he places the blame directly on israel's settlement project and its territorial maximalism which has its roots in the history of the entire twentieth century conflict. For instance he points to zev. Jabotinsky is notion of the iron wall. The idea that would only negotiate with jews after they had been defeated which has had the paradoxical outcome that the repeated israeli victories over the decades have emboldened the israeli leadership so they have been less likely to come to the negotiating table. He also emphasizes the collective memory of the holocaust as a profound factor in israeli society. And the pro israel lobby in the us both of which emboldened israel's hawkish parties and make the israelis less likely to negotiate a two state solution. And secondly lustick who once was a proponent of the two state solution now says that it's a distraction from reality. He argues that there is and has long been just one st between the jordan river and the mediterranean sea the pursuit of a two state solution. He posits is an unrealizable dream when the real need is to push for rights and citizenship for all people living in this territory which is effectively one. St

Lustick Israel Jabotinsky Palestine Oslo ZEV Jordan River Mediterranean Sea United States
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | 3 months ago

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"So my own provisioning in this in this sense is that they will certainly provide evidence of the palestinians. I have no doubt about this. I'm in. I could imagine that they would provide evidence in this matter. And perhaps they. We tried to block the procedure Through complementarity ya'll chantal sharon and other people. I've been speaking to all had so much more to say i mean. There is an enormous depth of research. Been done in. This area are loads of people concerned. We know that there's a lot to discuss on how expectations again to be managed for example. What the practical difficulties around the investigations. But we thought we also just discussed some of the more mundane stuff. Let's just stop. What about the timing of this decision. What did you think steph. Well in a way it was surprise to me because first of all the court broke what journalists here called the friday night curse where every kind of major decision of the court seems to come on fridays after six pm so we were all very happy that this came through on a regular Wednesday on the other hand. I had kind of You know when you work for big news agency you always have these kind of lert up that if you have to send super speed reports you kind of always have them on top of your computering case. This decision comes out. And i had taken the been. Souda opens an investigation into palestine. Alert off the computer. Because i thought that she would possibly wait for the new prosecutor kareem. Khan whose due to come in june sixteenth and maybe they wouldn't announce anything new before he could look at it and say yes. Go ahead or no and the other thing we should mention. In ben sued statement is that it was actually full of caveats full of warnings reminders. That not much might actually happen. Maybe until cream kong comes in because basically. She says she's got no resources. There might also be a load of other things. that might need to be litigated. I mean all we've got so far. Is this agreement that for the purposes of the investigation palestine can be regarded as an area that the office of the prosecutor can can work work on so a lot of ways even though she's opened the investigation. She's essentially just said okay. It's now going to be over to you. Kareem khan placing him in the hotseat. Yeah before Con was elected. There was a kind of whisper campaign that maybe he would be more reluctant to go against major powers such as the us Which is very opposed to this israel investigation. So we'll have to see how that plays out but in any case you know any of those four investigation usually take years before cases actually end up in court and we don't expect anything to happen really quickly with this. So good luck to kareem khan because the workload he faces is going to be enormous. As ben souda keeps on launching new probes will definitely get have quite a lot of work for us as well as reporters. Yeah which is good because my cats have just started eating only expensive dry food for quote unquote exigent cats. So i need the work to fund my cats new dietary habits. Okay investigations four. Stephanie's cat may thanks very much and we'll come back to palestine again. Sure in the future. This will be a case that will go on for many years. So there'll be lots and lots more justice updates.

Kareem khan kareem kareem khan Stephanie ben souda june sixteenth Wednesday Khan friday night fridays after six pm palestine chantal sharon four investigation kong israel Souda steph first palestinians four
Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

"Of relations with the Palestinians. More that from AP correspondent Mike Grassi provided administration is restoring relations with the Palestinians and renewing aid to Palestinian refugees. The moves reverse Trump administration Policy and signal the new administration support for a two state solution to the decades old conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians. Acting U. S. Ambassador Richard Mills made the announcement to a high level virtual meeting of the United Nations Security Council. The Trump administration was heavily pro Israel recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, moving the U. S Embassy from Tel Aviv and closing the Palestinian liberation Organizations. Washington office in September. 2018 might cross

Trump Administration Mike Grassi Acting U. S. Ambassador Richar AP United Nations Security Counci U. S Embassy Israel Palestinian Liberation Organiz Jerusalem Tel Aviv Washington
Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

Fareed Zakaria GPS

03:32 min | 9 months ago

Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

"Friday president trump announced that Bahrain would recognize Israel and the two nations would normalize relations. This comes just weeks after a similar move from the United, Arab Emirates what to make of it. All I'm joined again by Zanny Minton beddoes and we slaughter and Ian Bremmer in put this in context for us what does this mean? Why did it happen? What does it mean? Well two big things that people need to come to terms with the first. Is that Israel Palestine is considered close to the most important conflict in the region. It is for the Palestinians when you talk to the Maradas with the Saudis, the Bahrainis, the Kuwaitis you'll talk to you about their concerns about Iran they'll talk to you about diversification away from fossil fuels and the difficulties that they'll talk to you about domestic radicalism, all of these sorts of things. And so as a consequence, you no longer have a veto on if you don't get peace with Israel Palestine, you can't move on geopolitics. The second point is the united. States had long attempted to be seen as some kind of honest broker between Israel and Palestine when we're anything but Israel's our best ally in the region, the Palestinians particularly agree with we have problems with and so you know it's interesting trump's first trip as president outside the United States was to Saudi Arabia and then to Israel and those are the two places where he has the best personal relations and that's where they really drove. So yeah, you had the effort to. Talk about peace with Israel and Palestine where the Palestinians weren't even engage a big conference in. Bahrain. Now, you've got big announcements in relation. I think especially from you and I talking to jared through this that was kind of the game all along I I'm not in any way surprised by this. And we. A friend of mine WHO's from the Middle East very knowledgeable about the says what's really going on here this is this is the post American Middle East that is countries like. Israel UA Bahrain Saudi Arabia saying we're GONNA make our own alliances to defend ourselves against the the real threat that we feel as he was saying, which is Iran and we know the Americans aren't going going to help us. So we need we need to band together. Is that part of the dynamic. Afraid, I think that is right that again Obama wanted out of the Middle East. If you if you think about the direct line from his refusal to engage in Syria. And that's actually an area where he his policies and trump's have been closer than than other areas. But I also think you have to think about this in the context of us. Domestic Politics Donald Trump. Has Two modes he can be the fearmongering president or he can be the dealmaking president who delivers and if we're thinking about October surprises up for this election, what he would dearly love is to actually have a treaty or agreement between Israel and Saudi Arabia, which really would redraw the map of the Middle East and the conventional wisdom is the Saudis aren't ready but obviously, the UAE in Bahrain are stalking horses and and Bahrain would not have been able to do this without Saudi approval. So it's probably a low chance, but there is a real chance at least of a framework agreement in which Saudi Arabian Israel would would normalize relations in return for something more something bigger on the Palestinian sought.

Israel Israel Palestine Bahrain President Trump Saudi Arabian Israel Saudi Arabia Middle East Donald Trump Arab Emirates Iran Ian Bremmer Zanny Minton Syria United States Jared Stalking
"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Had a masters and I was trying to figure grab nextstep semi professional path in a friend of mine convinced me that scholarship matters if you're doing contemporary stop. Now I'm not getting into the validity of that but I do think for me. I can only do scholarship. That's related to what's going on right now that's just how design the teller oriented towards these things and the Israeli Palestinian conflict is not some yes it is taking place on the other side of the world and yes. The most people don't spend years living living over there. Endorse studying the conflict as I have in as mere has by there real people who are in this conflict end. This conflict is one of the most polarizing conflicts on American campuses. And why that is is a whole other probably podcast but it matters not just in Israel zero Palestine for the people who are living. This conflict matters for people who exist on college campuses because it's tied into their identities. It's tied into their their feelings of their safety on their campus. It's tied into so many pieces and part of the intersection out of this whole entity of Israel and Palestine. It is really like a spiderweb in it's connected to so many different things going on so given that and given that the Israeli president concert what is being taught on campuses are book is an attempt to add. Voices two classrooms that perhaps word present prior not particularly that because we want students necessarily think. ABC Or D.. But because we want them to think about ABC indeed and how does that relate to their understanding of Israel Palestine in there now does that relate to their understanding of the United States or Canada or wherever else. Because that's the world we live even today where these things are connected to another even if they're literally or metaphorically on the other side of the plan I feel like the through line throughout this whole conversation has been about helping to engender thoughtful discussion on the university campus by creating a text that students can read. The professors can use when when teaching when thinking about these issues because social justice in Israel Palestine are thing that is already taking place on the college campus. I think we can have kind of sanity. Check here and say say to what extent do discussions on college campuses matter. I know from personal experience in going back for for years and years and years people are always talking talking about what people are saying on college. Campuses like this is the end of the world or they're always talking about what people are talking about college campuses like this is the most important thing in the entire universe and it's easy I think for us as does professors who have sequestered ourselves to the college campus for years and decades to say okay. Yes what is happening. Here is the most important. This is our lives right but in the grand scheme of things competitions which are taking place all over the place and not just at the university campus level. So we're talking about all of this and the discussion about Israel and Palestine nine. Why do you think that the debates that take place at the university level here talking just about the professors and discussions but the overarching discussions and debates? You know when the Student Union is pushing forward on proposing to have obedience resolution or anything else. Why do we think that the university campuses debates about Israel and Palestine and social justice matter particularly as opposed to other places where this debate taking place debates on university? Campuses are really only one element of where these debates h show up in. Our book is equally applicable to trade union debate or Canada's recent about face in voting in the UN or mark trump's decision to move the US embassy to Jerusalem so there are debates taking place in a quarter of power there debates taking place triples. Workplaces added their debates taking place plays on campuses and there are debates taking place on the streets of Israel in the streets of Palestine so this book is a way of capturing the debates that are taking place in real about real people's lives back say that United States in Canada have disproportionate influence on the rest of the planet especially in terms of monetary unitary influenced the United States has a ridiculously disproportionate influence. So I think for pound if one wants to changed the world for the better vis-a-vis education I think one can have more influence on the world if they're working on a campus in a country that has disproportionate power great. Thank you guys so much for this really interesting conversation. Thank you Jason. Thank you for -tunities. Thanks for listening to this episode. If you like it. I hope you'll subscribe to the podcast which you can find on apple podcasts. Google play spotify. I or wherever else you listen until next time I'm Jason. Let's dig and thanks for listening to Jewish history matters..

Israel Israel Palestine Palestine United States Canada Jason ABC Student Union apple president Google UN spotify mark trump Jerusalem
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 1 year ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
"israel palestine" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:47 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Worldly

"It's finally here. The trump administration after teasing it for months maybe even years depending on how you time it has released its vision for Israel Palestine peace and it turns out. It's not so much a peace plan as it is a give everything everything Israel wants plan and then hope that leads to something that might be better. We'll get into whether there's actually any real aspirations for peacemaking in this plan and what it actually proposes today worldly part of the Vox media podcast network at beach. I'm here with Jim. Williams and Alex Ward. Hey team guest today That is call it L. Gandhi. He is a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute. And one of America's top experts on Israel Palestine. Really things He's sleep lanching when I say that Welcome welcome thanks could be the plan. It's here it's been called Depending on what you look at from prosperity to piece the deal of the century is a term that I think trump came up with making fun of it also calls itself the Vision inside the texts. So you know. Let's let's talk a little bit about what it actually does. I've set this up to be pretty bad right so called run. Run down the sort of big picture rules of the game as laid out in the deal. Yes so the the plan lays out out what it calls a vision for a two-state solution in theory At least that's how they're they're couching it. So the Palestinian state that they're describing basically would consist of about seventy percent of the West Bank In kind and of a fragmented Areas that are linked together through a network of tunnels and bridges and various infrastructure. But not actually actually territorially contiguous in addition to some swops In inside Israel In the south as well was A little bit in the north So that's the centerpiece of their plan. which is this Palestinian state that is essentially completely surrounded by Israel? So that's on On territory On Security Israel would have full control over everything between the Mediterranean NC and the Jordan River including the airspace territorial waters electromagnetic sphere Entering exit points The Palestinian NIAN quote state would not have the ability to enter into treaties with with foreign countries And of course Israel has overriding security. Control over the entire blanket area on Jerusalem Jerusalem is exclusively. Israel's capital of Palestinians. Estonians would be allowed to have a capital near Jerusalem. They could call it Jerusalem if they so desired but it would be outside. The plan is pretty clear that it would be outside of the security barrier or the wall as Palestinians call it and The plan is also explicit on the third major issue final-status issue which is Palestinian refugees and It stays pretty clearly that no single Palestinian refugee would be allowed to return to to to their homes in Israel and instead would have the choice between going back to a Palestinian entity to be resettled where they are in neighboring Arab states or in third countries and some sort of compensation package would be put together Over the long term. All all of this is contingent on obviously Palestinian acceptance but more importantly the Palestinian Entity could not come into into being until a whole array of Conditions had been matt the disarming of Hamas A long list of fiscal reforms of legal reforms. That Palestinians have to enact certain kinds of legislation and the decision as to win Palestinians met that threshold would be decided by Israel so it's a theoretical quote unquote state and one that frankly isn't all that appealing to Palestinians in the first place and as you said I mean pretty much gives Israel everything that it wanted An and I I should clarify. It's a wishlist not just for Israel but for Israel's right-wing explicit distinction because when I'm talking about Israel here I'm talking about the current government which does not represent the views of arguably most of the Israeli public depending and how you cut the polling right about half rough. Yeah Yeah Yeah but you know pretty. Remarkably the plan has the support of of Netanyahu's opposition of the Ben against the blue and white a coalition and even the president of Israel whose largely in a ceremonial remonial role. But still has influences and is seen as somewhat of a moderate And so there is a kind of Israeli consensus in Israeli early politics about this is a great plan and we should get on board I think the only real descent on this planet. Israel is coming from the joint lists which of course is predominantly lately made up of of Palestinian citizens of Israel and they're pretty much in the margins of Israeli politics so you know I think it's reflective of just how far to the right as really politics has moved In in recent decades there is much less support for the the plan. Here here we see Democrats especially being quite vocal in opposing it as a sham as a farce They're using that sort of language. Both Bernie Sanders offers and Elizabeth Warren. For example have criticized the plan. And we've seen a number of progressive members of Congress Also come out against the plan and I think that reflects a shift that's happening in American politics but from the standpoint of the Palestinians. This plan does not offer I mean it takes takes all of the issues that they care about a capital in Jerusalem. the refugees not even a symbolic Number of refugees that would be allowed to return and most importantly sovereignty self-determination are all off the table and so the vision that the trump plan represents is something thing more akin to Bantustans Than it is to to anything that we might call estate inside. What's advantage Stan? Bantustans were in south South Africa. These autonomous supposedly autonomous areas for black South Africans and as a way of segregating them from The white South African minority but still while claiming the black a majority had autonomy or statehood or sovereignty not And so these were sort of Isolated autonomous areas that were surrounded by South th Africa in Control very very similar to the plan that was laid out by the trump administration. So this sounds like apartheid. Then well that is that's the stick critique of it right is that it will lead to a permanent apartheid situation formalized and permitted by the United States right. I think the question of whether whether or not that is what the trump people wanted or thought of it is sort of separate and it's weather. I do think that it's hard to describe the end vision of this plan as anything but that so I wanna kind of step back just for a minute to kind of talk about how the the trump administration presented this. Right what the Just to kind of give listeners offensive you know how they are trying to sell this deal They essentially said Kushner Jared Kushner so that's White House senior adviser adviser and obviously trump's son-in-law He was the basically the grand architect this plan along with a core group of negotiators well. They're really negotiations gauthier shins but Core Group of advisers with them but they're essentially he's approach was look we've had these previous agreements over and over again. We've had all these negotiations none. None of them have ever actually led to complete final-status negotiations because all of these previous plans left the nitty gritty details to the end they laid out this broad framework during work like the Oslo process and basically said at the very end then the two sides. The Israelis in the Palestinian leadership in the West Bank will come together and and you guys will work out the saddest roussel. You guys will work out. You know land swaps in the West Bank and who you know which Pertz of of the West Bank Israel retains means which part are takes keeps in which parts you know will be a contiguous theoretically Palestinian state anyway so it was basically we. Don't WanNa get into the details tells but Kushner's approach was look. That didn't work so I'm going to go ahead and just decide the details for you guys. We're going to sit down. We're going to write down the details. We're going to have a very detailed the proposal and in that sense he succeeded right it is it does say no here. Here are the lines that are going to divide you. Divide or not divide Jerusalem as the case as maybe Here or the actual pieces of land you get you know Israel gets this thirty percent chunk of the West Bank. Meanwhile in return Palestinians Estonians. You got these two areas that are undeveloped. Land in the desert on the border Sinai in the border with Egypt And so that was basically the approach right. Look we're we're GONNA try this different method we're gonNA actually put it out there and you guys can take it or leave The problem is and we're GONNA get into that. Is that in doing so so they have actually made policy stated. US policy to be things that we hadn't stated before definitively that would be something we would support as a final status. We always said No. Leave it up to you guys. And that has essentially given Netanyahu at green light. So I think my favorite discussion discussion of the deal from jared and there have been many sort of cringe worthy interviews. Alex actually did a good piece on this For Vox is the time that he claimed that he read twenty twenty five bucks on the Israel Palestine conflict. It's on my head of started calling this jared's book report on the Israeli Palestinian conflict I think that that but sort of encapsulates the degree in care of thought that went into this. Because it's billed as a peace plan right but it was done in the way that Jen was describing without any consultation with one of the two sides that was supposed to sign on right like this was done by the trump administration in consultation with the Israelis elise with absolutely zero Palestinian. Buying whatsoever right. It isn't an attempts to say. Okay here's a mutually agreeable compromise. It's an attempt to dictate terms and I think the the best piece of commentary defending this deal which I think encapsulates the real spirit of it in a way. The trump administration won't won't actually say is this piece in the Washington Post by Isreaeli News analyst Eilon Levy and key the title of the piece is Israel won. He's really Palestinian conflict. Any plan has to reflect that and the court argument comes a little bit down And I want to read a short paragraph because I think it really is sort of an honest encapsulation of what's is happening throughout history. The victors always dictated. The ultimate terms of peace is that fair. Maybe is that how the world works in reality. Yes conflicts don't end when both sides agree agree that they are tired of fighting they end one side. The loser recognizes it. Can't keep up the battle and decides to get what it can before things get worse and there I think it is. It's red eye. I find this morally repugnant. As an argument right like it's basically a claim that anytime that somebody is victimized by another side international politics they just have to give up right and there's no such thing as fairness yeah. It's it's the million dialogue for those I are nerds. Who are listening here? just apply to the Israel Palestine in conflict But for those of us who have been committed to kind of just two state solution for a while and I grew up in a Jewish Zionist left-wing household. That was like our mantra growing up. This is a slap in the face and really quickly I mean. The trump administration had been pretty explicit leading up to the release that look Israel is has the advantage in Palestine does not and therefore it kind of has to accept some of these terms. I it mirrors or if not you know lends credence to that. That's the argument argument at least the thinking within the White House. I am not an expert on this situation but I am focused. A lot on trump's foreign policy was sort of a bigger stance and and I've talked to Jen about this. I kind of see this from the view like yet another maximum pressure campaign by the by the trump residents. They like that but just on the Palestinians I I. It's you know again. This is kind of like giving Palestine and ultimatum or something that is is the hope is would scare them so much that they would come to the table and look. It's one thing to do that against A nuclear power like North Korea. It's another thing to do it against Iran which you know you've you supports terrorism and has missile program in might someday one a nuclear weapon as nothing to do it against Venezuela for To It's a it's a more tenuous situation but A leader later that has completely decimated as country and there's another opposition leader. WHO's has the respect of you know? Tens of other countries but to do it against Palestinians is morally repugnant and You know the the. There's just nothing it's not like they're really going against a lot of aims of course Hamas yes but this is not a designed this kind kind of design just doesn't really make sense for this situation..

Israel Israel Palestine Kushner Jared Kushner trump Jerusalem Palestinian Entity Hamas West Bank Israel Vox media United States Alex Ward Netanyahu Middle East Institute Jen America L. Gandhi senior fellow Jim West Bank
Israel/Palestine war crimes probe 'momentous step forward', says UN rights expert

UN News

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Israel/Palestine war crimes probe 'momentous step forward', says UN rights expert

"Decision by the international criminal court the i c c to consider a formal criminal investigation into alleged alleged war crimes in palestine has been hailed by an independent. UN Human Rights expert as a momentous step forward in the quest for accountability. I see see prosecutor for Ben Souda announced on the twentieth December that there was reasonable basis to proceed with an investigation following the conclusion of a five-year a preliminary examination related to the two thousand fourteen war on Gaza Israeli settlements and the killing and wounding of Palestinian demonstrators near the Gaza Frontier Michael Link the UN special rapporteur for the human rights situation in the occupied Palestinian territory issued a statement on Tuesday welcoming the decision he. He observed that while the international community has adopted hundreds of U N resolutions condemning the fifty two year occupation yet really has it ever combined criticism with consequences for Israel now. The possibility of accountability is finally on the horizon. Mr Lynch observed that the prosecutor also intends to investigate investigate whether members of Hamas and other Palestinian armed groups had committed war crimes in the period since June twenty

UN Prosecutor Gaza Palestine Mr Lynch Ben Souda Israel Michael Link Hamas
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"During the colonial rule of the Indian subcontinent. The British came to love lots of Indian cuisine food and such as Chutney category were adapted for Victorian tastes but perhaps one of the most impactful concoctions of time developed without any Indian culinary influence. The Brits were in India. They were suffering from malaria. Berry Swanson was pretty. Primitive was to drink a lot of tonic and Thomas Adequate bitter taste to it and one one way to cut. It was to put in Jim. Thome Easton is economists. Mumbai Bureau chief. There are so many jains now that have an Indian name tomb. There's Bombay Sapphire cars very very popular. There's even one called Chindia. I mean any province of India probably has our name attached to a Chin but of course there's a great irony Iranian using an Indian name to somehow affected Indian S O of their team. Because the one thing that from all these Jen's really is the none. None of them are made in India. In fact the Jin that is made in India is very very cheap. And it's rumored that most of it goes off to Africa in barrels so the rotgut end and of the market is the only market actually in India. That's almost all of the market. There's some a little bit above that but it's still just a little bit about that. I mean given a choice I would say as a thirty six months ago. No one in India would actually choose as a question of taste or flavor to order any chin that was associated with being made in India but a couple years ago some entrepreneurs several of whom had spent time overseas and seeing the real boom in India came back to India and decided into create. Jin here into still one of the most prominent which had its year anniversary is called stranger and sons. Do you think the trend towards the the high end of the market will reverse the overall national trend as Indians gave up on the cheap stuff. I think what they've discovered it. India is that they can make a product that they really really really like your and so I think demand is going to be very very strong. Why not I mean the rest of the world wanting something is probably indicative of infection I or tastes there are many Indians who travel everywhere and come back? You're liking the same things that people to in Europe and in America. The Big Jim Markets Have Been Barcelona and New York and maybe wandering that it's hard to find a bar in any of those places that doesn't have a multitude of Jin's. There's no reason to expect that that won't be here as well. We haven't seen in these Mugen's any sense. The market is in any way satiated so India June for India at least for a while seems like one Belo's campus things at a time where the rest so the Indian economy is struggling. It may be the one product that has at least at the moment not only real products for growth but actually make people feel good during a very difficult time. What about beyond? India's borders say the popular brands that we we see outside India that kind of trade on India's name and history and so on aren't actually Indian. Am I going to start going into bars. Ars and seeing a a rich variety of Indian you will see a couple. India Jen's are beginning to stranger and sons is beginning to export Starting with Singapore and London didn't and I think that At least one other Indian brand has begun to do that as well so amidst the multitude of Indian S Jains are actually will be real Indians and and the extent that many of these genes do honestly have an India component the so-called pedantic the herbs and the spices and the go into Jin much of that does has come from India. Anyway it's just a exported in kind of a wholesale form but this fully formed India Chin. You'll be able to find it whether people like it. Who knows but I think the success that this has has had they charge roughly the same price here for a stranger and sons bottle as they do for a bottle of any premium imported jen and it seems to have found an audience regardless of price? So there's no reason to believe a won't find some sort of audience elsewhere in the world. Tom Thank you very much for your time. Thank.

India India Chin Jin India Jen malaria Berry Swanson jen Chin Mumbai Bombay Sapphire Jen Jim Thome Easton Africa Thomas Europe Tom Ars
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Ever heard of lab grown diamonds if not. We've got you. After thousands of hours perfecting the science lightboxes here to shed some light. Here's how it works lab. Grown diamonds are chemically the same natural ones just made in a lab to make them they use a plasma reactor to heat tiny pieces of lab grown diamonds up to temperatures almost as hot as the Sun John in about two weeks. Those little seeds turned into full carat stones. Light box has perfected the process to consistently create are gorgeous gems. Now here's where it gets. It's really interesting light box lab. Grown diamonds aren't just made the same every time they're also priced the same. Each carrot is eight hundred dollars. Mind blown so there you have it. Get the facts. And see the science behind the sparkle at light box jewelry dot com slash intelligence use code intelligence for twenty five dollars off last night. Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson went head to head in a televised debate on. It with his main rival. Jeremy Corbett. There'll be an election in just over three weeks called by Mr Johnson in an effort to resolve an impasse after he failed to persuade parliament to approve his brexit deal. Mr Corbin's Labor Party pitching itself as an agent of change Labor. We'll put wealth and power in the hands of the many Boris Johnson's conservatives who think that born to rule will only ever look after the privileged few Mister Johnson as promised to to leave the European Union as quickly as possible appealing to British public puts keen to move past the divisive issue of Brexit. If I come back here where they working majority in parliament then I will get parliament working again for you on day. One of the new parliament in December we will start getting our deal through so we can get brexit done. In January analyst countries potential. Neither man is especially popular nick. Mister Johnson's Conservative Party is leading in the polls. That's despite questions over his personal life which were raised again this week when businesswoman Jennifer or curate spoke to I tv about her relationship with him and I don't understand why you've blocked me and ignored me. An investigation is ongoing related to Mister Johnson's relationship with Missouri. When he was mayor of London he's denied wrongdoing? This week is curie alleged. That Mister Johnson had a child who he's kept secret but the debate steered largely clear of Oh choppy waters. British people have had some great TV. Recently I'm not just the Cran Dan but Prince Andrew's extraordinary interview with the BBC. This was not drama in that class. Emma Duncan is on our Britain team and was somewhat less than transfixed. Last night's debates. The format wasn't great. The participants were given such short term. Basically they mostly strung together a few stoke phrases said. Nobody was was on the edge of their seats during this debate. We'll we'll how did it start. How did Each of these candidates sort of set set off their their stole opening statements. Corbin essentially was saying on the vote for change and Johnson essentially was saying Kuban is the vote for continued horrific long-drawn-out uncertainty about brexit. And I am the gate brexit done. Vote suit it was slightly. Where in the sense that Kuban did a very competently learned statement? Straight to camera. Johnson was reading from a piece of the paper and given that he's got a reputation for laziness disorganization. That probably wasn't a great move and the defining issue for this election is inevitably brexit. Do you do you think that either one of the candidates performed better than the other. Yea On that one Johnson clearly performed better He's gone. It's very very very clear. Line which is vote for me and you will get brexit done get brexit damage what he kept saying during the debate somewhat to the audiences irritation Kubin did very badly on that in the sense. That Labor's policy is to renegotiate the deal. It's already been negotiated twice. We will have a referendum will abide by that result and after that to put the resulting deal you back to the country to another referendum and that firstly sand a bit exhausting to a country that is already fit up with this process. Secondly he wouldn't say how he would campaign in that referendum and Corbin is trying to conceal the void in the heart of his brexit policy and refusing to answer the question of which side Johnson pointed head. He's leaving open the possibility that he negotiates deal with the European Union and then campaigns against it which does send faintly ridiculous and there's another referendum issue to which again Johnson successfully prodded him on. which is that? Nobody thinks that Labor's GonNa get an overall majority one way that cool been could get into downing. Street is by doing a deal with the Scottish Nationalist Party. But the price of that deal would be the promise of another referendum referendum on Scottish independence and Kuban refused to rule that I'd say he sounded a bit shifty on both cans. Well Mr Johnson has a very well well known controversial personal life and career and in fact this week there have been stories coming out about a relationship. He had with an American businesswoman When he was mayor of London were any of those details explore during a debate? Not Really I mean it could have been worse for Johnson in the sense that some people were expecting getting a bold question Mr Johnson. How many children do you have because nobody really knows but no specifics were brought up and and there was quite a good moment which did demonstrate what the audience and the nation at large fields about Mitt willingness to trust Mr the Johnson when he said something along the lines of of truth Nashes to me and the audience laughed? And on Mr Corbin's parts. Did he score any sort of direct hits. Yeah he did on the National Health Service but really he had to. I mean attis Labor's home turf. Labor create the National Health Service. The tours I've been in power long enough to have to take responsibility for the strains that it's under at the moment through underfunding. Mr Cogan brought with with him a documents which he waved around we had lots and lots of black lines on it because it's been so redacted which he said was an account British negotiations Sion's with the Americans and there's a particularly sensitive point as far as the NHS and the USA is concerned? The left is is convinced that Britain. If it's run by the Tories will basically Opened the NHS to private American health companies and thus destroy the system. The country say loves so all told. What's what's your view? Did anyone win this debate. Will this debate make a difference to the election action. Do you think well Johnson Johnson. Just one eight. As far as the snap opinion afterwards is concerned it was fifty one forty forty nine to him I would say as of you're yeah he he did he just about one in buying those and he will be pleased with the event because he's on top in the race and he really just had to hold his own Kuban. We'll be disappointed because it could be needed to do something to re regain a foothold really because the numbers are so solidly in the jury's favor commend. Thank you very much for joining us. You're very welcome.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Mr Corbin Johnson Johnson Britain Brexit Kuban Labor London European Union Jeremy Corbett Labor Party Conservative Party Kubin Scottish Nationalist Party BBC Mr Cogan Jennifer
Why Israeli settlements are an obstacle to peace

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Israeli settlements are an obstacle to peace

"Over the past half century. Israel has built hundreds of settlements or Jewish enclaves on the land it captured from Jordan in the Six Day War of nineteen sixty seven seven. This land claimed by Palestinians for their future state which is why settlements are seen by many as an obstacle to peace the president of over four hundred thousand Israeli settlers living in the West Bank basically means that a Palestinian state cannot come into being is our Israel correspondent respondent Mason Jerusalem. Many of those settlements are stuck in between the main Estonian cities and towns so contiguous state cannot exist as long as they're there and their presence also means that it was obvious that so in effect they ensure that the military occupation of the Westbank continues the the announcement came just ahead of a key date in Israel. Today is the deadline for opposition leader. Benny Ganz to build coalition bowling. September's inconclusive election Prime Minister Benjamin. Netanyahu has already failed to form a government. Both candidates praised the trump administration's change in policy but the decision was America at odds with much of the international community. The international consensus regarding the settlements has been there in contravention of the full Geneva Convention. Attention which basically says that transfer or settlement of an occupied territory by the occupying power is against international law. And that's been the interpretation Shen of the Geneva Convention regarding Israeli settlements by most of the leading legal experts. There are some dissenting views of. Israel clings to those dissenting ending views in building the settlements. But that's been the broad consensus for decades now and so in that sense Mike Pompeo's announcement came as something of surprise. Well the competitive management didn't come as a surprise because certain elements within the administration were very pro Israel and pro the settlement lobby chief among them the US ambassador to Israel. Israel David Friedman who before becoming a master was both trump's bankruptcy la and financial backer of the settlements. They have been trying for the past three years to get a clear statement out of the administration saying that American doesn't see the settlements as being illegal and it has to be noted that in the past also the Reagan administration. Distraction made similar statements. So it hasn't always been one hundred percent clear what the American position on this has been. US public statements on settlement activities. In the West Bank have been inconsistent over decades in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight. The Carter Administration categorically concluded that Israel's establishment of civilian settlements was inconsistent with international law. However in Nineteen eighty-one president? Reagan disagreed with that conclusion. And stated that he didn't believe that the settlements were inherently l.. Legal actually most of the American administration's haven't even talked about the legality. They've called the settlements an obstacle to peace instead of diving into this rather controversial legal question so in a sense this kind of puts a finer point on kind of formalizes. Something that from the American standpoint had been kind of informally the case. What has been the case over the past three years? Because the trump administration had been very ambivalent towards the Israeli settlement activity previous administrations had condemned settlements especially the first Bush administration tried to limit funding to Israel while the tantamount building was going on the trump administration and some of its representatives have been much more friendly towards the past two years. The trump administration has made a series of statements and actions regarding the Israel Palestine conflict back in December seventeen nineteen. They announced that they recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital that in a few minutes later move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. A few months ago we had the recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the occupied Golan Heights. And in between these. We've had a number of steps. Was the Palestinians. We had cutting off of aid various Palestinian agencies to the United Nations nations agency which works with Palestinian refugees the closure of the Palestinian mission in Washington. All these things have put out a very clear signal where the trump administration restauration stands in the conflict. And even the timing of this announcement just a couple of days before the deadline for Bennigan's to form a government. Do you think it's connected to the current political the turmoil in Israel not directly connected to the current political situation for two reasons festival. It hasn't been times as some of the previous gestures were to help Out On the eve of an election other convenient junctures it doesn't seem to have been closely coordinating with Israeli government. That seems to have been something. which was it was very much an internal decision of administration? And do you think it's significant that it was Mr Pompeo who made the announcement. Well that's probably more about American politics in parents trying to show that he's not trump in many ways and loyal to some of trump's closest advisers. I think pump is also looking beyond the horizon of the trump trump administration and shoring up his own political bias. Perhaps his own run for the White House and this is a popular move among voters who he would also be relying upon one day if he runs for the candidacy and for the White House himself and now that Mr Pompeo has made this policy reversal. What do you think the immediate impact will be the speaking? Both Israeli officials Palestinians. No one's expecting an immediate impact even though they've been promises by Netanya before the last two election campaigns of going even further annexing parts of the West Bank. All those plans on hold because it doesn't a political deadlock there's no coalition in Israel. We have Netanyahu position bet against both failing instigate a majority Israel has been building settlements or the past fifty years regardless of what the administration positions being and on the Palestinian side. They've lost lost hope in anything. Good for them coming out. The trump administration long ago so for that. This wasn't a surprise. And they're facing their daily challenges whatever someone is saying in Washington it material to them but what about the prospects for grander scale change for the notion of annexation or in the other direction a meaningful peace process so the impact is perhaps lung It won't change anything the next few weeks and months. But when finally new government is formed in Israel. If it's a right wing government then the impetus to go ahead and AMEX parts. What's the West Bank will increase? Because now they seem to have a green light from the administration and even if the new government will be more central government under Benny Gansel some other interests lita. Yep It'll be much more difficult for them to justify so these ready public making any kind of changes on the ground baptists manning so because people will say them but the Americans okay so why make any of these changes if the settlements especially the ones which are deep within the West Bank or allowed to continue to grow that means the majority patient won't end either and any prospect of Palestinian statehood will be non-existent loop Israel basically in charge of one st with millions of Palestinians without optical rights and that's not the democratic say that Israel claims and takes pride in being so it's a situation which really is ready to have a solution Lucien right now and if anything compare announcement has made a solution for that even more remote

Israel West Bank Israel David Friedman Donald Trump Reagan Administration American Administration Mike Pompeo Carter Administration President Trump United States Washington Netanyahu Benny Ganz Prime Minister Mason Jerusalem Amex
Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

Bon Appetit Foodcast

14:30 min | 1 year ago

Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

"Yasmin I'm so excited to be talking to you today thank you for being here thank you for having me I love your book Zitouni we had it as part of our book club a few months ago and I read what about it then and I wrote about that and I'm still raving about it I find it just to be Such a great mix of cookbook that also tells a lot of really incredible story okay so I wanted to talk to you first about your own story you have a little bit of a unconventional background for food writer and I'd love to he's here a little bit about how you found your way to food from was it a law degree that you have to begin with yeah I mean it's about as dry as you can get saying they're studying you know treaties and laws it's about as far away as you can get from like the creative intensity of of a kitchen but I think that in a way my you know connection to the food world just started from such a young age because my family grandparents were farmers and think anyone who's grown up around fresh produce it just installs in you from such a young age real reverend of I mean definitely vegetables and you know when we were you know my my family would grow rice but then also all kinds of plants they eh clients and peppers and tomatoes and cucumbers and so you know cooking a meal you know would would very much be about going off getting eggs and getting beans and getting vegetables I'm getting rice all from the land we had chickens and we had cows soya milk cow like when I was like four years old so I think that's what is my love food but it wasn't until I was older when I was around thirty that I decided to make the the the real shift I was working for a British charity in London I'd been working for nonprofits throughout my twenties for different kinds of human rights campaign groups and you know often happens for people working on this quite intense subjects I mean I was working on stuff light deaths following contact with the police or Israel Palestine or the you know the continuing occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan so I mean you know pretty heavy stuff I just ended up having like a classic burn out like I just yeah you're still pretty young at that time rate thirty yeah that's pretty young really young but enough time to start a new career yeah absolutely and go diagnosed with chronic fatigue which kind of basically leaves you with very little energy to do anything but I could cook and it was during that purser healing from the illness and recovering the I. Refound my love of food and as part of my time off for my job going to Iran to spend some time with my grandmother my grandfather recently passed away and and while I was there I set myself this task of asking different family member is what their favorite recipes were and if they would show them to me and while we were cooking together I just stick my iphone down and record what we were saying and and I did the opportunity when we were in the kitchen you know chopping onions or you know at an making dumplings I do not opportunity to ask them about their lives in the history and and probably the kind of conversations you'd be wanting to have even if there weren't a recorder exactly yeah when I came back to the UK after that time I suddenly realized I sitting on a treasure trove of recipes and stories that would really enable you know someone in the asked you know someone like my friends just to kind of get a glimpse of what life in Iran was like and Iran is a place with just like the most incredible Zine which I'm so thrilled in the last is you know he's been getting lots more attention but you know when the Saffron Tales came out you know which is only three years ago that you know it didn't you know it was part of that that trend I think the Saffron Tales your first book you wrote out of those stories and recipes from your time in Iran exactly and that was definitely like part memoir very much about your own lived experience and then you your second books they tune which which we're talking today is kind of much different in a way because it's not the experience that you grew up with but it's a little bit more of an anthropological look got a region So how is it different to be working on that book after your first one yeah it was it was both weedy different and really similar I mean in a thread that's run through all of my work over the last eighteen years has been a real love of storytelling and a real understanding that stories is how oh not only we better understand the world around us but we also better understand ourselves and when I was working for Human Rights Charity israel-palestine was my brief signed so I was really familiar with the place but also the food you know I was really lucky in London like I live incredibly close to the author Langi Cafe so like you know twelve hundred eighteen years ago I remember I e in kind of food and being like wow it's so similar to Persian food but then it's got so many differences and you know food from that region was already part of my culinary repertoire so when I was thinking about what book to write next you know what motivated me really clearly to write the saffron tales was deep desired to not only celebrate the incredible culture and Food Iran but also to challenge stereotypes of how people normally perceive Iran and I think the Palestinian kitchen another place where I felt I could use food to really share stories of a place I think too often when we see depictions of places is like Palestinian communities either through very narrow political prison or it's because something really bad happened and you know of course there are huge challenges is in that region but there's also a lot of beauty of joy and a lot of great food and so you had been going to that region for work previously so that was your first exposure to it and to the cuisine there yeah so I I went in two thousand nine which is about ten years ago and I really remember it clearly because it was July so it was really hot and we was dipping in our meetings with projects that we were going to whether it was visiting olive farming communities or kind of joint and Israeli Palestinian in community initiatives and it was quite heavy stuff because it's you know region which is just yeah fraught with human rights abuse But the reason I remember it was July hi it's because I really remember in times off kind of walking through the markets and just it being packed with all this color the color and abundance of of summer whether there's that was like giant watermelons sweet Jami figs incredible like berries as I mean it was you know the the produce fell so alive and as I often say like in a region that feels like it's dying that just felt so important and you Talk a little bit about how this book is laid out because I think it's really I think it's really interesting and I learned a lot just by reading about the different regions within this region I and n how vastly different styles of food are in a in a area the size of Delaware so small yeah so talk about how you decided to put the together and how you decided to highlight these different cuisines yeah so I really see this book as a travelogue I wanna take my read on real culinary adventure through listen in kitchens so I divided the book into different chapters kind of starting kind of in the north of Israel actor I and Haifa which of these incredible seaside towns the food like how how do you describe the food there yeah so the food that and actually the food of that region the North region which is the Galilee is perhaps the most traditional Levin teen type foods so you know the the things you might think of along it's on the coast they have lots of fresh seafood perhaps likes him seabream that smothered in a gorgeous like garlic Tahini saw a recipe for that in this book there is and then just so many stuffed vegetables like stuffed bell peppers stuff eggplants Zucchini stuffed with what kinds of thing yeah stuffed cows it's I mean just like I feel like if Palestinians can stop something like they will and what are they stuffing yeah well a real variety of stuff so it can be with Rice on minced Tom Flavored with maybe nutmeg cinema and kind of a warming sweet spices sometimes it can be you know plant based with kind of chick peas and rice and and sometimes it can just be kind of rice and herbs and I think one of the things that really struck me when I was doing the research for this book is just how plant based the food is from from the both it'd be really common just to have a whole Vegan meal but without any like purposefulness about it was just an abundance of vegetables and I love the the book do divide out a whole section on the Vegan and also dairy free and gluten free menus because it does seem like it this zine just naturally lend itself to diets are particularly kind of trendy here right now I know it's funny isn't it I wonder if you know that helped to some of the trend but I think all Middle Eastern diets of very I mean the Mediterranean diet is said to be one of the best for health in the world right and I really wanted to make the book very practical because I'm a home cook you know I want people to the is this isn't a recipe book which has got you know dishes in it I mean there are few like standout dishes but it's mainly stuff that I just want people to to get home from work and unlike quickly pulled together and part of that referencing was about that because so many people I know dairy free or plant based on you know perhaps just I wanna have that choice yeah so tell me about the other regions Gallery New Orleans the Galilee and then we've got the food of the West Bank which you know if the Galilee was really green you know the the West Bank is is not it is dry it's you know it's it's you know it's huge water supply issues in the region the food there reflect that so it's a lot more grilled meats a lot more bread based as opposed to rice so we're kind of thinking about dishes such as massakin which is this gorgeous kind of marinated chicken dish that's-that's made with with all spice and Su Mac and then roasted and and the big huge flat breads and the meat juices of pulled over into the bread and then you tear apart it with your hand so interactive eating yeah or Mansa which is this kind of really Halsey lamb stew made with Jimmy which is a bit of it's kind of a strange ingredient it's it's a kind of amended way Lexus is Kinda funky the milk product yeah but fermented or dried so it's a common ingredient throughout the Middle East so you know we're talking heartier dishes and Maumee Bay and then the food from Gaza is completely different as well so Gaza is a tiny strip of land and it's on the coast the Mediterranean Sea and there the focus is on lots of like see food but also lots of the flavor palate is different so the whole eternity of Gaza and cuisine is garlic and Green Chili and dill you or beef stew that you would add these flavorings into so again just really unusual so within such a small bit of like land there were three distinct culinary identities all right we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor this week's episode of the bottom teeth food cast is brought to you by targets would gather when it comes to feeding families gooding gather believes that real life and eating well should go hand in hand that good food and good people are more important then when where and how we eat that's why they created good and gather favorite flavors in selected staples made for real life in many ways we gather made with high quality ingredients and carefully crafted recipes to create better tasting food that you can be confident is a good choice for you in your family that's good engaged her new and only at target so you spend a lot of time like just talking to people while you're there I mean it sounds like from reading the book you're constantly introducing the reader to new families to people who you cooked with and telling their stories so what was the is that might be through social media I'll call out for friends of friends does anyone know anyone in an area and luckily the way the world works now you can meet people that way other times you'd be at someone's House and then they'd be like Oh well you've got to try the bakery in this town like my aunt sisters cousin runs an incredible drier and she was like just this really likes spirited young Palestinian woman you know she had right head like pomegranate tattoos like a real kind of cool artists and she was such a big Foodie so we would just drive around in her car with the windows bled down listening to music and just like visiting friends there's all visiting people I've met through social media or people

Yasmin Zitouni Milk Twelve Hundred Eighteen Years Eighteen Years Three Years Four Years Ten Years
Second Israeli Election Shows No Clear Winner

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Second Israeli Election Shows No Clear Winner

"Results for the country's country's second election in six months which took place yesterday so far show no signs of a clear winner current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yeah who off the Lakers policians rival Ben Against of the century St- blue and white opposition party look to be neck and neck according to polls yesterday day Daniel Appellate join us to tell us where all this might be going. She's back today to continue to try and help us work. That's out one facing seems clear. It'll be going slowly so Daniele. What's the latest well the latest is that the the way the votes of lander is not that dissimilar to what happened in April once again? It seems that Abdul Lieberman will once again be the kingmaker in April he refuse to sit in government unless the ultra Orthodox were forced to serve in the army this perennial one of the perennial themes of Israeli politics takes and it looks like I think he has nine seats right now. It looks like he will be in a similar position. Logically you might look at the the way the numbers rack up because of cushion Israel doesn't matter who wins who becomes the largest party at Hugh can form a coalition you would think that Likud and the blue white posse could it's with another couple of centuries. Even Center left Parties Form Coalition. That seems very unlikely. I don't see Netanyahu agreeing to serve in a government l. From last he's prime minister similar leap any counts once the the top job but just how the numbers will work. How is really anybody's guess housing -nificant is this election results for the Middle East more widely what you think so well I guess it depends and how it turns out? I mean at the moment we have a stalemate clearly. If the coalition building process were to be a bit more radical and involve the Arab Israeli parties in the joint list it might look very different but there seems to be very little chance chance of that so one assumes that the coalition building process will be more or less business as usual we have a very similar story in Spain of course and it seems we get into this endless cycle of elections that are unable to break the empath Daniela. What does Benjamin Netanyahu's position look no? Let's remember that he called a snap election in April because he failed to form a coalition. What do you think he's thinking now? He's gamble did not pay off and various various tactics used to try and ensure that he would get a larger part of the vote for instances usual warnings about Arabs turning out now and the falsifying elections actually leads much higher our turnout in these elections rather desperate measures by saying that he was going to declare sovereignty over the settlements in the settlement blocks that in particular eight were either and his his colleagues in in Likud. I'm sure now a scenting weakness and thinking. How can we get rid of him? I'm actually play a part in in the next government but I think it raises a very good point which I think says quite low about the state of Israeli Moxie the moment we have the third largest party in the Knesset the the joint list the party or coalition which represents the political interest of a full twenty percent of the population and it's absolutely I quote absurd for Israeli politicians to think of forming a coalition elation ahead of the elections. Everyone ruled out. We've seen as loveable so that really says something about where we are in terms of representative democracy and the other thing that we can notice how where Israeli democracy has gone for the last ten fifteen years ten fifteen years ago I've seen and and what he described as far right his politics were seen as slightly outside the consensus and really extreme now is the centrist of the center on again the the guy who's going to be making the decisions and the election so the results will be will be clear hopefully later today. What what do you think about this final question for for you? Are we going to see another election anytime soon. Well it's very likely the next one what they won't be for before January or February and the joke going around. I'll say issue is really social. Media is that you know you get the day off the election in Israel and it's not gonna be beach weather. I think people are upset about that. Can I just add one thing I mean the shadow of US politics hangs very heavy over Israeli politics and clearly as long as donald trump is in the White House it's very difficult to see a big change there but of course there is an election in the US in just over a year towing worthy Democrats to win it with the progressive candidate. I think is really politics might start to look quite different degree Daniela well. I mean I think we we we look at Israel Palestine in exactly those terms from the occupation Palestinian dependence the problem is the incentive is internal Israeli politics. It really doesn't feature anymore. The majority of Israelis from right to left center Zantac think the occupation as a necessary eat rosary evil perhaps can be made a little bit better but do not see a solution with the sovereign in Palestine as the angle well. Let's continue now to the

Benjamin Netanyahu Likud Daniela Parties Form Coalition Prime Minister Benjamin Netany United States Israel Palestine Israel Daniele Lakers Prime Minister Palestine Middle East Abdul Lieberman Ben Against Knesset Daniel Appellate Spain Donald Trump
Israel supporters speak out against tactics with Palestinians

World View

01:57 min | 3 years ago

Israel supporters speak out against tactics with Palestinians

"It's the real news i'm ben norton as the israeli military continues to mow down unarmed protesters in the illegally occupied gaza strip on a weekly basis some of israel's most high profile supporters have begun to speak out against it's brutal oppression of the palestinians early this april one of hollywood's biggest actresses natalie portman ignited a firestorm when she announced that she would not be attending a major awards ceremony in israel in protest of its violence in gaza in response the genesis prize foundation which oversees what has been described as the jewish nobel prize canceled its price ceremony in israel natalie portman has been a longtime vocal supporter of israel she was born in jerusalem and has dual u s and israeli citizenship but now even some of the most prominent liberal zionists that is liberal supporters of the political movement and the israeli ethno state even they are publicly criticizing israel's extreme rightwing government since march thirtieth palestinians living in the illegal israeli besieged gaza strip have held weekly peaceful demonstrations as part of what they called the great march of return these really military has responded by massacring on armed protesters at least forty palestinians have been killed including journalists and young teenagers more than five thousand gazans have been injured israeli soldiers have shot thousands of unarmed palestinians with live ammunition joining us to discuss the growing divide between what liberals zionists say about israel and what's actually happening on the ground is alibaba nima alibaba is the director of the electric intifada he is also the author of several books about israel palestine thanks for joining us thank you ben so what do you think about this.

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