25 Burst results for "Isley"

"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

In the News with Mike Dakkak

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

"Saying you <Speech_Male> know what <Speech_Male> this is wrong. <Speech_Male> These <Speech_Male> guys are getting <Silence> bad information <Speech_Male> from health <Speech_Male> director. <Speech_Male> Who's really not <Speech_Male> a doctor. I mean <Speech_Male> he's got an md <Speech_Male> but he's not actually <Speech_Male> doctor. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> He's a bureaucrat. <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> ran <SpeakerChange> cal optima <Speech_Male> before he <Speech_Male> became the public <Speech_Male> health director. <Speech_Male> So he's a bureaucrat. <Speech_Male> he's not treating patients. <Speech_Male> He's not a clinician <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and yet he's telling <Speech_Male> people stay home we're <Speech_Male> a mask and wait for <Silence> a vaccine <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> we know that's not the right <Speech_Male> policy <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> we decided you <Speech_Male> know what we stand up. <Speech_Male> And how do we do <Speech_Male> that. And we're <Speech_Male> watching our board of supervisors. <Speech_Male> Every <Silence> two weeks <Speech_Male> voting <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> to spend <Silence> money <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> vaccines <SpeakerChange> on <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> ventilators et cetera <Speech_Male> et cetera et cetera. Instead <Speech_Male> of actually <Speech_Male> looking <Speech_Male> for alternatives alternatives. <Speech_Male> That would be good for <Speech_Male> our population. <Speech_Male> you know. We <Speech_Male> love austin <Speech_Male> good beach where i live <Speech_Male> california <Speech_Male> where i live. We <Speech_Male> lost over four <Speech_Male> hundred businesses <Speech_Male> when tenth of our businesses <Speech_Male> closed <Silence> last year <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> number <Silence> count. <Speech_Male> I'm sorry <Music> this is permanently <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This is from the <Speech_Male> lockdown. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> when <SpeakerChange> you have this <Speech_Male> happen you <Speech_Male> have to ask yourself. <Speech_Male> Why are the policies <Speech_Male> that these guys <Speech_Male> if you'd spousing. It's <Speech_Male> causing worn damaged <Speech_Male> by far <Speech_Male> than it's <Speech_Male> helping <Speech_Male> as we know <Speech_Male> now you <Speech_Male> know. The cdc has <Speech_Male> verified twice <Speech_Male> now april <Speech_Male> twenty six last year <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> april fifteenth <Speech_Male> of this year. <Speech_Male> They verify <Speech_Male> that only six <Speech_Male> percent <Speech_Male> of the people who <Speech_Male> were marked as kobe <Speech_Male> deaths actually died from <Silence> code. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ninety four <Speech_Male> percent died with <Speech_Male> code <Speech_Male> but it was not <Speech_Male> the inciting <Silence> factor <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> there. Copd <Silence> <Speech_Male> stop <Speech_Male> it right there. This is something <Speech_Male> that you've heard <Speech_Male> many many times dying <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> covid <SpeakerChange> versus <Speech_Male> dying with cova <Speech_Male> but you see the <Speech_Male> the the <Speech_Male> refreshing <Speech_Male> nece <Speech_Male> if you will of <Speech_Male> someone who knows <Speech_Music_Male> someone who has <Speech_Male> a background <Speech_Male> at least in the medical <Silence> profession <Speech_Male> versus <Speech_Male> elected politicians <Silence> who don't <Speech_Male> and are just <Speech_Male> listening to <Speech_Male> things being <Speech_Male> information <Speech_Male> coming down from on <Speech_Male> high <Speech_Male> and you have people like <Speech_Music_Male> brian who are on the <Speech_Music_Male> front lines. They are boots <Speech_Male> on the ground <Speech_Male> and these people are <Speech_Male> sitting in their ivory towers <Speech_Male> and they think they know <Speech_Male> more. This <Speech_Music_Male> is the value of <Speech_Male> patriots. <Speech_Male> Brian <Speech_Male> and others who <Speech_Music_Male> are on the <Speech_Male> front lines <Speech_Male> and are taking <Speech_Music_Male> the information that they're <Speech_Music_Male> seeing accurate <Speech_Male> truthful <SpeakerChange> information <Speech_Male> and attempting <Silence> to <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> elected politicians. <Speech_Male> Who were espousing. <Speech_Male> Other <Speech_Male> information <Speech_Male> holding them <Speech_Male> accountable. This <Speech_Male> is the value <Speech_Male> of the movement. <Speech_Male> This is the value <Speech_Male> of the democratization <Speech_Male> of information <Speech_Male> and this is why <Speech_Music_Male> censorship <Silence> is. It's it's <Speech_Male> so people like <Speech_Male> brian can't bring <Speech_Male> you the information that <Speech_Male> they're seeing <Speech_Male> and you have to believe <Speech_Male> what's coming down <Speech_Male> from the ivory <Speech_Music_Male> towers. <Speech_Male> Will we do <Speech_Male> everything we can to make sure <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> voices like <Speech_Male> brian's are amplified <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> so head <Silence> on over to the site <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> check out <SpeakerChange> the rest of the <Speech_Male> interview. It's really eye <Speech_Male> opening We <Speech_Male> spoke for <Speech_Male> about an hour <Speech_Male> a little bit more than <Speech_Male> an hour <Speech_Male> and we talked about <Speech_Male> a lot of good information <Speech_Male> about vaccines <Speech_Male> about the board of <Speech_Male> supervisors out <Speech_Male> there by medical <Speech_Male> tyranny and <Speech_Male> about the overall <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> movement <Speech_Male> of powerful <Speech_Male> elites <Speech_Male> trying to <Speech_Male> get individuals <Silence> to succumb <Speech_Male> to censorship <Speech_Male> into <Speech_Male> their <Silence> forms of control. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> our update for today. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for joining us. We'll see next time. In the meantime take care yourselves and each other.

cdc california patriots
"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

In the News with Mike Dakkak

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

"Italy and coming out of china area in. We'll okay this is a bad flu but it's treatable so we started doing the research on it and when we found out it was a krona virus we started doing research on the prior coronavirus and we found on the national institute of health website. Which dr fauci actually funded. This study. He did a study in two thousand six on sars. Kobe won and he stated that hydroxychloroquine. While clark they hydroxy have when at the time was ninety nine percent effective in curing. Sars covy one so logically. If you know something has worked where do you start you. Start with the thing that worked right so we started doing all the research and research showed give him hydroxy and then we ran across ivermectin. Give him ivermectin do nebulous hydrogen peroxide clean the lungs out. So we started doing that and the whole time. We're hearing from the public health. People and from our board of supervisors home wear masks. Wait for a vaccine. And while we're seeing bodies piling up now from mistreatment putting somebody on a respirator. When they don't have lung congestion what they have is inflamed are inflamed blood vessels in the lungs which is causing them not to be able to breathe. That's why the nebulizer. Hydrogen peroxide in iodine along with ivermectin or hydrochloric when clears that out in two or three days and we had people come in who are very ill. I mean like they were at the point of they were gonna go to the hospital and they would probably die as they would put on a mental later and then they would probably die so we were able to bring them back. I mean some of them came in and they were great. They had their oxygen sats. Were down into the eighties. They were not in good shape at all and took longer for those guys about a week week and a half and then they were fine so this whole time. I was trying to get our order. Supervisors and several other physicians. Were trying to get the supervisors to at least listen to the idea of early treatment modalities and they just refused to this day. They have not listened at all so we have that medical issue right. Were kind of going. Why so.

dr fauci national institute of health flu Kobe Italy clark china
"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

In the News with Mike Dakkak

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

"They're out there in orange county california and they're working very hard to hold elected officials out there accountable. I have been detailing. How the board of supervisors out there. In orange county california has been doing everything in its power to make voters feel like they are serving the board. Instead of the board serving the people the public will come down to meetings and voiced their displeasure with actions being taken by the board and the board will just completely stiff form them and not give them the time of day. They will be dismissive. They will be disrespectful. They will treat them with contempt and disdain and that is forest residents out there to consider recalling each and every one of them. It's a five person board. The board of supervisors is the governing body of orange county and so one of those individuals who has kind of taken up arms taken up activists arms that little arms against the board of supervisors. Is brian eisley. He joined us today for a lengthy conversation. I'm gonna play you an excerpt of it here and you can find.

orange county california board of supervisors brian eisley
"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"Welcome back to. Gmc book view podcast and the conclusion of my interview with christine eisley farmer. Remember that before the break we were talking about race and issues that have been facing this country in the past well way too years of course but definitely been more in the forefront lately but We're going to change the subject slightly as we go into the conclusion of this interview Well on a slightly different note the whole that was all very very important but I know you have a website so you can share. Your website will where people can find you on social media. Yes i can. I'm on facebook. Instagram twitter and lincoln lane on all of them Okay and On my facebook. I have an author page and personal page so i have two different pages. So people are interested from the standpoint they can friend me on my On my Author page okay. Oh i did have a website and it's www dot good reads by christine i. Hris t. e. dot com. And if you go on that you can look at well I just think it's a really nice website. But you can read more about me and also you can read reviews that have come out about the book. If you're thinking about buying it for child you can your child or children. You can read what other people had to say about it. you can also order the book from my website because it has buttons for barnes and noble and amazon and of course has bookshop on their to So i wanted to include the indie Bookstores as well but Yeah that's where you can sign me and if you also if you want to sign up for i haven't really started it yet because we've been so busy with promoting the first book that but i do have you can sign up for a newsletter or Give me your email and contact you. If i have if i have something special i want to offer you or to just to keep you in touch with what's going on all right. Thank you well christine. We've talked about a lot of different things today. But is there anything that we haven't touched on that. You were hoping to be able to talk about during our time together. I think that you Act you ask about every question that You sent me john. I think we covered it all all right. Well i wanna thank you so much for taking the time out of your weekend. Talk to me and talk theresa who has Disappeared to go do other things now. But i'm thinking so much for letting her join us. Well i loved it. It was wonderful to have a young reader in on the conversation. Talk loved the boy. He's excited about the next one. Oh good well she. She likes mystery. She'll like this when the well thank you so much. You're welcome so thank you once again to christine for joining me and especially for being so kind and leading research be part of the interview. She did not have to do that. I asked ahead of time if she would mind and she said absolutely so. Thank you christine for that for your wonderful conversation. The the the wonderful conversation that we had and they really enjoyed not only the conversation but also the book finding my yip. I am looking forward to reading more about boomers and chloe's adventures as the series continues seeing where that takes them and learning more about nana's magic because we know she has it. We don't know much about it beyond the fact that she has it and Recently both have questions. We were actually very glad when christine explained it a little more in the book. Because it's alluded to in the first parts of the book. And then morris explained in recent. I kept saying what what. What does this rang what what is going on so again. We thoroughly enjoyed it. And if you have children in the age range that age range seven to twelve or even older really you know your your children or grandchildren or nieces nephews cousins. Whatever you know they're reading preferences probably so if you have someone in that age range or someone that you think would enjoy this book. You should definitely check it out him and again. Finding my hip and the author is christine is the farmer. I know i've said that a million times but want to get that stuck in everybody's brains. I hope that you will join me for the next interview. I be interviewing Me up he manansala. And i hope i said that right I probably didn't. I will double check Without her book it is a cozy mystery. It is called arsenic and adobe adobo adobe arsenic and adobo might be time for me to shut things down. I can't remember my words today Arsenic and adobo. Let me say that again. It is a cozy mystery. Please join me for that interview. The book is a lot of fun and my conversation with me was also a lot of fun. Hope you're a great day. Hope that You're surviving the heat wherever you are. It is unseasonably warm here in montana. Hi brought the california weather with me. No one is happy. I have to apologize to the entire state of montana for the heat. But i hope wherever you are you either have a break from the heat or some really good. So thank you for joining me. If you're a fan of this podcast Please do leave us. A review that can be written that can be a starred review also. Please follow the podcast on social media. Facebook twitter and instagram. I love to hear from readers and listeners. Let me know what you're reading. Let me know if you have Authors that you'd like to see on the podcast. I can't guarantee that. I will get them on here. But i i'd love to hear your thoughts and as i was saying wherever you are whatever the temperature. I hope that your day is affording you plenty of time to get yourself lost in a good book. Thanks you've been listening to the golden state media concepts book review. Podcast part of golden state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at. www dot gs mc podcast dot com download. Our podcast on itunes stitcher soundcloud and google play just type in gs mc to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast network from movies to music from sports to entertainment and even reared news. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program..

christine christine eisley facebook barnes twitter noble theresa amazon nana chloe morris montana john adobe instagram california google
"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"The feet.

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"I've been so busy getting these others Ready to go to the publisher and the illustrations all all of that that Had written yet but the other. They're five for sure all right and A little bit about the illustrator and howl you work together well. Illustrator is Here in murfreesboro where. I live and i actually met him through his father who is now z. his father and i were co colleagues and school of music faculty as father were it was a pianist and his mother is a cellist and she taught there she was an adjunct for a while there too. But i had asked taylor. Bill is my illustrator When i was the opera director at issue i knew about his talent from his parents and he developed he designed to these sets for me for the opera program and i had sort of fog with him along and i knew that he was great at illustrating so when i came up with the idea of these books that's all he's the number one person i wanted to ask and luckily he has been willing to work with me on the well. So far on the set. We've only the the illustrations have been played it for the the second book. My hope it's gonna fall through all of the series. Yeah that'd be wonderful. That'd be wonderful. all right. Recent has another question why did wrong. Why did you want to become a writer. Oh that's that's also another interesting question. We would think that. I had had seen as i had had a singing career. Where did riding come from well Even as a child I made up stories. I can remember in fifth. I made up a story about the missing white station wagon. it wasn't a little miss three and And i do right poem. I mean before i retired. I was already writing points and I started writing these books before. I retired I didn't have a lot of time to right. During the academic year but in the summertime. When i was not teaching fulltime i started writing the story. So the kernel of riding has always been there but the thrust of making it more of A thrust of more energy into writing Has happened more since retirement and that's been retired for years. I've been retired from my university position for year. But i like what ought to be retired. Exactly in fact. I was still teaching when The university was closed down for the pandemic. So i had to finish out the semester teaching zoom which. I had never done before. So i had to be a quick learner and so the student had to be quick learners to actually it's been a good year For writing because you're not pulled into all of these outside activities that you know one is usually pulled into row regard whether you're retired or not. I'm i'm already getting more busy with things outside of my writing Because things have revved up again you're able to meet again. I'm going to also say another thing about riding. We need to think of the winding. Its voice to and so for years. I sang and that was expression of my voice. My singing voice but riding is also expression of a voice. So i feel like it's very compatible with my singing career He can cook. You know you said you. You wrote a story. In fifth grade about a white station wagon missing white nationwide waiting. We'll reset just finished fourth grade. So should be going into fifth grade in the fall. And i love right right mystery. Also we saw. When i got here she gave me a gift of a couple of her stories that she's written so it's very exciting and i love that she she loves to read and write and now i've been barrister and she's making the bears face. Well reese i think that's wonder- wonderful. What's the name What are the name of your story that you wrote abigail smith but the mischief the cemetery with salmon city yeah san shady book one alleys simpson and the office autobiography. Then does the second hour. Yo smith which. I don't remember the name of it was about then being kidnapped. Oh goodness yes. She didn't realize she was quite as prolific. You are well you. Are you familiar with goosebumps series goosebumps. Rl stein never read those of their you. Oh that's yeah actually. I'm reading yana. Lessons can be murder right now. Oh no but you know. I think it's important when you When you are children's book writer you ride. You read children's books too. I agree though. I'm i had never read charlotte's web. And so i live off that. Have you read that. I read it. I have it in my cupboard. Yep yep so. I'm i'm getting started on that because i never. That came out after you know. I was already an adult but i like children's books. Yes what i'm going to go back. I'm writing book. I'm going to go back and read some of these like maggie and the magic tree house. I've read several of those. I read the mambi You know really well written children's books. I think so I just i just love that. Recent is already writing her own story. I do too. It's wondering when a jump in here so we can take our second break of the podcast. But i know i'm a little biased. But i'm hoping that someday i'll be interviewing reza for this book review podcast once she puts you know more stories together and get some of those published. I think that'd be awesome. If that's what she decides she wants to do when she grows up right now. She's got about fifty two different options. What he wants to do. Depending on what day you dr salah take that break when we come back. We'll be hearing from christine about her advice for aspiring authors. Stay tuned you're listening to the gmc book review podcast. And i'll be right back. Tired of searching the jungle of podcasts. Now listen close and here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching. The golden state media concept podcast network is here nothing less than a podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast coverage from news sports music fashion entertainment fantasy football and so much more so stop lurking around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to fill that. Podcast is whatever it may be visit us at. Www dot s mc podcast dot com. Follow us on facebook and twitter.

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"Probably depends on each reader exactly and and a re Recess is can right. he's ten yet and it's fairly easy. Read for her wasn't it. Yeah in fact i. I was reading allowed to her and her sister and she would sometimes correct me when i missed a word so she was reading right along with me. That's good okay. Now redmond wonder fan most of the words and the vocabulary. Yes were there any words. You didn't understand. You remember. If i did i have. Yeah there you go. If she did she asked her mom it so good all right so you have the next question to ask well. Why don't you inspiration for right. What was the inspiration for my story. Well we had a lot. I had a lot of inspiration for the story I would say that my inspiration is from my own background of being a child who loved to sing dance and act. I used to play in my yard and make up songs and even get together with Neighborhood children and we would put on shows we would throw of all things we were throwing like a bedspread over top of a picnic table and we were dressed underneath that picnic table. And put on our ballet costumes and our cat costumes and we would dan. We invite our parents in the neighborhood community becoming watches all perform. So the inspiration of this was to have I know children. Enjoy the arts. And i wanted to have a child who like i Wanted a love singing however she has a problem and that problem is that she has stutter as you as you know her greatest wishes to be able to sing like her grandmother because her mother is a music teacher and The may came from my childhood. Actually a lot of ways that you write for children can come from your own childhood or your own background and relation to was. I remember growing up. I had dogs and cats. And i remember i would talk to my dogs and my cats and they were. I would tell them things that. I was not always willing to see my parents. So now you've got to ship when animals and and children. I think it's important to so you talk to your dog right. Yep got a. She also has a blue but right now where he would like everyone to know. She's been drawing sidewalk. Chalk on the front of the front porch and the dog keeps rolling in it. So blue blues. Aw nothing nothing. What's your dog's nagy so well. Well you're lola. Yeah well okay. Well you might have to change that name to blue or or be lola. Blue yup good love like christine. Can you talk a little bit. More about chloe who is the human character and boomer. Who is the puppy What about them and their relationship. You think will resonate with your readers. Well i think that you know what. I just said about that intimacy between dogs animals and humans. And whether you're don't i felt and i i have a cavalier king charles spaniel like the one in the book You know i. I talked to him all the time. you know. I think the relationship between humans and animals is very important and no matter. What the animal is i think. At any age we can find some kind weather so horse or a ghost or oh a cat bird There's something about that between humans and animals to me. That's very important. So i think that reading this book you can learn that but also khloe is in a difficult situation because this is not explained in the book but this is part of my back story. Which is you know you that. I developed my characters in back story before i start writing. Moe's story is that her parents were killed in a car wreck. Yeah and she had a stutter before that but the fact that she has to move to live with her grandmother and a new community going to a new school making new friends has increased the problem that she has with her daughter and also it has affected her confident No this dog. This puppy who is in the home of her grandmother. Who was taking care of the momma dog and the three puppies while the owner is away on a trip She notices that slowly writes poetry and she notices that Her grandma went up after she goes upstairs to get her portugal book and oh get her poetry book She notices that nanna is in the kitchen singing and she notices that the other puppy start to sort of along with nana's singing and boomer tries to do so but he can't He's like his hip pop. Yeah she Whispers in his ear. You remember reading this. I wish i could sing like now. Yep so we have a bond. We have empathy between two beings. Yes and i think that's important to learn to know a little bit about coq. Chloe and her problem we stuttering and what her main desire is and you learned that in the third you learned that in the first chapter. I want sing like my my nanna. Yeah mobile making is. She can't she doesn't have the confidence. It's not just the ability. She doesn't have the confidence. So that's where the bomb is that. That's where the bond between the two come time to take our first break of the podcast when we come back. We'll be talking a little bit about a coincidental youtube video. That recently and i watched that reminded us both of the dog in this story. So stay tuned. You're listening to the gmc book review podcast. And i'll be right back. You want to be healthier yet. You just don't know what to do all these shows telling you this and that but nothing seems to work will listen close. Golden state media concepts has got something great for the health and wellness podcast dedicated to workout. Healthy eating habits. Diane everything about healthy living. Join us in our as we help you not just live life to.

lola redmond nagy charles spaniel dan chloe khloe christine Moe nanna nana portugal Chloe youtube Diane
"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"isley" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"Host. Sarah i am coming to you once again from giant bear studios in the spare room in my parents house in montana's so welcome back to this crazy little makeshift studio i of going on. I am so excited about today's episode. Because i got the opportunity for my ten year old needs to ask some of the questions and she was really excited And sues really excited a little nervous and She was kind of bouncing around in her chair. And so she she. She asked some of the questions. And and then at one point toward the end as we were chatting a little more She just kind of wandered away. She went and got a snack or whatever but anyway. She asked all the questions that she was supposed to ask and she really liked the book and she loved being able to be a part of this so again. Her name She my ten year. Old as i've mentioned her probably a million times. Her name is reza. she'll be eleven the end of august and so much fun. I was laughing when we started reading the book. The book by the way is Finding my hip by christine eisley farmer and i was reading it to only my ten year old niece but also my fifteen year old niece was hanging out with us and listening and my sister was doing something in the same room that we in and so we opened the book in the first line of the book is something like mommy had just finished giving us. Our tongue baths melt. Focus went what we had not realized that the book was told from the point of view of the dog which it is It is is told from the point of view of the puppy in the story. So that made reset even happier because in a former life she was a dog. I'm telling you she loves dogs so very much. She has approximately eight million stuffed dogs in her possession in her collection and she loves them and she pretends to be a dog and so this was the perfect book for her to for for us to read together and for her to join me on this interview. Let's let me tell you what the book is about. Obviously there's a dog in it again. It's called finding my yip. It's the first book in a series of Books that will be called boomers tales boomer. That's the dog is a cavalier king. Charles spaniel who is unable to yip boor lives with nanna. Weather's a musician who possesses a magic ring. Boomer quickly bonds with nana's nine year old granddaughter. Chloe who has a stutter her big wish is to sing like nanna khloe and boomer make new friends at dog obedience school and grow their confidence by learning up. Excuse me by teaming up in the music room and gaining a little help from their friends will khloe and boomer find their voices so there's a little bit of magic. There is a wonderful relationship between a nine year old girl and her dog again. That was something else that was relatable for reza. Who's a little bit older than khloe but understands and you'll hear reza has some trouble with her r's so she's working on that so she could definitely understand some of the issues that that khloe and boomer go through in fact and the car the other day she was reading squirrel girl and she had told my mom her nanna again another another coins. Another thing in common that she has with khloe She had told nanna that the other day that squirrel girl was a really good book for her to read and to practice reading out loud because she needs to work on her ours so she is working on those ours and while i know that the the little bit of a speech. It's not really a speech impediment but you know. A children often have issues with certain letters. I know that she needs to work on those ours. But part of me will be a little sad when the ours with the the cute Cute the way she speaks now goes away. But i know that you know she has to grow up so at any rate let's go ahead and turn to the interview with christine. So she can tell you more about the writing of the book Her inspiration for boomer and chloe how many books she wants to see in the series etc again at the book is called finding my hip. The author is christine is lee farmer. Hi christine welcome to the podcast. Thank you sarah. It's nice to be with you today. We're excited to have you here As i mentioned before. I'm here with my ten year old niece reza and she's going to be asking some of the questions. We're going to be talking about your book finding my hips. But before we get to the book. Can you share a little bit about yourself so my listeners can get to know you. Yes i'd be happy to do that. i am a former professional classical singer. And now we're retired university. Professor where i coordinated the voice area and taught voice related courses And my My writing career began. We'll before now. Because i was riding academic articles for publications but creativity. Writing started as a childhood after my retirement. I decided that. I wanted to write these. This series of books so That's a little bit about myself and my background. So it may that leads into talking about finding my lip. Yep down listening finding my hip to lilly and we could probably do a whole podcast just on your professional singing career because it sounds like you had some Was reading your the biography on the book and it sounds like you've had some pretty cool experiences i have. I was lucky enough to live in europe for awhile and sing in a house there for six years and travelled in england and ireland and And i have also sung with a regional opera companies here in the united states. And that's before. I started my academic career as a teacher All right well can you share The premise of finding my. Yep okay i think finding my year is a book about him. Work trust and friendship between humans and humans and animals and animals with animals in my finding my yip. The animals our dogs right. Yes and what This is for younger readers. What age group would you say is the best for this. This book well amazon has it for ages. Seven to twelve but okay in the book is nine year old khloe so usually must most readers like to read up all right so i think i think it's all right for a twelve year old also but It's probably if you're reading to your child. I think you could really five or six year old would appreciate it to as long as you explained what works and there's a glossary in the back of the book anyway. That helps out with that for children. Who are re or or learning to read their tricky words that they need to know the meanings of but with very blonde wealthed twin seven to twelve right but most most parents are our caregivers are gonna know the the you know what their children are capable reading and interested in reading so it.

khloe reza christine eisley yip boor nanna khloe christine Charles spaniel lee farmer montana Sarah nana nanna Chloe chloe sarah lilly ireland europe england united states
"isley" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"isley" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Com available anywhere on our I heart radio app now number one for podcasting news radio WFLA and I heart radio station can't descend into anarchy I'm Lisa listen Arraf fox news those words from president trump after seeing last night the violent protests in Minneapolis in response to the death of George Floyd while in police custody the president says he understands people are upset hurt and upset there were a lot of different people and they were good people too and they were purchasing and they were protesting for the right reason they were protesting in honor of the man George Floyd where something happened that could have happened residents said he spoke with Floyd's family and expressed his condolences the now former police officer Jerry Johnson was charged earlier today with third degree murder and manslaughter the three other former officer seen on video with him have not been charged but prosecutors say they have not ruled it out a curfew in effect tonight in Minneapolis and St Paul as the national guard is called in to help keep order but in Atlanta protests that turned violent in the downtown with at least one fire being set there was also locked out of the White House where demonstrators have gathered outside the game protests continued property across the U. S. after violent clashes the night before in Phoenix protesters lobbed rocks and bottles police responded with pepper spray and stun grenades in Louisville shots from inside the crowd injured two seriously as riot police fire paintballs and tear gas unless they're not just over the events in Minneapolis but the killing of Brianna Taylor an unarmed black woman shot in her apartment by police executing a controversial no knock search warrant gunfire also lifting in Denver as protesters paint black lives matter at the state capitol the block traffic thanks Isley loginis president trump taking further action against China ending of any special treatment for Hong Kong in an effort to punish China for its plans to impose new security legislation there America is listening to fox news from the Florida central credit union homeless traffic center the earlier crash reported on two seventy five south on that was blocking a lane near sly has been cleared out of the way traffic is now back up to speed throughout that area so if you get some minor delays due to the crash reported on the veterans expressway north bound near Hutchison road one lane blocked in that area also be on the lookout for a crash that was causing delays earlier this evening on Dale Maybury traveling northbound between Hillsborough Avenue and laugh right street currently no delays on I. for quite a few clouds around this evening also a lingering shower or thunderstorm can carry into the early evening hours temperatures near eighty four degrees very high humidity.

Florida Louisville Phoenix Atlanta Dale Maybury America Hong Kong China Isley Lisa Denver Brianna Taylor White House St Paul officer third degree murder Jerry Johnson
"isley" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

27:32 min | 2 years ago

"isley" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"So really in terms of the rates, there's a lot of variables that are going to determine where the rates themselves go, and for anybody that's in the market, and they want to know whether or not they're getting competitive rate. One resource that I highly recommend. Is Mortgage News daily? They have a daily rate survey that surveys a bunch of different lenders and puts together sort of an average rate for. For that day said just a great resource. If you're trying to figure out if what you're getting is competitive, but going back to your question. Should you wait or should you look into it right now? I would recommend looking into it right now, and being prepared right now because we don't know what's going to happen, but if it doesn't make sense for you financially to pull the trigger today. Of the terms that you're getting or the feedback that you're getting, even because as you both alluded to depending on the lender, betim lines for these processes can be extended if it doesn't make sense based on what you're hearing. I think that there is a lot of reason why it could make sense to potentially. Wait and see, but you are running the risk by waiting that. The dynamics of the market are gonNA. Change in a way that we couldn't foresee just like they did when all of this started. that the great rates historically low rates that we're currently dealing with right now will pass by. Okay, I'm sitting in a relatively strong position, right where this refinance would only help me either buffering up my cash position or lowering my payment or a mixture of both right, so it's not necessary for me either way. It makes sense right now at current rates to do that in some ways, but want to be cash position, it makes more sense, the lower the rate is the Isley isn't a blowout either more cash and maintain the same level of cash flow, or I can. Reduce My. Total financing COZMA cash outlay at a monthly basis by greater degree, so in the context of that. What do you think since it makes sense now makes more sense later and I don't want to have to close to. You're absolutely right, but if it makes sense, now I don't think that you should wait and see I. think that's a lot like trying to time the market. Okay, and I think that's sort of a good way to think about it. So if it makes sense now you may want to. To, really dig into it and see if there's an option out there for you in just to put in context, the beginning of March march ten. We hit the lowest rates that we've ever seen in. We are near. You know within a quarter percent depending on the lender, because some lenders as we mentioned, are pricing themselves out. Just on a conventional conventional and I'm not trying to jump around here, but conventional pricing is better than other types of pricing right now just because of the risk profile and the general buyer profile. Associated with conventional financing. But if you're in that market, I think that you should look at all your options perhaps do some shopping, and if you find something that really works for you in the numbers were don't hesitate.

Isley
Bigfoot Shares an Update on How Hes Handling the Coronavirus

The Howard Stern Show

05:23 min | 2 years ago

Bigfoot Shares an Update on How Hes Handling the Coronavirus

"Show. I did tell you that we had not heard from bigfoot but I do have a bigfoot update and that finally just with this because of corona. It's really weird. He did check in with us but in typical bigfoot fashion. I mean literally. It's been months since we heard from him. Shouli had been trying to track them down. We couldn't get a hold of him and I mean we do have a phone number into his house and sal or something. But I don't know what was going on. But he wasn't picking up and we didn't know we feared he was in hiding or in jail or dead but last week this is just so in keeping with bigfoot bigfoot called former Howard one hundred news reporter Jon Lieberman at now. Lieberman hasn't worked with US per year. He doesn't work here anymore. Lieberman quickly being the excellent news person he is and since he receives superior training from me. Howard Stern Lieberman was able to record the call so we can hear POW bigfoot to doing so thank you John for that right off the bat. Bigfoot said he didn't have corona virus. He wanted everyone to know. But who knows you know he might still get it but so far so good. Here's Big Fund Mark. I'm Li- Hey It's Jon Lieberman during much what's going on. How are you doing? I wanted to check got too close wires yet. You don't have it yet. No I or no fever. I got a little bit of time. You have a runny nose cough but no fever. Fever what about body aches. No M- real body aches. Nellie you go show partial good only to symptoms. That's it but I think he always had a cough because he smokes and he. Yeah he's always had a terrible cough. Bigfoot is not exactly sticking to the quarantine this might shock you rub and he's still going out and it sounds like he's turned his home into a bar like a like a like hang. Hang out listen to this and see what you get out of it. How have you been doing with the lockdown? No the neural. I'm going once in a while. What have you been going out to do all going to go? Slow shop cigarettes all kinds of good stuff. So you're not staying inside. Oh you're not staying inside you know why because I have things to do. Run ALONG GHERKINS BUSINESS. So people are coming into your home blown. Yes and you think that's okay. You think that bar we out cigarette slow game. We smoked by wrinkle wind. Gore's we're go- area now and now a net slow but thinks he's running a loansharking business which I'm wondering around loansharking business. I think he probably worked for a loan shark or and I guess he's the enforcer you see him on the door you pay up you pay what you right? That's the only figure but he seems to have turned his home into a bar. So that concerned us of course concern. Jon Lieberman report him. He's violating the lockdown. But he claims he social distancing even though he's not worried about catching the corona virus. He's it's weird listened to more. What about social distancing can't stand you what what about social distance thing? That's so I gotta run coming over. Tomorrow would get me high. Yes but social. Distancing is gang Isley. Six-speed away from people. This is the way for them on top of them so when they come to your house you stay six feet away. Yes someone like that. Yeah how concerned are you about Corona virus concerns on? I don't care by gender not bigfoot attitude to have well. I don't care whether I catch it or not. Bigfoot says he still renting rooms out in his apartment. He's going businesses. He's a loan shark. He's got a bar. Tell Jon Lieberman try to get more details? But bigfoot again had trouble hearing him. This is a constant problem. I guess big foot's developed a hearing problem. Listen to this exciting exchange. Are you still renting rooms out? Even through Corona virus are you. What are you still renting rooms out? Even though corona. I don't think that's down say survive. Are you sharing bathroom and here you? Why are you sharing the bathroom and kitchen here? You are you sharing the bathroom and the kitchen again okay. I'll try you later. I'll try I'll try you a little later. Going pretty exciting it's comforting. I think to know that some things. Don't

Bigfoot Jon Lieberman Corona Howard Stern Lieberman Shouli Cough Reporter Fever Nellie Gore John
"isley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"isley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the year of the Isley Britain's leaving the E. U. has been rolled the full process do you think that undermine Strauss would you say what happens in the political arena doesn't really affects what happens in the trade arena I do think that the fruit to process the rhetoric of the Johnson administration has undermined trust and made this whole process much more difficult than it had to be the Brits not really deciding what they wanted to until quite late in the game I think that made things very difficult the bridge painting problems as the E. useful when actually it was really problems on their own side the rhetoric is I think making so many you worried that if they do trust person not to part from its own system of regulation actually Britain will try to go ahead and and tried on the cot European standards to get an edge and that's really something that they don't want in this day and age when we have access to US official intelligence drones on so one would not be possible to just dispense with trust and check up on what the other polls he's doing it depends on how heavy handed do you want to be do we want drones from another country being sent to check up on whether they your own sense of domestic regulations all meeting the text of a trade you allowing the inspectors occasional something that has been very very politically difficult for countries to accept that was a recent agreement between Mexico and the US well on the US side people really pushing hard for the inspector is and and not what became ready toxic for the Mexicans right it became a real violation of the national sovereignty the I did the American inspectors would be coming in to check up on them what they did agree to in the end was a system whereby you would have more dependent panelists from both sides that would respond to any concerns raised in Mexico it has come to this country is checking up on each other to make sure they're sticking to.

Britain E. U. Strauss Johnson administration Mexico US official
Director Kitty Green On Her New Film, 'The Assistant'

Amanpour

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Director Kitty Green On Her New Film, 'The Assistant'

"Yes definitely a lot of people went to. Hi in order to voice their concerns and realized that the HR is really see that affect the company and not the employees so a quickly kind of spit out the other end not taken seriously and and it's it's an example of gas sliding as well. He really makes her doubt herself. I self and her intentions and what she's seen but yeah we were looking for all these kind of concrete examples of this system that is structured against women. So tell me about why you decided sided to do this. What was this sort of trigger point that you feel what I could make a feature film because most of your work has been very feminist orientated but but in the documentary entry of field so far most of the work this well known why did you decide? And how did you side to make this leap into feature on on this issue. I feel like there's a lot there's been a lot of coverage in the media. There's been a lot of facts written up and there's a lot of a lot of stuff out there about assistance in what they're Judy's work love for these men but what I was interested in was getting an audience to emotionally identify with this character put really squarely putting them in her shoes. 'cause I think often the the the wedding neighbors gets thrown around this idea that oh she's she's such a horrible person and I wanted to kind of correct that and explain the kind of complexity of the situation. She's in she has no power and and she's stuck within kind of machinery so that became really important. That emotional identification describe a little bit of your own situation like you're on a film. Set your director urine charge. How do people treat you whether they're actors or or or whoever it might be who comes in doesn't quite know who's who and yeah I mean I've been on the film festival second for ten years? He is and I don't i. I guess people have never assume I'm the director why people always walk in and hand me the coach and assume I'm the assistant so I was getting very frustrated with that I was also. I'm getting like a lot of questions. Whenever I I went to Sundance a few years ago and immediately people ask me? Who gives me my ideas is it James Scott and then my two male produces and I thought you'd Never Never Oscar mail direct to that so I was there? It's really frustrating. And I think in order to change the system we conscious get rid of a few kind of bad apples we need to really kinda stupid APO- and try and get more women into the film industry and that hopefully will change things for the better. What is this film set? Is it set in the madman era. Is it set in the post. Harvey Weinstein Era Post Me To. What is the setting for your film your fictional film? It's pre- this all of the the rise rise of the METOO movement. I'd say it's before people really had an avenue or pathway or space chat about misconduct. I think things have changed a little. But there's still a lot of a lot of the behavior in the film you can still see exists today so. I think it's important to still have these compensations. How have you reacted to the reaction? What would you say has been the overwhelming reaction? Has Anything. Surprised you I mean I had a one woman in Salt Lake City. Who worked for a company and she said that she thought that character was her and really identified with it which is kind of amazing idea that it isn't just about the film industry but it's transferable to any workplace and anyone who's ever worked in an office or workplace with that didn't take them seriously Isley so that's been a really wonderful experience? I just be clear you did work in such workplace in terms of being an assistant. But you didn't necessarily have such negative experience. That's right yeah. I was at the ABC Straight in broadcasting company. And I was in the editor assistant so I press record on all the machines and I'm but I I I. It was a very safe and positive environment but I did you still there is a lot of. It's very scary to be the youngest person in the office. I guess it's very you do feel powerless in and yes I understand the character completely. Well Good luck to you as I say it's had a lot of good reviews. Everybody's talking about it very timely movie. Katie Green thank you very much

Director Harvey Weinstein Katie Green Judy Metoo Sundance Salt Lake City ABC James Scott Editor Isley
"isley" Discussed on Andrew Hackett's Illimitable Living

Andrew Hackett's Illimitable Living

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"isley" Discussed on Andrew Hackett's Illimitable Living

"To evacuate because we we had evaluated what was going on and realized that it just wasn't worth it. You know we just let's get out of. He leased them. We neither way Saif allies copy replaced but at home and everything could into be quite honest with you at time that time it was a very quiet drive. It was a nine hour ten hour drive to safety. Extraordinary circumstances with tens of thousands of other people doing exactly the same thing on the only road that was open to get out. It was not something to be quite honest with you today. I ever WANNA repeat again but in itself it was the the easiest and the lightest and most. Let's just say less fearing less as traumatic experience. You know we weren't faced with a front like many people were but it was a very quiet drive because we honestly didn't expect to come on. We didn't expect to come home. Two zero how standing in any shape or form saw because the warnings and the expectation was effectively that the fire was just gonNa push towards the ocean and nothing was going to stop it as it turned out. We're incredibly lucky because the northwesterly Salihi That was supposed to push through. That was actually forecast was actually meant on the day by nor Isley which means the FIS effectively any any. Easterly effectively meant that. The FIS pushing away from where I live. 'cause we live right on the coast right on the water so we are incredibly lucky in itself as were many other people on that particular day. But what I didn't want to do is we didn't want to be caught. In this post apocalyptic scenario where there was not parallel era literacy. There was still no food was petrol and therefore people would start effectively forced to act they worst just sheely out of the man act of the prominent stinks of survival. It's just not something we wanted to be a powder and it was definitely the right decision to Mike for us so I need to be clear talk about lot these like it was an extraordinary tragedy and it has been for a lot of people. We have been very very fortunate but my story is not even a scratch on the surface of the remarkable stories of survival that have been popping up up and down the coast in fact the stories of Harrowing Trauma. Aw Endless and with you. It's going to take us a long time.

Easterly Isley Mike
Falling and Getting Back Up

Be Great TODAY - Weekly Inspiration

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Falling and Getting Back Up

"So I felt earlier this week. I was getting out of the shower. And my equilibrium must have been off of consciousness. I fell backwards. I don't think it hurt myself but I've been taking the lead this week. I mean privates about getting older but in the same week somebody that I know I won't say who it is. I don't want them to feel bad. But they fell off their hover board for a little bit. They didn't WanNa get back on the hover board and then they also didn't want to go outside again with it I get it. I still haven't learned to ride a bike doc and partly because I fell off the badly when I was a teen and I just have to get back on. Sometimes it can be hard to get back on because you're afraid of how your past hurt but while we were watching the new lion king. My brother-in-law mentioned there's one line that's missing. That's in the original animated linking. The line. Were Rafiki says Oh oh yes the past can hurt but the way I see it you can either run from it or learn from it and they kind of made me think about when we fall and other physically or not physically early. What happens when we don't want to get back on because you remember that that hurt you remember pain that you feel? You don't WanNa get back into it. The things I've gotten back into because of the pain because of the hurt and because it's the end of the year make me think about this next year. I'm I'm GONNA fall again. Hopefully not physically but I will make mistakes this past year. I left Karaoke doing on twitch things until this past vacation where icing in from an audience three to four times. I did not want to get back into Karaoke. I didn't WanNa make the mistake of failing a song or stuff like that but after doing that Karoki. I've I started doing it again on. Twitter sings in one of the song that's on twitter. Things now is secure. Try everything from Zootopia and one of the lines. I love the secure song long is I won't give up. I won't give out try everything even though I could fail and I love that idea we could fail. We're GONNA fall. Things aren't going to go right and many times. I've failed again doing these podcasts. And you streams things that having Gone Reich on the right way but look at it Renou episode one twenty two tonight tonight. I'll be recording episode. One thirty nine of my gaming podcast protecting a dear friend about has taken twenty eight twenty nine years to finally see what what am I gives his is in this world and how I can contribute back so this week in this year when we fall when we fail. Let's get right back up. Let's continue at it again. Because Rock Isley. The person that fell off the board by the end of the day doing so much better than they were the beginning of the day and before anybody says this is not one of those words. That's going to catch on fire. We got a lot of the reviews.

Twitter Rafiki Rock Isley Zootopia Reich
"isley" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"isley" Discussed on 600 WREC

"That you have this guy and then basically his you know gospel of lovers theology of love sounds you know very nice but it's pretty much mystical mumbo jumbo that strikes at the heart of Jesus Christ in his work on the cross it was a little class he was literally with he was literally kill literally died in literally rose from the dead he said that Jesus said you know that the Romans will come and destroy Jerusalem and they would you know Jesus and self not a stone of the temple would be left one upon another they would be torn down because the gold that was in there melted in when in between the you know if owns there so they they this now the stones to get the gold so forth and in seventy AD that's when that happened through the the Roman general Titus spaces but Jesus was saying that you know shortly after that the world will and then you know it didn't and I thought he was gonna go where so many people go aronie Isley and in to the passages which are in all three of the synoptic gospels that say there are some among you here today is the last piece of death until they see the manifestations of the kingdom and then they jump on that one and say I'll see that that's it two thousand years since and so there's nobody alive that was listening to Jesus right there if you go to those three synaptic gospels you'll see right after that Jesus took his disciples up into a high mountain anywhere closer with the you know his inner circle of James John and Peter and then of Moses and Elijah representing the law and the prophets will manifest there in Jesus was transformed they've seen the glory that was contained within its flesh that that was a manifest the king of the kingdom was manifested them right there so that's what that was talking about but here's the thing well it was a good how is it going to be the single technically and logically that doesn't make any sense he said the Jews would be scattered throughout the whole world into the entrance the wandering Jew the diaspora which they were in persecuted from nation to nation then in the end times will be drawn back to Jerusalem and they'll be a rock of offense in the couple's trembling he said take this what's.

Jesus Jerusalem Isley James John Moses Elijah Peter
Memphis is giving the middle finger to the NCAA over James Wiseman's eligibility

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

10:58 min | 2 years ago

Memphis is giving the middle finger to the NCAA over James Wiseman's eligibility

"Of the weekend involves one of the biggest names in the sport fourth presumptive number one overall pick of the two thousand twenty NBA draft Memphis Freshman. James Wiseman instable a as you probably heard has inform Memphis that James Wiseman is quote likely in eligible among other things. The school announced Friday. That wise was going to be withheld from competition. Based on a rule interpretation issued by the incident this all being being tied to Penny Hardaway provided the Wiseman family with approximately eleven thousand five hundred dollars for the university called quote moving expenses. That's back when wiseman moved from Nashville. GO TO MEMPHIS in two thousand seventeen at the time. Penny Hardaway was the coach at East High School in Memphis Wiseman he ultimately enrolled at East High School in Memphis and this would be possible. NCWA regardless of the specifics. But what makes it an undeniable. NCWA issue is that in two thousand Seventeen Penny Hardaway was a memphis booster booster according to the way the NCAA defined such thing so what we have here if you destroy all the details away is a memphis. Booster providing a sizable amount of money to a five star. Prospect prospects mother to get the family to move to Memphis and then that five star prospect enrolled at the University of Memphis. There's just no logical way to argue. That's not against NCWA NCWA rules in Memphis again. Prepared to withhold. James Wiseman from competition as early as Friday afternoon. That's where we were. Why has been on the verge being held out of games but then later Friday afternoon wiseman and his attorney Leslie balanced went to court and got a temporary restraining order in Memphis in decided to allow wise men to play in Friday night's game against Illinois Chicago and for what it's worth Penny Hardaway is on record? He has said James Wiseman will continue to play next against Oregon important on on Tuesday night. Now some have suggested that the temporary restraining order force Memphis to play WII. That's just not true. No court can force a school or a coach to play a player. Even when as is good as James Wiseman Memphis simply opted to play James Wiseman for better or worse they bold move for many reasons it could lead to the Tigers first two games and any other Games Games wiseman plays in being vacated it could also lead to bigger instable issues because in the instabilities is Memphis is right now knowingly using a player it has been told hold is quote likely in eligible. So there's a lot to unpack here. Obviously but let's just start right here in Orlando what you think of Memphis is decision to play. James Wiseman under these circumstances because it is definitely not how schools typically handle these types of situations. I Love Memphis decision to play him. Because it makes for a fascinating standoff here. I Hate Memphis decision to play. Play him because my issue with this story. Perish is the institutions that have failed James Wiseman and how how he is likely to be on the wrong end of this and essentially serving as the only victim of this perhaps the Memphis program. I'm at large you know not having James Wiseman at some point in perpetuity for the remainder of the season. If we get to that point its final. Four hopes certainly take a masset but why why isn't who is trying to become the number of picking the two thousand twenty. NBA draft to be able to play for his adopted opted hometown. And here's my problem and take this where you may take it okay. Penny Hardaway becomes a booster twelve twelve years ago when the his Alma Mater ops to build hall of fame wing and his name and he is obviously a key part of that. I get all that okay. Now when that my issues intention here when that happens Penny Hardaway becomes booster. James Wiseman is there's no even real. I thought that who ever played college basketball. That point seven eight years old so then Penny Hardaway eventually gets into the coaching business. And it's been well documented community many places as to why he became a coach. That's actually a very inspirational ernest kind of story. At the grassroots level and at the high school level then James James Wiseman develops into a number one type prospect in his class wild playing on the other side of the same but while playing in Nashville so the family is moved from Nashville to Memphis. For a number of reasons. You can be cynical about it and I would encourage that But one of them Apparently because Weisman sister attended the University of Memphis Penny Hardaway agrees to help pay the moving fees as a side note It does not cost eleven thousand dollars to move all your stuff from one place to another. That is an exorbitant amount of money. And I'm sure the particular details as to Penny Hardaway providing that money what it really went to aside for moving. I'm sure those have been talked about at length and I would assume receipts have been provided. Perhaps they haven't perhaps it's a major major sticking point with this case because that is a significant amount of money we are told James Wiseman is not privy to any of this information. Now the fights against this by saying doesn't matter because and we've talked about you know these kinds of situations overall these overarching situations at Sylvia's okay specifically at Kansas. He was going to be sad for two years for not knowing what was happening and reduced it to just basically essentially once and that's why he's Villa Kansas now but regardless when that happens in two thousand seventeen gene penny hardaway is not even a candidate for the Memphis job. Tubby Smith is coaching. Penny Hardaway's coaching high school in Tennessee. The issue I have with the instability doubly ruling. The way it's ruled here is the circumstances that surrounded all of this. I think are unfairly putting James Wise Men's eligibility ability. I don't even know if I WANNA say up for debate Peres because in the eyes of the it's not for debate in fact does give you an idea via of how pissed off. The instable is in the middle of Memphis game on Friday night. And what a crazy night that was parish was in the studio for. CBS Sports Network. It says is. The University of Memphis was notified. The James Wiseman is likely ineligible. The university chose to play him and ultimately is responsible for ensuring its student. Athletes are eligible to play. That's not a common move. By the way in the midst of these cases the organization's general stance is that. It has no statement on ongoing cases. So whomever whomever cleared that is obviously really ticked off that Weisman and his legal representation. Who for my he's Leslie Ball and I know it's Balan F that he's he's Leslie Isley Baldwin and he's incredible and hoping turned around for Wiseman in the right way? I understand the way the rules are written. I have a problem with all of these circumstances affecting Weisman the way they have and I have an issue with penny and what he may or may not have told MEMPHIS MEMPHIS may or may not have known. Because here's the other deal because because this became an issue in the state of Tennessee and I'm kind of speaking back at this with pairs pairs knows all of this. Obviously he's he's talked about it for two years on his radio. Show the details of of this exact thing. We're known to the point where wiseman actually went to the court to get a restraining order to give him eligible in the first place at the high school level. So what I need to know from the standpoint is when when Wiseman was apparently cleared in May of two thousand nineteen when he still had the option to play wherever he wanted most notably Kentucky. If he wasn't gonNA play at Memphis why was he cleared. What are the what he did not know? Because here's my deal if the NC double A.. New All of this if it knew all live this and cleared him and then someone came back in late. October and said oopsy are bad or by the way we might have just missed this dangling thread on no take backs. Wise Men should not suspended over this if all of the details have been provided and I have to. Eileen I lean to believe that they have given that they went through this at the high school level. That Penny Hardaway given who he he is when Memphis brought him in when they knew his connections to all of these different kinds of players. I cannot believe there would be so much unaccountability laziness oversight on this matter. I have to believe all of this stuff was disclosed. If it wasn't to be clear if this was not disclosed Penny Hardaway knew of this and did not tell his employer employer. Then there's a real case against Weisman as much as it sucks but I am. I am opting to believe that all of this stuff was known and provided I to Memphis this and then theoretically cannot be so stupid not to have realized that the number one player in his class did not have this benefit provided to them. That's why I've got the problem if you told them took them. I'm glad you took it there because this is still a point of confusion as it relates to this specific case because if you read the lawsuit that James Wiseman has filed and certainly talk to people who are arguing that side of it. What they they will tell you is that the incidentally cleared and then they just decided to rolling ineligible just you know new information? They just changed their mind and and that may be true. At least I can't tell you it's not true but what I can tell you is it's definitely not the way Memphis. Explain the situation when it released a statement Friday night. I don't know if you saw that. But the statement the university released reads this way after a joint standard eligibility review by the university and the instable As is common for all high profile incoming student athletes James Wiseman Iceland was declared eligible by the instability in May two thousand nine hundred nine however based on information that necessitated a deeper investigation. The university began to work alongside aside the instability in investigating the matter after several months of interviews and after a review of documentation it was determined that in the summer of two thousand seventeen while Wiseman was a a high school student and Prospective Student Athlete Penny Hardaway provided eleven thousand five hundred dollars in moving expenses to assist the wiseman family in the relocation to Memphis unbeknownst to wisemen end of statement so again the lawsuit suggest that the NC Double A. changed its mind but the university statement doesn't suggest that at all what the incident delayed statement said. I mean what what Memphis statement says is listen. We did the initial eligibility review. Everything was cool. He was eligible but then based on information that necessitated a deeper investigation. So after this happened there was information. Asian that necessitated a deeper investigation and we worked on that and then after several months of interviews and after we review of documentation it was is determined that the summer of that in the summer of two thousand Seventeen Penny Hardaway provided eleven thousand.

James James Wiseman Memphis Penny Hardaway Memphis Wiseman University Of Memphis Wiseman James Wiseman Iceland Weisman NBA Nashville Tennessee East High School Ncaa Basketball CBS Orlando Tubby Smith Tigers Chicago Peres
What is a Bunyip?

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

06:59 min | 2 years ago

What is a Bunyip?

"I always thought the Bunyip was a mythical creature an aboriginal belief about a creature with supernatural for natural powers that lived in swamps billabong creeks riverbeds and waterholes that is until I went on my walkabout I walked about yeah I saw the devilish evil spirit nearly face to face living in the world of my rite of passage on my right of passage trying to make the spiritual traditional transition into manhood I so he was masturbating on his walkabout I was aware of Bunyip sightings before but I always felt that there were made up stories that were told to children to make them stay away from dangerous areas of water I had read the Bunyip said dark for face a dog sharp teeth and claws flippers a duck like bill tusks and even horns and that someone even described it as having ahead like an EMU and the body and legs of an elevator Oh my God this is just a mishmash of crap but most people who encountered them were too afraid of these futures to be able to take notice of their appearance on my walkabout I was admiring nature walking around the middle of nowhere and hoping to obtain the personal satisfaction that would make it a home alive at the end of my adventure that I took in the outback Oh my God I realized that most people usually recount their wilderness trek by exaggerating every detail of what happened happen to them adding all these details to provide extra excitement and trill by certainly not one of those storytellers my trip started out being very dull as I was and I was okay with that as I was not looking for any near death experiences are we ever yeah like maybe almost die on this about my adventure was about being far away from my towns and cities and living off the land or survive this was not an excuse for me to take a holiday or to shirk any work that I could have been doing as I consider my walkabout about to be an important institution of my Australian upbringing my mom is an aborigine and she told me about the cuss this custom and I was hoping to meet some interesting aborigines that I could communicate indicate with but this was the most walkabout I think in his rite of passage not drink his walk this is so weird but this is mostly Isley desert that I would be in and unpopular places that usually unpopulated so I might not meet anyone I wanted to embrace a lifestyle that is firmly rooted in nature and I had hoped to develop specific nick skills and talents that would allow me to respond to this rural environment this was a way for me to stop binge watching that sure is something that I had been and doing way too much of at the time I should have taken a camera with me but all I cared was my Swiss army knife I was used to sleeping out under the stars and eaten a few bugs in my day spiders riders Lizards Scorpions and snakes did not scare me eating them no just separate thought oh of all the the Scorpions spiders lizards Scorpions snakes this guy is all over I was actually really expecting him to start telling what he was watching Netflix that is as long as they were not crawling all over me I knew that is going to be a hot dry and dusty however hated the humidity and as I was not really fond of flies and Mazey's excuse probably Australian idiom I enjoyed eating kangaroo when I got hungry so I thought that I was ready but I did not possess all the the secrets of survival and I didn't realize until it was too late at read that the outback claims an average of forty lives a year and I study up all the basic survival tips for being in the outback I knew how to light a fire without matches a new enough to wear a hat and to try and stay in the shade during the day I understood that the only thing that really matters in the outback is having enough water to drink and and I knew that I could never carry too much water with me is I would not be able to survive without it my mom showed me how to locate rock formations that are prone to catch water and these with likely would be likely to be safe to drink from she also taught me how to dig up below the surface where I might find water when I came across a dry creek bread bed my big mistake was I had not spent a lot of time being in areas that are well off the beaten track areas venomous creatures are looking at every step of the way. This is exactly what I think because you know like Australia has the most venomous animals yeah well it's weird that he's like I've I'm used to bugs and venomous creatures and eating Scorpions the the Bundy up but now he's like but I'm not used to venomous creatures and I'm like bitch you just said you are what's happening okay continue my first Dan this adventure I made a spear and I practised practice throws you got all the time I was going with an open mind and I thought that I might come in Handy as able to navigate by the sun during the day and also get bearings from the stars at night most of my time was spent searching searching for food but I do not stop at several waterholes to wash up and but I did stop at several waterholes to wash up and if they're big enough I did enjoy a leisurely dip from time to time I I had no particular destination mind so there was no hurry for me to get any place as a result I was taking it slow and easy moving along at my own pace after sixteen days of being in the outback that's insane Oh my God or holy showcase I was like he's taking a walk hike like why is he doing all this person out now this is like his like saying is right of passage so it stays in days this is making more sense now because he's going on a two hour hike and he's doing like a nine week like survival on this little hike okay sixteen days of being in the outback it started raining and the rain continued for several days which made the Earth Turn Red Earth turn green and the river started to overflow I I was so happy to see the rain that I started dense that I started dancing around it was coming down but after two days of a steady downpour and I wanted it and I climbed up a tree to feed out of the puddles that we're all around and that is when I saw that I I was not sure what I was looking at but then I put it together that this was indeed a Bunyip Bunyip dry saw had a long had long looking in front legs in thick short hind legs that appeared to be very strong had long closet and it was covered in grey feathers God when it was in the water it was able to swim like a frog rog but when it got to the shore it walked on its hind legs standing twelve or thirteen feet being about the size of a small cow I felt safe being up in a tree but my curiosity was starting to get the better of me and I wanted to get a closer look I was not sure if this creature was a ferocious carnivore Predator or maybe it was just a gentle urban for but I stayed up in the tree thinking that it's better to be safe than sorry that is the story I am sticking with and you can believe me or not okay you don't even know what to say well I think it's funny that like twelve or thirteen feet tall that's two of me can you imagine to like how tall it is he balcony of my house and then he's like yes so it was about the size of a small cow well what an like if accounted up straight they'd be pretty

Australia Thirteen Feet Sixteen Days Nine Week Two Days Two Hour
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 3 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
"isley" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"isley" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This the I this is the economy that is as strong as it has ever been that we could we should do nothing about because as Larry Kudlow says the president says the economy is and not even can it's not even considered that there's a recession now let's talk about what we do if there is Hey the economy was so strong that trump had to bully the fed into lowering the interest rate yes do they do that yes they did under circumstances well lot of people were like this isn't really the way that we're you lower interest rate what do they do that yesterday now they did have the decision was I don't know the answer go on something yeah I did I got okay yeah side that I'm talking about I thought you said recent no well it's somewhat recently okay I missed it I thought I'd missed some happier automation that there's two realities happening jungle Taney Isley one is how strong the economy is and the other is a lot of maneuvers that you normally associate with a weakening economy so how what we what are we to believe that well we're gonna believe that if we do if the economic indicators do go south although what are what are the futures right now on the market we know what that market futures are and we'll see yesterday but the market went up two hundred fifty points after a drop of about well he went to days in a row after a drop of seven hundred eight hundred points plus three oh so it's flat right now all right well a judge has the overturned sheriff me in a way this re hiring of a fire deputy.

Larry Kudlow president Taney Isley
"isley" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"isley" Discussed on KTOK

"We didn't think anybody ships wouldn't blow up any type lines going into this member union. We're not supporting we're not the largest sponsor terrorism. So what are they trying to achieve? They're trying to bring Trump back in the Dutch shooting table to intimidation trying to divide us Europeans. They're trying to drive up the price of all because they need money. So getting out of the nuclear deal was a good decision cost. It was a bad deal to get Trump back in the gauche eating table. They're trying to use hostile acts as the means to do that, if they're successful that mccombs the template for other outlaw regimes and terrorist organizations. So the Iranians and made a miscalculation, only Trump responds in a way to deter this kind of effort to restart negotiations. When you're in your pocket. States and Israel. Put in place. After their naval forces. Retires? Backbone and vis murders. Rashid? Tended to get to the negotiating table. In. Outrageous conduct the same. This was in international waters. Clearly, we have it all documented. It's documented, scientifically not just words and a very bad mistake. You'll find out he'll find out. Isley. You know, we're not going to be talking too much about it. You're gonna find out. They made a very big mistake. And I think probably Iran made a mistake, I would imagine it was a.

Iran Trump Rashid Isley Israel
The world is losing the biodiversity that secures food production, UN expert says

UN News

05:50 min | 3 years ago

The world is losing the biodiversity that secures food production, UN expert says

"This is Liska Fiji with UN news B's soil trees, even tiny organisms. We can't even see all play a vital role in producing the world's food yet this biodiversity which supports how food and agriculture systems is under stress. That's according to a new report by the United Nations food organization FAO, which finds that thirty three percent of fish, stocks are estimated to be overfished and be colony losses are on the rise. All factors that endanger, the world's future security, speaking to Sharada Lomas. Dan, Lesquin from the commission on genetic resources for food and agriculture explained. Why biodiversity is essential to food production without by D? We wouldn't have any food by the visit. He is the variety of all life on earth. It's crops vegetables livestock. But in addition by diversity is also a huge number of organ. Resumes that do not end up on our plate. But they're essential to support the food production, for example, bees which we need for pollination microorganisms invertebrates that may which basically worms or insects that enrich our soil's and FARs that provide shelter to wild foods and regulate the climate mangroves grasses at cars that provide habitat to important fishery species, this so-called associated biodiversity is what we looked at in the report on the state of the balls by diversity for culture. And so what are the main drivers of this loss in Bida versity for food and agriculture? The report lists are whole range of different drivers, including major global trends to just climate change. But also precious by international markets, consumer habits pollution, and the transition of many of our production systems to very intense production systems based on a very reduced number of crops or livestock. So where are we saying the biggest losses in biodiversity while we've known for a long time that will losing the biodiversity that ends up on our played. We're losing crop by visit. He we're losing the diversity of animal breeds, for example of more than seven thousand five hundred could breeds twenty six percent have been classified as being as being at risk of extinction. And for sixty seven percent of them. We basically don't know if they are at risk or if they don't are at risk and similarly in the case of Trump's plan species, we know. That were using only very tiny percentage of the plant species that are actually available for food production. Sixty six percent of our total Trump production comes from elite nine crops globally. But we're also losing biodiversity that supports our production systems. We're losing for example, birds, bats and insects. Many European countries have reported dramatic declines in those organisms, and they play an important role, for example for the pest and disease regulation. What impact does that have on all a food security? But what we need to understand is that losing bio-diversity for food and agriculture, whether it's the WSB TV eat all the diversity that supports the production of our of our food be it soil microbes or pollinators lady box that eat efforts losing this by visiting is not just an environmental issue. It is a very serious threat to world. Food security. They how can we halt the loss of biodiversity? What changes must be made? Now. First of all, we need to address the factors that lead to the loss of biodiversity suggests pollution or overexploitation or also consumer habits, we need to make sure that we conserve biodiversity where and whenever possible by sustainably using biodiversity. Now, it is advised insurance policy to conserve biodiversity. Gene bangs at research facilities or other similar institutions and many countries are doing this already, but there's clearly room for improvement. And we also in the future need to take more care of the biodiversity that doesn't end up on our plate the biodiversity that support of food production systems because that has been largely neglected part of our bad westie say, even if we make these changes, we still have the mounting problem of climate change by too, but what we need to realize that biodiversity. T- while it is threatened by climate change also provides an important reservoir of solutions to mitigate and to adapt to climate change biodiversity increases the range of options that farmers livestock. Peepers forest dwellers, Fisher fog, and fish farmers can draw upon to adopt their production strategies to changing conditions, including climate change by the visit t means resilience in means the ability to recover to recover from an to also adapt to disasters and other shocks Scholley. The choices we make its consumers have an impact on what products get produced. What role can we play in all of this? Well, let me first of all people are not just consumers their voters. They may be teachers. They may be hobby gardeners. They may be citizen scientists and in all these roles they may play important roles in raising awareness of biodiversity for food and agriculture consumers. Do not always and everywhere have the. Formed choice. But where they have the information they should've Isley opt for food produce with minimal impact on the environment up for fresh rather than processed food for seasonal food. They should opt for locally produced food and agriculture product.

Sharada Lomas United Nations Bida Versity FAO Donald Trump DAN Isley Gene Bangs Lesquin Fisher Fog Thirty Three Percent Sixty Seven Percent Twenty Six Percent Sixty Six Percent
"isley" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"isley" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"But let's say I put a TV outside right outside. It'd be cool. You know, it doesn't really rain much here. So I don't really need to put on a cover every day, you know, kind of thing. And then sure enough the one day out of the year. It rains on your TV TV seems. But if you would prepared properly. Yeah. Even though it's sunny, you just keep the cover on. Anyway, you know, just in case it rains Goodwin. Yeah. That's you know, to me that was the perfect example. I think there's a majority of people will find that perfect example. One last last little thing to close this out, and he goes into some some more kind of historical documentation and examples, but this was a good one. So I just wanted to close it out with this prince may be seen happy today and ruined tomorrow without having shown any change of disposition or character. And what that saying is normal face. You just need to keep like, regardless things are going great things are going bad. Guess what we're sticking with normal? That's how we're sticking. And that wraps up the book again a ton to think about a ton. That does there's there's definitely parts of it that match kind of the traditional Machiavelli Machiavellian. Common perception, and there's plenty of it that goes against it. And I believe the right answer is balance, and it's more balanced than people think it is. But. Speaking of you know, bolstering up our defenses against the whims of fortune or misfortune. You know, do you have any maybe suggestions on how we could share bolster and prepare for that few lays well back to the book real quick in. So let's say to sort of sum up with what is a way to sum up Machiavellian ways will like I said, the the the traditional understanding and meaning of the word Machiavellian is a negative. It means, hey, this person's underhanded, they're gonna deceive. They're not going to care what kind of destruction they leave in their path. That's what people think of if you like I said, if if you say, hey, this person's Machiavellian leader, everyone thinks okay, they're going to be merciless. They're going to just run roughshod over everyone. They don't care who they step onto get to rise to power. That's true. That's true. That's what the word actually means. But we just gave example after example, it's not that cut and dry, and he definitely introduces many dichotomies to to that idea that you're just gonna do whatever it takes to get to the top. He talks a lot about these other more moderate and important things that you need to do as a leader to get not only to get into position to but to stay in position. So being having good relationships with your people making sure they understand where you're coming from like, these things are not considered when you hear the word where you don't know any better. And you just take the word for what the word has become demean. What the word means now Machiavellian Isley. Hey, I will stop at nothing to rise to the top. And that's one of the reasons why I wanted to cover this. Because even with that, even though he definitely leans in that direction, and he he would he saying look, sometimes you gotta sometimes you gotta stab you're somebody in the back Caisley, then you've got to cover it up to the best your ability. That's. He says, I don't believe that. I believe in when you stab someone in the back that person they may die, but they got a big out, a friend. They got a brother they got someone else. They got someone else that you don't know you don't recognize and at some point they're going to come and get you. So you have to you know, you have to try and balance these dichotomies you have to try and that's not even balancing economy. That's just straight up. Like, hey, you gotta take you got to treat people. You gotta respect people..

Isley Goodwin Caisley one day
"Shocking scene": Deputies find 4 bodies, then shoot man trying to kill girl

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

"Shocking scene": Deputies find 4 bodies, then shoot man trying to kill girl

"He was running out of the house after wrestling an axe type weapon away from Geico. She came running down here wearing nothing, but a gym pants and a t shirt, no shoes, no code. So clearly, she. A hurry to get out of the house no known motive for the awful attack. But one neighbor said the killer had been using drugs, potentially meth. Carleen Johnson, KOMO news. Jay Inslee is testing his presidential prospects in New Hampshire for the next two days. He has several appearances scheduled to talk about his signature issue of climate change last week. He wrote in the Washington Post at the Democratic Party must nominate a presidential candidate who will put fighting climate change at the top of the agenda. New Hampshire stages. The nation's first presidential primary next Friday and Isley says he'll make a decision on whether to run for president by April rumors at former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz will run as an independent not going over. Well, ABC political reporter Steve Roberts telling KOMO president. Trump is not likely to be reelected at this point unless the democratic vote is split one of the reasons why Bill Clinton one

Jay Inslee New Hampshire Komo Geico Democratic Party President Trump Carleen Johnson Isley Bill Clinton Howard Schultz Starbucks Donald Trump Washington Post ABC Steve Roberts CEO Reporter
"isley" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"isley" Discussed on WTVN

"President Trump and Kim Jong on on a red-carpeted stage in Singapore arriving at the same time. President Trump extends a hand as does Kim Jong UN a slight Pat on the shoulder from President Trump to Kim Jong UN they appear to be exchanging. Greetings, has President Trump says things to Kim. And he simply nods in return. Now, President Trump and Kim Jong UN turn to face the cameras in front of a Bank of American and North Korean flags. A handshake the first between the leaders of the United States and North Korea. This Annette summit in Singapore gets underway. Discussion. Commend Isley successful. And it's my honor. They will have a terrific relationship. Who? Nobody. Pass. On our names and the old prejudices and practices as obstacles on our way forward, but we overcame all of them. And we are here today. President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong UN reach across a small cable and UK of flowers to shake hands. Once again at the beginning of their historic summit in Singapore. President Trump said I feel great we're going to have a great discussion. We will have a terrific relationship. I have no doubt. And Kim Jong UN said it was not easy to get here old prejudices and practices workers obstacles. But we overcame all of them and President Trump quickly. Agreed. The two men are meeting privately seated in chairs next to one another. Between them a small table K of flowers on the table the two men smiling. Now.

President Trump Kim Jong UN Kim Jong Kim Singapore President North Korea Annette summit Isley United States UK