35 Burst results for "Isabelle"

Balenciaga's 'Edgy' Lotta Volkova Is Twisted

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:23 min | 2 months ago

Balenciaga's 'Edgy' Lotta Volkova Is Twisted

"There's a woman named lada volkova. She is balenciaga's senior stylist. W magazine once called her the coolest stylus in the industry and by cool, this is the way people talk. They mean that she's edgy. And takes chances and those bold things. In other words, she does disgusting things that people don't. People are too afraid to speak down about because what do I know? Maybe she's so brilliant. She just knows so much more than me. I'm not going to stand up and say this idea is horrible. I mean, it's a lot of October. Because stylus in the industry. And when you get to the balenciaga level of stylish stylist, that's pretty big. Now, a few days ago, the fashion house tried to blame the photographer for the child sex controversy, but now it seems clear that the real fault is with volkova. In fact, the photographer came out and said, I don't know what they're going to do once I take the pictures and you know, I know he's got to be a little complicit when he took the pictures that those things were out, the plush BDSM teddy bears were in the little girl's hand, so I don't know what that means. But I will add them on Instagram, but of course he didn't write back to me. Because I said, what kind of a sick bastard would take pictures of kids like that? I'm sure he didn't even look at it because he's been too busy getting creamed by a lot of people in the public. But it's a big, big problem. And this vocal has been working with working closely with the head of balenciaga, in other words, the fish stinks from the head down. In other words, everybody knew about it and was in on it. Because it was edgy, and who's going to complain, but it's so popular. Do you see that Kanye wears us and Kim Kardashian wears us and Nicole Kidman does add to us? Isabelle huppert does add for us? Yeah, well, that backfired, didn't it assholes? But now ever since people became aware of this perverse ad campaign, volkova suddenly made our Instagram private. I ran through my phone to look at her Instagram, gone. But you can go on the Internet and find some snaps. If you're sadly enough, it's not that hard that they're out there. But you can get a peek at how messed up she is. I mean, you don't want to walk away from your phone and vomit. It's just a very glaring indication of how many people. People in important and very influential positions innocent little children like stray dogs. Some of the pictures I saw had disgusting imagery of children and all sorts of haunting violent sick perverted ways. Like a lady wearing a red latex shirt holding two plastic newborns covered in red red blood. Just sick shit. A toddler lifting up the skull of a dead man. A child lying in the middle of a pentagram while the devil sits on a throne behind it. Devil has his legs spread wide open. He's not wearing any pants. Just a new devil with a kid on the floor. It's actually one of those pictures with an adult woman on the floor. You got a female toddler lying on her side, smiling a little girl's smile, but honor they have this JonBenét Ramsey wig and full beauty contest makeup. There's a little, there's a little boy bound to a chair and gagged. There is a feminized little boy posing like a female in a position I can't even imagine getting in. He's got no top on he's wearing jeans and gold pumps. Then there's the bursting I've ever seen. A photo titled murder and a child's bedroom. It's so disgusting. It looks like an actual crime scene. I mean, it's almost like, I mean, I know, I'd all happen recently that the four murders and I Idaho, but it's almost like they were depicting that. You see a bloodied bed. Covers a role messy, there's a person child, I should say, I can't tell if it's female or male. For the back of the bed, face against the wall, blood everywhere in the bed. And on the bloodied carpet, there are several items of bloody clothes on the floor. There's a record player. And some records and albums around and disarray,

Volkova Lada Volkova W Magazine Balenciaga Isabelle Huppert Nicole Kidman Kim Kardashian Kanye Jonbenét Ramsey Idaho
"isabelle" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:37 min | 4 months ago

"isabelle" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"My life completely changed with one tweet. This was back in 2015 when Twitter was mostly a place. We went to see what Kanye was mad about. But then I saw it. I tweeted by a scientist I deeply admire. Doctor Carolyn berco. Wait, I thought nuclear energy was bad? Yet, here's the scientist, and a Ted speaker, making it sound good. Is that me on a journey? I spent years reading papers, talking to scientists, and I always ask them the same question. What do you think about nuclear power? Their responses were shockingly similar. It's good. We need it. People hate it. In the last 7 years, I've seen climate change go from being a scary thing of the future. To being a scary thing of the present. My wake-up call came after seeing the fires ravaged the world in California. And Australia, and in my home country of Brazil. I decided I wanted to turn my growing sense of anger and despair into something helpful and productive. So I had an unusual idea. I should be a nuclear energy influencer. I wanted to make nuclear energy cool. Inspired by Internet culture, I created a digital version of me. And called her isotope. She's sassy. A little weird. But she always tells the truth. Hey guys, so a lot of you have been asking about my makeup routine. The most important thing is to make sure you wash your face really well because we want those pores as clean as we want our electricity. And the best way to get that is to use this cleanser called stop shutting down nuclear plants for Christ's sake. It's carbon free emission free pollution free electricity. Then I use this plant based serum called when a nuclear plant is shut down, it is replaced by fossil fuels. That's bad. Isotope is like a dealer of good memes. When I say meme, what I mean by it is a fixed belief or idea. Good or bad that spreads from person to person and defines how we see the world. For example, people should have equal rights. Birds aren't real. It's a thing. Nuclear energy is bad. When it comes to nuclear power, the world has been sold a bad meme. An outdated one. Let's go back in time. It all started with the anti nuclear movement of the 1970s. The movement was driven in large part by an understandable fear of nuclear weapons. And I get it. It must have been terrifying to grow up in the 50s and 60s. Fearing a nuclear attack. But here's the problem. They're logic was nuclear bombs are bad. Therefore, nuclear energy is bad. Which if you think about it is like saying the electric chair is bad, therefore electricity is bad. The case against nuclear power was never based on science. But the anti nuclear meme was very catchy. In the decades that followed, aspiring engineers didn't choose nuclear engineering. Politicians got points for closing nuclear plants, even though it always led to higher carbon emissions. In the last ten years, we have spent trillions of dollars on renewables. Yet, we only get 8% of our electricity from wind and solar. Now don't get me wrong, I love renewables, but to me, it's clear that we need more. We need a source of energy that's clean and works 24/7 to complement them. And it's been sitting right in front of us this whole time, but we have ignored it because we're too blinded by the meme. Now, most people today aren't exactly anti nuclear. As much as they're not passionately against it, but they've heard of Chernobyl. They've seen images of leaking green barrels. They have a vague feeling, it's bad. And remember, that's where I used to be. Until I saw this chart. The only thing you need to take away from this chart is that nuclear power has the lowest life cycle emissions of all energy sources, producing only three tons of CO2 per gigawatt hour of electricity. And I could keep talking like this all day long, but let's be real. This is not changing minds on social media. So I do things a little bit differently. The reality is that nuclear is one of the safest forms of energy. The problem is that nuclear accidents are dramatic. While fossil fuel damage is boring, I'm literally falling asleep talking about it. Recent studies say that 8.7 million people die from burning them. Every year. This would be like having 5.8 Chernobyl a day. I'm just a humble influencer, but I think this means fossil fuels are worse. Most people have a feeling airplanes are more dangerous than cars because when a plane crashes, it makes the headlines. It's memorable, of course we know the opposite is true. Planes are significantly safer than cars. Just like nuclear power is significantly safer than fossil fuels. In this next video, isotope will address the idea that we don't know what to do with nuclear waste. I'm sure you don't know what to do with it, but there are people who spend decades studying this issue. They're called scientists. Pinland is almost done building the world's first nuclear waste repository. They're storing it deep underground in geologically stable locations. Sweden is about to do the same. And know you're worried about what might happen 19,000 years from now, but again, just to humble influencer, but we might not make it that far. If we keep burning fossil fuels. Now, a more modern objection to nuclear power is that it's too slow. It takes too long to build. Well, I'm sure isotope has something to say about that. Finally, an argument that isn't older than me. Unfortunately, it's still sucks. In a 70s, France built 45 reactors in 15 years. More recently, Japan, China and Korea have built reactors in 6 years or less. So this means BTS is blow drying their hair with clean energy. Even if it takes ten years to build one, nuclear power plants can make clean and reliable electricity for at least 80 years. This.

Carolyn berco Kanye Ted Brazil Twitter Australia California Sweden France Korea Japan China
Bongino Displeased About Local School Hosting Planned Parenthood Rep

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Bongino Displeased About Local School Hosting Planned Parenthood Rep

"You know the show is obviously live So I get this store in the break Jim's like what is he gonna do What is he doing now One of my daughter's schools I'm not gonna say where but school I'm extremely unhappy with and have been for a long time It's become an indoctrination factory of leftist nonsense I just get this email Dear parents on April 21st is a guest speaker for the kids school will be a I'm not going to say the name but a health educator with Planned Parenthood Oh oh they will Oh really That's fascinating Thanks for telling us It says it's the 7th year this program has been a part of their seminars Oh really That's good It's good to know It says considering the sensitive nature of this topic Oh what do you mean You mean whacking kids in the womb You mean that one What are you talking about What do you think Planned Parenthood does exactly Played by therapy Preventative healthcare but no they're into preventing human life business That's what they do Considering the sensitive nature some parents may prefer to have these conversations with their child privately Yeah I do I see Isabelle whacking kids not a good idea Terminating life in them no good Yeah we have that conversation often And prefer that their student does not participate in this presentation Oh yeah they just got a B mail from me Yes they did Yes they did I'm trying to you may be saying good Sorry just texted this to my daughter Under the under no circumstances will you attend this Hold on I got to text her back This is important Sorry folks I'm not kidding She says sounds good Don't go to this No matter what This is ridiculous I mean you want to talk about imperfect timing right

JIM Isabelle
"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:34 min | 11 months ago

"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

"The program Isabel barrow hello Isabelle Hi Rick Isabelle of course you know her very well She co hosted my old radio show with me quite often and substituted solo for me when I didn't feel like working Isabel of course director of financial planning at Edelman financial engines So I'm going to let you have the microphone since you're an old hand at doing financial planning issues regarding women Well it is certainly a topic that I think deserves some conversation Women are making economic inroads that are unprecedented in U.S. history 40% of households now have women as a primary wage earners 30% of businesses are owned by women more than half of all management and professional jobs are held by women nearly half of all a millionaires in America are women And women now control more than half of all the wealth in the United States Anyway what are all these statistics mean to you Isabelle In general the majority of my clients are couples they come in and they plan together Often there's an age difference between the husband and the wife and if it's a case where the wife is the younger of the two now the issue of planning for longevity is even more important for her Because women tend to live longer In fact recent studies have shown that women are averaging life expectancy around 82 and men around 78 You know obviously the pandemic may have changed some of that math in the short term but overall we still expect those longevity differences to continue and people are living longer and longer I read recently that the U.S. Census Bureau predicted that by 2060 life expectancy is projected to be around 87 for women and 84 for men Women tend to overall have lower income both pre and after retirement because of lower social security benefits fewer pensions when you compare to their male counterparts And women also tend to be more reliant on those types of income streams than men According to social security women are making up 64% of social security beneficiaries age 85 and older And even at age 62 and over it's 55% So with all of this in mind what do women need to consider about planning for retirement Well they need to plan to live longer and they need to plan for having less income to meet those needs from those secure sources They need to start sooner They may need to consider working longer maybe part time work in retirement and saving more but the sooner you start to plan and the sooner you start to lay out your objectives the more likely you are to be able to meet those goals And that's really the key right It's not just developing the financial plan but it's also engaging in investing You know so many people as you just said defer it I'll just worry about it later Absolutely And even if you're not a woman you need to think about it If you have a woman in your life if you have a wife mom a sister or an aunt a friend who may be either partially or fully dependent on your income you may need to be planning for their longevity not your own longevity as it relates to your financial planning Because if they run out of money due to their lack of planning well guess who they're going to turn to for help Exactly Here at Edelman financial engines we plan for these contingencies within our financial planning program We have a discussion about health about your family who might be dependent on you who may need your income Are you noticing different behaviors You've got clients both men and women married and unmarried singles versus couples Are you noticed different behaviors among your clients So if we broaden that question to not just our clients but women overall A recent study from fidelity looked at women's changing investment behavior in part due to the pandemic in part just due to the increased prevalence of women who have the lion's share of these investable assets Two thirds of women are now investing extra savings outside of their emergency funds which is a 50% increase over the last couple of years but only one third of women are feeling competent in their ability to make investment decisions And I think in general women tend to have too much cash on the sidelines And I think in part it's a lack of competence about how when and where to invest this excess cash And sometimes I think admitting to a financial planner that you're a novice or you may have a PhD in neuroscience but you don't understand how to build a portfolio It's an intimidating conversation If you haven't done it before and the good news is that financial planners are very used to this You know nobody walks through our doors knowing everything right Everyone's coming here to look for help and guidance and education So women having lower levels of confidence are really not well founded They deserve to applaud themselves give themselves a pat on the back because they're actually much better at investing than they give themselves credit for Absolutely I think overall studies have shown that that in and of itself is what increases their return So it's not to say that trading is bad but trading too much And for the wrong reasons can reduce your long-term returns All right so this is a fine conversation to have if we're talking about a client who is a woman versus having a conversation with a client who is a man But I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of your clients are married couples So talk about the dynamic therefore The two of them are sitting and you've got a very pretty office right behind you for those that are watching This conversation on our video which you can get at our website the truth ayf dot.

Edelman financial Isabel barrow Isabelle Hi Rick Isabelle United States U.S. Census Bureau Isabel Isabelle fidelity
"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:14 min | 11 months ago

"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

"Goals and know where you stand And if you don't have a financial adviser give us a call at 8 three three plan EFE or plan EFE dot com to sign up to have a meeting with a financial planner and get the process started Yeah it seems to me again that in the most vulnerable upsetting time of your life probably learning how complicated all of these things are is not so helpful You know we've had a number of women go through our finance fix course at her money dot com as they were going through divorce or thinking about going through divorce We've got another session starting in just a few weeks You can learn about it at finance fixed dot com or at her money dot com It's a nice way to dig into where your money is going and start making some changes about what you want to do with it Yeah it sounds like being very intentional and a lot of communication between the couple working with somebody who can really help you figure out where is your money Are you living the life you're valuing Isabelle what are the top things that you should do when you're preparing to file for divorce Well I think you obviously need to at least initially figure out what your budget is You need to think about where you're going to be living You want to track your spending write down like here are my major expenses It's my car payment my insurance you also want to start gathering all of your joint financial records get copies of all of your different accounts your spouse's accounts and kind of understand what your overall financial picture looks like You want to consider whether or not you're going to hire an attorney or not Tick off for me what someone should do post divorce Change your beneficiaries meaning IRAs four-o-one-ks all of that change your power of attorney change your emergency contacts revisit your overall estate plan with your attorney and make sure that the new plan kind of fits in with what your view is of what should be happening going forward And lastly and maybe most importantly is meet with a financial planner to come up with a new plan that is going to address all of your now post divorce finances Just a little advice.

Isabelle
"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on KGO 810

"Today Isabelle Thanks for having me It's so nice to have you So how much money did Americans give away in I think the last day that we have is 2020 So how much money would you guess Are we talking per person Are we talking overall Overall money You know the answer because of paper right here but I was surprised by that 471.44 $1 billion went to charity which I think is amazing really when you think about it just how much money people are really handing off to charities across the board It's pretty remarkable 6 out of ten American households participate in some kind of charitable giving That's according to the philanthropy roundtable And the average age of a donor is 64 so that's baby boomers I wonder if it's because people who are younger than that just don't necessarily feel like they're on enough solid ground financially to start handing off cash to people I think it may be But across the board people tend in America we give away about 2% of our income and people who tithe people who give through their religious organization tend to give away a whole lot more than that One reason we give is because it makes us feel really good I mean if you want to do something with your money besides spending it on an experience that's just going to light you up you should give it to somebody else I found we run my husband and I run a very small nonprofit and we found both in our own personal giving And in people who give to us to help support the young women that we send to and through college that what really makes people happy is when they can target their giving very specifically that people don't necessarily want to give to a general fund which I know is problematic sometimes for charities People must show up on your couch all the time in your office or call you and say let's talk about giving and how do I do it in a way that's both beneficial to me from a tax perspective and also will give me the most bang for my buck in terms of actually helping people Absolutely It's a really really common goal that we see in those initial conversations with clients is they may say yes I have children Yes I'm planning for retirement But I'm also charitably inclined And in many cases like you said it could be through tithing It could be through monthly contributions to a religious organization But oftentimes it's also giving directly to a charity in the form of a check or an appreciated stock or a mutual fund And those can be a little bit more technically complicated It's tracking its understanding when and timing and how to get it there But overall absolutely Charity is at the top of many people's financial goals Obviously just writing a check because you found a foundation or a charity that you like is pretty straightforward Is the more complicated one the donor advised funds and people come to you to get sort of help in how to do that in a way that's I guess more straightforward The donor advised fund is a vehicle where you can make a contribution and then you give the money at a later date So I've got one of these I've had it for a number of years now but what I love about my donor advised fund is because I make contributions into the fund the money is invested it grows I feel like I'm giving away free money Now to kind of back it up a little bit for those who may not understand exactly what a donor advised fund is It is essentially an account that is in and of itself a charity right It's its own 5 O one So you add money to this fund that you set up in your own name and you can kind of title it however you like And you can either add securities or you can add cash from the bank One thing you can't add interestingly is your QCD your qualified charitable distribution from an IRA So that's something that a lot of people will take their IRA money when they're over 72 And send money directly to a charity and that's money that interestingly can not go into a donor advised one but a lot of other things can in many cases cryptocurrency can go in real estate There's a lot of flexibility And when you put the money in the account the account then itself is invested and it can grow You can make distributions from it directly to a charity Now those distributions they still come out and show your name or the name of your account however you've set it up And you get a tax break when you put the money in Not when you take the money out and send it to the charity So that's an important differentiator They're called grants by the way when you give money from your donor advised fund so if you're looking for a way to feel like a philanthropist just seeing that word makes me feel like I've stepped it up a level You touched on taxes and I want to come back to taxes for a second because when the new tax law passed And the standard deduction became the norm for many many people There was a lot of worry that it would take the wind out of the sales of charities unless you itemized and the bar for itemizing was much higher It became more difficult to write off all those charitable contributions What have you seen as a result of that I don't think that from what I have seen that that has had much of an impact So if you're itemizing you're still able to add obviously all of your charitable deductions and up to a point This year is somewhat unique and it's a little different than prior years Last year you were able to make a contribution up to a 100% of your income and deduct it into a donor advised fund or directly to a charity and they have scaled back to more normal levels this year It's a range of 30 to 60% of your AGI your adjusted gross income that you can offset with some deductions But even if you don't itemize so those deductions are helpful for people who are itemizing but 9 out of ten people these days are not itemizing So even if you don't itemize you can still take a deduction for three or $600 on top of your standard deduction for single versus married And if you're looking for more tax tips we've got some great content at her money dot com just.

Isabelle America
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"And not feeling like an impostor i did see. I think shot arrives. Instagram post mazing. She said something like a. Don't worry about imposter syndrome. Because you wouldn't be in the room if you weren't worthy you know if you're in the room wondering if you should speak up or not you wouldn't have been invited into that room unless you've already so. Yeah so just. There's a reason why certain applications are on our screen that we're actually looking at it going. I apply well. If you wouldn't be potential why would you be looking there or why would you not milan or yeah so just be brave and do it. Yeah and that reminds me of the stephen press quote that i don't know word for word off the top of my head but you know he's talking about how the counterfeit artist is wildly confident but the real one is scared to death ryan because the counterfeit artist. Who's just faking. It all doesn't have to take any chances and we'll finish anything either probably rate so if everyone that they're working on their bath got like a couple of concertos. I mean no got this Staf thing that's going to be happening some time next year. Yeah yeah but yeah. The other artists sitting there doing in their own emotional drama like kurt. Yeah yeah because the other artists is actually doing it. Yeah raged wow so. So where are you going from. Dragon conman from dragon con. I'm finishing midnight and bell sir. Which is booked hugh of bitch bell slur and then i'm most likely after that. Oh i also have another script on working on about a vampire rich and Bat is finished. I'm gonna probably right off work on beck's the The story about beck's which is Bond we'll see. We'll see what happens and you did mention you're getting into script. Writing is that. I mean i know that script writing has very different rules from designing a novel. How're ya i'm sorry. How are you finding that switch voter different. It's like it's much shorter but it's interesting Tedious as well Takes a lot of time but It's something that i've always been interested in. I looked at a class. Guess ten years ago and it was like oh my goodness like forbidden. Shoot kind of did have been seen like getting a mohawk You know and then you get the mohawk. You're like well whatever but so we'll see that's just fun We'll do that leads. But i did that. Trying to also seemed like the concept of having my story which above floor on screen will. Hopefully i can send you an austin email in the future. We'll be looking forward to that for sure year. Thank you so. I feel like this is just the perfect place to wrap things up. But i've really really enjoyed. This conversation is always fun talking to other writers about their processes and what they've enjoyed the with nancy. Thank you. that's this week. Show my thanks to isabel hardesty and to you for listening. If you like what. I do please subscribe rate and review on apple or your favourite pod catcher. It really helps me reach new listeners. And don't forget to tell a friend. Thanks so much you can find. Show notes the six creative beliefs that are screwing you up and more at f. y. curiosity dot com. I'd also love for you to join the conversation on instagram..

beck milan kurt ryan hugh bell isabel hardesty austin nancy apple
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"And it is so easy. 'cause i i know that feeling of has the deadline already passed because it has. I don't have to do this. They here's conduct my neck out and part of me wants to do it but there's another hard on me over here it's like i'm really hoping the deadline is yeah sitting on the couch. You going what do not. They're not gonna come on roy your time but because right because i'm not wasting my best nighttime and this because i have a book that i love i have three other books i love to and i have readers like my work and i matter and my voice matters and i want to talk about what i light. So this is me world. Yeah and it's it's so easy to psych ourselves out of that right you know a and to deliberately say oh i think i think that that deadline has like another month. I think it's okay. I don't have to look for weeks because you know. I'm pretty sure that if you wait three weeks. The deadline will have passed away. So it's the easiest thing in the world to do what mean. Meanwhile the show's not come out or something like hey siri set a timer or you know relying but we can't do it for something important right yes so. I purposely got outlook on my phone. But i have done calendar because i wanted to keep track of things a bit more and not just let things kind of like well whatever. I'm not like that but you know there's certain times in life you know case summers year i don't want to lose track of things just Miss opportunities honestly. Yeah and i think and you could tell me if this has been your experience or not but i have the feeling because so much of life is like this including creativity. You know the for when you. I sit down and say i'm gonna try to write something it's terrifying because you have that blank page in its stereo or the blank canvas or the blank whatever but once you spend five minutes even if it is five minutes of the worst words that anybody has ever put on that page. It's scary anymore right. So you feel encouraged to keep going back. And and i think it's that way with taking chances to like through breath don't necessarily have to be tomorrow. I am leaving. And i'm going to fly to mount everest and riots. You know i'm gonna go for a walk in the local nature preserve for half an hour exactly and then you're more likely to do it again. There's yeah agic in just doing anything. Yes leaning into things and just trusting the process and.

roy siri summers
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"The kid going. Missus hardesty you like it. Waiting looking in my eyes. And i look at the kid and i knew what they want in like my looking at say do you like it. So that's what we have to even as adults which is sometimes not as easy but you. Yeah but you know. I think we are all that kid. Bright we are like talk to that kid and wants to be good enough and want approval and say hey look your work is just as good as anybody else's you like it. That's the only thing that matters. It doesn't have to hang on anybody else's wall accolades sit on anybody else's shelf but how many people walk into. And i i will confess. I have had moments of this. Because i am not an artist but you know like walk into the the museum of modern art right and see something like a mondrian painting ago exactly squares and i could do this do they exactly. Because i'm here to tell you. I have never sat down and tried to paint like that exactly. So it's pretty rich for me to go in and judge somebody else's stuff when i've never on it and right people say oh. I could write a book about this end. Then they are so if you have that alone regardless of the quality of the book or the painting or whatever is something to celebrate exactly. that's so true just to to finish it love it and then devan something else. And that's okay and just to give yourself permission to not be perfect and is still create and have fun and enjoy the process. Do you have anything that works for yourself on giving yourself permission not to be perfect Say no i just. I just know that doesn't really matter. All the perfection but perfection is stifling and it just makes its freeze so Yeah i am goofy. I'm silly i liked to for painting times. I have made some my nicest work with a mistake. When i thought i had blue and i put it on the paints on the canvas and it was green. I'm like that happened. And then it works out nicely so with writing to. It's just kind of enjoy the process you. When you're writing you can make your little happy place with unicorns. Whatever that makes you happy you know. I used to buy time to go. I'm going to sell this to give it away. And i just kept it because i was like whoa. I'm just lying myself. I like the unicorn. It's silly to glass unicorn. I still have it but Just find that. Inner child that Artist and make it happy..

Missus hardesty devan
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"And she sees her fingertips light up. And you it's because the kiss. Potentially she realizes fingers lighting up as she just hides them but it's not because the kiss so he. I basically give her more power to yourselves. It's not like oh. He eliminated my fingertips because he is the key to me. She's the key to herself. And i didn't want to It's true because i know that a lot of women our age you'll read it but also women who are in their twenties and teenagers so you know we can guide. Sometimes it's wonderful to like you don't have to go for the bad guy. Yeah and also things that you might think mean. Ooh this is the right one. Yeah often actually mean you should run right. Rebels are not necessarily good things. It's like a fire long leave rate. Yeah i'm at that point now. Where i'm thinking back and i'm noticing it in songs and in you know things that i watched as a kid or read hit and it's like we have a really screwed up idea about how this stuff works so right exactly and i mean all all due respect to any lennox who. I absolutely adore. But i had her song waiting in vain on the radio recently. And i thought it's been three years and you're still waiting for this guy honey. Oh yeah oh. What are you doing. Brian and i thought. Oh i like the song. But i'm not sure if i can listen to it anymore. I know so Yes so. I'm i'm very aware of that. Power that we have is as a artists You influence people. And it's nice to just like no. And i'm gonna do this but there's a little push pull. There was that character but not too much. I didn't i could've done love triangle. One hundred percent does like. I think i'm not going to do that. but yes that's the problem with outline if it's super structured and we look at this is awesome and you know we invite her take pictures shore friends. Oh my gosh maitland's so cool who cares. It's not the book that the monday night. It's super rush. The book ho now. I spent three months on the outline. But i do know that for some authors day structured outlined and sometimes they literally need to because that's how bremer and is super structured takes forever and then they easily write the book and that's works for them which is great. The as you're saying nancy for the people that doesn't work for they walk away going why i guess not a writer yen. It's not true at all. And you know from what i've heard in various interviews and things you know even the people who plot everything yellow to leave room for the possibility that someday you know their character is gonna wake up and say so. Hey you'd have to kiss the bad boy. But i'm doing it exactly. I'm doing it and it's happening your like and it happened right. You do have to love it. Yeah yeah and then. I mean i am. I could never do that. Super detailed level of plotting though if i were writing something on the scope of a harry potter series. Oh yeah i would have to do a lot better because it's kinda like you know..

lennox maitland Brian nancy harry potter
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Let's say three points three. I think they're points. I'm sorry And then right those and then you could do on the extra after that so you said so. His thing is that that so. Let's say that one of us gets hit by a bus. You said if we're not there the other people could just ride it out. 'cause we're everything such a beautiful faint framework so that is really nice. May to do it But i do think that when someone talks about the outline everyone assumes it's one specific warm but it could be a visual outline where he just draw things it could be like Maybe three words doesn't have to be as details and time consuming as we always think it has to be Yeah i think. I want to be very careful the way i phrased this as a former teacher and somebody who has all the respect for english teachers Yeah i i think i know. I always rebelled against outlining. Yeah and if one of my high school english teachers listening to this know who he is because he knows exactly. Yeah rebels against that but But i think in part it was like yeah. I don't know all of these things that you know when things change and your perception of things changing my that you know this little letter a. Over here five layers down. Gosh right. it's like but but that might not be the thing. I end up with that ray. It felt like such a straight jacket. And i you know it was kinda like okay i can do an a and maybe a one and a two but the right as much as i do here and and yeah i think. I think it's good to teach people how they can organize stuff like that because otherwise not realize you could may same time. I think you need to live. Leave a little bit of room because half of the process of writing i find especially for nonfiction but also when writing is discovering what you actually know and how it grew together as you right it was very liberating for me to change that love story because was going one way and i thought i had to that. I was like so beautiful kiss. So i actually changed it from the kiss that just being close and it was her instead of it being a kiss rasheed.

ray
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"I've never done looking for cotton mouth. Nick benham never done that. But oh yeah watching telenovelas i love during that with my mom and my sisters. My brothers were not related to this telenovelas. That was those are fine memories So that's exciting. The drama was still on a belli's Say that there's some. There's some beach scenes. They're serious South beach party stuff so I yeah. I drew a lot about what i've experienced but also what i've loved to watch read things that have sparked joy that Just like this is exactly what i wanted to see so there. There's a party scene with lotus flowers floating in a pool. I just every time i see that. I think it's just it's beautiful. i love. i won't tell you too much about the love. The situation but writing. And i did introduce a character. Who was kind of a bad boy and at first knows writing it. I want it okay. She goes to the bad way. Obviously and that. I was writing it my more mature sites. I don't want her to. I really want her to just e with someone. That's right for her. So i i just kind of avoided the chaos of life and i just made her without tasting saying too much. But i just like. I don't me to do that. You don't need to have that drama times so you mentioned panthers before. I'm assuming that that means you are one. I can't be finished which avail. Floor i I did see that amazing image. Jk rolling how she has her outline. There's like a sheet that she does with its like really intense where she has every character or every faction and then. She writes down where they show up like. That's good because sometimes people can talk about something or person and you're like whoa man at the end of the book they mentioned like. Oh gosh i forgot to talk about mcgann so i. I kind of didn't do that at all because that was like super. Jk rollings brain but I did. I am made like an outline. I made different outlines for my visual brain. I made i outline with all the chapters. And i would put little nose and then i also made for like my other books. I would take a shot sheet of paper kind of like show. Tv show writing style. And i broke it like How they break stories. Because i i love that actually. And i'm actually writing scripts a little bit just playing with it because it's super fun and i do say three scenes and three points a little bit of for my novella so there are different ways like to outline and i do believe in outlining but if you're very visual it can be overwhelming. Sometimes if you're not an outline person so i make my outlined the way it works for me not like stuff. They learned about in high school. That made me scared. But by the roman numerals. Oh my gosh. I don't like that. Yeah so my outline is very visual. C talking about breaking for the the script style. And i'm not sure people are familiar with what that means. i've listened to this video from the maker of the creator of breaking bad news talking about how they break a scene. I could be getting strong but so blessed to have seen he says. What do you want to have happened in that scene. Or what do you want the viewers to see. They should be..

Nick benham belli South beach panthers mcgann
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"We started going my husband and i to dragon khan and i found myself consistently going back to the writers. The writer tracks And just scribbling my notepad and meanwhile i could have gone to seed famous actors from star trek Different other shows other authors. But i was just there scribbling away and that's how i found out the analogy but i noticed that these rooms were very small. It wasn't as dynamic and exciting as the other. But i just kept going. There was feeding me so it was just. It's interesting to see how life a leads us. it does and did you make any connections in those rooms. I have to think you've entered. Make connections yes. I did and connect with some of the people still and it actually helped me because i'm now going to be going to dragon con september first. And he as them being very strict with their protocols for vaccination or proof of negative tests for that. Yeah so I'm going to be going to be in seven panels. Which is so fabulous. Yeah yeah. I'm super excited. Is that your first time going as a as a panelist. Yes it ed's so i like i've been checking the app and seeing my name consists like on sock. Who yeah it's real it's real. It's like that phrase book as an actual book on your hard drive and like this is real i. it's wonderful but Yeah well that's fantastic. So then how from dragon con a. How did you progress from there with your writing. Well dragon con than i. I entered into anthropology. Took a chance and it was like even during christmas right finished that short story and i kept just working on it working on it until i felt like it was ready and i did it. The day of like within hours of the deadline. And i waited. And i waited. And i waited and then That summer like a basically six months later. I didn't know whether she got it. Have thalji sites noah. I'm gonna start another books on my oh And then i started the which about slur so that was wonderful. I had a lot of time to just just create and relax and not worry about whether it was going to get into anything. There was no -nology deadline. But i learned how to finish something so And i learned what not to do. Because before that i mean. I still have an unfinished book. Which is ridiculously long. I learned how to not just let things just like away like a wild horse. She do need even. If you're a pensioner you'd still need structure with the ideas that are just like these freeform reform ideas. You still need to give it to them in chapters know what's happening with the characters So i i used. I learned from my short story for my big novel. And then when i found out that my book was accepted my short stories accepted. I kind of had ideas for the nobel series which i put on the side but then i finished my book. I thought it was finished a night. Did revisions learned that step to finish like november. Twenty fifth started that summer like finished. I could write a novel Three months world so it was so cute and then the reality of like i could leave it at best or i could just actually fix it so i learned and i queried a lot..

khan ed noah
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"And i was like oh so then i'd have to continue it so i learned how to learn some of the art of storytelling from students. And they're very wonderful teachers. So what age group were you teaching. I was teaching kindergarten pot at high school. Oh wow okay. Yeah yes the little ones will very frank quite frank. Yes yeah so. Did teaching art influence you. Aside from the storytelling to kill time did did these things kind of feed off of each other for you or are they completely separate They both helped me with creativity. Because you're as you're teaching as a parent also many times. I tell my son things and you know. It's like on teaching myself like well. Something doesn't work out. She bond going and it's like all upset note to self discipline. I need to do so. Yes as you're teaching the students and you say okay. It's okay to you made a mistake. Keep on going everybody or they would come up to times is an ass. Do you like it. And i'd say to them. It's not really important if i like it. You like it. Because i didn't want them to be I don't want. I wanted to train them just to go. Yeah he jaw. That's just not healthy honestly as To people as as creators anything so Yeah they definitely helped me. The concept of being an educator health A lot everything works out. It all helps on. The journey does and i'm. I'm so glad that you were the kind of teacher would say. Do you like it. Sadly 'cause i feel like that is so critical and is something that so many people get hung up on is yeah stop thinking about whether they like it. And they're so focused on winning will think or if someone will buy it or whatever i no no no no you gotta like it. I so true. Let it find its audience so true. It's very true about the process not the product and Yeah i did have a Person that class. I was teaching. I think i forgot who the person was. But when a child made an orange sky or whatever the color was the person said you dealt that well that's orange style. Have you ever seen that. And i quickly interject but will actually in are. You can do that. i wanted. I came to the child's defense immediately because it's very important to to do whatever he wants and to do. Whatever you thank god even things that are bizarre and so many so many of tv shows books and things that we love our people who take a chance or it was a mistake some of the recipes that we think are just normal actually started off as stakes which i told my students a lot in lies. Yeah and you know. If you've seen a sunset you had sky oh exactly exactly right exactly and one of the things that really inspired me Was i guess in two thousand nine..

frank
"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"In visual art and fashion before trying her hand at writing inspired in part by her childhood in south florida her most recent novels are the witch of bellflower and its sequel midnight and bellflower. We talk about the importance of listening to our intuition being. Sure you like your own work. Why she self publishes. The responsibility. Creatives bear for the messages. We put into the culture the revision process and more. Here's my interview with isabelle hardesty isabel. Welcome to follow your curiosity. I'm so glad you're here today day. You're having leniency. So i'm wondering if you can start us off by telling us you know how. How did you get your creative start where you a kid who was always doing wild imaginative things or did you sort of stumble into things later on. How did that go for you. Hey well i'm one of six kids and my mother is a singer. So i grew up just saying a lot of creativity we had haitian paintings on the walls It was something that i thought was natural. I used to love to draw. And then when i was going into high school i admitted to a special program called payback which is performing and visual arts center. Now it's new rules will the arts. I was able to kind of get focused with my creativity and learn. Learn that way. And just i don't know i guess channel my my energies that's cool so you started outdrawing. When did you start writing. I started writing. I do remember in college. I always loved English language arts. Growing up. And i i did very wellness facets of but i think that i didn't take it seriously until a teacher asked me in college pratt institute He asked me what he. What is your profession it. He said you know you could do anything you wanted to road. It's like to roach any seem very frustrated. Kind of like you just. I think that was like the end of our conversation kind of because he was like. But yeah i love. I've always loved writing And so then. I guess only when i went i went to dragon khan and there was an open call for them solidarity I took a chance. And i entered a story in there and showed me how to finish something as an adult not. Finish something in school You know you have to do this for grade. So that was wonderful. And then from there. I took that short story and i turned into novella. Nitra that novella series. So that helped me a lot but Yeah it's wonderful all the teachers that we get in lies not always in the in the educational system but justin life at dragon con. Let's say who just helped show you. Your actively can blossom..

isabelle hardesty isabel south florida dragon khan pratt institute roach justin
"isabelle" Discussed on Ladies Knight Chess

Ladies Knight Chess

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Ladies Knight Chess

"To the horror that war brings to the horror of not respecting human beings to the horror that happens in the world if we're not careful, if we do not fight not for peace for respect for human beings and especially for children for solidarity for all that is good in the world, just true, love, laughter, solidarity, friendship. There are so many beautiful things. Let's throw the others in the garbage. Not solidarity. Let me check on the better shows. If you like what we're doing at U.S. jazz to encourage women and girls to explore stem fields, accentuate competence and approach an even ratio with a focus on intersectionality, your donation to our U.S. chess women programs is always appreciated and tax deductible. The U.S. chest suite of podcasts, including ladies night, are produced and edited by Jason Andre at 7 season films, photography and media. Please visit 7 season films dot com to find out how to start your own podcast. Don't forget to listen and subscribe to all U.S. chess masks. From one move at a time, cover stories in the chess underground. Till next time may.

U.S. Jason Andre chess
"isabelle" Discussed on Ladies Knight Chess

Ladies Knight Chess

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Ladies Knight Chess

"Monica. It was my parents who transmitted it to me and also my school, which was a very special call as I said. It was called not record. Founded by three women before the war, and in this school, we learned the same as at home. It suited me perfectly, and it suited my parents. I called them. When I read that part in the book, I couldn't help but be moved by the fact that also obviously the Nazis were very brutal to people with disabilities. And so that felt like almost a bit of a premonition as well. We absolutely know. Absolutely, you know. Yes, absolutely. They immediately deported people with disabilities. They protest decision. Your mother, edi, it's a magnificent story of motherly love. I mean, one of the most memorable parts for me of your first book is when she carried your school report card with her because she was so proud of you and thought that that might help on this horrible journey and violence that you experienced in an outfit. But can you tell us about your mother and how important the love has been for both of you even after her passing and what would she say about your life now? In a more generic situation. She always thought that I could continue to study. You know, the love of parents and the love of a mother, it's irreplaceable. My mother at old free moments, she worked a lot, but she freed herself to take care of me. She brought me during the winter on the ice so that I could skate. Her feet were frozen. Because she didn't skate, but I was having fun, of course. She also brought me so that I learned to swim. I had to be a complete young girl to know a lot of things to manage in life to be able to be a healthy and strong young girl, unfortunately in the ghetto during the war, the things have been very different. She would be happy. Absolutely, she would be very happy. I think about my parents a lot. I think about my mother a lot. Every time something pleasant happens to me, I think of them. And when I have some difficulties, I think of them too. For me, when I am asked, I believe in what, I always answer, I believe in the love of my parents. I don't know more than that. Wow, that's amazing. Your parents, your mom and your father were successful entrepreneurs, they owned a pharmacy and you recounted so vividly, the moment when that was taken away from them, you write one afternoon, my parents took me to the pharmacy where I looked on an astonishment as mother with tears in her eyes, handed the store keys to two men I had never seen before. My mother and father squeezed my hands hard as we walked home in total silence. The fruit of over 20 years labor had been relinquished to strangers who only had to hold out their hands for the keys to a Jewish business. Now, later, when you immigrated to France, after liberation, your memories of your parents as business people and entrepreneurs did that play into your own career decisions. My mother always taught me to be interested in everything, to be interested in what was happening around me to move forward to learn everything, and of course, she even thought of making me learn French when I was a little girl. I had French lessons because my mother wanted me to finish my studies in Paris. That was her wish and indeed, I often thought about this wish that I could actually achieve. More. You think about your parents every day. What is the number one image or memory that comes to mind of your mother and then also your father? It's difficult to answer because it's not always the same image that comes up. It's depending on the moment, but it's always the image of my mother next to me in my bed. For example, on Sunday, the only time I could spend in bed with my parents, because it was the only time they were resting and me too. It was a big bed. My mother allowed herself this luxury. It was a rose wood bed. So, obviously, I often think of that rosewood bed with my parents. Don't say on blood rose. Yes, I remember you writing about your parents and the early days of your childhood. And that bed. You're right, my parents bed made of gold and boss rosewood. Seems enormous to me. Sunday is not like other days because my parents and I can spend the entire day together without interruptions from their jobs or my school work, I savor the morning. Mothers gray eye is looking at me with love. Her hands with their long delicate fingers touch me tenderly. At last we have time to smile at one another and talk. Did you ever encounter or see any chess at the camps? No, don't count. In the camps, we had nothing more than work. Forced labor, walking for forced labor, only beatings, only hunger, thirst, only called for 6 or 8 months, I went to forced labor. We were on thinking of anything. That to the cold and the hunger and that the day hands and fortunately. And luckily on the other hand, there were French prisoners of war, and I was lucky. I always say there have been miracles. I've experienced miracles. Often in desperate places. There was someone who was helping me, who was giving me a hand, and that allowed me to survive a few weeks. A few more months. This French prisoner rain or shine brought me a small parcel of food every day, which he gave me in secret and with my huge strip dress, I had room to put it in. So that no one sees it. This is how I was able to give my mother a little bit and eat myself. That's what kept us alive a bit..

edi Monica France Paris chess
Miami Rescuers Continue Methodical Search for Survivors of Condo Collapse

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Miami Rescuers Continue Methodical Search for Survivors of Condo Collapse

"Firefighters, men and women are working around the clock. A huge task force of people that are continuing their right now working. They're gonna work all through the night. Happening now a desperate search through the rubble and twisted metal after the deadly condominium collapse and Surfside, Florida search and Rescue crews have been at it all night. They say the number one priority right now is trying to save as many people as possible. 99 people are missing as of this morning, and many are feared dead. Isabelle Rose. Hollis is there as anxious families wait for word on their loved ones. Deadly wake up call part of a condo north of Miami, collapsing in the middle of the night when people were sleeping, then you're like a big boom. I decide, grabbed Nairo and I was like in a talent. I just ran out. I left everything. My phone, my wallet. Everything's done The apartment, dozens of people still unaccounted for. A search crews desperately look for survivors in the dark. I just started seeing people in the balconies with the flashlights up their phones, asking for help. They were desperately yelling. One person confirmed dead. The rescuers fear the death toll may rise as they continue the massive undertaking of sorting through the flattened portion of the beachfront property. This process is slow and methodical. You see that every time there's a shift in the rubble, something we have additional rubble that shift on US family members anxiously awaiting word on their missing loved ones and desperately pleading for information on the My nephew was here with Okay. Wife and three small Children to six and nine. They had an apartment there. You never lose hope. The big question. What caused the building to partially collapsed. Authorities are not sure but say there was construction on the roof of one tower. We need to find out why these bills why this building fell down. But today's not that day is the day to save lives. So we're 100% focused on that in

Isabelle Rose Nairo Surfside Hollis Florida Miami United States
China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 1 year ago

China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

"Is very far from unheard of for chinese military aircraft to buzzed the skies around the time on yesterday. However the people's liberation army air force stepped such provocations up a notch. Twenty-five chinese jets a record number into taiwan's air defense identification zone. This hefty squadron included eighteen of china's chengdu j ten fighters and four nuclear capable h six k bombers taiwan's air force scrambled their own planes to shoot the intruders off. But it seems reasonable to suppose that they will be back on. Joined with more on this by isabel hilton. Ceo at china dialogue isabelle twenty. Five aircraft is a fairly significant gesture by china. But this kind of stunt in itself isn't unusual is. How often do they do this. Well particularly this year. They'd been doing it a quite lot. They've been doing it. You know several times a week in recent times and its its military chest beating over fairly unpleasant kind I don't think it means that an invasion is imminent but it certainly it. It has a lot of advantages from the chinese perspective. It keeps the population on edge. It forces the china. The taiwanese air force to respond in some way they got so tired of scrambling a late last year that they decided that they would just monitor from the ground but again you know if you step the pressure up again then then scrambling has to happen. So it it. It's a long campaign of attrition and it's also testing the biden administration so there's a lot of probing testing and chest-beating beating happening at the moment.

People's Liberation Army China Taiwan Isabel Hilton Chengdu Air Force Biden Administration
Susan Mills Introduces Detective Colt Jessup In Steamy Thriller Rock Bottom

Charlotte Readers Podcast

04:41 min | 2 years ago

Susan Mills Introduces Detective Colt Jessup In Steamy Thriller Rock Bottom

"In today's episode visible. Susan wilson author of rock bottom occult jessop novel the first book and the jessop series of fast paced and spellbinding thriller with a hint of romance. About lucas twin. Sister brianna is dead and isabelle refuses to accept that her sister could have died by suicide returns to charlotte from new york to find out the truth. Enlisting the help detective coach jesse vice cop in new about brianna history of addiction as it come closer to finding the killer. Isabella found herself in mortal danger. And only jessop can prevent her from becoming the next victim. Bob rogers author of the laced. Shamlan calls the book. A superb mystery and thriller with a new level of action or or providing insights into addiction embezzlement greed and policing susan. Welcome sir thank you. Thank you for having me -gratulations on the book you know we. I met a thank you parker books about five years ago. I was there to plug my first book. I think you were there with your husband. I think it might have been your second or your third book at the time. And i bought your thank. You was good gone. Bad is the one that listen. I fuck i work you and your now to have many seven and seven. I'm working on my eight. Okay what do you do put out every year. Usually the last book rock bottom bottom took me eighteen months front to me. Sixty five is sixty. Five thousand words ahead to put some coherent order. Took longer gasa said. You made the mistake in your first novel. Good gone bad of killing off your best character about. His name was streaker and he was the former cop who went to the dockside. And that's where the title came. Good going bad and everybody log. This particular character and i hated that i killed him off because i wanted to write him again so i just invented. His brother and his brother is a cult. Jessop who is Pardon my new series. That i started. And he has some of the similar traits since his brother and likes to go rogue and doesn't always follow by the rules so he was a lot of fun to write so. I'm having a good time with colds and reported to him being in in future novels but he the paranormal route and brought. You know your first character back in the second books on how through some supernatural maine's or suffering. I could've done that. But i chose not not. You know what you're right. You're right the The suspense thrillers with the with the touch around. That now a little bit about uses. And you're the author of rock bottom and six other romantic suspense novels first of all. What is a romantic suspense novel. It's fast pace page turner. it's a really not quite as intense as a thriller as very similar to a mystery. And what i've ride is Not a cozy mystery. But it's more like a hard full detective story and That's a good way for me to reach a bit wider market because women like my books a lot for the romance for the guys like the rough characters and some of the hard bowl techniques that are using stories. You said that you are a woman trapped in the body of a sweet southern bell at that you release your inner wild child creating gritty stories where the sparks fly Talk about talk about the pretty much sends me up. I didn't realize that to my daughter. said that that she said mom. Everybody thinks you're so sweet and ns than than such as polite southern lady she said but. I think that you're a tall blonde and a leather jacket on motorcycle and And i laugh at that but this kind of like what i like to raid is kind of gritty stuff. I like the gritty movies. My favorite movies shawshank redemption. I don't watch the a nine into the Ryan combs a lot of women are so i like kings kinda gritties. So that's what i like to read. And so that's what i write.

Jessop Susan Wilson Sister Brianna Jesse Vice Bob Rogers Shamlan Gasa Isabelle Brianna Isabella Lucas Charlotte Parker Susan New York Colds Maine Turner Ryan Combs
Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

"At the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is recovering now after being attacked by a cheetah cheetah was being walked with the zookeeper came by. After working around giraffes. Staff members say Isabelle was purring when the keeper approached, But when they got closer, Isabel lunged officials believe her animal instincts kicked in after smelling the giraffes. Zookeeper has already been discharged,

Columbus Zoo Isabelle Isabel Zookeeper
Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

"Keeper at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is recovering now after being attacked by a cheetah cheetah was being walked when the zookeeper came by. After working around giraffes. Staff members say Isabelle was purring when the keeper approached, But when they got closer, Isabel lunged officials believe her animal instincts kicked in after smelling the giraffes. Zookeeper has already been

Columbus Zoo Isabelle Isabel
"isabelle" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

Supporting Leaders

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

"Truthfulness a for lack of better word. and so many takes courage to get there right. So i think the to me. Delete her said. I observe and admire those. Who have the courage to speak up the courage to be. They are despite. Sometimes you know a lot of people who who might not not agree So i see that as part of this truce yeah. I love that the women inspiring way to end the show and i love that visual to of leading from behind because something i feel like you see a lot of the visuals where it's you know the leader out in front. You know helping the team. But i that's really resonating with me. The the leader leading from behind it. And i just really appreciate you being on the show. Dr charney there's so many little nuggets of wisdom throughout the whole show and it was so much fun to listen to you. Talk about a portion of your journey. And i really appreciate you being here today. Thank you so much. Lisa said it's been wonderful to see you and this is a great way to to give homage to to leadership sell. Thank you for doing that. The same m sure. It's going really resonate not mind but but everybody else's will be you know it's just something that we need to hear about. These one on one talks are a great way for For others to getting inspired by you and what you're doing so oh i think many will.

Lisa today charney
"isabelle" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

Supporting Leaders

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"isabelle" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

"Recruit and retain great staff. What does cultural like. How do you have difficult conversations. The supporting leaders typecast connects with leaders in the field to gain insights into these leadership challenges in beyond. Enjoy the show. Welcome to the next episode of supporting leaders. Today we have with us. Dr isabel cherney and she has such a diverse and very cool resume. So let me read this to you. There's some really exciting things that she's been a part of. Dr charney is the currently the vice provost for graduate education and professor and former dean of the winston school of education and social policy at merrimack college under her leadership. The winston school started a very successful early college program with abbott lawrence academy the meramec institute for teachers support which was the first competency based masters event program in massachusetts and the first graduate certificate at merrimack allerg- under her leadership. The school has tripled the number of graduates prior to this venture of moving to the east coast in twenty sixteen. She served as the associate dean of the graduate college and professional studies and professor of psychology at creighton university in omaha nebraska. She's the founding director of their innovative and nationally ranked eadie and masters program an interdisciplinary leadership in undergraduate honors program. She's received numerous teaching advising awards.

Idaho Internet Provider Blocks Twitter and Facebook Over Censorship After Both Banned Trump

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Idaho Internet Provider Blocks Twitter and Facebook Over Censorship After Both Banned Trump

"Hello, everybody. Charlie Kirk here, it Isabelle Brown is about their the Internet wars are raging on raging indeed, Charlie. We're hearing a great story coming out of north Idaho, which I know you visited several times. I spent part of my childhood growing up in that region. It's a beautiful area and very conservative. And we're hearing that. A major Internet service provider that provides Internet to the areas in North Idaho, as well as eastern Washington and the Spokane region is now blocking access to Facebook and Twitter for customers that requested writers are doing they are and so they're hearing that customers are upset about the issue of censorship and more than two thirds of the company's customers. Have now requested firewalls against Facebook and Twitter in their household because they don't want to be censored anymore. So now Facebook and Twitter are gonna have to fight Internet service providers across the country. If people say I don't even want to get near that thing. This seems to be the new president. The Internet

Charlie Kirk Isabelle Brown North Idaho Charlie Facebook Twitter Spokane Washington
At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:49 min | 2 years ago

At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

"We start the program tracking one of the most potentially SA- serious spot points globally the ongoing hostilities between the nuclear-armed countries, India and China earlier this week they discharged weapons that each other for the first time in forty five years as a four month standoff between their armed forces escalated into warning shots in the western Himalayas. The skirmishes worryingly reminiscent of the circumstances surrounding the beginning of a war between the two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two. Yesterday. The foreign ministers of the two countries met in Russia in a bid to defuse the military standoff Jonah Slater New Delhi Bureau chief for The Washington Post and Isabel Hilton China dialogue join me on the line now. Thanks both for for joining us is about what was behind this most recent exchange of shots. That rather depends who you believe I mean one. Of the meeting that has taken place in Moscow, which has been some extent. Calming is that neither side will acknowledge any wrongdoing and indeed continue to blame the other. There is a very in general terms there isn't defined line of actual, control? The seem to be signs that the past three or four months across quite a a a length of it. So not just in one sector, China has been a pushing the actual you know situation on the ground by crossing the line of Control China, accuse his India doing the same thing in this most recent incidents and says that it had to fire shots in the ad to deter what was Indian aggression India has said over the repeated incidents over the past few months that China has advanced and then has not on a promises to retreat. So we now have quite an extended standoff which began in the in the West and sector. But has now extended to the eastern sector to what in your Natural Pradesh which to southern. Tibet. So it's a sustained standoff still during the what more do we know about the outcome of the meeting between the two men yesterday Well we know that they met for two and a half hours a lengthy meeting their first in person meetings since the crisis began Jason Curve India's foreign minister is a is a former ambassador to China. He has deep experience there. But in terms of outcomes, what we basically have is an agreement to continue talking it's not nothing but it's definitely not a breakthrough I mean Isabel do you think there's any real appetite for compromise and given China's current aggressive stance globally will one be trying to dial it down I think that I don't see very much appetite for compromise on either side we all you have is highly nationals governments which both. Set great store on territorial integrity and and then of course, you come to the sensitive point where the territories real defined and then you have a you know constant potential for confrontation. But if you add to that I mean what one thing that is very different from in in this border confrontation with other areas of conflict China like the South China Sea for example, where were you have because it's accessible and and territory marine territory that's used by lots of different kinds of people in people from from different countries, you can enact a conflict at a lower level if you like using fishing boats or or customs boats, and you don't actually have to use your main forces. But this is highly inaccessible territory. The only people who are out there really are our armed forces and they have increased. Both sides have increased the presence of their forces really dramatically in the last few months, and in the last few years, they have increased access to the border by building infrastructure building roads and railway building roads rather So you have the potential to mobilize both heavy weaponry and larger numbers of troops When you have a moment like this, do strategically, I would say that China is trying to discourage India from. Joining in a mall full blooded way any anti-chinese coalition organized by the United States so the has been quite a warm relationship between Modiin trump as we know, and and the question is how far India will take this because that could be a Catholic. And during this meeting, come about because the to happened to be in Moscow anyway or is Russia playing the piece Burqa. Well. Both of them would have been at this meeting, but it does seem that Russia is playing a little bit of a role of convener here as a country that. Ostensibly would like to see tensions reduce. It has constructive relationships with both countries there have been reports in the Indian media suggesting that I'm sorry that Russia was doing some quiet diplomacy behind the scenes earlier in this crisis but I think the these these two men obviously would have been there anyway just comes at a very. Sensitive, sensitive, and important time. It's about what's in it for? Would I guess it's less less difficulty in the neighborhood they do as we've heard have rush the Russians do have constructive relations Russia likes to be seen as a broker these days I mean the whole trajectory of Putin's kind of outward posture has been to assert Russia's important so to be able to mediate between a traditional friend India and. country. Rival with whom relations little complicate it China would greatly enhanced prestige. One of the difficulties is that what we know from the reorganization, for example, the Chinese military which is put sheeting. Very firmly, inconspicuously in command, we need to assume I think that decision is made about deployment of troops and our posture go very much to the top So you know without a signal from the tall, the foreign ministers of my decide couldn't actually resolve this. Yeah. How do you think this fits in with the the general foreign policy aims of India. I don't think expected crisis with China I. think that was not part of its. Foreign Policy Goals as Isabelle was speaking about no, India is. Wary of China's rise, it has been drawing closer to the United States and also to this grouping called the Quad, which includes the United States Japan and Australia this one of the interesting aspects about this crisis with China along the line of actual control is that India says at least that it's at a loss to understand why China is doing this it repeated that again today that. Shot, the tiny side has not provided a credible explanation for this deployment. Jay Shankar, the foreign minister a few days ago said repeated that India's is a little bit flummoxed here, and so if China is sending a message that it doesn't want India to draw closer to the United States, India's not really getting the message quite clearly So I think that's one of the strange parts about this entire episode, which is we don't India claims at least not really understand what China's motivations are for this. Quite significant deployment along the line of actual control which began in April and then Burst into actual skirmishes, skirmishes in May, and then the deadliest violence between the two countries and more than fifty years in June. I mean Isabel attorneys right WH- one can't really see what's in it for China I. Mean as you say, this is an area where there's really not very much. It's inaccessible the only people there are the soldiers. What's the point? I think the point is is partly to shore up she gene pins reputation at home is a vigorous defender of China's global position and Chinese sovereignty, and you might well argue that that sovereignty over a few miles of inaccessible mountain compass matter but they matter symbolically domestically in China. It also might be I mean, we've seen a passion of a very assertive behavior. Put it no more strongly from China pretty much since the coronavirus outbreak and a lot of you know if you look across the piece it what's been going on there had been provocations in around Taiwan with you with Chinese. Military flights crossing into Taiwanese airspace very recently and and we have you know I, think for the first time that I can recall in. Since the sixties we have on this board, we have confrontations in both the important western sector and the equally important eastern sector. Now, that's that's kind of unusual that does signal a much more firm intent to send a message even if it's not a message that India understand. So it may be a message that's being directed to the Chinese public that you know we can do this because we are bigger and stronger than India and we will continue to defend. China's position in the world.

China India Isabel Hilton China South China Sea United States Russia Jason Curve India Moscow Isabel Delhi Bureau Jonah Slater Natural Pradesh The Washington Post Tibet Taiwan
China's Xi vows unceasing fight against Tibet separatism

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:59 min | 2 years ago

China's Xi vows unceasing fight against Tibet separatism

"China's president has called for what's described as an impregnable fortress to stop separatism in Tibet Xi Jinping, speech, set out the country's policy direction intended to protect national unity, maintain stability, and educate the masses. Well, Isabel Hilton is the editor of China dialogue and has written extensively about Beijing's relationship with Tibet. Hello? Isabelle. Doing. Very. Well, thank you. Tell us what is this impregnable fortress. Well this is come out of the Communist Party Central Symposium on Tibet work, which is the you know the high level. It's the meeting that gathers together everyone who has anything to do with Tabet from security to economics to environment, and of course, the polit bureau is in attendance at the last one was five years ago. So it is quite important to understand the direction that things taking and I have to say it's not a particularly encouraging direction the the emphasis on a border security was not extensively publicized in China but I think that that is undoubtedly related to the continuing tensions with India, and we've seen a number of clashes along that border. But the other. Really important aspect of this statement is is really about hearts and minds, which has been a massive failure in terms of of Chinese occupation of Tibet and the the stress on patriotic education on the fact that monasteries must you know put put the party first and so on. All isses familiar but it's becoming more intense in terms of of of you know government propaganda and just simply failed over the years. So how does it intend to impose or bill this impregnable fortress to maintain not just stability but? Engage in those hearts and minds which which they find so important and what I think probably I'm sorry to say more repression it's. There is a relationship between what happens in Tibetan what happens in Xinjiang, which has lately had some more attention and but the body secretary who? Had A kinda panel up to consecutie system in Tibet then moved to Xinjiang to continue his work. So the security approach is very much the same and it is extremely tight security on on an absolute day to day level. So you know police boxes every few hundred yards kind of panopticon effect on on watching society for any kind of behavior that might be considered deviant. So that's one aspect of it and and the other oil done in the name of national security. and. Then the other aspect is the intense education and signification of Tibet. So it's been some years now since two Beden as a medium of instructions in schools was damaged and and you know there's heavy language pressure heavy cultural pressure on on Tibetans who are encouraged not to have a photographs of the delay in their homes but to her photographs of Xi. Jinping, instead to the the, it's really an an example of enhanced integration. Hitherto has been a policy in the People's Republic at least in name over SPEC for national minorities as they would call them. So Cultural Rights, language rights, and the idea that they could be in some sense autonomous and self governing. Now, that was never entirely implemented but at least it was official policy and that is now being abandoned really in favor of kind of. Han Chinese dominance in every aspect including culture and language, and how is that likely to be received in Tibet? Well. The evidence is that the more pressure the culture comes under in a way, the more people attached to it. So you know the most famous case was in nineteen eighty when when the reports from to bed to the center. Essentially said everyone's forgotten by the Dalai. Lama. They loved the Communist Party. It's all going swimmingly and it emboldened the central government to allow or to think about a visit from the delara sue the Dalai Lama sent. A representative. Group to inspect Tibet to see what conditions would like and as soon as rumors of these people's presence spread across to bet you thousands and thousands of people went to pay homage and his push notes into the hands and to weep and to go for the Dalai Lama. So you know the Chinese never been very good at reading. Tibetan sentiment and every time they criticized the Dalai Lama officially it sort of gives comfort to the Tibetans that. The Dalai Lama still matters and he still bad. So it's it's you know it's not a particularly helpful policy and the more that they cracked down on Tibet. The more Tibetan people feel more. They feel the difference and in a moment ago, you mentioned the fact that Tibet is stuck as well in terms of the relationship, the the very techy relationship that's being played out between India at the moment two degrees either side twenty used to bet. Well I think that this. That that's always I. Guess a problem you know the wasn't a border between India and China until the Chinese occupation of Tibet. So so now we have to Asian supervise and this border which is constantly disputed, which is unresolved and across which flow or manner of things including of course, people you know the flow of refugees to India from Tibet. has been a feature of the years the very large settlements of Tibetan refugees in India, which has given them pretty generous hospitality, the presence of the Dalai Lama in India. Then on the Indian side, you know there is anxiety about water supply because wall of. India's pretty much all of India's water supply comes from the Tibet Plateau, and there is constant fear in Indian security services that that the Chinese can somehow turn the top of which is unlikely but nevertheless it makes them deeply anxious. So there are any number of issues that that would need to be resolved in NFL comprehensive settlement. But at the moment you have to highly nationalistic governments each which is you postures vigorously over Tibet and I think that a settlement is not terribly likely Isabel. Indeed as ever for joining us on monocle twenty four, that was China dialogues is.

Tibet Tibet Xi Jinping India China Tibet Plateau Isabel Hilton Communist Party Central Sympos Isabelle Xinjiang Communist Party Tabet President Trump Editor Jinping Polit Bureau Beijing NFL
Election security, integrity worry Americans

AP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Election security, integrity worry Americans

"Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of the twenty twenty elections according to a new survey A. P. Isabelle Thomas has a look at the results of the Associated Press and a R. C. center for public affairs research poll FBI director Christopher Wray recently told Congress that Russia is still engaged in information warfare heading into the twenty twenty election but law enforcement has not seen efforts to target infrastructure like voting machines still U. S. officials say one of Russia's goals is to sow doubt about the integrity of U. S. elections in the latest poll numbers suggest they may be having some success well a third of those surveyed said they have high confidence the twenty twenty presidential election will be counted accurately another third put their confidence and moderate while the rest said they had little confidence Ben Thomas

A. P. Isabelle Thomas Associated Press R. C. Center Director Christopher Wray Congress Russia Ben Thomas FBI U. S.
Ali Alizadeh

Published...Or Not

11:20 min | 3 years ago

Ali Alizadeh

"Offers an intense perspective on the issues and feelings most prescient in the poet's mind to that end Ellie Ellie Sada's latest collection towards the end challenges a range of concerns troubling our contemporary world today. So Ellie welcome back to three. Ci Thank you. Thanks for having me Nev- it. The title here. Seems a little ominous towards the end leading to the end of the world as we know it but the world as we know it I you know I think as I was. Finalizing the book Earlier in the year. And I'm thinking well. This is a bit of a melodramatic title. And then I turn on the news now. Actually I just step out at you know to the back yard and I can't breathe because of the ember storm you know. This is interesting learning new language. Courtesy of the Times. We live in so there. Is You know parts of Australia. Burning soon have another of the horse. Men of of the apocalypse disease being unleashed in Wuhan China. At exact same time we had you know trump trying desperately to start the Third World War by by killing that Iranian General I thought well the four horsemen are here so my title was in to a to an in some ways necessarily see the physical demise here. It's it's more for the values and concerns that we hold dear if I may I'll just read the first poem and we can discuss it in a little more detail. It's called the singer. This is how I croon my son singing Humpty dumpty a melody. He screams out in the absence of my song. I wasn't nearly as loud toddler. My voice vanished from the void of my father's car father's es sorry. I remember him having vaguely while driving wrapped up in his own world in mind. My son's medley moves onto Jack and Jill recalling the tune. I whistled yesterday. Did it ever exist? Did I ever have a voice? Even as an infant to seek to mit a whimper. Our member dad crying out the lyrics of an old Persian. Dirge wobbling from the speaker's not long after moving to Australia homesickness. Haunting his larynx like ghost howling in a haunted house. So much for parenting the loss of the music I never could muster. I'm here for my son's nursery rhymes to enact the presence unsung words now. My interpretation and this is the thing about poetry. It's open to all sorts of possibilities. The music the music of the child the music of the father and the music of your father and your music seems to get lost in there somewhere and your voice. Because there's your father recollecting purge at the music is a wider connect with these past life your son Humpty Dumpty Jack and Jill vs the medleys all Utah of the future. So but this is my interpretation. But I'm just wondering if that coincides with your intention but also then the question Your Voice. Your music Great I just want to say that you read it very well and I think I would like you to do all my readings from here on if that's okay look into. I guess I wouldn't call it an ironing. It's too weak word but I guess the contradiction is that it's actually written in my voice. The whole poem is actually in my voice. It's a little bit like Plato in the Republic. Saying all this nasty things about art but the Republicans written as a play with characters. So you know there's that sort of again i. I guess this is paradox. I guess is the word so so here is a Paul supporters. You know saying I don't have a voice but it's actually nothing but the poet's voice I think that that's sort of the lost there and it's something that identify in the rest of the collection is not so much for voice of personal you know emotional autobiographical identity. But one of something deeper something more more meaningful which are identified to be the voice of universal human subjectivity. Now that's one of the oldest things that poets tried to do scene at a time of the great epic poets. They want. I wanted to speak on behalf of humanity. Now this is something. A modern poetry mob has certainly rejected strongly beginning with romanticism. Which says look you know. It's just you the lyric I expressing your feelings. All the way to sort of like postmodernism and which says the lyric is bad but any mention of we is also not okay. Only he only express the immediacy of language. And that's all you ever do and I kind of feel like well. I don't I mean I I mean that's a tall these traditions but the quest that I guess I felt as I was putting the poems in this book together on a road some additional poems and arranged upon where particular wide at Kinda tells of sort of a story and is not so much about finding my personal voice. You know how do I how do I express myself? But it's about well. What is the voice? That's is needed for our times. And I think that's the kind of the big universal question which is perhaps even a political question. Wouldn't you raise some very mighty topics vertical philosophical social There's one called saga the more obscure and undesirable the more palatable. Ice Scowl still bothers me. And she's been dead for at least a decade. Her husband comically defendant. A downtrodden man wants a Communist. How much more fascinating radical with? My grandparents emigres escaping style and coming to Iran to found a trotskyite cell instead of Banal Matriarch and dull ethics patriarch immersed in gossip and religion. As a child. I hated any a few things more than being left alone with him. He once believed in the dictatorship of the proletariat when he died. I couldn't some in a single tear from my added on to his grandson. He'd being so simple meaningless as for Anna perhaps not really possible that she migrated as a teenage girl from Baku to Iran for more exceptional reason than giving birth to a son. Who'd made a woman who didn't give birth to me? Jeans are poor substitute for the fable of revolutions that universal family. Thank you but this notion of needing a viable needing a sag that's momentous and yet the irony or the opposite is the sort of mundane Mundane missive life Yeah totally I mean. I think you know this is my third book of poems. I kind of exhausted. That's sort of like Again reflection on the personal and familial and the mundane I know. That's what a lot of poets do and they do. Well you know since I mean who's to say that William Williams was wrong to talk about her red wheelbarrow on K. Good not yourself that and I've done that but I kind of feel like especially the Times though was writing this collection of putting it together and I kind of begins around the time that I live into by and this is two thousand and eight and I see the global financial crisis at that really impacts me and I feel like perhaps there is a tradition of poetry that is much more easily impacted by what's happening in the world by the economic social and political. Then there are other traditions. You know the the great sort of I mean this is this is again. It is also paradoxical thing we think about romanticism. We think well. It's the poetry of you know some some English Dandy wandering around and looking at daffodils. Okay it's that but it is also the poetry of the same Dandy as a young person going to be a part of the French Revolution. So so you know that sort of again. I feel like there is a a traditional poetry. That is more public. That is more We can talk about its political. Buddy and what what sense of the word is as as people listening to this and listening to your excellent readings of my poems that. I'm not a preachy person. Nevertheless these are poems that express a desire for universality of the human experience. I mean you've got some lovely lines at times. I mean the economy's manifest destiny and that juxtapose -sition manifest destiny was part of the American agenda expansion prearranged by God over an indefinite area and yet now applying that to the economy as that he's now want is determining allies those sorts of images and juxtapose that you've created. I forget which one that was in their alphabet city Alphabet yeah so that. That's sort of those the images that you're able to provide to make us think more profoundly more deeply. Yeah thanks I I mean I mean you know it's Yeah it's a kind of again referenced. Historical things look as you said manifest destiny but that that particular Isabelle a cafe. They used to being in North called alphabet city. And and and you know I mean I. I was away from Australia for some time. Then I came back and didn't move back to Northcote. Couldn't afford it but but eventually when I went back and also well I go to this cafe where I used to hang out and it's just not there anymore and and I will on why you know what what is happening here. Look really and I thought well. It's there is to concreteness of the city. Being being pulverized due to the forces of capital and nobody I mean. It's it's an absurd thing to say what I don't want this old. You know cafe to be knocked down and replaced by auto residential flats built with you know to to enhance the value of capital for investors. Who Am I to say no to that? But I mean that's a very symbolic and visible way in which our lives are being impacted by this extraordinary juggernaut of capital to use a Marxist term the jagged of capital in many ways destroys the spirit of a place. I mean one of the things I've noticed in my son is that when I first moved in the dwellings were sort of seventies style and such like and now they being pulled down and two story brick mausoleums going from fence. Lan Events Line What is the old quarter Acre block and the veggie patch in the back? But it's it's a Y Y of how life is represented we see as leading allies and it's being destroyed in many

The Times Australia Ellie Ellie Sada Humpty Dumpty Jack Jill Wuhan China Donald Trump Iran Baku Paul Utah Isabelle Anna William Williams K. Good
Raising Two Children with Muscular Dystrophy

Motherhood Sessions

07:07 min | 3 years ago

Raising Two Children with Muscular Dystrophy

"Today I'm talking to a woman we're calling audrey. She's thirty two and lives in Washington state with her husband and two sons last year just days after giving birth to her second child. She found out that both her baby and her two year old had inherited a condition called muscular dystrophy. It's a disease. That's not obvious at birth but over time it gets in the way of muscle development leaving many children unable to walk walk and some with severe heart problems. Audrey was familiar with the disease because her half brother also has it but she didn't realize until recently that she herself could pass this gene enter children five months later. Audrey has come in to talk with me about living with this new reality. She's struggling Glenn with intense feelings of guilt about passing this condition onto her boys. I start by asking her what it was like to learn about her brother's diagnosis. We didn't know anything was wrong with him until probably around the time he was ten or so he started walking. Funny any And then he And my mom went to visit my sister one time when he was probably twelve my sister at at this point was fresh out of medical school. She was a resident and she noticed that he used his hands. When he would go to stand up I think most people we don't think about it but when we go to stand up plant our feet and rise without using our and maybe a little bit for support but my brother had to bear both hands of weight onto the sides of his this chair and sort of jut himself forward and lift himself up into a standing position and my sister said that it's not normal so he did the geneticist and he was tested for muscular dystrophy and they found a deletion in his gene for go dystrophy? And I remember for exactly where I was found out that my brother. Where were you? I was on my college campus and My sister called me and she told me we got the news back. Genetic results say that my brother has muscular dystrophy. We weren't clear on what type yet But but I just remember crumbling to the ground I mean I literally fell to my knees in the middle of campus like on the grass and just started bawling because we didn't know what that meant. I mean we didn't know that mean he's GonNa die. He was thirteen. You know like like he's just a kid home. They said he has this in. My sister said Mom's going to be tested as a carrier. If she's a carrier then she could pass it onto all of her kids and then we will need to be tested and so I said okay. We'll just let me know what I need to do. And the next thing I remember was that she just told me. We're in the clear. Mom doesn't have the disease. She's not a carrier or none of us need to be tested sergeant of don't worry about it. Yep Yep the ones. I don't remember asking more questions. I don't remember being more curious than that. I just remember saying my sister's a Dr. They're working with the geneticist geneticists. Tested my mom and it just made sense because she and I were healthy. My older brother was healthy We just were convinced that this was the science. I didn't know that there is any other chance for anything else. So ten years later you're pregnant. Dragnet was it a prepregnancy conversation. Or you're what you're already pregnant when you talked about genetic screening with your doctor. I was already pregnant or already i. Yeah the thought never entered my my mind by they did. They did the intake. They asked Do you have any genetic diseases in your family. And I said yes. My brother has muscular dystrophy Fi. But my mother was found not be a carrier so They didn't they just like okay. Great they just moved on from that so they said so. You don't need any further screening right. Yeah and then two weeks postpartum for the second for my second son things were going. According to plan and my sister Texted me one day and she said we need to talk and how many weeks was the baby he I was two weeks old instantly. My mind was just searching for what it could possibly be I've got two week old in my arms and she sits on the couch and she says they just like right now. There's a pit my stomach just trying to put myself back in. The spot is the worst moment in in my life. She said my son her seven year old has muscular dystrophy. And it's the same type as brother. The exact same deletion and It's like another world experience. who was just like? I've time froze and I didn't even think about myself 'cause the next thing that she said I said I'm so sorry and I burst into tears and it was just like it didn't even connect the dots what she said next. She said I'm a carrier. It turns out what mom has is a very rare form where the deletion has happened in her eggs. Only and that's why she didn't test positive as a carrier she she said you could be a carrier and this only exhibits and sons and you could have passed it on to your boys and there's nothing to prepare you for that feeling when you feel like someone has pink punch you in lungs and like all the air escapes so I just. There's a blood test that you can do to measure the CK PK levels which are like the protein that could leach into the blood. And if it's high I mean there's a chance that you have like a muscle disease and so I made an appointment the following. Windy a on a Tuesday with Just our primary care physician so We took the two week old and the two and a half year old to this appointment. Went and Was the longest wait of our lives. I mean there is not a window in the room we were just sitting there like kind of shaking nervous and the doctor walked into the room. We saw the Base every new interim stapled up there. CK levels and she pulled up the baby. I it's two-weeks-old in his city at my feet. And she said Said Mrs Level Isabelle's shouldn't be about two fifty and she pulled up a two and a half year old His level is eight thousand.

Audrey MOM Washington Mrs Level Isabelle Glenn Dragnet
Samsung's 'The Frame' TV: Spotify of Art?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:17 min | 3 years ago

Samsung's 'The Frame' TV: Spotify of Art?

"Better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com. This is tech news briefing. I'm tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in new york a television manufactured by samsung known as the frame and called by many eddie spotify of art is digitally bringing masterpieces into the living room museum speed the future but first these headlines google issued new guidelines limiting employees discussion of politics and other topics not really to work a major shift for the company that has long long prided itself on open debate and freewheeling internal culture alphabet inc said in a public memo that staffers should avoid spending time debating matters unrelated into their jobs among other discouraged behavior a google spokeswoman said quote this follows a year of increased incivility and our internal platforms and we've heard that employees want clearer clearer rules of the road on what's okay to say and what's not walk technologies trumpeted its first high end a i processor the chinese telecom giant's latest attempt to challenge silicon valley's advanced technology the ascend nine ten designed to crunch. The massive amounts of data used to build a._i. Algorithms is available immediately. The chip advances while always goal of curbing reliance on american tech kolding up the palm sized ascend nine ten at an event at weiwei's headquarters deputy chairman eric su declared it as quote the industry's most powerful a._i. Processor and quote a federal appeals dell's court froze a ruling that qualcomm had committed an array of anti-trust violations a boost for the chip maker that allows it to maintain its business practices for the time being the court court decision is a setback for the f._t._c. which had sued the company citing an illegal monopoly that harmed smartphone manufacturers and rival chip producers to his ruling found. The company leveraged its dominance smartphone chips to force manufacturers to pay high royalty rates for qualcomm intellectual property qualcomm argued its business practices were justified justify. The journal says the court action isn't a definitive reading of the merits of qualcomm appeal but indicated the company has a fair shot at winning coming up as museums meet the future were introduced with the new spotify of art better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel veon scalable processors reduce. The cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com samsung has struck digital art agreements with the tate gallery in london the prado in madrid the van gogh museum amsterdam westerdam's among others. The latest deal sees its unique television. The frame landing at the royal museum of fine arts in belgium as part of the new agreement samsung samsung display twenty two of the belgian galleries flemish masterpieces on its frame. T._v.'s isabelle van who necker managing director at the museum has more. We are participating dissipating into some some initiative because we think technology has a lot of possibilities to spread our heritage in another way india museum so we some some frame we can bring the artwork into the living room of the people and hope that they will afterwards want to to to visit the museum and see the authentic work intern. We're seeing some comparison with the digital methods that the likes of spotify made popular johann von camping out samsung tv lifestyle project manager explains its subscription based so you have to formulas in a way you be u._p. Eater five a month and you have unlimited access so i always personally i call it the spotify of arts so you pay five hundred a month. You have unlimited <unk> access to all the artworks that are in there more than one thousand two hundred artworks or you can also decide to pay a one time fee for one on artwork and then that will cost you twenty euros more on the actual technology sensor measures the lightning in your living space ace and based on these results. It's adopts the back light of the hill so it would really look like a real picture because of you would show this picture on on another tv. You will always have the feeling you are looking at the t._v. Isabel van acker is back to talk to museums of the future. There are a lot of challenges for museums is because the museum of tomorrow and we have to think about it before you had only physical museum. Today we have also digital museum if people are used to to have after digital images and we have to develop this whole digital museum today and accessibility is one of the important challenges as as well. That's it for the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom in new york. I'm tanya bustos. Thanks for listening.

Samsung Qualcomm Spotify Intel New York Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam West Royal Museum Of Fine Arts Google India Museum Tanya Bustos Isabel Van Acker Dell Weiwei Deputy Chairman Belgium Tate Gallery Eric Su Intern
Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

Science Magazine Podcast

11:17 min | 3 years ago

Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

"We have Andrew Curry. He's a journalist based in Berlin and this week he wrote on inherited trauma. I Andrew Okay so this is about be genetics. It's been around a long time but it's kind of morphing in its definition. Can you give us the latest on that different. People mean different things when they talk about epigenetics with the the basic concept is there are ways in which organisms inherit traits that are maybe not genetic so we have DNA the strict genetic code but increasingly scientists are finding other ways in which traits are passed down through generations and they're trying to figure out what the exact mechanisms are and some organisms. It's really easy and the more complicated the organism that trickier it is figure out how these things are passed on outside of the genetic code <hes> so for example some of the EPA genetic mechanisms might involve modifications to DNA or it might be a different set of molecules altogether that are being inherited through the cells that make up the offspring yes so so it's all modifications a two D. N. A. in the thorough lots of different kinds of proteins in the cell that help when the D._n._a. is telling the cell what proteins to make how to develop and their different ways that these small proteins can signal signal the cell to read more or less off of the genetic code or can turn off gene so to speak so that certain traits aren't passed on or certain traits are passed on in amplified ways. You know it's not something that's in the the D._N._A.. itself it's more things that affect how the cell reads the D._N._A.. Right at the very moment that the cell I divides now that's one of millions of subsequent divisions. If you have a tiny impact after the very beginning right it can have a massive consequence down the loan. Let's talk about when epigenetics this different form of inheritance. I got linked to the idea of trauma. What are some of the early examples of those lakes people started looking at how the environment chain diet exposure to extreme colds or exposure to high level of chemicals could affect what was inherited and then probably about fifteen twenty years ago some researchers? Started looking or noticing other effects during experiments and one researcher in particular who I spoke with Isabelle Swing. She's at the University of Zurich and E.. T. H.. Eric created a mouse model because she wanted to study borderline personality personality disorder and so she was traumatizing baby mice by separating them from their mother at unpredictable intervals and then she noticed that the offspring of those baby mice often hadn't same behavioral symptoms of trauma that the parents Prince two and sometimes those behavioral symptoms went on for several generations. The idea here is that it's not just physical deprivation of food or exposure to a lot of coal. It's there's something about the psychology or you know emotional states of the the mice that are being passed down the ideas that the stress of trauma the stress of being separated from from your parents the stress of traumatic childhood you could be with your parents. Your parents could be neglectful. Those levels of stress caused chemical changes in your body that then affect how your d._n._A. is encoded and that those changes can be so powerful. They're passed on even to your offspring that didn't directly experience trauma right so this this researcher that you mentioned she has looked at this for generations and generations of mice she does some experiments where she's gone out five generations and she still sees behavior in the offspring of traumatize mice that she doesn't see see in control mice and that's even when she does the separation but then like the children are the children of the children have been exposed to separation from a parent. This is kind of the crux of the the question that's that was a challenge challenge for her in terms of the experimental design and it's been one of the main criticisms when people look at humans is really hard to separate what is EPA genetic trauma what is sort of biologically transmitted and what is just the stress yes of living with a parent that has been traumatised because your parents are that are part of your environment so these kids environmental effects exactly so how she the way she controlled for that is she only studied the mail so she would traumatize is male mice and then breed them with females but take the males out but the females the mothers of the subsequent generations hadn't been traumatized so there was no bad parenting so to speak and yet she still found differences teams in the mouth behavior so this is all behaviors you can you know judge based on that that something is being inherited but the biological mechanism is is still is still pretty far away from being understood in mice and in other organisms they've also so found changes in sperm and blood and other tissues of things called small non coding Arnaiz which are these things that help the body re- D._N._A.. And this small all non coding are in a in a traumatized mouse or David looked at traumatize. People is different in specific ways than in non traumatize people okay so there is some and those those are passed down subsequent generations yet outing sees changes in the Arnaiz later as well. The big question is how does it get from for example the blood of the parent to the sperm of the child and later than to the brain of child let alone. Alone the child's child that sort of that whole middle bit is what is still really unclear. Let's turn to the human here for a minute. One of the first places this was talked about was with respect to the Holocaust so can you talk about what what the research has shown with respect to Holocaust survivors a few years ago a researcher named Rachel Yehuda looked at the children of Holocaust survivors and found that they had higher levels of depression but also lower levels of specific stress hormones and different kinds of EPA genetic markers called D._N._a.. methylation than people whose parents had been born in the U._S.. <hes> from sort of similar ages in cohorts and argued that this could be evidence of EPA genetic trauma but that study was criticized at the time for the reasons that that I mentioned earlier you know a lot of people said well. It makes sense intuitively that if your parents survived the Holocaust they might behave differently at home that might be stressful in a different way and so that is solid enough evidence of this biological mechanism that they found in mice. There is an ongoing project that you talked about with <hes> children in an orphanage. How are they looking at that situation and asking questions about EPI genetic inheritance? It's really hard in humans to do ethical L. experiments over multiple generations so basically what they're doing right now is looking at humans who have been traumatized to see if they have changes in these EPA genetic marks and then using those to design mouse studies to understand how that might be carried across multiple generations and in the Pakistan example. This is now orphanage. This is the orphanage in Pakistan so a researcher WHO's part of Isabel Might Matsui's lab is working with orphans in Pakistan whose fathers have died and they were forcibly separated from their mothers because their mothers weren't able to earn enough money to support them and they're put in orphanages which they argue is fairly close to their mouse model that had how they're separated from the mother as children and they see different levels of these are in these kids blood and they're using those kids as sort of a starting point to then design better mouse experiments to understand how that it might be transmitted through different generations but to do a human experiment you would have to look at those kids kids and follow refer multiple generations and so for a whole range of reasons. It's extremely difficult coulter controlled intervention experiments in humans right. We should point out that the children in the orphanage are there's an intention from the people taking care of them to make sure that they're not traumatized. Yeah I mean this is a situation. The already happened this was not they didn't separate them from their mothers for the purpose of the experiment of course and they're being given great care they go to the same schools. This is actually another interesting part of the experiment they go to the same schools as local kids. It's who still live with their parents so they're also looking at the local kids who still live with their parents to see if there are differences and it's voluntary. These kids get good care New York's fridges by there still something about this experience that they. I went through that is really difficult seems to have biological backs. I WanNa ask you what it means what we should do about it but I feel that the really big question you know it's it's a great question. <hes> <hes> I think one of the most hopeful things to come out of the story for me was again something that seems sort of intuitive but has been lost a lot in the discussion of epigenetics because I think a lot of people here this idea that Oh my my grandparents parents were traumatized and therefore have this unavoidable legacy of pain right but there have been some early experiments again in mice where if you intervene with basically sort of happy cages they call them enriched environments governments. You can reverse this biological process. Yeah we actually had I think we had a segment on happiness in in mice and rats and how giving them things to do and making them comfortable in their environment can yeah it can change the way experiments turn out yeah and so one of the arguments that several the researchers made is rather than looking at this as a sort of a stigma and a mark we should maybe you know if we can identify by these things use them to identify people who will benefit from therapy or maybe we should just this is where it's sort of intuitive. Maybe we should just give all children in which are yeah and that this is not <hes> an unavoidable burden but something that we can look at as reversible and that we should be looking at it as reversible not something that we should be working towards. Thank you so much Andrew Thank you Andrew. Curry is a journalist based in Berlin Orlando. You can find a link to his future at science mag dot org slash

EPA Researcher Andrew Curry Pakistan Berlin Behavioral Symptoms University Of Zurich Colds Arnaiz Isabelle Swing Eric David N. A. Berlin Orlando Coulter New York Rachel Yehuda Isabel Matsui Fifteen Twenty Years
Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

All Things Considered

03:44 min | 4 years ago

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

"For the first time. Scientists have used genetically modified viruses to treat a patient fighting a life threatening superbug infection NPR health correspondent, rob Stein. Has the story is it bell. Cornell Holdaway was born with a lung disease called cystic fibrosis when she was fifteen a nasty infection started spreading through our body after she got a double lung transplant in London. Nothing could help her not antibody. Nothing. Her mom, JoAnn says the doctors told her there was no hope devastated to be told. You know, we could well be burying all child was just anyone has a child and never expects to have to bury them this this selves. But then is false doctors decided to try something out of the box therapies called Phages their natural enemies of bacteria. So the doctors found Graham hatful, he's an expert on phases at the university of Pittsburgh using genetic approaches with genome engineering were able to assemble this collection of three Phages that we could then combine tile to use the treatment, they know infect the kill efficiently. People have been treated with Phages before with mixed results. But no one had ever tried infusing genetically modified Phages into someone's body. It's kind of a scary thing to go in and administer treatment. Like this full, which we're completely on new ground. We don't know what to expect. Isabelle's doctor started infusing about a billion Phages into her body twice a day and held their breath. There's lots of things to worry about. And so the very first thing was, you know, does something does anything bad happen. But nothing did. In fact, Isabel started to recover she got stronger and stronger and Isabel who's now seventeen is living in almost completely normal life driving lessons. A school making fake city pool. God ning. No. Now, doctors aren't sure exactly how the Phages might have worked and is about is in cured. She still needs to get fade infusions every day. But the infection appears at least to be under control. I think it's amazing. It kind of shows there is completely. No limit. Until they can come up with really her. Mom, agrees them to be able to just have a little fiddle around with these Phages moins blowing valley when you think about it. Stephanie drafty studies Phages at the university of California San Diego. This is actually a historic moment. Fades therapy, seems to be the most promising alternative to anti-biotics that's on the scene. And this is the first time that genetically engineered fade has been used to successfully treat a superbug infection. Anna human being so strategy and hatfill hope this is just the beginning. What can we do for example to extend this to other types of diseases? The most obvious one is closest which is caused by a related bacterium, and that causes a lot of disease, and that's across the world each year and this very prevalent, drug resistant, strains that are very hard to treat. Now, this is just one case. And a lot more research is needed to see how well phases, including genetically engineered Phages really work, and if they're safe, but with superbugs on the rise and biotic losing their power. Researchers hope Phages could help save more

Phages Cornell Holdaway Rob Stein Isabel London Graham Hatful Isabelle Superbug University Of Pittsburgh Stephanie Drafty University Of California San D Anna
Isabelle Huppert and Chloe Grace Moretz on their new movie 'Greta'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

07:48 min | 4 years ago

Isabelle Huppert and Chloe Grace Moretz on their new movie 'Greta'

"Welcome to popcorn where I tell you. What's happening at the movies? And if you want to go to a movie feel suspense little terror. Also laugh also just have a really good time. Then you see, Greta and lucky for me and all of you. I've got the two stars. Right here is about pair. Who is Greta and Coa grace Murat's who's not. Now, I'm shocked to of you did not bring handbags. Now, it's a shame. I wanted to see what would be in to do this. Can you set up a little bit about what Greta is about without spoiling everything for everybody? Grad is the story of. Two women young women and myself, and and and Guerra is is not a really nice person. She's thirty faced person. Indeed. And. And she liked to attract for a beautiful and and weak young woman in her space. And and she likes to do things that I hope nobody thinks example in her apart from western screen. When you played several roles like that where. Yes nut to to this point. No, she's not. This point. I wouldn't do it. And you grace are the innocent the naive. Yes. Yes. Yeah. I mean, it was it was a wonderful experience building, our our relationship onscreen. And obviously, of course, offscreen, but I think we have such a nice time building that love relationship in the beginning. And then to watch it decay in fall apart in the, you know, the psychosis takeover was it was really fun to shoot. But also, it was difficult really intense at times stay in character. Doing this. I think it's really difficult for Chloe. Sometimes. Giving Riyadh time. And and and myself, you know, I mean, the most horrible things I was doing the most. Lisera? But it was for me. But it wasn't to do to Neil Jordan's vision and aging I mean, the movie's really as you said, you know, is it's as horrible as it is. It's a lot of fun because there was such a great some humor in it all the time. And it's it's and it adds to the to the of balance into misery to the female. So this humor, and he's being funny. It's very disturbing. I think I think in the beginning, I was kind of liking it. So you see? Yeah. There was a moment where that is. And I think I can talk about that premise because I brought up the hand back. Right. You leave him back on the subway in New York. Even though this movie was shot in Ireland. Looks like subway to me. I guess it's Neil Jordan just wanted to be home. You wanted to be an Ireland, and you would pick it up or somebody would pick it up and return it to you. Because her. Name and address would been there. I keep thinking as a New Yorker that most New Yorkers would say, I'm gonna take it sell it on EBay, you know, but you are so sweet sweet girl from Massachusetts is just freshly moved this city, and it swallows her whole, Greta Greta had Greta takes her in. Would you both had experienced in playing people who hey, especially you your carry your hit girl and kick ass, you you played different roles. That's what I love about both of this impossible to type cast you when she think, oh, you can do this you just change everything up. So you were saying before that you can have fun. How did you have fun on this movie with all this suspense going way? We had fun because you know, I think doing the movie as you do it, you know, the devices, and you know, the tricks and so and being an actress is not the same as being spectator. You know, I know it because I am speaking to myself. So I mean you react and you are scared or disturb. Very different than when you went actually when you're actor just have fun doing that. Fingered and things like this. I don't onto nvr what's happening. So it's fun. You know, it's just it's just doing it. You know? And that's all there was a quote from you want and probably never said it. But anyway, I liked it. So I'll repeat it that. It was the acting was away to workout ones insanity. Yes. Yes. And also watch movies away of acting twins insanity. I think that's what movies are made for and books and everything that that, you know, make your imagination travel. It's very healthy. The whole Dewey twitching the screen or acting in Phelan for real that's for sure. Do you feel that way? Most definitely, you know, I think I've had the opportunity over the years as a kid to grow up acting and using it as as much, you know, more of an outlet than anything to express, my feelings and learn a lot about my own emotional, compass, but it's, you know, it's interesting to to act out these wild moments in movie, sometimes that are just so, you know, off the walls that you would never be able to achieve in your life. Hopefully, if you are of a sane mind. So yeah, it's incredibly therapeutic. You both started in this business. Really young right. Oh, she started younger that I you. What were you? No, I was seven. A bit more. More. What does that do t you when you begin so early in a business, even if you're I think it was really begin? You know, when you are an actor whenever you do actually, and, but especially doing movies, I think it's really the art of doing it for the first time by definition, you know, you work on unknown material, you know, unknown dialogues stories, and and and meeting director for the first time and him having him imagining his staging is always some it's the art of the of the first time and of the present moment. So I think it makes everybody even in that respect. And you don't feel like you repeat yourself or that you can shrive on on on knowing things before on, you know, you just very fresh in a way. Well, yeah, that's the collaboration process, but one about did you ever feel you miss. St- out on your childhood. By no means. No, I still with me. Anyway. So. You know, I think that's something. You carry all your life, isn't it? But she has it, you know, she can certainly took buried more. You didn't feel that you missed something or being with your friends when you were quite on the contrary, I think for me, I I learned tenfold what you know. I could've learned just being in school. You know, I think I was able to do my schooling and stuff on set. And I was around such amazing people from young age that I felt you know, really very much. So that I'm marinated in a in a situation, which really harbored my artistic ability and allowed me to grow in ways that I I don't think I could have an different system. So for me, it was it was a treasure. It was a gift. Yeah.

Greta Greta Neil Jordan Ireland Riyadh New York Guerra Grace Murat Ebay Director Dewey Massachusetts Phelan
Baby receives South Africa's first HIV positive organ transplant to HIV negative recipient

Weekend Edition Saturday

08:56 min | 4 years ago

Baby receives South Africa's first HIV positive organ transplant to HIV negative recipient

"Joan of arc has become such an emblematic figure a Saint of the Catholic church the inspiration of so many novels and films, and of course, George Bernard. Shaw's conic play we might sometimes forget, she was a real teenage girl was burned at the stake in fourteen thirty one she did farm work, and she had parents who loved her and were with her until her end Glenn Close plays. Joan of arc mother. Isabelle a strong. Steely loving woman in Jane Anderson's, new play mother of the may now New York's public theater is grateful to her door as healthy heartiest. Her job. Great. She's grateful that the English. Like, they did the Leveque. Beck was Isabelle's. Best read. The

Isabelle Joan Glenn Close George Bernard Leveque Shaw Catholic Church Beck Jane Anderson New York