27 Burst results for "Israel Palestine"

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

02:00 min | 3 weeks ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"The idea that a two state resolution to the israel palestine conflict is no longer possible is not really a new one. It has been after all a quarter century. Since the oslo agreements and pessimism seems to rain but lustick offers too powerful but potentially controversial ideas about the failure of the two state solution. I he places the blame directly on israel's settlement project and its territorial maximalism which has its roots in the history of the entire twentieth century conflict. For instance he points to zev. Jabotinsky is notion of the iron wall. The idea that would only negotiate with jews after they had been defeated which has had the paradoxical outcome that the repeated israeli victories over the decades have emboldened the israeli leadership so they have been less likely to come to the negotiating table. He also emphasizes the collective memory of the holocaust as a profound factor in israeli society. And the pro israel lobby in the us both of which emboldened israel's hawkish parties and make the israelis less likely to negotiate a two state solution. And secondly lustick who once was a proponent of the two state solution now says that it's a distraction from reality. He argues that there is and has long been just one st between the jordan river and the mediterranean sea the pursuit of a two state solution. He posits is an unrealizable dream when the real need is to push for rights and citizenship for all people living in this territory which is effectively one. St

two state Jabotinsky jordan river twentieth century thomas one st mediterranean sea two state solution lustick israeli both zev israel one oslo once israelis palestine conflict jews quarter century
Is a Two State Solution Possible in Israel/Palestine?

Jewish History Matters

02:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Is a Two State Solution Possible in Israel/Palestine?

"The idea that a two state resolution to the israel palestine conflict is no longer possible is not really a new one. It has been after all a quarter century. Since the oslo agreements and pessimism seems to rain but lustick offers too powerful but potentially controversial ideas about the failure of the two state solution. I he places the blame directly on israel's settlement project and its territorial maximalism which has its roots in the history of the entire twentieth century conflict. For instance he points to zev. Jabotinsky is notion of the iron wall. The idea that would only negotiate with jews after they had been defeated which has had the paradoxical outcome that the repeated israeli victories over the decades have emboldened the israeli leadership so they have been less likely to come to the negotiating table. He also emphasizes the collective memory of the holocaust as a profound factor in israeli society. And the pro israel lobby in the us both of which emboldened israel's hawkish parties and make the israelis less likely to negotiate a two state solution. And secondly lustick who once was a proponent of the two state solution now says that it's a distraction from reality. He argues that there is and has long been just one st between the jordan river and the mediterranean sea the pursuit of a two state solution. He posits is an unrealizable dream when the real need is to push for rights and citizenship for all people living in this territory which is effectively one. St

Lustick Israel Jabotinsky Palestine Oslo ZEV Jordan River Mediterranean Sea United States
"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | Last month

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

Palu robbins Palestine jason today palestine israel jewish both harani palestinian sophia d'amato pulu robbins bard college twenty twenty palestinians albert
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | Last month

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

03:44 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"So my own provisioning in this in this sense is that they will certainly provide evidence of the palestinians. I have no doubt about this. I'm in. I could imagine that they would provide evidence in this matter. And perhaps they. We tried to block the procedure Through complementarity ya'll chantal sharon and other people. I've been speaking to all had so much more to say i mean. There is an enormous depth of research. Been done in. This area are loads of people concerned. We know that there's a lot to discuss on how expectations again to be managed for example. What the practical difficulties around the investigations. But we thought we also just discussed some of the more mundane stuff. Let's just stop. What about the timing of this decision. What did you think steph. Well in a way it was surprise to me because first of all the court broke what journalists here called the friday night curse where every kind of major decision of the court seems to come on fridays after six pm so we were all very happy that this came through on a regular Wednesday on the other hand. I had kind of You know when you work for big news agency you always have these kind of lert up that if you have to send super speed reports you kind of always have them on top of your computering case. This decision comes out. And i had taken the been. Souda opens an investigation into palestine. Alert off the computer. Because i thought that she would possibly wait for the new prosecutor kareem. Khan whose due to come in june sixteenth and maybe they wouldn't announce anything new before he could look at it and say yes. Go ahead or no and the other thing we should mention. In ben sued statement is that it was actually full of caveats full of warnings reminders. That not much might actually happen. Maybe until cream kong comes in because basically. She says she's got no resources. There might also be a load of other things. that might need to be litigated. I mean all we've got so far. Is this agreement that for the purposes of the investigation palestine can be regarded as an area that the office of the prosecutor can can work work on so a lot of ways even though she's opened the investigation. She's essentially just said okay. It's now going to be over to you. Kareem khan placing him in the hotseat. Yeah before Con was elected. There was a kind of whisper campaign that maybe he would be more reluctant to go against major powers such as the us Which is very opposed to this israel investigation. So we'll have to see how that plays out but in any case you know any of those four investigation usually take years before cases actually end up in court and we don't expect anything to happen really quickly with this. So good luck to kareem khan because the workload he faces is going to be enormous. As ben souda keeps on launching new probes will definitely get have quite a lot of work for us as well as reporters. Yeah which is good because my cats have just started eating only expensive dry food for quote unquote exigent cats. So i need the work to fund my cats new dietary habits. Okay investigations four. Stephanie's cat may thanks very much and we'll come back to palestine again. Sure in the future. This will be a case that will go on for many years. So there'll be lots and lots more justice updates.

Kareem khan kareem kareem khan Stephanie ben souda june sixteenth Wednesday Khan friday night fridays after six pm palestine chantal sharon four investigation kong israel Souda steph first palestinians four
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Formerly the government is not going to cooperate. And i think that's even being said by government it's shows even if they hadn't it's unclear because any formal cooperation is in some sort of implicit acceptance of legitimacy of the of the process of things decision and this is something that the government of israel commodity or to do. That does not mean that it might not conveyed messages through third parties of talk extensively americans that were submitted with To requests under article ninety three the question of their state of palestine. What is some of these americans story. I probably prompted by the government without detracting. From from the authority. Responsibility of those submitted directly whether israel will impose sanctions on the icy sea as the us. Osama i don't know Does not have the power that the the us does. Not much of the us has the power that the us plans to have but of But it does raise interesting questions if we do not know if the state is not call rates with regard to its own Potential indictee would cooperating providing information about palestinian. And i think here the use of third parties would would probably be simplest so so i don't expect to see any direct involvement by the government. So sometimes you very open cooperation and sometimes we have you have unofficial cooperation okay. So when we saw the un factfinding mission. So it's not the acc but it's the goldstone mission of two thousand and nine or the professor schabas one of two thousand and fourteen. So officially israel was not cooperating. The the the the committee was not allowed to come in. But unofficially they were cooperating. So my own provisioning in this in this sense is that they will certainly provide evidence of the palestinians. I have no doubt about this. I'm mean i could imagine that they would provide evidence in this matter. And perhaps they. We tried to block the procedure Through a complimentary y'all chantal sharon and other people. I've been speaking to all had so much more to say i mean. There is an enormous depth of research. Been done in. This area are loads of people concerned. We know that there's a lot to discuss on how expectations again to be managed for example. What the practical difficulties around the investigations. But we thought we also just discussed some of the more mundane stuff. Let's just stop. What about the timing of this decision. What did you think steph. Well in a way it was surprise to me because first of all the court broke what journalists here called the friday night curse where every kind of major decision of the court seems to come on fridays after six pm so we were all very happy that this came through on a regular Wednesday on the other hand. I had kind of You know when you work for big news agency you always have these kind of lert up that if you have to send super speed reports you kind of always have them on top of your computering case. This decision comes out. And i had taken the been. Souda opens an investigation into palestine. Alert off the computer. Because i thought that she would possibly wait for the new prosecutor kareem. Khan whose due to come in june sixteenth and maybe they wouldn't announce anything new before he could look at it and say yes..

kareem one june sixteenth Wednesday palestine Osama friday night Khan steph two thousand chantal sharon article ninety three fridays after six pm fourteen palestinian third Souda two thousand and americans schabas
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

03:16 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Grab as the one we were the victim of like atrocities of the nazis Those are the kind of the crime the icc should prosecute and of course it's not as so he's always this approach that we are the victim and therefore we can not the perpetrator and then if we tried to see israel as a traitor. Then it go back to being not semitism to go back the victim framing so this is another kind of argument which is very strong because the ministry of for enough on its facebook. I dunno. I receive it in france so i saw it in french. And you can really see the image of auschwitz. You know of The the nazi camps. And then you have those statements so it's an emotionally they use picture and you know they use. It's a very strong. They of course they will not show picture of palestinians behind by they use This picture of auschwitz for on positioning and what's interesting in. What sharon says is that these different attacks actually showed that israel is still somehow in the game. it hasn't completely decided to destroy the court head on so we asked both yell. And and sharon is there a chance that the israeli authorities will actually start cooperating with the court well. I think it's clear that formerly the government is not going to cooperate. And i think that's even being said by government. It's even if they hadn't it's unclear because any formal cooperation is in some sort of implicit acceptance of legitimacy of the of the process of things decision and this is something that the government of israel commodity or to do that does not mean that it might not conveyed messages through third parties of talk extensively americans that were submitted with To requests under article ninety three the question of their state of palestine. What is stemming tori. Some of these americans story. I probably prompted by the government without detracting. From from the authority. Responsibility of those submitted directly whether israel will impose sanctions on the icy sea as the us. Osama i don't know Does not have the power that the the us does. Not much of the us has the power that the us plans to have but of But it does raise interesting questions if we do not know if the state is not call rates with regard to its own Potential indictee would cooperating providing information about palestinian. And i think here the use of third parties would would probably be simplest so so i don't expect to see any direct involvement by the government. So sometimes you very open cooperation and sometimes we have you have unofficial coporation okay so when we saw the un factfinding mission. So it's not the acc the goldstone funding mission of two thousand and nine or the professor schabas. One of two thousand and fourteen so officially israel was not cooperating. The the the the committee was not allowed to come in. But unofficially they were cooperating..

One france sharon Osama palestine facebook both two thousand israeli two thousand and palestinian french nazi fourteen nazis third parties article ninety three israel tori third
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

04:02 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Anderson and stephanie number. All rise high steph tenet super happy that chantal maloney. She represents palestinians from gaza as victims in a situation at the international criminal court. And she's really happy because the prosecutor fatou ben souda has finally launched an investigation into war crimes in the palestinian territories might sorn what i understand working closely with palestinian lawyers. You rights lawyer at us for them. It's a huge achievement. Already the fact to that finally the An open formerly open investigatin for the first time in history the court an international tribuna which has asserted its jurisdiction on alleged criminal responsibilities of israeli citizens. Of course also we. We are very aware that are also alleged criminal responsibility of palestinians butts seeing these from the perspective of those who triggered the these investigation. Who are the palestinians of course another israeli or radi the opening the formal opening of the investigation twelve years after the first attempt to to do so. It's huge as she says it is a big moment. Let's just rewind to see how we got here. There's been a lot of to and fro about whether palestine is a state. they. I asked the court to intervene way back in two thousand nine and after palestine where she given a proper status at the united nations they became members of the icc in two thousand fifteen and asked the court to look back at what had been happening. Since two thousand fourteen the prosecutor had had a preliminary examination and had closed it because of the statehood issue and then with this new request it was relaunched and and last month judges finally decided that the court does have jurisdiction. They said they could not decide on statehood but that palestine had followed the normal accession procedure to the court and as such they could refer cases to the court giving the court territorial jurisdiction in the case now this is obviously grossly oversimplified but to put it in very general terms. This is the decision of the touches. So what's the potential investigation actually into. I shouldn't tell mention. There's a lot to this. There are many layers. Been to has already said that she believes war. Crimes have been are being committed in the west bank and the gaza strip by both israeli defense forces and armed palestinian groups such as moss also more. Broadly she's looking at crimes. By senior israelis for allowing settlers to live in the occupied area of the west bank and that was all in preliminary examination documents last year and thinks that she failed to the court in one of chantal submissions to the court together with raji surani of the palestinian center for human rights in gaza. She describes the conflict as one of the most well documented situations of widespread and systematic commission of war crimes and crimes against humanity in the world and in her statement launching. The investigation been souder really wanted to stress. Her principal nonpartisan approach referring to palestine and israeli victims. Three times in the statement so trying really really hard to be balanced. Y'all ronan is professor of law at the academic center for science and law at hot hasher ron and research fellow at the minerva for human rights at the hebrew university in jerusalem. And that tone in the statement towards israelis who aren't members of the court really struck. I think it was very different from previous statements and documents that we've received from from the prosecutor. I think it was quite conciliatory gerate..

fatou ben souda raji surani Anderson jerusalem last year both minerva for human rights Three times two thousand last month stephanie first time israeli hebrew university palestinian souder gaza palestinian center for human r icc hot hasher ron
"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

02:36 min | 2 months ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Update with janet anderson. Any number all rise high steph tenet happy that chantal maloney represents palestinians from gaza as victims in a situation at the international criminal court. And she's really happy because the prosecutor fatou ben souda has finally launched an investigation into war crimes in the palestinian territories is really my sorn. What i understand working closely with palestinian lawyers. You rights lawyers at us for them. It's a huge achievement. Already the fact to that finally the An open formerly open investigatin for the first time in history the court an international tribuna which has asserted its jurisdiction on alleged criminal responsibilities of israeli citizens. Of course also we. We are very aware that are also alleged criminal responsibility of palestinians but seeing these from the perspective of those who triggered the these investigation. Who are the palestinians of course another israeli or radi the opening the formal opening of the investigation twelve years after the first attempt to to do so. It's huge as she says it is a big moment. Let's just rewind to see how we got here. There's been a lot of to and fro about whether palestine is a state. they. I asked the court to intervene way back in two thousand nine and after palestine where she given a proper status at the united nations they became members of the icc in two thousand fifteen and asked the court to look back at what had been happening. Since two thousand fourteen the prosecutor had had a preliminary examination and had closed it because of the statehood issue and then with this new request it was relaunched and and last month judges finally decided that the court does have jurisdiction. They said they could not decide on statehood but that palestine had followed the normal accession procedure to the court and as such they could refer cases to the court giving the court territorial jurisdiction in the case now this is obviously grossly oversimplified but to put it in very general terms. This is the decision of the touches. So what's the potential investigation actually into. I shouldn't tell mention. There's a lot to this..

janet anderson fatou ben souda last month chantal maloney israeli first time icc first attempt two thousand fifteen palestinian two thousand fourteen twelve years two thousand nine palestine united palestinians
Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

"Of relations with the Palestinians. More that from AP correspondent Mike Grassi provided administration is restoring relations with the Palestinians and renewing aid to Palestinian refugees. The moves reverse Trump administration Policy and signal the new administration support for a two state solution to the decades old conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians. Acting U. S. Ambassador Richard Mills made the announcement to a high level virtual meeting of the United Nations Security Council. The Trump administration was heavily pro Israel recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, moving the U. S Embassy from Tel Aviv and closing the Palestinian liberation Organizations. Washington office in September. 2018 might cross

Trump Administration Mike Grassi Acting U. S. Ambassador Richar AP United Nations Security Counci U. S Embassy Israel Palestinian Liberation Organiz Jerusalem Tel Aviv Washington
Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

Fareed Zakaria GPS

03:32 min | 8 months ago

Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

"Friday president trump announced that Bahrain would recognize Israel and the two nations would normalize relations. This comes just weeks after a similar move from the United, Arab Emirates what to make of it. All I'm joined again by Zanny Minton beddoes and we slaughter and Ian Bremmer in put this in context for us what does this mean? Why did it happen? What does it mean? Well two big things that people need to come to terms with the first. Is that Israel Palestine is considered close to the most important conflict in the region. It is for the Palestinians when you talk to the Maradas with the Saudis, the Bahrainis, the Kuwaitis you'll talk to you about their concerns about Iran they'll talk to you about diversification away from fossil fuels and the difficulties that they'll talk to you about domestic radicalism, all of these sorts of things. And so as a consequence, you no longer have a veto on if you don't get peace with Israel Palestine, you can't move on geopolitics. The second point is the united. States had long attempted to be seen as some kind of honest broker between Israel and Palestine when we're anything but Israel's our best ally in the region, the Palestinians particularly agree with we have problems with and so you know it's interesting trump's first trip as president outside the United States was to Saudi Arabia and then to Israel and those are the two places where he has the best personal relations and that's where they really drove. So yeah, you had the effort to. Talk about peace with Israel and Palestine where the Palestinians weren't even engage a big conference in. Bahrain. Now, you've got big announcements in relation. I think especially from you and I talking to jared through this that was kind of the game all along I I'm not in any way surprised by this. And we. A friend of mine WHO's from the Middle East very knowledgeable about the says what's really going on here this is this is the post American Middle East that is countries like. Israel UA Bahrain Saudi Arabia saying we're GONNA make our own alliances to defend ourselves against the the real threat that we feel as he was saying, which is Iran and we know the Americans aren't going going to help us. So we need we need to band together. Is that part of the dynamic. Afraid, I think that is right that again Obama wanted out of the Middle East. If you if you think about the direct line from his refusal to engage in Syria. And that's actually an area where he his policies and trump's have been closer than than other areas. But I also think you have to think about this in the context of us. Domestic Politics Donald Trump. Has Two modes he can be the fearmongering president or he can be the dealmaking president who delivers and if we're thinking about October surprises up for this election, what he would dearly love is to actually have a treaty or agreement between Israel and Saudi Arabia, which really would redraw the map of the Middle East and the conventional wisdom is the Saudis aren't ready but obviously, the UAE in Bahrain are stalking horses and and Bahrain would not have been able to do this without Saudi approval. So it's probably a low chance, but there is a real chance at least of a framework agreement in which Saudi Arabian Israel would would normalize relations in return for something more something bigger on the Palestinian sought.

Israel Israel Palestine Bahrain President Trump Saudi Arabian Israel Saudi Arabia Middle East Donald Trump Arab Emirates Iran Ian Bremmer Zanny Minton Syria United States Jared Stalking
"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Had a masters and I was trying to figure grab nextstep semi professional path in a friend of mine convinced me that scholarship matters if you're doing contemporary stop. Now I'm not getting into the validity of that but I do think for me. I can only do scholarship. That's related to what's going on right now that's just how design the teller oriented towards these things and the Israeli Palestinian conflict is not some yes it is taking place on the other side of the world and yes. The most people don't spend years living living over there. Endorse studying the conflict as I have in as mere has by there real people who are in this conflict end. This conflict is one of the most polarizing conflicts on American campuses. And why that is is a whole other probably podcast but it matters not just in Israel zero Palestine for the people who are living. This conflict matters for people who exist on college campuses because it's tied into their identities. It's tied into their their feelings of their safety on their campus. It's tied into so many pieces and part of the intersection out of this whole entity of Israel and Palestine. It is really like a spiderweb in it's connected to so many different things going on so given that and given that the Israeli president concert what is being taught on campuses are book is an attempt to add. Voices two classrooms that perhaps word present prior not particularly that because we want students necessarily think. ABC Or D.. But because we want them to think about ABC indeed and how does that relate to their understanding of Israel Palestine in there now does that relate to their understanding of the United States or Canada or wherever else. Because that's the world we live even today where these things are connected to another even if they're literally or metaphorically on the other side of the plan I feel like the through line throughout this whole conversation has been about helping to engender thoughtful discussion on the university campus by creating a text that students can read. The professors can use when when teaching when thinking about these issues because social justice in Israel Palestine are thing that is already taking place on the college campus. I think we can have kind of sanity. Check here and say say to what extent do discussions on college campuses matter. I know from personal experience in going back for for years and years and years people are always talking talking about what people are saying on college. Campuses like this is the end of the world or they're always talking about what people are talking about college campuses like this is the most important thing in the entire universe and it's easy I think for us as does professors who have sequestered ourselves to the college campus for years and decades to say okay. Yes what is happening. Here is the most important. This is our lives right but in the grand scheme of things competitions which are taking place all over the place and not just at the university campus level. So we're talking about all of this and the discussion about Israel and Palestine nine. Why do you think that the debates that take place at the university level here talking just about the professors and discussions but the overarching discussions and debates? You know when the Student Union is pushing forward on proposing to have obedience resolution or anything else. Why do we think that the university campuses debates about Israel and Palestine and social justice matter particularly as opposed to other places where this debate taking place debates on university? Campuses are really only one element of where these debates h show up in. Our book is equally applicable to trade union debate or Canada's recent about face in voting in the UN or mark trump's decision to move the US embassy to Jerusalem so there are debates taking place in a quarter of power there debates taking place triples. Workplaces added their debates taking place plays on campuses and there are debates taking place on the streets of Israel in the streets of Palestine so this book is a way of capturing the debates that are taking place in real about real people's lives back say that United States in Canada have disproportionate influence on the rest of the planet especially in terms of monetary unitary influenced the United States has a ridiculously disproportionate influence. So I think for pound if one wants to changed the world for the better vis-a-vis education I think one can have more influence on the world if they're working on a campus in a country that has disproportionate power great. Thank you guys so much for this really interesting conversation. Thank you Jason. Thank you for -tunities. Thanks for listening to this episode. If you like it. I hope you'll subscribe to the podcast which you can find on apple podcasts. Google play spotify. I or wherever else you listen until next time I'm Jason. Let's dig and thanks for listening to Jewish history matters..

Israel Israel Palestine Palestine United States Canada Jason ABC Student Union apple president Google UN spotify mark trump Jerusalem
"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

12:26 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Because these are the terms that students as you're hearing in the streets in the student union building just usually go to metaphor for the way that israel-palestine optimism plays out outside the So part of what we're we're trying to do is enable students to bring back the sloganeering and slogans on protest signs and import back into the classroom using scholarly lands to really investigate. What's going on so sampler Who You mentioned who ultimately decides that competing nationalisms is a better framework in south colonialism Still take setter colonialism seriously before. He concludes concludes so what the students will see. It's not a shouting match between these two perspectives between these respective authors. It's thoughtful engagement and that's really I think what we're trying to model. Yeah I just want to emphasize I do. You think that those distinctions matter and I do think that these debates matter. I think the question that I was trying to ask here was about the intersection. Between the scarlet. Discussion and the the scholarly efforts to try to pin down the right terminology pin down. The right frameworks one versus the other. I think some people outside of the academy they look at these debates and the either right off some of these terms like there are a lot of people especially within the Jewish community. who very apprehensive about anybody? Who's claiming that Israel? Israel or Zionism is colonial to any extent. That's one thing and I think that that is really problematic. Because fundamentally shuts down a conversation that we the scholars have been having now for a long time. About how do you understand. How do you conceptualize and compare and contrast the efforts of Jews to settle in Palestine and and other colonial enterprises around the world? Whether we're talking about Canada where you're talking about the US whether we're talking about Australia. Whether we're talking about European powers involving in Africa in China Japan Etcetera and I think that this is part of the reason why it matters but I think that part of the question here is. What do we gain from exposing the people to these debates and from trying to bring these scholarly discussions out into a broader sphere about terminology in about frameworks? My hope is that the a debate will become more nuanced by those who read these respective essays and so the question is not as nearly as clear cut. I think in the Israel Palestine case as it is in the anglosphere the settler colonial countries that you mentioned Canada you have upscale New Zealand. Where the a settler communities did not have historical ties to the land that they settle the matter is certainly distinct in Israel so these are debates that readers will be able to engage gauge with more thoughtfully and with more nuance with more knowledge and sometimes some readers will find that if they're on the fence about whether one category Ori is better than the other or they they already believe? That category is better than the other they WANNA see. If they get convinced won't get convinced tonight others will be persuaded to us is the dynamic ability. Ability of the book is that some people will side with the offered that they already ABC read with and others might find that their ideas change part of what this highlights. It's for me. Is that that. This distinction between foundational issues and contemporary debates are not really divorced from each other in a lot of ways. It's useful for the for the table. We'll contents is useful for sort of presenting the material but in a lot of ways. These debates which are financial issues are actually still contemporary and these contemporary debates are still foundational and a lot of ways absolutely and we have some tactical thoughts about that when we put at Chapter Chapter let self-determination in the first half in the Foundational House. 'cause what we're really trying to do and we succeeded was hash out the Tuesday solution versus one state solution debate in different words. And I think that's what Red Sauce Leagues Essay. DASGUPTA says Hodge and Ron Greenstein is looking looking at the concept of what it means to self determine in the concept of what it needs to be yet. Jewish state in today's international global formation dated to natural systems system looking at the norms and looking at the ethics of knock by and Financial Ism and again passing up that debate in ways that are perhaps a little surprising to career. I think that if we turn to the contemporary debates two of them that really stood out to me as I was reading through the book where the sections that dealt with intersection. MBBS the reason why. I think that that those two issues are so important both on their own and also within the context of the book is because the highlight the crossover between in Israel and Palestine broader social justice issues of our present moment. Essentially the part of what I'm thinking about is how the discussions about Israel and Palestine. Elstein tie in with bar discussions about how we fight injustice so there we're talking about your sexuality and then also the extent to which tactics and strategies that have proven effective in other instances particularly South Africa can be applied to Israel and Palestine how they're being pushed as a strategy by certain people and I'm really obviously opposed by many people as well. I WanNa talk about both of those. An all-star with intersection -ality my thing intersection -ality is that this is really important. As we think about about the shifting alliances as they relate to Jews in the diaspora and other groups as they relate to the Israeli Palestinian conflict for instance. If you look at the chapter that Joya you you wrote you know. He argues that a more robust black Palestinian alliances still going to emerge in which reflects in a lot of ways. Major shift from The realities of breath fifty sixty years ago when American Jews they tend to understand their own. History has been kind of on the right side of history when it comes to the civil rights movement. Part of what I ubis suggesting here is that this is changing. And the situation in Israel and Palestine is sort of forcing Jews into the opposing side of the oppressors as opposed to those who are interested Civil Rights and liberation. Part of why is your sexuality is important because it is a tool that helps us to think through sort of what is happening on the ground both in terms of Israel in Palestine itself and also in terms of the debates about the discourse as you said which is the way that it manifests itself in the US and Canada. I want to put it out to you guys. Why do you think the intersection analogy is useful category for thinking about contemporary debates about the Israeli Palestinian conflict? How discussed and debated in particular as you mentioned? Engine Mirror right. This is the language of the college campus that this is the language the students are using to talk about different kinds of injustices which are taking place today. What is your approach to thinking about intersection with all of these things in mind so in terms of when we were crafting the book and figuring out? What are the topics who want to deal with? I think you've hit the nail on the head that one of the reasons. We had a chapter on intersection or the S or international law were apartheid was because those are common tropes in common words thrown around when people are debating and discussing israel-palestine in both on academic campuses and beyond so we were doing what we could to. Okay this is a common word that pops up also also a lot of these work pop in in media about these types of topics as co editors. I think in American speak for herself. We were trying to Somehow tap into the pulse of the discussions on israel-palestine today and then bring people in to offer perspectives on these given even issues as a non co-editor per se. I would say wearing a different APP. I would say well intersection. Audi is that word is it's pretty common on university campuses now especially with people who identify with the left than the right. It's dominant entry point into all. All sorts of social justice issues in Israel. Costs is one of them but it has to deal with connecting. What is going on over there with what is going on over here? To some degree we it's UNHEALTH- growth of globalization in all sorts of phenomena taking place around the world for decades. Now I'll add one other thing. Is that in wearing the two hats. 'cause Mary and I both have pretty serious opinions. On all sorts of things related to these topics. It was more difficult for me. The Mirror Mirror master this much better than I. Sometimes when I was editing given Essay Mirror would be like. Hey remember. We're editing but not not without perspective can be difficult when it's issues that you're so passionate in connected to to enter any conversation or any topic or your answer a question like you're asking wearing a an editor hat. Were wearing an author hat so to speak in Chin. That's struggle that Aaron outlining part of our role is editors also is to codes Challenges Authors our role as editor is to imagine ourselves in the place of a critic who vehemently disagrees with an author's position. So would it. Offer say in response to arguments Y Z it often the authors would be getting anyway for their counterparts in their clusters of two or three in chapter. But when they weren't we would be standing. So that's what's important part in terms of intersection alley. We actually call that section intersectional alliances because an important essay within that chapter is about. US foreign policy life and how it has shifted over time with regard to israel-palestine House probably shifted less than the grassroots might like at the Democratic Party for example so there is up interesting attention being trained to nat essay by us about how the views of some Kenya I need new democratic representatives on the scene are trying it push. US foreign policy perhaps leftwards Crew term are part of that Bush does derive from issues of race and gender and other identities in the American context. Obviously I think Erin as you're pointing out. There is a distinction between how you approach these topics as an editor and how you approach it yourself as a scholar and also as somebody who's involved in all sorts sorts of issues. I can also appreciate this because also as a podcast host. I also have a similar situation where you are dealing with issues as yourself and also in terms of trying to shepherd a conversation in which I think is a big part of what you guys are doing with. The book is trying to shepherd a conversation. But if we take off the editor hat for a moment as you look at some of these terms things like intersection things like Expulsion things even like narratives. There are some people who reject these ideas as having any value to begin with particularly from people who are more on the right wing side of things more on the left. As you mentioned intersection. Alan you particular is a very central idea of left wing circles very specifically part part of what I'm asking here is as you look at the ideas that are being engaged with here on the book and there are of course people writing in the book for instance writing about Ds who are vehemently opposed to it. Where do you see this book fitting in in terms of expanding the discourse about Israel and Palestine when so many people for instance within the Jewish community kind of scoff? Put these ideas to begin with some of anyway. Let's take the easy when I some people in the Jewish community scoff at that. Some of those people also really derive great purpose from writing public pronouncements in opposition to yes while they may be very frustrated by date. They don't want to be silent. Twenty shoes so this book again braves together scholars activists who have some say about these very saline issues as richer sexuality me me we could say that some people might roll their eyes at but again it's a perspective that is used in many activists circles than the question. is what kinds of insights sites. Can we take from it and people may agree or disagree but I guess what we're trying to do in. The book is not necessarily debates the value of terms on their own but to the debate the policy directions and political.

Israel Palestine editor US Canada Foundational House Africa braves Audi Australia ABC South Africa Joya Alan co-editor
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 1 year ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
"israel palestine" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:47 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Worldly

"It's finally here. The trump administration after teasing it for months maybe even years depending on how you time it has released its vision for Israel Palestine peace and it turns out. It's not so much a peace plan as it is a give everything everything Israel wants plan and then hope that leads to something that might be better. We'll get into whether there's actually any real aspirations for peacemaking in this plan and what it actually proposes today worldly part of the Vox media podcast network at beach. I'm here with Jim. Williams and Alex Ward. Hey team guest today That is call it L. Gandhi. He is a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute. And one of America's top experts on Israel Palestine. Really things He's sleep lanching when I say that Welcome welcome thanks could be the plan. It's here it's been called Depending on what you look at from prosperity to piece the deal of the century is a term that I think trump came up with making fun of it also calls itself the Vision inside the texts. So you know. Let's let's talk a little bit about what it actually does. I've set this up to be pretty bad right so called run. Run down the sort of big picture rules of the game as laid out in the deal. Yes so the the plan lays out out what it calls a vision for a two-state solution in theory At least that's how they're they're couching it. So the Palestinian state that they're describing basically would consist of about seventy percent of the West Bank In kind and of a fragmented Areas that are linked together through a network of tunnels and bridges and various infrastructure. But not actually actually territorially contiguous in addition to some swops In inside Israel In the south as well was A little bit in the north So that's the centerpiece of their plan. which is this Palestinian state that is essentially completely surrounded by Israel? So that's on On territory On Security Israel would have full control over everything between the Mediterranean NC and the Jordan River including the airspace territorial waters electromagnetic sphere Entering exit points The Palestinian NIAN quote state would not have the ability to enter into treaties with with foreign countries And of course Israel has overriding security. Control over the entire blanket area on Jerusalem Jerusalem is exclusively. Israel's capital of Palestinians. Estonians would be allowed to have a capital near Jerusalem. They could call it Jerusalem if they so desired but it would be outside. The plan is pretty clear that it would be outside of the security barrier or the wall as Palestinians call it and The plan is also explicit on the third major issue final-status issue which is Palestinian refugees and It stays pretty clearly that no single Palestinian refugee would be allowed to return to to to their homes in Israel and instead would have the choice between going back to a Palestinian entity to be resettled where they are in neighboring Arab states or in third countries and some sort of compensation package would be put together Over the long term. All all of this is contingent on obviously Palestinian acceptance but more importantly the Palestinian Entity could not come into into being until a whole array of Conditions had been matt the disarming of Hamas A long list of fiscal reforms of legal reforms. That Palestinians have to enact certain kinds of legislation and the decision as to win Palestinians met that threshold would be decided by Israel so it's a theoretical quote unquote state and one that frankly isn't all that appealing to Palestinians in the first place and as you said I mean pretty much gives Israel everything that it wanted An and I I should clarify. It's a wishlist not just for Israel but for Israel's right-wing explicit distinction because when I'm talking about Israel here I'm talking about the current government which does not represent the views of arguably most of the Israeli public depending and how you cut the polling right about half rough. Yeah Yeah Yeah but you know pretty. Remarkably the plan has the support of of Netanyahu's opposition of the Ben against the blue and white a coalition and even the president of Israel whose largely in a ceremonial remonial role. But still has influences and is seen as somewhat of a moderate And so there is a kind of Israeli consensus in Israeli early politics about this is a great plan and we should get on board I think the only real descent on this planet. Israel is coming from the joint lists which of course is predominantly lately made up of of Palestinian citizens of Israel and they're pretty much in the margins of Israeli politics so you know I think it's reflective of just how far to the right as really politics has moved In in recent decades there is much less support for the the plan. Here here we see Democrats especially being quite vocal in opposing it as a sham as a farce They're using that sort of language. Both Bernie Sanders offers and Elizabeth Warren. For example have criticized the plan. And we've seen a number of progressive members of Congress Also come out against the plan and I think that reflects a shift that's happening in American politics but from the standpoint of the Palestinians. This plan does not offer I mean it takes takes all of the issues that they care about a capital in Jerusalem. the refugees not even a symbolic Number of refugees that would be allowed to return and most importantly sovereignty self-determination are all off the table and so the vision that the trump plan represents is something thing more akin to Bantustans Than it is to to anything that we might call estate inside. What's advantage Stan? Bantustans were in south South Africa. These autonomous supposedly autonomous areas for black South Africans and as a way of segregating them from The white South African minority but still while claiming the black a majority had autonomy or statehood or sovereignty not And so these were sort of Isolated autonomous areas that were surrounded by South th Africa in Control very very similar to the plan that was laid out by the trump administration. So this sounds like apartheid. Then well that is that's the stick critique of it right is that it will lead to a permanent apartheid situation formalized and permitted by the United States right. I think the question of whether whether or not that is what the trump people wanted or thought of it is sort of separate and it's weather. I do think that it's hard to describe the end vision of this plan as anything but that so I wanna kind of step back just for a minute to kind of talk about how the the trump administration presented this. Right what the Just to kind of give listeners offensive you know how they are trying to sell this deal They essentially said Kushner Jared Kushner so that's White House senior adviser adviser and obviously trump's son-in-law He was the basically the grand architect this plan along with a core group of negotiators well. They're really negotiations gauthier shins but Core Group of advisers with them but they're essentially he's approach was look we've had these previous agreements over and over again. We've had all these negotiations none. None of them have ever actually led to complete final-status negotiations because all of these previous plans left the nitty gritty details to the end they laid out this broad framework during work like the Oslo process and basically said at the very end then the two sides. The Israelis in the Palestinian leadership in the West Bank will come together and and you guys will work out the saddest roussel. You guys will work out. You know land swaps in the West Bank and who you know which Pertz of of the West Bank Israel retains means which part are takes keeps in which parts you know will be a contiguous theoretically Palestinian state anyway so it was basically we. Don't WanNa get into the details tells but Kushner's approach was look. That didn't work so I'm going to go ahead and just decide the details for you guys. We're going to sit down. We're going to write down the details. We're going to have a very detailed the proposal and in that sense he succeeded right it is it does say no here. Here are the lines that are going to divide you. Divide or not divide Jerusalem as the case as maybe Here or the actual pieces of land you get you know Israel gets this thirty percent chunk of the West Bank. Meanwhile in return Palestinians Estonians. You got these two areas that are undeveloped. Land in the desert on the border Sinai in the border with Egypt And so that was basically the approach right. Look we're we're GONNA try this different method we're gonNA actually put it out there and you guys can take it or leave The problem is and we're GONNA get into that. Is that in doing so so they have actually made policy stated. US policy to be things that we hadn't stated before definitively that would be something we would support as a final status. We always said No. Leave it up to you guys. And that has essentially given Netanyahu at green light. So I think my favorite discussion discussion of the deal from jared and there have been many sort of cringe worthy interviews. Alex actually did a good piece on this For Vox is the time that he claimed that he read twenty twenty five bucks on the Israel Palestine conflict. It's on my head of started calling this jared's book report on the Israeli Palestinian conflict I think that that but sort of encapsulates the degree in care of thought that went into this. Because it's billed as a peace plan right but it was done in the way that Jen was describing without any consultation with one of the two sides that was supposed to sign on right like this was done by the trump administration in consultation with the Israelis elise with absolutely zero Palestinian. Buying whatsoever right. It isn't an attempts to say. Okay here's a mutually agreeable compromise. It's an attempt to dictate terms and I think the the best piece of commentary defending this deal which I think encapsulates the real spirit of it in a way. The trump administration won't won't actually say is this piece in the Washington Post by Isreaeli News analyst Eilon Levy and key the title of the piece is Israel won. He's really Palestinian conflict. Any plan has to reflect that and the court argument comes a little bit down And I want to read a short paragraph because I think it really is sort of an honest encapsulation of what's is happening throughout history. The victors always dictated. The ultimate terms of peace is that fair. Maybe is that how the world works in reality. Yes conflicts don't end when both sides agree agree that they are tired of fighting they end one side. The loser recognizes it. Can't keep up the battle and decides to get what it can before things get worse and there I think it is. It's red eye. I find this morally repugnant. As an argument right like it's basically a claim that anytime that somebody is victimized by another side international politics they just have to give up right and there's no such thing as fairness yeah. It's it's the million dialogue for those I are nerds. Who are listening here? just apply to the Israel Palestine in conflict But for those of us who have been committed to kind of just two state solution for a while and I grew up in a Jewish Zionist left-wing household. That was like our mantra growing up. This is a slap in the face and really quickly I mean. The trump administration had been pretty explicit leading up to the release that look Israel is has the advantage in Palestine does not and therefore it kind of has to accept some of these terms. I it mirrors or if not you know lends credence to that. That's the argument argument at least the thinking within the White House. I am not an expert on this situation but I am focused. A lot on trump's foreign policy was sort of a bigger stance and and I've talked to Jen about this. I kind of see this from the view like yet another maximum pressure campaign by the by the trump residents. They like that but just on the Palestinians I I. It's you know again. This is kind of like giving Palestine and ultimatum or something that is is the hope is would scare them so much that they would come to the table and look. It's one thing to do that against A nuclear power like North Korea. It's another thing to do it against Iran which you know you've you supports terrorism and has missile program in might someday one a nuclear weapon as nothing to do it against Venezuela for To It's a it's a more tenuous situation but A leader later that has completely decimated as country and there's another opposition leader. WHO's has the respect of you know? Tens of other countries but to do it against Palestinians is morally repugnant and You know the the. There's just nothing it's not like they're really going against a lot of aims of course Hamas yes but this is not a designed this kind kind of design just doesn't really make sense for this situation..

Israel Israel Palestine Kushner Jared Kushner trump Jerusalem Palestinian Entity Hamas West Bank Israel Vox media United States Alex Ward Netanyahu Middle East Institute Jen America L. Gandhi senior fellow Jim West Bank
Israel/Palestine war crimes probe 'momentous step forward', says UN rights expert

UN News

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Israel/Palestine war crimes probe 'momentous step forward', says UN rights expert

"Decision by the international criminal court the i c c to consider a formal criminal investigation into alleged alleged war crimes in palestine has been hailed by an independent. UN Human Rights expert as a momentous step forward in the quest for accountability. I see see prosecutor for Ben Souda announced on the twentieth December that there was reasonable basis to proceed with an investigation following the conclusion of a five-year a preliminary examination related to the two thousand fourteen war on Gaza Israeli settlements and the killing and wounding of Palestinian demonstrators near the Gaza Frontier Michael Link the UN special rapporteur for the human rights situation in the occupied Palestinian territory issued a statement on Tuesday welcoming the decision he. He observed that while the international community has adopted hundreds of U N resolutions condemning the fifty two year occupation yet really has it ever combined criticism with consequences for Israel now. The possibility of accountability is finally on the horizon. Mr Lynch observed that the prosecutor also intends to investigate investigate whether members of Hamas and other Palestinian armed groups had committed war crimes in the period since June twenty

UN Prosecutor Gaza Palestine Mr Lynch Ben Souda Israel Michael Link Hamas
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"During the colonial rule of the Indian subcontinent. The British came to love lots of Indian cuisine food and such as Chutney category were adapted for Victorian tastes but perhaps one of the most impactful concoctions of time developed without any Indian culinary influence. The Brits were in India. They were suffering from malaria. Berry Swanson was pretty. Primitive was to drink a lot of tonic and Thomas Adequate bitter taste to it and one one way to cut. It was to put in Jim. Thome Easton is economists. Mumbai Bureau chief. There are so many jains now that have an Indian name tomb. There's Bombay Sapphire cars very very popular. There's even one called Chindia. I mean any province of India probably has our name attached to a Chin but of course there's a great irony Iranian using an Indian name to somehow affected Indian S O of their team. Because the one thing that from all these Jen's really is the none. None of them are made in India. In fact the Jin that is made in India is very very cheap. And it's rumored that most of it goes off to Africa in barrels so the rotgut end and of the market is the only market actually in India. That's almost all of the market. There's some a little bit above that but it's still just a little bit about that. I mean given a choice I would say as a thirty six months ago. No one in India would actually choose as a question of taste or flavor to order any chin that was associated with being made in India but a couple years ago some entrepreneurs several of whom had spent time overseas and seeing the real boom in India came back to India and decided into create. Jin here into still one of the most prominent which had its year anniversary is called stranger and sons. Do you think the trend towards the the high end of the market will reverse the overall national trend as Indians gave up on the cheap stuff. I think what they've discovered it. India is that they can make a product that they really really really like your and so I think demand is going to be very very strong. Why not I mean the rest of the world wanting something is probably indicative of infection I or tastes there are many Indians who travel everywhere and come back? You're liking the same things that people to in Europe and in America. The Big Jim Markets Have Been Barcelona and New York and maybe wandering that it's hard to find a bar in any of those places that doesn't have a multitude of Jin's. There's no reason to expect that that won't be here as well. We haven't seen in these Mugen's any sense. The market is in any way satiated so India June for India at least for a while seems like one Belo's campus things at a time where the rest so the Indian economy is struggling. It may be the one product that has at least at the moment not only real products for growth but actually make people feel good during a very difficult time. What about beyond? India's borders say the popular brands that we we see outside India that kind of trade on India's name and history and so on aren't actually Indian. Am I going to start going into bars. Ars and seeing a a rich variety of Indian you will see a couple. India Jen's are beginning to stranger and sons is beginning to export Starting with Singapore and London didn't and I think that At least one other Indian brand has begun to do that as well so amidst the multitude of Indian S Jains are actually will be real Indians and and the extent that many of these genes do honestly have an India component the so-called pedantic the herbs and the spices and the go into Jin much of that does has come from India. Anyway it's just a exported in kind of a wholesale form but this fully formed India Chin. You'll be able to find it whether people like it. Who knows but I think the success that this has has had they charge roughly the same price here for a stranger and sons bottle as they do for a bottle of any premium imported jen and it seems to have found an audience regardless of price? So there's no reason to believe a won't find some sort of audience elsewhere in the world. Tom Thank you very much for your time. Thank.

India India Chin Jin India Jen malaria Berry Swanson jen Chin Mumbai Bombay Sapphire Jen Jim Thome Easton Africa Thomas Europe Tom Ars
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Ever heard of lab grown diamonds if not. We've got you. After thousands of hours perfecting the science lightboxes here to shed some light. Here's how it works lab. Grown diamonds are chemically the same natural ones just made in a lab to make them they use a plasma reactor to heat tiny pieces of lab grown diamonds up to temperatures almost as hot as the Sun John in about two weeks. Those little seeds turned into full carat stones. Light box has perfected the process to consistently create are gorgeous gems. Now here's where it gets. It's really interesting light box lab. Grown diamonds aren't just made the same every time they're also priced the same. Each carrot is eight hundred dollars. Mind blown so there you have it. Get the facts. And see the science behind the sparkle at light box jewelry dot com slash intelligence use code intelligence for twenty five dollars off last night. Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson went head to head in a televised debate on. It with his main rival. Jeremy Corbett. There'll be an election in just over three weeks called by Mr Johnson in an effort to resolve an impasse after he failed to persuade parliament to approve his brexit deal. Mr Corbin's Labor Party pitching itself as an agent of change Labor. We'll put wealth and power in the hands of the many Boris Johnson's conservatives who think that born to rule will only ever look after the privileged few Mister Johnson as promised to to leave the European Union as quickly as possible appealing to British public puts keen to move past the divisive issue of Brexit. If I come back here where they working majority in parliament then I will get parliament working again for you on day. One of the new parliament in December we will start getting our deal through so we can get brexit done. In January analyst countries potential. Neither man is especially popular nick. Mister Johnson's Conservative Party is leading in the polls. That's despite questions over his personal life which were raised again this week when businesswoman Jennifer or curate spoke to I tv about her relationship with him and I don't understand why you've blocked me and ignored me. An investigation is ongoing related to Mister Johnson's relationship with Missouri. When he was mayor of London he's denied wrongdoing? This week is curie alleged. That Mister Johnson had a child who he's kept secret but the debate steered largely clear of Oh choppy waters. British people have had some great TV. Recently I'm not just the Cran Dan but Prince Andrew's extraordinary interview with the BBC. This was not drama in that class. Emma Duncan is on our Britain team and was somewhat less than transfixed. Last night's debates. The format wasn't great. The participants were given such short term. Basically they mostly strung together a few stoke phrases said. Nobody was was on the edge of their seats during this debate. We'll we'll how did it start. How did Each of these candidates sort of set set off their their stole opening statements. Corbin essentially was saying on the vote for change and Johnson essentially was saying Kuban is the vote for continued horrific long-drawn-out uncertainty about brexit. And I am the gate brexit done. Vote suit it was slightly. Where in the sense that Kuban did a very competently learned statement? Straight to camera. Johnson was reading from a piece of the paper and given that he's got a reputation for laziness disorganization. That probably wasn't a great move and the defining issue for this election is inevitably brexit. Do you do you think that either one of the candidates performed better than the other. Yea On that one Johnson clearly performed better He's gone. It's very very very clear. Line which is vote for me and you will get brexit done get brexit damage what he kept saying during the debate somewhat to the audiences irritation Kubin did very badly on that in the sense. That Labor's policy is to renegotiate the deal. It's already been negotiated twice. We will have a referendum will abide by that result and after that to put the resulting deal you back to the country to another referendum and that firstly sand a bit exhausting to a country that is already fit up with this process. Secondly he wouldn't say how he would campaign in that referendum and Corbin is trying to conceal the void in the heart of his brexit policy and refusing to answer the question of which side Johnson pointed head. He's leaving open the possibility that he negotiates deal with the European Union and then campaigns against it which does send faintly ridiculous and there's another referendum issue to which again Johnson successfully prodded him on. which is that? Nobody thinks that Labor's GonNa get an overall majority one way that cool been could get into downing. Street is by doing a deal with the Scottish Nationalist Party. But the price of that deal would be the promise of another referendum referendum on Scottish independence and Kuban refused to rule that I'd say he sounded a bit shifty on both cans. Well Mr Johnson has a very well well known controversial personal life and career and in fact this week there have been stories coming out about a relationship. He had with an American businesswoman When he was mayor of London were any of those details explore during a debate? Not Really I mean it could have been worse for Johnson in the sense that some people were expecting getting a bold question Mr Johnson. How many children do you have because nobody really knows but no specifics were brought up and and there was quite a good moment which did demonstrate what the audience and the nation at large fields about Mitt willingness to trust Mr the Johnson when he said something along the lines of of truth Nashes to me and the audience laughed? And on Mr Corbin's parts. Did he score any sort of direct hits. Yeah he did on the National Health Service but really he had to. I mean attis Labor's home turf. Labor create the National Health Service. The tours I've been in power long enough to have to take responsibility for the strains that it's under at the moment through underfunding. Mr Cogan brought with with him a documents which he waved around we had lots and lots of black lines on it because it's been so redacted which he said was an account British negotiations Sion's with the Americans and there's a particularly sensitive point as far as the NHS and the USA is concerned? The left is is convinced that Britain. If it's run by the Tories will basically Opened the NHS to private American health companies and thus destroy the system. The country say loves so all told. What's what's your view? Did anyone win this debate. Will this debate make a difference to the election action. Do you think well Johnson Johnson. Just one eight. As far as the snap opinion afterwards is concerned it was fifty one forty forty nine to him I would say as of you're yeah he he did he just about one in buying those and he will be pleased with the event because he's on top in the race and he really just had to hold his own Kuban. We'll be disappointed because it could be needed to do something to re regain a foothold really because the numbers are so solidly in the jury's favor commend. Thank you very much for joining us. You're very welcome.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Mr Corbin Johnson Johnson Britain Brexit Kuban Labor London European Union Jeremy Corbett Labor Party Conservative Party Kubin Scottish Nationalist Party BBC Mr Cogan Jennifer
Why Israeli settlements are an obstacle to peace

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Israeli settlements are an obstacle to peace

"Over the past half century. Israel has built hundreds of settlements or Jewish enclaves on the land it captured from Jordan in the Six Day War of nineteen sixty seven seven. This land claimed by Palestinians for their future state which is why settlements are seen by many as an obstacle to peace the president of over four hundred thousand Israeli settlers living in the West Bank basically means that a Palestinian state cannot come into being is our Israel correspondent respondent Mason Jerusalem. Many of those settlements are stuck in between the main Estonian cities and towns so contiguous state cannot exist as long as they're there and their presence also means that it was obvious that so in effect they ensure that the military occupation of the Westbank continues the the announcement came just ahead of a key date in Israel. Today is the deadline for opposition leader. Benny Ganz to build coalition bowling. September's inconclusive election Prime Minister Benjamin. Netanyahu has already failed to form a government. Both candidates praised the trump administration's change in policy but the decision was America at odds with much of the international community. The international consensus regarding the settlements has been there in contravention of the full Geneva Convention. Attention which basically says that transfer or settlement of an occupied territory by the occupying power is against international law. And that's been the interpretation Shen of the Geneva Convention regarding Israeli settlements by most of the leading legal experts. There are some dissenting views of. Israel clings to those dissenting ending views in building the settlements. But that's been the broad consensus for decades now and so in that sense Mike Pompeo's announcement came as something of surprise. Well the competitive management didn't come as a surprise because certain elements within the administration were very pro Israel and pro the settlement lobby chief among them the US ambassador to Israel. Israel David Friedman who before becoming a master was both trump's bankruptcy la and financial backer of the settlements. They have been trying for the past three years to get a clear statement out of the administration saying that American doesn't see the settlements as being illegal and it has to be noted that in the past also the Reagan administration. Distraction made similar statements. So it hasn't always been one hundred percent clear what the American position on this has been. US public statements on settlement activities. In the West Bank have been inconsistent over decades in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight. The Carter Administration categorically concluded that Israel's establishment of civilian settlements was inconsistent with international law. However in Nineteen eighty-one president? Reagan disagreed with that conclusion. And stated that he didn't believe that the settlements were inherently l.. Legal actually most of the American administration's haven't even talked about the legality. They've called the settlements an obstacle to peace instead of diving into this rather controversial legal question so in a sense this kind of puts a finer point on kind of formalizes. Something that from the American standpoint had been kind of informally the case. What has been the case over the past three years? Because the trump administration had been very ambivalent towards the Israeli settlement activity previous administrations had condemned settlements especially the first Bush administration tried to limit funding to Israel while the tantamount building was going on the trump administration and some of its representatives have been much more friendly towards the past two years. The trump administration has made a series of statements and actions regarding the Israel Palestine conflict back in December seventeen nineteen. They announced that they recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital that in a few minutes later move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. A few months ago we had the recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the occupied Golan Heights. And in between these. We've had a number of steps. Was the Palestinians. We had cutting off of aid various Palestinian agencies to the United Nations nations agency which works with Palestinian refugees the closure of the Palestinian mission in Washington. All these things have put out a very clear signal where the trump administration restauration stands in the conflict. And even the timing of this announcement just a couple of days before the deadline for Bennigan's to form a government. Do you think it's connected to the current political the turmoil in Israel not directly connected to the current political situation for two reasons festival. It hasn't been times as some of the previous gestures were to help Out On the eve of an election other convenient junctures it doesn't seem to have been closely coordinating with Israeli government. That seems to have been something. which was it was very much an internal decision of administration? And do you think it's significant that it was Mr Pompeo who made the announcement. Well that's probably more about American politics in parents trying to show that he's not trump in many ways and loyal to some of trump's closest advisers. I think pump is also looking beyond the horizon of the trump trump administration and shoring up his own political bias. Perhaps his own run for the White House and this is a popular move among voters who he would also be relying upon one day if he runs for the candidacy and for the White House himself and now that Mr Pompeo has made this policy reversal. What do you think the immediate impact will be the speaking? Both Israeli officials Palestinians. No one's expecting an immediate impact even though they've been promises by Netanya before the last two election campaigns of going even further annexing parts of the West Bank. All those plans on hold because it doesn't a political deadlock there's no coalition in Israel. We have Netanyahu position bet against both failing instigate a majority Israel has been building settlements or the past fifty years regardless of what the administration positions being and on the Palestinian side. They've lost lost hope in anything. Good for them coming out. The trump administration long ago so for that. This wasn't a surprise. And they're facing their daily challenges whatever someone is saying in Washington it material to them but what about the prospects for grander scale change for the notion of annexation or in the other direction a meaningful peace process so the impact is perhaps lung It won't change anything the next few weeks and months. But when finally new government is formed in Israel. If it's a right wing government then the impetus to go ahead and AMEX parts. What's the West Bank will increase? Because now they seem to have a green light from the administration and even if the new government will be more central government under Benny Gansel some other interests lita. Yep It'll be much more difficult for them to justify so these ready public making any kind of changes on the ground baptists manning so because people will say them but the Americans okay so why make any of these changes if the settlements especially the ones which are deep within the West Bank or allowed to continue to grow that means the majority patient won't end either and any prospect of Palestinian statehood will be non-existent loop Israel basically in charge of one st with millions of Palestinians without optical rights and that's not the democratic say that Israel claims and takes pride in being so it's a situation which really is ready to have a solution Lucien right now and if anything compare announcement has made a solution for that even more remote

Israel West Bank Israel David Friedman Donald Trump Reagan Administration American Administration Mike Pompeo Carter Administration President Trump United States Washington Netanyahu Benny Ganz Prime Minister Mason Jerusalem Amex
Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

Bon Appetit Foodcast

14:30 min | 1 year ago

Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

"Yasmin I'm so excited to be talking to you today thank you for being here thank you for having me I love your book Zitouni we had it as part of our book club a few months ago and I read what about it then and I wrote about that and I'm still raving about it I find it just to be Such a great mix of cookbook that also tells a lot of really incredible story okay so I wanted to talk to you first about your own story you have a little bit of a unconventional background for food writer and I'd love to he's here a little bit about how you found your way to food from was it a law degree that you have to begin with yeah I mean it's about as dry as you can get saying they're studying you know treaties and laws it's about as far away as you can get from like the creative intensity of of a kitchen but I think that in a way my you know connection to the food world just started from such a young age because my family grandparents were farmers and think anyone who's grown up around fresh produce it just installs in you from such a young age real reverend of I mean definitely vegetables and you know when we were you know my my family would grow rice but then also all kinds of plants they eh clients and peppers and tomatoes and cucumbers and so you know cooking a meal you know would would very much be about going off getting eggs and getting beans and getting vegetables I'm getting rice all from the land we had chickens and we had cows soya milk cow like when I was like four years old so I think that's what is my love food but it wasn't until I was older when I was around thirty that I decided to make the the the real shift I was working for a British charity in London I'd been working for nonprofits throughout my twenties for different kinds of human rights campaign groups and you know often happens for people working on this quite intense subjects I mean I was working on stuff light deaths following contact with the police or Israel Palestine or the you know the continuing occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan so I mean you know pretty heavy stuff I just ended up having like a classic burn out like I just yeah you're still pretty young at that time rate thirty yeah that's pretty young really young but enough time to start a new career yeah absolutely and go diagnosed with chronic fatigue which kind of basically leaves you with very little energy to do anything but I could cook and it was during that purser healing from the illness and recovering the I. Refound my love of food and as part of my time off for my job going to Iran to spend some time with my grandmother my grandfather recently passed away and and while I was there I set myself this task of asking different family member is what their favorite recipes were and if they would show them to me and while we were cooking together I just stick my iphone down and record what we were saying and and I did the opportunity when we were in the kitchen you know chopping onions or you know at an making dumplings I do not opportunity to ask them about their lives in the history and and probably the kind of conversations you'd be wanting to have even if there weren't a recorder exactly yeah when I came back to the UK after that time I suddenly realized I sitting on a treasure trove of recipes and stories that would really enable you know someone in the asked you know someone like my friends just to kind of get a glimpse of what life in Iran was like and Iran is a place with just like the most incredible Zine which I'm so thrilled in the last is you know he's been getting lots more attention but you know when the Saffron Tales came out you know which is only three years ago that you know it didn't you know it was part of that that trend I think the Saffron Tales your first book you wrote out of those stories and recipes from your time in Iran exactly and that was definitely like part memoir very much about your own lived experience and then you your second books they tune which which we're talking today is kind of much different in a way because it's not the experience that you grew up with but it's a little bit more of an anthropological look got a region So how is it different to be working on that book after your first one yeah it was it was both weedy different and really similar I mean in a thread that's run through all of my work over the last eighteen years has been a real love of storytelling and a real understanding that stories is how oh not only we better understand the world around us but we also better understand ourselves and when I was working for Human Rights Charity israel-palestine was my brief signed so I was really familiar with the place but also the food you know I was really lucky in London like I live incredibly close to the author Langi Cafe so like you know twelve hundred eighteen years ago I remember I e in kind of food and being like wow it's so similar to Persian food but then it's got so many differences and you know food from that region was already part of my culinary repertoire so when I was thinking about what book to write next you know what motivated me really clearly to write the saffron tales was deep desired to not only celebrate the incredible culture and Food Iran but also to challenge stereotypes of how people normally perceive Iran and I think the Palestinian kitchen another place where I felt I could use food to really share stories of a place I think too often when we see depictions of places is like Palestinian communities either through very narrow political prison or it's because something really bad happened and you know of course there are huge challenges is in that region but there's also a lot of beauty of joy and a lot of great food and so you had been going to that region for work previously so that was your first exposure to it and to the cuisine there yeah so I I went in two thousand nine which is about ten years ago and I really remember it clearly because it was July so it was really hot and we was dipping in our meetings with projects that we were going to whether it was visiting olive farming communities or kind of joint and Israeli Palestinian in community initiatives and it was quite heavy stuff because it's you know region which is just yeah fraught with human rights abuse But the reason I remember it was July hi it's because I really remember in times off kind of walking through the markets and just it being packed with all this color the color and abundance of of summer whether there's that was like giant watermelons sweet Jami figs incredible like berries as I mean it was you know the the produce fell so alive and as I often say like in a region that feels like it's dying that just felt so important and you Talk a little bit about how this book is laid out because I think it's really I think it's really interesting and I learned a lot just by reading about the different regions within this region I and n how vastly different styles of food are in a in a area the size of Delaware so small yeah so talk about how you decided to put the together and how you decided to highlight these different cuisines yeah so I really see this book as a travelogue I wanna take my read on real culinary adventure through listen in kitchens so I divided the book into different chapters kind of starting kind of in the north of Israel actor I and Haifa which of these incredible seaside towns the food like how how do you describe the food there yeah so the food that and actually the food of that region the North region which is the Galilee is perhaps the most traditional Levin teen type foods so you know the the things you might think of along it's on the coast they have lots of fresh seafood perhaps likes him seabream that smothered in a gorgeous like garlic Tahini saw a recipe for that in this book there is and then just so many stuffed vegetables like stuffed bell peppers stuff eggplants Zucchini stuffed with what kinds of thing yeah stuffed cows it's I mean just like I feel like if Palestinians can stop something like they will and what are they stuffing yeah well a real variety of stuff so it can be with Rice on minced Tom Flavored with maybe nutmeg cinema and kind of a warming sweet spices sometimes it can be you know plant based with kind of chick peas and rice and and sometimes it can just be kind of rice and herbs and I think one of the things that really struck me when I was doing the research for this book is just how plant based the food is from from the both it'd be really common just to have a whole Vegan meal but without any like purposefulness about it was just an abundance of vegetables and I love the the book do divide out a whole section on the Vegan and also dairy free and gluten free menus because it does seem like it this zine just naturally lend itself to diets are particularly kind of trendy here right now I know it's funny isn't it I wonder if you know that helped to some of the trend but I think all Middle Eastern diets of very I mean the Mediterranean diet is said to be one of the best for health in the world right and I really wanted to make the book very practical because I'm a home cook you know I want people to the is this isn't a recipe book which has got you know dishes in it I mean there are few like standout dishes but it's mainly stuff that I just want people to to get home from work and unlike quickly pulled together and part of that referencing was about that because so many people I know dairy free or plant based on you know perhaps just I wanna have that choice yeah so tell me about the other regions Gallery New Orleans the Galilee and then we've got the food of the West Bank which you know if the Galilee was really green you know the the West Bank is is not it is dry it's you know it's it's you know it's huge water supply issues in the region the food there reflect that so it's a lot more grilled meats a lot more bread based as opposed to rice so we're kind of thinking about dishes such as massakin which is this gorgeous kind of marinated chicken dish that's-that's made with with all spice and Su Mac and then roasted and and the big huge flat breads and the meat juices of pulled over into the bread and then you tear apart it with your hand so interactive eating yeah or Mansa which is this kind of really Halsey lamb stew made with Jimmy which is a bit of it's kind of a strange ingredient it's it's a kind of amended way Lexus is Kinda funky the milk product yeah but fermented or dried so it's a common ingredient throughout the Middle East so you know we're talking heartier dishes and Maumee Bay and then the food from Gaza is completely different as well so Gaza is a tiny strip of land and it's on the coast the Mediterranean Sea and there the focus is on lots of like see food but also lots of the flavor palate is different so the whole eternity of Gaza and cuisine is garlic and Green Chili and dill you or beef stew that you would add these flavorings into so again just really unusual so within such a small bit of like land there were three distinct culinary identities all right we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor this week's episode of the bottom teeth food cast is brought to you by targets would gather when it comes to feeding families gooding gather believes that real life and eating well should go hand in hand that good food and good people are more important then when where and how we eat that's why they created good and gather favorite flavors in selected staples made for real life in many ways we gather made with high quality ingredients and carefully crafted recipes to create better tasting food that you can be confident is a good choice for you in your family that's good engaged her new and only at target so you spend a lot of time like just talking to people while you're there I mean it sounds like from reading the book you're constantly introducing the reader to new families to people who you cooked with and telling their stories so what was the is that might be through social media I'll call out for friends of friends does anyone know anyone in an area and luckily the way the world works now you can meet people that way other times you'd be at someone's House and then they'd be like Oh well you've got to try the bakery in this town like my aunt sisters cousin runs an incredible drier and she was like just this really likes spirited young Palestinian woman you know she had right head like pomegranate tattoos like a real kind of cool artists and she was such a big Foodie so we would just drive around in her car with the windows bled down listening to music and just like visiting friends there's all visiting people I've met through social media or people

Yasmin Zitouni Milk Twelve Hundred Eighteen Years Eighteen Years Three Years Four Years Ten Years
Second Israeli Election Shows No Clear Winner

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Second Israeli Election Shows No Clear Winner

"Results for the country's country's second election in six months which took place yesterday so far show no signs of a clear winner current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yeah who off the Lakers policians rival Ben Against of the century St- blue and white opposition party look to be neck and neck according to polls yesterday day Daniel Appellate join us to tell us where all this might be going. She's back today to continue to try and help us work. That's out one facing seems clear. It'll be going slowly so Daniele. What's the latest well the latest is that the the way the votes of lander is not that dissimilar to what happened in April once again? It seems that Abdul Lieberman will once again be the kingmaker in April he refuse to sit in government unless the ultra Orthodox were forced to serve in the army this perennial one of the perennial themes of Israeli politics takes and it looks like I think he has nine seats right now. It looks like he will be in a similar position. Logically you might look at the the way the numbers rack up because of cushion Israel doesn't matter who wins who becomes the largest party at Hugh can form a coalition you would think that Likud and the blue white posse could it's with another couple of centuries. Even Center left Parties Form Coalition. That seems very unlikely. I don't see Netanyahu agreeing to serve in a government l. From last he's prime minister similar leap any counts once the the top job but just how the numbers will work. How is really anybody's guess housing -nificant is this election results for the Middle East more widely what you think so well I guess it depends and how it turns out? I mean at the moment we have a stalemate clearly. If the coalition building process were to be a bit more radical and involve the Arab Israeli parties in the joint list it might look very different but there seems to be very little chance chance of that so one assumes that the coalition building process will be more or less business as usual we have a very similar story in Spain of course and it seems we get into this endless cycle of elections that are unable to break the empath Daniela. What does Benjamin Netanyahu's position look no? Let's remember that he called a snap election in April because he failed to form a coalition. What do you think he's thinking now? He's gamble did not pay off and various various tactics used to try and ensure that he would get a larger part of the vote for instances usual warnings about Arabs turning out now and the falsifying elections actually leads much higher our turnout in these elections rather desperate measures by saying that he was going to declare sovereignty over the settlements in the settlement blocks that in particular eight were either and his his colleagues in in Likud. I'm sure now a scenting weakness and thinking. How can we get rid of him? I'm actually play a part in in the next government but I think it raises a very good point which I think says quite low about the state of Israeli Moxie the moment we have the third largest party in the Knesset the the joint list the party or coalition which represents the political interest of a full twenty percent of the population and it's absolutely I quote absurd for Israeli politicians to think of forming a coalition elation ahead of the elections. Everyone ruled out. We've seen as loveable so that really says something about where we are in terms of representative democracy and the other thing that we can notice how where Israeli democracy has gone for the last ten fifteen years ten fifteen years ago I've seen and and what he described as far right his politics were seen as slightly outside the consensus and really extreme now is the centrist of the center on again the the guy who's going to be making the decisions and the election so the results will be will be clear hopefully later today. What what do you think about this final question for for you? Are we going to see another election anytime soon. Well it's very likely the next one what they won't be for before January or February and the joke going around. I'll say issue is really social. Media is that you know you get the day off the election in Israel and it's not gonna be beach weather. I think people are upset about that. Can I just add one thing I mean the shadow of US politics hangs very heavy over Israeli politics and clearly as long as donald trump is in the White House it's very difficult to see a big change there but of course there is an election in the US in just over a year towing worthy Democrats to win it with the progressive candidate. I think is really politics might start to look quite different degree Daniela well. I mean I think we we we look at Israel Palestine in exactly those terms from the occupation Palestinian dependence the problem is the incentive is internal Israeli politics. It really doesn't feature anymore. The majority of Israelis from right to left center Zantac think the occupation as a necessary eat rosary evil perhaps can be made a little bit better but do not see a solution with the sovereign in Palestine as the angle well. Let's continue now to the

Benjamin Netanyahu Likud Daniela Parties Form Coalition Prime Minister Benjamin Netany United States Israel Palestine Israel Daniele Lakers Prime Minister Palestine Middle East Abdul Lieberman Ben Against Knesset Daniel Appellate Spain Donald Trump
"israel palestine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the wall. As an Israel Palestine. Where did where did? Where does the person? Lives at sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue. Hopefully, not for long. Get the idea that walls are so effective. And I've seen the wall in Palestine. And it it if it in many ways encapsulates the whole history that that is talking about. And. To assume that we can only we can talk about conditions in the US without referring them to what is happening in the world. What is happening in the Middle East? What is happening in Brazil where you have a version of the current occupant of of sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue that is even worse than the one. We are experiencing if if you had imagined that that was possible. I think that. It's very sad that we now are in possession of the communications technology that allows us to be in touch with people all over the world this. We didn't always have this. As a matter of fact, I'll say parenthetically, and some of you may be aware of the fact that that there's a little controversy going on in Birmingham. Alabama. And so. I'm the day that the whole thing broke. My sister was in South Africa doing work there. And she wanted to put me in touch with someone in Berkeley pastor, Mike in Berkeley. Right. Yeah. Who could put us in touch with people on the ground in Birmingham. So within a short period of time this call from South Africa. I talked to fast. You know, this is possible. These days. And I will maybe we can talk a little bit about Birmingham later. But but right now what I want to focus on is lack of an internationalist consciousness. The fact that when we when we think about. What it is that we would like to see in a just world. We usually only imagine this country. And that's problematic. Whoever told us that the nations where the best forms of of human community. As a matter of fact, we're witnessing right now. The the fact that the nation has become so obsolete given given the fact that there are people coming from Central America. People who have whose lives have been placed in jeopardy largely as a result of the flow of capital from the US. To.

Birmingham Israel Palestine US South Africa Middle East Alabama communications technology Berkeley Brazil Central America Mike
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"It's you know, Islamic groups all transnational groups to some extent many of the nationals groups period. And it was you know, because it was the outstanding issue that came out of our best perations after World War Two. And it was not let's not forget, you know, most of the measure r. Wars up until that period were fought between Israel now upstate's, obviously, there was also that you're on Iraq war, which was quite devastating later on. But initially that was the story on I think generation after generation of odds rule up on that. And the story hasn't died because every once in a while a flare up, and it brings people back to this issue. And I think when you look at you know, in the polling just I use that as a test. You know, when you ask people who do you admire most or whom do you dislike most I don't really use that as popularity contest. I just I find. So what's the mindset there? Why are they thinking of people the way they think jock Sharar sometimes that use them has unless rely Shii leader or doin who's a non Arab leader. Hugo Chavez, these people that rise to the top over the years. As most admire leaders now world and all of them are tied to. To the question of pasta because this is a sub-conscious measure people saying do I like the Spurs or not is this person? Good on Israel, Palestine, dispersion, not good on Israel Palestine that used to be part of the measure not for old, but for large number of Arabs as as a shortcut in doesn't mean that people like the Palestinians people like, but they used to that that was sort of a sub-conscious prism through which people made an evaluation thing that you put it in terms of pain. Like, this is something people really feel was humiliating to them personally living, you know, maybe in Morocco, or you know, countries that really don't have direct connection. This is source of humiliation. I mean, look at the social media even now about how humiliating for example, with reports about Israel, normalizing the Gulf states, look at the discourse of the opposition humiliating humiliating is what you hear the word you hear? Yes, I hear that ought. Sure. I mean, this is and people would Email me. Who would you know on some of the social media? It's because they see it as you know, breaking with their sense of self. They should as going against themselves going against who they are. Now, it has changed a little bit. And what what I mean by that number one. It was never true that governments really cared that much. They cared. A little don't get me wrong. They fought over this issue in a yeah. You can call their political maneuvers as political. But look, you know, the still went to war with Israel and forty eight and sixty seven and fifty six of course, that initiate and seventy three and yeah, they were our territories involved as well beyond posting. Territories. But still you know, they cared upto point. But the public was a different story there. So it as the Prisma pain. Now, of course, you have something a little bit different. You have governments who not only don't see it as a priority issue to them. But the don't. Even feel like they have to pay as much lip-service did before. And they are trying to change the narrative that the people have that it central because they think that if they allow that narrative to be sustained it'll come back to haunt them because they want to have relations with Israel. And if the public doesn't like it it will play into the hands of the opposition. So Palestine has become an opposition issue? The question is whether succeeding now, you can argue that the Palestinian question has diminished for the public as well since the album prices for a lot of reasons, there are the priorities. I mean, if you Syrian or if you're Libyan or Yemeni or an Iraqi when you you're so entrapped with your own and from my pulling in the region, I can tell you not for my pulling sorry from our colleague Shikaki polling. We know that Palestinians are highly aware of exactly that they know that they're preoccupied. Sure, the preoccupied this is not a top priority for many of them..

Israel Palestine Hugo Chavez Morocco jock Sharar Iraq Spurs Shii
"israel palestine" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Population exchanges, mass, deportation, forcible de-nationalization minority rights treaties and refugee resettlement are those inherent to political partition. I think what by the time we reach World War Two and a special deposed were partition partition became this sort of package deal as I like to call it. So it's not only about drawing lines on maps. It's not only about much more. Yeah, my colleagues are doing the polish Commonwealth. They're using the term permission, but this is exactly not a partition into sense. I, we are talking about. It's about creating new sovereign nation state. So it's about this hyphenated creature, call nation state, which is very important and about creating a clear majority in potentially ethnic cleansing would be method of achieving it in Daphne state. So this is the package deal. Now my norppa normative and empirical rhetorical arguments are intermingled in that respect because there is a sort of an assumption, not only among politicians, but sometimes Amman some political scientists that still consider partition to be empirically sound conflict resolution method. There is an assumption that empirically it worked that empirically it was successful, but this is what I want to challenge because you have one line that sort of encapsulates. I think the point that I would like to raise which is you say something like all other partitions laid the groundwork for future conflict. And I think that what you see in the policy community is. That they point to certain examples where that's just not the case. So for example, the velvet divorce right of Czech Republic and Slovakia. They're not at war. Now, Serbia Montenegro, separated by referendum by agreement in two thousand six. They're not at worn out. Now, here's the touchier examples, Sudan, and south Sudan or not at war with each other, south Sudan of courses embroiled in terrible civil war. And maybe the most ambiguous example for now would be Kossovo, which is, of course a partition of Serbia, but and they're, they're not at war. The trajectory is to accept that partition doesn't look. Let's go back to war, but it's very complicated because it's not over obviously. So is it true that all partitions lead to ongoing conflict? Or is that a little too categorical? That's two categorical. I won't go dot DAT far, but I would definitely challenge few of the assumptions in these aid to question is water. The type of entities that emerge out of these Titian. If these are Lee put states cannot pull themselves economically in terms of natural resources in terms of militarily. Depend on other bigger bigger entities. You actually, you know, pave road often to neocolonial types type regimes, but this is contemporary contemporary affairs. I would if I will go back to, you know, maybe the two classic aces which Israel Palestine, India, Pakistan. I think that part of the assumption and maybe this is where we have a bit of a dialogue of with some of the conflict resolution are thinkers that assume partition is the best solution. There is sort of an assumption that partition is an one. It's an act in. It's an event in history that finished, maybe like these really like to call its Bendigo. It was very violent. It was very cruel, but and we have to remember that they mentioned, right. No, we're familiar with the with the case of of the nineteen forty eight war in in Palestine and expulsion of roughly seven hundred thousand Palestinians. That was in that respect war partition in order to take the theory and put it into practice, you had to do this and also the case of Pakistan and India. The numbers are simply breathtaking. We're talking about me as we did to this day. We cannot even know the exact number of refugees and people that were forcedly forced to leave their houses. We're talking about rapes of roughly seven hundred fifty thousand women. So the violence in that event is quite astonishing. But there's also an assumption that after this, you know the storm ended peace reigned the area. And I think that both the case of India, Pakistan, and the case of Israel Palestine shows exactly in shows too many evidence to the contrary. So a in the case of India, it was very clear that partition was an impact solution. And for instance, we tend to forget that was an an entity. We called East Pakistan. Suddenly you hen again, the partition continued on and you have Bangledesh again, process of separation that was extremely violent. The divisions led, you know, to assassinate of in the Oregon dean in nineteen Eighty-four. Sally Indians were saying, we thought the partition is past deal..

Kossovo Israel Palestine Pakistan India East Pakistan Serbia Montenegro polish Commonwealth south Sudan Sudan Czech Republic Bendigo Amman Oregon Sally Indians Lee Serbia Slovakia
Israel supporters speak out against tactics with Palestinians

World View

01:57 min | 3 years ago

Israel supporters speak out against tactics with Palestinians

"It's the real news i'm ben norton as the israeli military continues to mow down unarmed protesters in the illegally occupied gaza strip on a weekly basis some of israel's most high profile supporters have begun to speak out against it's brutal oppression of the palestinians early this april one of hollywood's biggest actresses natalie portman ignited a firestorm when she announced that she would not be attending a major awards ceremony in israel in protest of its violence in gaza in response the genesis prize foundation which oversees what has been described as the jewish nobel prize canceled its price ceremony in israel natalie portman has been a longtime vocal supporter of israel she was born in jerusalem and has dual u s and israeli citizenship but now even some of the most prominent liberal zionists that is liberal supporters of the political movement and the israeli ethno state even they are publicly criticizing israel's extreme rightwing government since march thirtieth palestinians living in the illegal israeli besieged gaza strip have held weekly peaceful demonstrations as part of what they called the great march of return these really military has responded by massacring on armed protesters at least forty palestinians have been killed including journalists and young teenagers more than five thousand gazans have been injured israeli soldiers have shot thousands of unarmed palestinians with live ammunition joining us to discuss the growing divide between what liberals zionists say about israel and what's actually happening on the ground is alibaba nima alibaba is the director of the electric intifada he is also the author of several books about israel palestine thanks for joining us thank you ben so what do you think about this.

Ben Norton Israel Hollywood Natalie Portman Gaza Nobel Prize Jerusalem Alibaba Director
"israel palestine" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"Absolutely i think with in with in the academic community they are as well and then within genomics they're sort of biological anthropologist people who work on paleo stuff and so on and so forth but i kind of want to just go back to that question like the fact that we're addressing this in public form in public facing way is really important because the majority of people in my field would never go near it they would you you know know they would ran off the stage already so with all of that being said i i want to just repeat this clint sort of mentioned this and hit it on the nose he was very elegant in describing this sort of interface with race engineer but there is no basis for race in terms of biology there just isn't it's a socially constructed phenomenon generally speaking i can give you tons of examples of this you know we're talking about partition india israel palestine you know all of these different conflicts all these things kind of center around separating people from resources and using things that we kind of confuse signatures of race we get it confused with missing a lot of the times but one thing that's really important is something like skin color is a genetic component agent netted variant that contributes to something that's physically observable that's what we call phenotype the word we use to describe it but that is not associated with race i e a social construct these things are like oil and water and it causes a lot of controversy within our field people generally don't do a good job handling these sorts of questions i hope i'm doing justice.

engineer clint
"israel palestine" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"israel palestine" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

"And i will enjoy it ethnic linking findings so sip of your favorite things about being a five if you were gonna look at you know the strengths of a five for the things that you feel like you agreeing to the table what are some of those things i think that a solves capacity to focus to go long and deep i am it's hard to say is that is i love my ability to do that and i think that is a function of my five nece you is to spend you know maybe it spending a three or four hours going into something and being able to hold focus but also there are things i have been studying for years i've been reading about israel palestine for over twelve years and i love that you know we can continue to go deep and discover new facets it's like i'm not easily board there's always something new that can be learned and added to a body of knowledge that we can continue to develop and i yeah i'm a lifelong lerner and so i think my five nece serves me well and i i enjoy that i hope that that informs my work that it allows me to have work is more um um durable because it isn't just something that it came up with yesterday but some things that i laboured over with much love but i hope that that allows me to bring something substantive to conversations that i want to contribute to present i hope that that's what my five nece facilitates uh i certainly think so you are one of my favorite people listen to and you know what's interesting about about you and i i think this is probably of part of of five type as well.

israel palestine twelve years four hours