17 Burst results for "Isabel Gowdy"

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"That talk on animal forms like cats, dogs, goats, beds, toads, rodents, insects, and hairs. They did the witches magic, but also inspired the witches shifting rituals in Scotland. which is often shape shifted into the hair. The accused Scottish witch Isabel. GOWDY admitted openly in court to her shape, shifting abilities Hera. Animal of choice was the hair. We gotta tell me how to read my show up at just bail. Hardly no way. Less, new killer. Can't kill her. She does go up in a popa smoke, and then she comes right back again. Ways. What tell me. How you're gonNA, pay me. What are you won't? Knock of your hair. Not tricked me like get. Takes Lots of money learn how to kill a witch? You go home. Make a figure of Jess male. Poodle it close, just Baylor's warn. Then if you have the courage. Stop through the heart with silver. And in the end killer, which he does, an kills just bell,.

GOWDY Baylor bell Scotland.
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Al Gore kind of did that in the seventeenth century she. He was talking about how one day soon information will just be in. The ether will be everywhere which has wifi absolutely whatever cloud so luckily she was not persecuted in the same way that many women of her ilk were She was never tortured. She was not killed and thankfully the end also did not comment common eight hundred eighty one so she may have been off the mark on that particular also lakeside note though how many people predict the end of the world every the year like does anybody else have into the world fatigue. You know I'm a ninety s baby and I can't recall a year. That wasn't supposed to be the last. I'm ready for it to happen like wasted Lisa. Hot Tangle finish. The show finished the genuinely thought he was going to be December twelve. I think what was it. Two Thousand Thousand Twelve Joe. Rogan had a show that night. I thought it was going to be over. He's a witch bro. He's no way was she. Everything was fine so other people would be as we mentioned before doctors doctors medical practitioners of some sort but also people who were practising not just the non Christian religion but a non Catholic religion because we have to face it. Despite the best efforts of the church at the time everybody knew Christianity was far from the first religion on the block and Catholic churches had sought to subvert supplant and suppress US pre existing belief systems. But when you have a tradition it's deeply rooted. People are going to continue to practice it to the best of their abilities. So they'll just go go underground and these weren't evil beliefs by any means these are things. Ancestor worship animus believes polytheism. And so on and because it's the church because it clashed with social control. They conflicted all of these practices with things like sorcery necropsy et Cetera. And then and you have the category of folks with legitimate mental illness mental illness or what is today referred to as a neuro atypical behavior Existed during that time as well of course and in some cases folks with mental illness or cognitive conditions might have actually been considered blessed by God or capable of receiving visions from on high. I don't know if anyone's seen mid some are the one of the characters that sort of is the village. Sir Is someone that clearly has condition of this sort. But then it would there would be the the flip side of it right where much prevalence absolutely. Yeah No. And then there'd be the flip side of that where they were absolutely victimized and used as scapegoats because it was an easy way to say which yes speaking of scapegoats. This has been a running theme of this entire episode. Another group of people who were victimized were vulnerable members of society like widows the disabled and again. What's the main thing you've been hearing probably that's just been a Hitting the back of your head is the misogyny that was involved in all of this stuff in fact the largest demographic of people persecuted for witchcraft. Were actually the elderly women and a lot of that had to do with well. There's a lot of it had to do with misogyny just at large but hold on a second we were talking about the individual's right. We're talking about each individual person. What their role was why they were persecuted? But what about the whole idea of them getting together and working together right Yes yes we did stereotypes of witches and we just we just busted that hopefully hopefully so I did and we did stereotypes covens. Yes but we're real covens Evans. See that's the thing history is history is funny and history is a lot more dynamic than people would sometimes have believe histories our conversation. Right William Faulkner said the past. Ask these in over. It's not even pass and what we look at where we dig into covens in the concept of covens. Is that the idea that a coven was a name for a group of witches came way way way afterward after any of these events the word Calvin I came around some time in fifteen twenty so there had already been witch-hunts and it wasn't used to describe meetings of witches until a trial in sixteen sixty two for a woman named Isabel gowdy before then then it was just like meet up it was just a hang out and it wasn't until nineteen twenty one that that term became popularly associated with the gatherings specifically of witches ages and this association was made within an author Margaret. Murray's work the witch cult in western Europe. I love that title and Yes me too in this work also so help solidify. There's a common idea that within a coven there would be thirteen members exactly thirteen members and there are some accounts that say. That's twelve actionable. Actionable what you would call witches as well as either a leader or the devil or deity themselves so you'd have actually like twelve apostles and then one liter or one deity right and Murray actually believe that having twelve which is was a mockery of Jesus twelve disciples and while it's true that the number thirteen eighteen does hold significance within certain wiccan belief systems. The number of members of a Coven was generally not a requirement. There was no hard and fast rule will but we have also found several modern covens that do only allow thirteen members. So why did people bother hunting which is in the first place I think partially because they genuinely believed they were doing. God's work fighting the infernal insidious forces of hell of darkness. Yes yeah that's what it said on the label short but there's a dirty truth to this. You see the way. The laws usually worked said that if someone was convicted convicted of witchcraft. Whomever they were the person who convicted them got their possessions all of their worldly possessions? Like good job you. And and this means that in many cases which hunters were working on commission basis. That's a problem. Yeah so like you have some bills to pay. You're a witch hunter. You're probably have three or four victims picked out and now. Fortunately for history brand apology for science for humanity at large these inquisitions in these other persecution programs did not wipe out every non Catholic religion. And you can still find. Modern groups identified as Colvin's or witches or pagans of some sort today. This episode.

covens Evans Murray Al Gore US Lisa William Faulkner Rogan Isabel gowdy Colvin western Europe Margaret
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Beyond reality radio itself late night Tuesday. Jason and JV have the week off, Bruce Marcus and filling in and tonight, we continue our conversation on witchcraft so authors, Christopher or a pillow and Tara Maguire their new book just out December, first Belgium Stang and sword Christopher and terror. Love are which is they are obviously authors and podcasters as well, and you can access their podcasts by going to the website, infinite dash beyond dot com. Again, that's infinite dash beyond dot com before the break, Christopher we asked about Tara loves influences. And she talked about Isabel gowdy Marie lavonia William s Burroughs. How about for you, Christopher who are the influences that really kind of helped shape your love of witchcraft your interest in witchcraft? Oh, man. Oh, that's that's a really tough question. Actually, they're all over the place. Really? Yeah. As far as what we're doing? Now with black tree. I would definitely say the work of Robert Cochran foreign ROY Bowers back in the nineteen thirty one thirty top of my head. Definitely his influences is big mckern practice as well. As I my path has wandered down. So many different avenues, you know, cast magic Tolima work some of the works to Croly lot of popular books on Wicca as well. Definitely has shaped and influenced by pass as well as just my may sonic background, which I got involved in freemasonry to kind of understand some of the nineteenth century cultism in the sewer that kinda got a lot of its influence from which was the ritual structure freemasonry freemasonry itself is not a court related in any way, shape or form and trying to clarify that makes me sound like I'm trying to cover something up. But a lot of that all of that has has definitely influenced my path in some way, shape or form. It's my patterns a little to read out to really be. So specific of an answer for you. I apologize. Many influences along the way we will continue with Christopher or appello and Charles McGuire. Authors of Basim staying and sword. Please stay with us. You're listening to beyond reality radio. We will continue with the subjective. Witchcraft don't go away. Holiday flower, faux,.

Christopher Tara Maguire ROY Bowers Bruce Marcus Belgium Stang Jason Isabel gowdy Marie William s Burroughs Croly Basim Charles McGuire
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"And she talked about Isabel gowdy Marie Lavoro William s Burroughs. How about for you, Christopher who are the influences that really kind of helped shape to your love of witchcraft your interest in witchcraft? Oh, man. Oh. That's that's a really tough question. Actually, they're all over the place. Really? Yeah. It says far as what we're doing. Now with black tree. I would definitely say the work of Robert Cochran born ROY Bowers back in the nineteen thirty one thirty. Top of my head. Definitely his influence is big in my current practice as well as I might path has wandered down. So many different avenues, you know. Cast magic Tolima work some of the works of Crowly lot of popular books on Wicca as well definitely has shaped an influence my path as well. As just my may, sonic background, which I got involved in freemasonry to kind of understand some of the. A nineteenth century cultism in the sewer that kinda got a lot of its influence from which was the ritual structure. Freemasonry freemasonry itself is not a cold related in any way, shape or form and me trying to clarify that makes me sound like I'm trying to cover something up. But a lot of that all of that has has definitely influenced. My Pat, in some way, shape or form. My little to spread out to really be. So specific of an answer for you. I apologize. Fun. Any influences along the way, we will continue with Christopher or appello and Tara love Maguire authors of Basim staying and sword. Please stay with us. You're listening to beyond reality radio. We will continue with the subject of witchcraft don't go away. When it comes to taking care of.

Christopher Marie Lavoro William s Burroug Robert Cochran Isabel Crowly Pat Basim Tara
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

WWL

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

"And you teach an entire course on this fascinating. No, really. It's it. It really is amazing. You mentioned a term a moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. A black mirror is the one of the most coolest tool lists that. It's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like you take a picture frame that has a she has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the put the piece of glass back into the frame, and you look through the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. Ended up looking under the right lighting conditions. It ends up looking like this black expanse just as this. Void that. You would just look endless void that you will look into and it allows you to kind of trance out and to not focus on anything, you know, because when we're looking around the room, or is focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's a chair or table or the cat, but when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not focus on anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I, you know, like when you have your eyes shot, and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your runs in rods and cones in your eye or kind of pulling down from the just from the daily activity you. You might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelids. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of nation is just about interpreting abstract shapes or symbols or. A symbolic language like in tarot work. Studying pictures and interpreting pictures and Lang in a language on its own. So like black mirrors like really cool and really easy to make so yeah. With with very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name that explains that sort for a pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book bedroom, staying stored tear love I want to talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and you've had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy Maria VO and William s Burroughs. Let's talk about each of those people familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans. I guess eighteen hundreds. Kind of. Right. Yeah. Well, there's also there's two marines the mother and the daughter, and they were very very influential in shaping of American food are Americans do so there's her because very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gowdy is actually Scottish witch from the whole team hungry. I forget the year, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. She was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here, and we dance, and they give me things, and they taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't really hear about in the witch trials. Really good book by a woman named Emma will be called divisions in his belt gowdy that goes into the witch trial records and then executed. I know actually she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. And then the third person writer American writer, William Burroughs. Will you must boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch..

Isabel gowdy Christopher black Isabel gowdy Maria VO William Burroughs New Orleans Netflix Emma Lang writer Tara thirty years
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

13:35 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"We continue with Christopher pillow and terror love McGuire wanted to ask you about another piece of terminology in the title. We we broke down the bedroom. I'm staying in sword part in our number one. What exactly though is the sixfold path that you reference in the other part of the title. Everyone could cast their minds back to like sixth grade science class when you're learning about elements in the periodic table, and that is there was a substance that could be broken down to its most purest form that was only one month, we kind of took a look at that like witchcraft like in we broke witchcraft down to its barest components. We came up with six six separate disciplines that comprise witchcraft the six pack and those disciplines our history and lore, which is one magic divination herbalism. And head witchery and all six of those things. Together, comprise witchcraft. All right. Well, that makes sense one of the things that has always fascinated me is the subject of necropsy, which is for those not aware. That's basically the effort to communicate with the dead in order to try to predict the future that correct? A little bit. Sometimes just to get knowledge not necessarily. Future or purposes? Yeah. And is that is that a subjects that you go into quite a bit of depth in the book. Yes. Yes. We the book itself. Six Pazar broken down in chapter in the books and Necker Mitzi has its own chapter nicer. So now have either of you had personal situations where you've been able to communicate with the dead. Usually, it's it's it's it comes in the form. And a lot of our experience. Neither just through likes crying where you know, you're looking into incense or a black mirror, for example, or in what people refer to as unsubstantiated personal Knossos. Where urine conversation like you said before we have an ancestor altar suicide before the the ancestor altar as a daily practice and just have conversation. And sometimes you get feelings of answers from that interaction. That's just one way that we employ Necker Mansi. Neck romance itself is it's such a nebulous thing. Because a lot of people. It gets interpreted as corpse divination or give nation by a dead body. And you don't do that at all. Well, no, no. Fortunately, bruce. I don't have access the corpses. Right. Just wanna make that clear directors out there willing to try some weird stuff. Give us a call. That was something that was done quite a bit going back. Probably what nineteenth century even and obviously before. Then I mean that was a common thing. Yeah. Even further back. I mean their stories in all kinds of classical literature that talk about people attempting to contact the dead to find out information. I mean, Christopher crash on Necker Mansi called resurrecting achromatic. And he tells this story about the witch and Eric so and how she was hired. Well, you you tell your the one he wrote here. This is the story of Eric comes from Sarah solu-, which is a an early. Roman epic poem written by Lucan. In her public domain oddly enough, you know, being so all the this. But it it tells of Eric so who is employed by Sexton's poppies to make contact with the dead. So he can find out whether or not he was gonna die in the battle the next day. Eric so was rile creature of of a woman who lived outside of society and hung out in graveyards in caves and would steal corpses. And body parts from battlefields, and employees, the spirits and. Employees the spirits into joining her army of shades on this particular occasion, she sought out a body from the local battlefield that had no wounds to the lungs and drug it to the cave to summon the spirit of the soldier to answer questions for sexist puppies. You teach an entire course on this fascinating. No, really. It's it. It really is amazing. You mentioned a term a moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. Black mirror is one of the most coolest. It's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like, you take a picture friend that has you know, has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the glass back into the frame, and you look through the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. It ends up looking under the right lighting conditions that ended up looking like this black expanse, just as the void that you just look endless void that you will look into and it allows you to kind of trance out and to not focus on anything. Because when we're looking around the room, or is is simply focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's a chair or table or the cat, but when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not focus on anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I you know, like when you have your eyes shot and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your do cod runs in garage. And Conan your eye are kind of pulling down from the just from the daily activity. You might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelids. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of the nation is just about interpreting abstract shapes our symbols or. A symbolic language like in work. Studying pictures and interpreting pictures in a language on its own. So like black mirrors like really cool and really easy to make so yeah. With with very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name explains that Arcus artistic or a pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book bedroom, staying and stored tear. I want to talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and he's had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavoro and William s Burroughs. Well, let's talk about each of those people familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans. I guess eighteen hundreds. Right. Yeah. Well, there's also there's two Murray's the mother and the daughter, and they were very very influential in shaping American food are American doodoo. So there's her because I very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gouty is actually Scottish witch from the whole team hungry. I forget the here, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. And she was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here, and we bands, and they give me things. And then they've taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't normally hear about in the witch trials. Yeah. Really good book by a woman named Emma will be called divisions in his belt gowdy that goes into the Wichita records and then executed. I know actually she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. Yeah. And then the third person writer American writer, William Burroughs, will you miss boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch. Yeah. It was made into an awesome film in the early nineties directed by David Cronenberg, William Burroughs was one of the beats he hung out with Carolina back and Allen Ginsberg and that whole crew people, and he definitely had an occult flavor to the things that he right but not overt. Like people would think it was. It's an undercurrent going through there. He talks about different realities that people live in and how to shift between them and how sometimes it just happens pay accident. And I started reading it probably inappropriately early age. And it really impacted me. And I think it it really shaped my my my witchcraft. When I think of writers of the colts. One of the names that always comes to mind is HP lovecraft. At all. We do we both fans of HP lovecraft, and the mythos and things that he writes, he has a very Eldridge Harlem, kind of style cosmic horror. I think is how they actually phrasing. We don't tend to or too much with that type of people would call it current just because the elder gods in the in the lovecraft, cosmology are who not the time. They kind of really just wanna mostly destroy humanity. But there are people who do who do absolutely work with them as their as their chosen paradigm. They work within that structure. But we we mostly keep lovecraft for entertainment. Yeah. He's become a controversial figure too because it's turned out that he was pretty virulent racist. Attitudes that we really would not tolerate today. I guess you know, it can be difficult to separate that from the the quality of the writing it can. And it's a lot of the time. When people dissect things like that from writers or artists from from way, back they removed some from the context in which they happened in and place them in a modern context, and they say things like, oh, well had I been around during that time by then explains E, and it's like, no, you probably wouldn't have because you also would have been raised in that society in that time, and you points that someone like lovecraft were reprehensible. He's extremely Zeno phobic very racist berry antisemitic, but strangely married. A Jewish woman. And there were there's a lot of arguments among love dollars who some of them say that he was starting to kind of pull away from that mindset as he was getting older, but he also on lung. Yeah. And there's others who say, no, no, no. Until the day he died, and they bicker back and forth about it endlessly. But I read the craft within the modern context keeping in mind. What things were like then? And I don't venerate him like some. And I definitely aknowledge all of his flaws and. Repugnant. On particular people's at the world we continue on a Tuesday night. Our guests, Christopher or appello and terror love McGuire. They are practitioners of witchcraft authors of the new book staying in sword guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. We will continue really a fascinating subject you've conversation witchcraft. You're listening to beyond reality radio. This is John Greenhut, and.

Christopher black Eric William Burroughs lovecraft Isabel gowdy Necker Mansi Christopher pillow Necker Mitzi HP McGuire New Orleans writer Netflix Christopher John Greenhut Conan colts Murray Sexton
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"From the carrier heating. He's three. Oh. Marcus and filling in and tonight, we continue our conversation on witchcraft authors, Christopher or a pillow and Tara Maguire their new book just out December first Besson Stang and sword. Christopher and terror. Love are which is they are obviously authors and podcasters as well, and you can access their podcast by going to the website, infinite dash beyond dot com. Again, that's infinite dash beyond dot com. Before the break. Christopher we asked about Tara loves influences. And she talked about Isabel gowdy Marie lavonia William s Burroughs. How about for you, Christopher who were the influences that really kind of helped shape to your love of witchcraft your interest in witchcraft? Oh, man. Oh. That's that's a really tough question. Actually, they're all over the place. Really? Yeah. As far as what we're doing? Now with black tree. I would definitely say the work of Robert Cochran foreign ROY Bowers back in the nineteen thirty one thirty top of my head. Definitely his influence is big in my current practice as well. As I my path has wandered down. So many different avenues, you know, cast magic Tolima work some of the works of a Croly lot of the popular books on Wicca as well. Definitely has shaped and influenced by pass as well as just my may sonic background, which I got involved in freemasonry to kind of understand some of the nineteenth century cultism in the sewer that kind of got a lot of its influence from which was the ritual structure freemasonry freemasonry itself is not a court related in any way, shape or form. And and me trying to clarify that makes me sound like I'm trying to cover something up. But a lot of that all of that has has definitely influenced my path in some way, shape or form. It's my paddle to read out to really be. So specific of an answer for your apologize. Many influences along the way we will continue with Christopher or pillow and Tara love Maguire authors of Basim staying and sword. Please stay with us. You're listening to beyond reality radio. We will continue with the subject of witchcraft don't go away. Yeah. Holiday Inn, express wants to let you in on a little secret..

Christopher Tara Maguire Besson Stang ROY Bowers Holiday Inn Marcus Isabel gowdy Marie William s Burroughs Basim
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

14:16 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Markson guest hosting tonight Jason and JV enjoying a little bit of vacation time in the midst of the winter early in the beginning of the winter in the northeast year. Jason I'm not sure where Jason is. But I know the JV is somewhere in Florida where it's considerably warmer were and where it is right now. But we're still enjoying things here in upstate New York and enjoying our conversation with our two guests tonight, Christopher or a pillow and Tara Maguire. They are authors of a book that has received quite a bit of critical praise and new book called Belgium's Stang and sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the six full path and the hidden landscape. It's been described as a book that offers a fresh spirit based non practice of witchcraft without DVD's, or holy days, it brings authentic traditional spiritual practice to light. But in a modern context and also presents an accessible introduction. Two regional traditional witchcraft. We continue with Christopher appello and terror love McGuire wanted to ask you about another piece of terminology in the title. We we broke down the bedroom. Staying in sword part in our number one. What exactly though is the sixfold path that you reference in the other part of the title. So if if everyone could cast their minds back to like sixth grade science class when you're learning about elements a periodic table, and we're is there was a substance that could be broken down to its most purest form that was only one month. We kind of took a look at that like witchcraft like if we broke witchcraft down to its barest components. We came up with six six separate disciplines that comprise witchcraft. So the six will pass and those disciplines are history and lore, which is why one magic divination herbalism necropsy and head witchery and all six of those things. Together comprise which passed. All right. Well, that makes sense one of the things that has always fascinated me is the subject of necropsy romance. Which is for those not aware. That's basically the effort to communicate with the dead in order to try to predict the future that correct? A little bit. Indicate with the diet sometimes just to get knowledge, not necessarily all future or Disney purposes. Yeah. And is that is that subjects that you? Go into quite a bit of depth in the book. Yes. Yes. We the book itself. The six pads are broken down in the chapter in the book, the Necker Mitzi has its own chapter. So. Now have either of you had personal situations where you've been able to communicate with the dead. Usually, it's it's still it's it comes in the form. And a lot of our experiences either just through lex crying where you're know. You're looking into in center, a black mirror, for example, or in what people refer to as unsubstantiated, personal nauseous. Where you're in conversation. Like, you said before we have an ancestor altar suicide before the off the ancestor altar as a daily practice and just have conversation. And sometimes you get feelings of answers from that interaction. That's just one way that we employ Necker Mansi. Neck romance itself is it's such a nebulous thing. Because a lot of people. It gets interpreted as corpse divination or give nation by a dead body. And you don't do that. All well. No, no. Unfortunately, bruce. I don't have access to corpses. All right. That clear if there's any directors out there willing to try some weird stuff give us a call. But that was that was something that was done quite a bit going back probably what nineteenth century and obviously before. Then I mean that was a common thing. Yeah. Even further back. I mean, there's stories in all kinds of classical literature that talk about people attempting to contact a dead to find out information. I mean Christa clash on Necker Mansi called resurrecting macaroni. And he tells the story about the witch of Eric though, and how she was hired. Well, you you tell your the one who wrote it. This is the story of Eric comes from Sarah solu-, which is a an early. A Roman epic poem written by Lucan, public domain oddly enough, you know, being so all the this. But it it tells of Eric so who is employed by sexist poppies to make contact with the dead. So he can find out whether or not he was going to die in the battle the next day, Eric so was vile creature of a woman who lived outside of society, and and hung out in graveyards in caves and would steal corpses. And body parts from battlefields, and employees, the spirits and employees the spirits into joining her army of shades on this particular occasion, she sought out a body from the local battlefield that had no wounds to the lungs and drug it to the cave to summon the spirit of the soldier to answer her questions for sexist pompous. And you teach an entire course on this fascinating. No, really. It's it. It really is amazing. You mentioned a term moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. A black mirror is one of the most coolest tool lists that. It's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like, you take a picture frame that has you know, has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the put the piece of glass back into the frame, and you look through the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. It ends up looking under the right lighting conditions that ends up looking like this black expanse just as this. Void that. You just look at this endless. Void that. You will look into. And it allows you to kind of trans out and to not focus on anything, you know, because when we're looking around the room, or is focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's a chair or table or the cat, but when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not so 'cause on anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I, you know, like when you have your eyes shut and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your do cod. Runs in rods and cones in your eye or kind of pulling down from the just from the daily activity, you might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelids. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of David nation is just about interpreting abstract shapes or symbols or. A symbolic language like in Tara work. Studying pictures and interpreting pictures in a language on its own. So like black mirror is like really cool and really easy to make so know with with very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name that explains that our Christopher pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book bedroom staying in stored tear. I wanna talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and you've had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavoro and William s Burroughs. Let's talk about each of those people familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans guess eighteen hundreds. Kind of. Right. Yeah. There's there's also there's two Murray's the mother and the daughter, and they were very very influential in shaping of American food are Americans doodoo. So there's her because very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gowdy is actually a Scottish witch from the bowl team hungry. I forget the year, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. She was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here, and we dance, and they give me things and they've taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't really hear about in the witch trials. Really good book by a woman named Emma will be called the visions of his belt gowdy that goes into the witch trial records and then executed. No, actually, she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. Yeah. And then the third person a writer American writer, William Burroughs. Will you must boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch. Yeah. It was made into an awesome film in the early nineties directed by David Cronenberg, William s Burroughs was one of the beasts he hung out with Carolina back and Allen Ginsberg, Oregon that whole crew of people, and he definitely had an colts lever to the things that he right, but not overtly people would think it was it's an undercurrent going through there. He talks about different realities that people live in and how to shift between them and how sometimes it just happens by accident. And I started reading barriers it probably inappropriately early age raised by wolves. And it really impacted me. And I think it it really shaped my my my witchcraft. When I think of writers of the occult. One of the names that always comes to mind is HP lovecraft. We do we personally are both fans of HP lovecraft, and the Kippur mythos and the things that he writes, he has a very Eldridge Harlem, kind of style cosmic horror. I think is how they actually phrase it. We don't tend to or too much with that type of what people would call it current just because the elder gods in the in the lovecraft, cosmology are not a good time. They kind of really just wanna mostly destroy humanity. But there are people who do who do absolutely work with them as their as their chosen paradigm. And they they work within that structure. But we we mostly keep lovecraft for entertainment. Yeah. He's become a controversial figure too. Because it's you know, turned out that he was pretty virulent racist attitudes that we really would not tolerate today. I guess you know, it can be difficult to separate that from the the quality of the writing it can. And it's a lot of the time. When people dissect things like that from writers or artists from from way, back they removed them from the context in which they happened in and place them in a modern context. And they say things like oh, well had I been around during that time. I then x y and z, and it's like, no, you probably wouldn't have because you also would have been raised in that society in that time and the viewpoints that someone like lovecraft had were reprehensible, he's extremely phobic very racist. Very antisemitic, but strangely married Jewish women. And there was a lot of arguments among lovecraft scholars who some of them say that he was starting to kind of pull away from that mindset as he was getting older. But he also I mean, he don't put lung, and there's others who say, no, no, no. Until the day he died, and they they pick back and forth about it endlessly. But I read lovecraft within the modern context keeping in mind. What things were like then? And I don't venerate him like some I definitely acknowledge all of his flaws and repugnant on on particular people's at the world we continue on a Tuesday night. Our guests Christopher pillow and terror love McGuire. They are practitioners of witchcraft authors of the new book Belgium, staying in sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. We will continue really a fascinating subject you've conversation witchcraft. You're listening to beyond reality radio..

lovecraft Eric William Burroughs Christopher black Jason Belgium Isabel gowdy Christopher pillow JV Tara Maguire New York Necker Mansi Christopher appello Necker Mitzi Disney HP Florida McGuire New Orleans
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Jason and JV have the week off their enjoying a little bit of wintertime vacation. My name is Bruce marks. And glad to be with you. And glad to be talking to our two guests who are going to be joining us momentarily. They are authors of a brand new book Beeson Stang and sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. Let me introduce each of the two guests we have Christopher or appello. Christopher is co host of the very popular pagan podcast down at the crossroads. He is a tarot enthusiasts. Also is a proud south jersey. Freemason spends his time podcasting writing sculpting and practicing witchcraft with the black tree coven Tara love. Mcguire has been a practicing witch for over thirty years on a path that has been influenced by the likes of Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavaux and William s Burroughs. She specializes in hedge witchery and poisonous plants and along with Christopher founded the black tree coven Christopher terror love. We welcome both of you to beyond reality radio. How are you tonight? Thank you for having us. We are well alone. Yes, thanks for being with us. And before we get into the subject of witchcraft, which we're gonna go into quite a bit of detail over the next couple of hours. I want to talk specifically about the title, which I find very interesting. I looked up some of these terms that was not familiar with. And if if I'm correct in anything that I've said, please feel free to correct me. But as I understand, it them is kind of the traditional witches broom with twigs tied at the end of a broomstick, right? Okay. I mean, we we we've heard bedrooms and we've heard them. Okay. But you know, they're both. Think potato you say potato all right? And a. Traditional traditional word. We'll fancier sounding, you know. Yeah. For the people on the inside. Okay. Now Stang is a staff that has like a fork at the end of it. Yeah. It's like a fourth branch. Okay. And it's you it's generally about like person height, and it's used to connect the above and below it represents the world trade. Okay. And a sword. I guess is self explanatory. So these are essentially what the the symbols or images that we associate with witchcraft. Yes. Yeah. Along with a lot of other things in our in our tradition, specifically quackery tradition. Those are primary tools that we use in our practice. So hence the title of the book. Yeah. Let's begin with traditional witchcraft when we use that term. And this is what you talk about in the book, we use the term traditional witchcraft. Let's let's begin there. What exactly do we mean by that? Well, the term itself is is a pretty big umbrella term and it can. It branches off into two different directions. When you use that phrase, you can either mean cultural practices like hoodoo. What or you can mean magical traditions like creditable came called the body seventeen thirty four we tend to not use it in the regards of cultural practices because you need a lot more time in words to go into those and do them the Justice that they deserve. And a lot of those practitioners also don't necessarily identify which is. But if you look at it from the other perspective traditional witchcraft, the it's it's generally non wiccan, although there are some people who will say British traditional Wicca falls under traditional which. But it is the traditions are pass that fall under the heading of traditional witchcraft. They tend to be more of an introspective nature and the work is more heavily centered in individual Chamonix, practices and connection with the land rather than any actual beauty veneration. A lot of it goes back to using folklore, and which trial records, and literature and mythology and things like that get the tools and information that you need to. To practice witchcraft rather than going through any type of dogma or religious lineup. Now when we talk about traditional witchcraft is this a religion or not? No, I don't I don't honestly feel that witchcraft itself is actually a religion. I know that statement would disagree with a lot of people. I mean 'cause witchcraft the term has been applied in so many different contexts and in relation to so many different religious traditions that to say witchcraft is a religion, ignores the fact that Christians from hundreds of years ago where choose to practicing witchcraft and burned at the stake. So it's it's a little bit of weird contradiction and understanding so in our print our perspective, and how we talked about it in the book, we specifically present witchcraft as a practice and not as a religion. Okay. I say now, let's take it a step further because you both a spouse regional which raft. Explain what that is a lot of people who get into things like this. They in the in the beginning. Books. You see things about taking your pantheon? And it's all these. Two inch in Europe. Coats and English and and somebody in Des Moines. I know this very far away. Energy and the way that we view it is why are you going to plug your vacuum cleaner into the electrical plug that is down the street. Plug it into the next to you where you're at is going to be so much more powerful. So much more meaningful to you just as a person, and as an as a witch or as anybody following any type of spiritual path like the land that you live on is much more. Just connected to you rather than some some country never been to and probably never will be. So we definitely take a take a very strong look at the land around us for what we do how it shapes our practice and things that we learn. And since we've started actually recognizing doing that. I felt I've just learned a lot about myself as a person over a lot about myself as a witch. I've learned a lot about this. How the world works in selling. It's something that I I actually prefer rather than going very far. Now when you talk about the land is there, an implication of rural settings or can this be urban suburban? No, it's absolutely not just world. The land is not just what wild you you find the same type of land energy in the cities. I mean cities are living creatures all their own. They have. Blood vessels and nervous centers. And they become like something that just has its own consciousness. Just like a forest. Yeah. Still out of concrete and gone rather than something organic. Now, you both live in southern New Jersey are you in a city setting? No, no call. Nia? But we don't have to drive like half an hour. Star. And we're pretty close to a major city. Yeah. And you're both in the same location. Right. Yes. Seventeen. And we just got married in September. Congratulations..

Christopher Beeson Stang Bruce marks south jersey Jason Mcguire Chamonix Isabel gowdy William s Burroughs Europe Des Moines New Jersey Marie Lavaux thirty years Two inch
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"To take care of others. You have to take care of yourself to that's cover VA dot org or eight five five to four to eight to eight to brought to you by. The Commonwealth Virginia. WBZ T, a radio dot com station and tonight, we continue our conversation on witchcraft authors, Christopher or a pillow and Tara Maguire their new book just out December first Beckham Stang and sword. Christopher and terror. Love are which is they are obviously authors and podcasters as well, and you can access their podcast by going to the website, infinite dash beyond dot com. Again, that's infinite dash beyond dot com before the break, Christopher we asked about Tara loves influences. And she talked about Isabel gowdy Marie Lavaux William Burroughs. How about for you, Christopher who are the influences that really kind of helped shape to your love of witchcraft your interest in witchcraft? Oh, man. Oh. That's that's a really tough question. Actually, they're all over the place. Really? Yeah. As far as what we're doing? Now with black tree. I would definitely say the work of Robert Cochran foreign ROY Bowers back in the nineteen thirty one thirty. Oh, my head. Definitely his influence is big in my current practice as well as I might path has wandered down. So many different avenues, you know, cast magic Lima work, some of the works of Crowly lot of popular books on Wicca as well definitely has shaped and influenced my pass as well as just my may sonic background which I got involved in freemasonry to kind of understand some of the. On nineteenth century cultism in the see where that kind of got a lot of its influence from which was the ritual structure freemasonry freemasonry itself is not a court related in any way, shape or form and trying to clarify that makes me sound like I'm trying to cover something up. But a lot of that all of that has has definitely influenced my path in some way, shape or form. My paddle to read out to really be. So specific of an answer for you. Oh, that's fine. Many influences along the way we will continue with Christopher or appello and Tara love Maguire authors of Basim staying and sword. Please stay with us. You're listening to beyond reality radio. We will.

Christopher Tara Maguire ROY Bowers Commonwealth Virginia Marie Lavaux William Burroughs WBZ T VA Beckham Stang Crowly Basim Isabel
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

WWL

14:36 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

"Title. You can't handle the truth. Handle the truth. Hour number two of the show. Bruce Markson guest hosting tonight Jason and JV enjoying a little bit of vacation time in the midst of the winter early in the beginning of the winter in the northeast year. Jason I'm not sure where Jason is. But I know the JV is somewhere in Florida where it's considerably warmer were and where it is right now. But we're still enjoying things here in upstate New York and enjoying our conversation with our two guests tonight, Christopher or a pillow and Tara Maguire. They are authors of a book that has received quite a bit of critical praise and new book called Belgium's Stang and sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the six full path and the hidden landscape has been described as a book that offers a fresh spirit based non religious practice of witchcraft without DVD's or holy days. It brings an authentic traditional spiritual practice to light. But in a modern context and also presents an accessible introduction. Two regional traditional witchcraft. We continue with Christopher pillow and terror love McGuire wanted to ask you about another piece of terminology in the title. We we broke down the bedroom. Staying in sword part in our number one. What exactly though is the sixfold path that you referenced in the other part of the title. If if everyone could catch their minds back to like, sixth grade science class when you're learning about elements in the periodic table, and is there was a substance that could be broken down to its most purest form that was only one multiple. We kind of took a look at that like witchcraft like if we broke witchcraft down to its barest components. We came up with six six separate disciplines that comprise which perhaps the six pass and those disciplines our history and lore, which is what one magic divination herbalism neck and head witchery and all six of those things. Together, comprise witchcraft. All right. Well, that makes sense one of the things that has always fascinated me is the subject of necropsy. Necker Madison, which is for those not aware. That's basically the effort to communicate with the dead in order to try to predict the future that correct? A little bit. Indicate with the diet sometimes just to get knowledge, not necessarily Hoyle all future or giving purposes. Yeah. Okay. And is that is that a subject that you go into quite a bit of depth in the book. Yes. Yes. We the book itself. The six pads are broken down in chapter in the book, the Necker Mitzi has its own chapter nicer, so. Oh. Now have either of you had personal situations where you've been able to communicate with the dead. Usually, it's it's it's it comes in the form. And a lot of our experiences either just through likes crying where you know, you're looking into in center black mirror, for example, or in what people refer to as unsubstantiated personal Knossos where you're in conversation. Like, you said before we have an ancestor altar suicide before the the ancestor altar as a daily practice and just have conversation. And sometimes you get feelings of answers from that interaction. That's just one way that we employ Necker Mansi. Neck romance itself is is such a nebulous thing. Because a lot of people. It gets interpreted as corpse divination or give nation by a dead body. And you don't do that. All well. No, no. Unfortunately, bruce. I don't have access to corpses. Right. That clear if there's any directors out there willing to try some weird stuff give us a call. But that was that was something that was done quite a bit going back probably what nineteenth century and obviously before. Then I mean that was a common thing. Yeah. Even further back. I mean, there's stories in all kinds of classical literature that talk about people attempting to contacted dead to find out information. I mean does a class on Neckermann she called resurrecting macaroni. And he tells this story about the witch and Eric so and how she was hired. Well, you you tell it you're the one who wrote. This is the story of Eric comes from Sarah solu-, which is a an early. Roman epic poem written by Lucan, public domain oddly enough you now being so all this this. But it it tells of Eric who is employed by sexist poppies to make contact with the dead. So he can find out whether or not he was going to die in the battle the next day, Eric so was vile creature of of a woman who lived outside of society and hung out in graveyards in caves and would steal corpses. And body parts from battlefields, and employees, the spirits and. Employees the spirits into joining her army of shades on this particular occasion, she sought out a body from the local battlefield that had no wounds to the lungs and drug it to the cave to some in the spirit of the soldier to answer her questions for sexist pompous. And you teach an entire course on this fascinating. No, really, it really is amazing. You mentioned a term a moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. A black mirror is one of the most coolest. But it's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like, you take a picture friend. That has a she has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the put the piece of glass back into the frame, and you look through the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. It ends up looking under the right lighting conditions that ends up looking like this black expanse just as this. Void that. You just look at this endless void that you would look into. And it allows you to kind of trans out and to not focus on anything, you know, because when we're looking around the room, or is focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's a chair or table or the cat, but when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not so close on anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I, you know, like when you have your eyes shut and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your do cod. Runs in rods and cones in your eye or kind of pulling down from the just from the daily activity. You might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelids. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of nation is just about interpreting abstract shapes or symbols or. A symbolic language like entira work. Studying pictures and interpreting pictures in a language on its own so like black mirror like really cool and really easy to make so yeah. With with very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name that explains that. For a pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book Basim, staying stored tear love, I wanna talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and you've had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy Maria VO and William s Burroughs. Let's talk about each of those people Lebowa familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans. I guess eighteen hundreds kind of a leaving practitioner, right? Yeah. Well, there's also there's two Murray's the mother and the daughter, and they were very very influential in shaping of American food are American do. So there's her because I very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gouty is actually a Scottish switch from the bowl teams hungry. I forget the year, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. And she was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here on weei bands. And they give me things and they've taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't normally hear about in the witch trials. Really good book by a woman named Emma Wilby called the visions of his belt gouty that goes into the witch trial records and then executed. No, actually, she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. Yeah. And then the third person a writer American writer, William Burroughs. Will you must boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch. Yeah. It was made into an awesome film in the early nineties directed by David Cronenberg, William Burroughs was one of the beats he hung out with Carolina back and Allen Ginsberg, and that whole crew of people, and he definitely had an occult slave labor to the things that he right, but not overtly people would think it was it's an undercurrent going through there. He talks about different realities that people live in and how to shift between them and how sometimes it just happens by accident. And I I started reading barriers it probably inappropriately early age by wolves. And it really impacted me. And I think it it really shaped my my my witchcraft. When I think of writers of the colts, one of the names that always comes to mind is HP lovecraft. We do we Chris, and I are both fans of HP lovecraft, and the Kippur mythos and the things that he writes, he has a very Eldridge Harlem, kind of style cosmic car, I think is how they actually phrase it. We don't tend to or too much with that type of what people would call it current just because the elder gods in the in the lovecraft, cosmology are who not a good time. They kind of really just wanna mostly destroy humanity. But there are people who do who do absolutely work with them as their as their chosen paradigm. And they they work within that structure, but we mostly keep lovecraft for entertainment. Yeah. He's become a controversial figure too because it's turned out that he was pretty virulent racist. We really would not tolerate today. I guess you know, it can be difficult to separate that from the the quality of the writing it can. And it's a lot of the time. When people dissect things like that from writers or artists from from way, back they removed them from the context in which they happened in and place them in a modern context. And they say things like oh, well had I been around during that time. I then x y and z, and it's like, no, you probably wouldn't have because you also would have been raised in that society in that time and the viewpoints that someone like lovecraft had were reprehensible, he's extremely phobic very racist. Very antisemitic. But strangely, married, a Jewish woman. And there were there's a lot of arguments among lovecraft scholars who some of them say that he was starting to kind of pull away from that mindset as he was getting older. But he also I mean, he don't lung. And there's others who say, no, no, no up until the day. He died, and they just back and forth about it endlessly. But I read lovecraft within the modern context keeping in mind. What things were like then? And I don't venerate him like some I definitely acknowledge all of his flaws and repugnant between fun on particular people's at the world. We continue on a Tuesday night. Our guests, Christopher or appello and terror love McGuire. They are practitioners of witchcraft authors of the new book Beckham staying sword guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. We will continue really a fascinating subject of conversation witchcraft. You're listening to beyond reality radio..

Christopher black lovecraft Eric William Burroughs Bruce Markson Jason Tara Maguire JV Christopher pillow Isabel gowdy Maria VO New York Belgium Necker Mitzi Necker Madison Necker Mansi Florida Emma Wilby Netflix McGuire New Orleans
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

13:32 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Want to ask you about another piece of terminology in the title? We we broke down the bedroom. Staying in sword part in our number one. What exactly though is the sixfold path that you reference in the other part of the title. If everyone could cast their minds back to like, sixth grade science class when you are learning about elements in the periodic table and learn that there was a substance that could be broken down to its most purest form that was only one multiple. We kind of took a look at that like witchcraft like in we broke witchcraft down to its components. We came up with six six separate disciplines that comprise which passed the six pack and those disciplines our history and lore, which is what one magic divination herbalism. Neck and head witchery and all six of those things. Gather comprised witchcraft. All right. Well, that makes sense one of the things that has always fascinated me is the subject of neck romance. Which is for those not aware. That's basically the effort to communicate with the dead in order to try to predict the future that correct? Little bit. Sometimes just to get knowledge not necessarily. Future or? Yeah. Subject. And is that is that a subject that you go into quite a bit of depth in the book. Yes. Yes. We the book itself. Six Pazar broken down in the chapter in the books and Necker Mitzi has its own chapter. So. Now have either of you had personal situations where you've been able to communicate with the dead. Usually, it's it's it's it comes in the form in a lot of our experiences. Either just through likes crying where you know, you're looking into incense or a black mirror, for example, or in what people refer to as unsubstantiated personal Knossos where you're in conversation. Like, you said before we have an ancestor altar associate before the the ancestor altar as a daily practice and just have conversation. And sometimes you get feelings of answers from that interaction. That's just one way that we employ Necker Mansi. Neck romance itself is is such a thing. Because a lot of people. It gets interpreted as corpse divination or give nation by a dead body. And you don't do that at all. Well, no, no. Fortunately, bruce. I don't have access to corpses. Right. That clear. Directors out there willing to try some weird stuff. Give us a call. That was something that was done quite a bit going back probably what nineteenth century, even and obviously before. Then I mean that was a common thing. Yeah. Even further back. I mean, there's stories in all kinds of classical literature that talk about people attempting to contact the dead to find out information. I mean Christa the class on Necker, she called resurrecting macaroni. And he tells this story about the witch of Eric and how she was hired. Well, you you tell it you're the one he wrote in. This is the sort of Erica comes from Sarah solu-, which is a an early. Roman epic poem written by Lucan. The public domain oddly enough, you know, being so all this is, but it it tells of Eric so who is employed by sexist poppies to make contact with the dead. So he can find out whether or not he was going to die in the battle the next day, Eric so was vile creature of of a woman who lived outside of society and hung out in graveyards in caves and would steal corpses. And body parts from battlefields, and employees, the spirits and. Employees the spirits into joining her army of shades on this particular occasion, she sought out a body from the local battlefield that had no wounds to the lungs and drug it to the caves to some in the spirit of the soldier to answer questions for sexist pompous. Teach an entire course on this fascinating. No, really. It's it. It really is amazing. You mentioned a term a moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. Black mirror is one of the most coolest. It's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like, you take a picture frame that has you know, has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the put the piece of glass back into the frame, and you look to the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. I ended up looking under the right lighting conditions that ended up looking like this black expanse just as this. Void. Just look at this endless. Void that you were looking into. And it allows you to kind of trans out and to not focus on anything, you know, because when we're looking around the room, or is is certainly focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's chair or cable or the cat. But when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not so Kasana anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I, you know, like when you have your eyes, and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your do cod runs in garage and Kundun your eye or kind of pulling down from the just from the daily activity, you might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelids. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of David nation is just about interpreting abstract shapes or symbols or. A symbolic language like entira work. We're studying pictures and interpreting pictures in a language on its own. So like black mirrors like really cool and really easy to make. So yeah. With very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name that explains that. Christopher pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book bedroom staying sword. Tear love I want to talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and he's had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavoro and William s Burroughs. Let's talk about each of those people familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans guess eighteen hundreds. Right. Yeah. There's well. There's also there's two Murray's the mother and the daughter, and they were very very intellectual in shaping the American food are American voodoo her because I very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gouty is actually a Scottish witch from the bowl team. I forget the year, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. She was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here, and we dance and they give me things. And then they've taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't normally hear about in the witch trials. Really good book by a woman named Emma will be called divisions of his belt gowdy that goes into the Wichita records and then executed. I know actually she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. Yeah. And then the third person a writer American writer, William Burroughs, will you miss boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch. It was made into an awesome film in the early nineties directed by David Cronenberg William s Burroughs was one of the beats. He hung out with Carolina and Allen Ginsberg, and that whole crew of people, and he definitely had an occult flavor to the things that he right, but not overtly people would think it was it's an undercurrent going through there. He talks about different realities that people live in and how to shift between the house sometimes it just happens by accident. And I started reading it probably inappropriately early age. And it really impacted me. And I think it it really shaped my my my witchcraft. When I think of writers of the colts. One of the names that always comes to mind is HP lovecraft. Answered all we both fans of HP lovecraft mythos, and the things that he writes, he is a very Eldridge Harlem, kind of style cosmic horror. I think is how they actually phrase it. We don't tend to or too much with that type of what people would call it. A current. Just because the elder gods in the in the lovecraft, cosmology are who not a good time. They kind of really just wanna mostly destroy humanity. But there are people who do who do absolutely work with them as their as their chosen paradigm. And they they work within that structure, but we mostly keep lovecraft for entertainment. Yeah. He's become a controversial figure too because it's turned out that he was pretty and racist attitudes. That we really would not tolerate today. I guess you know, it can be difficult to separate that from the the quality of the writing it can. And it's a lot of the time. When people dissect things like that from writers or artists from from way, back they removed some from the context in which they happened in and place them in a modern context. And they say things like oh, well had I been around during that time. I then explains E, and it's like, no, you probably wouldn't have because you also would have been raised in that society in that time and the viewpoints that someone like lovecraft were reprehensible. He's extremely Zeno phobic very racist berry antisemitic, but strangely married. A Jewish woman. And there were there's a lot of arguments among lovecraft scholars who some of them say that he was starting to kind of pull away from that mindset as he was getting older. But he also I mean, he don't put lung. Yeah. And there's others who say, no, no, no up until the day. He died and they bicker back and forth about it endlessly. But I read lovecraft within the modern context keeping in mind. What things were like then? And I don't venerate him like some I definitely acknowledge all of his flaws and. Repugnant. Meantime on particular peoples of the world we continue on a Tuesday night. Our guests, Christopher or appello and terror love McGuire. They are practitioners of witchcraft authors of the new book them staying in sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. We will continue really a fascinating subject you've conversation witchcraft. You're listening to beyond reality radio. Attention all authors..

lovecraft Christopher black William Burroughs Eric Isabel gowdy Necker Mitzi Necker Mansi HP Netflix New Orleans writer David nation David Cronenberg Allen Ginsberg colts Necker Christa Erica Christopher pillow Murray
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

13:32 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on KNSS

"Want to ask you about another piece of terminology in the title? We we broke down the bedroom. Staying in sword part in our number one. What exactly though is the sixfold path that you reference in the other part of the title. If if everyone could catch their minds back to like, sixth grade science class when you're learning about elements periodic table, and is there was a substance that could be broken down to its most purest form that was only one multiple. We kind of took a look at that like witchcraft like if we broke witchcraft down to its barest components. We came up with six six separate disciplines that comprise which paths to the six pack, and those disciplines our history and lore, which is what one magic divination herbalism Nakamachi and head witchery and all six of those things. Together comprise which crashed. All right. Well, that makes sense one of the things that has always fascinated me is the subject of neck romance. Which is for those not aware. That's basically the effort to communicate with the dead in order to try to predict the future that correct? A little bit. Indicate with the diet sometimes just to get knowledge, not necessarily coil teacher or giving us an purposes. Yeah. And is that is that a subject that you go into quite a bit of depth in the book. Yes. Yes. We the book itself. The six Pazar broken down in the chapter in the book, the Necker Mitzi has its own chapter. So. Now have either of you had personal situations where you've been able to communicate with the dead. Usually, it's it's it's it comes in the form. And a lot of our experiences either just through likes crying where you know, you're looking into incense or a black mirror, for example, or in what people refer to as unsubstantiated personal Knossos. Where you're in conversation. Like, you said before we have an ancestor altar suicide before the off the ancestor altar as a daily practice and just have conversation. And sometimes you get feelings of answers from that interaction. That's just one way that we employ Necker Mansi. Neck romance itself is is such a a nebulous thing. Because a lot of people. It gets interpreted as corpse divination or give nation by a dead body. And you don't do that at all. Well, no, no, unfortunately, Bruce. I don't have access to corpses. Right. Just want to make that clear. There's any directors out there willing to try some weird stuff. Give us a call. But that was that was something that was done quite a bit going back probably what nineteenth century, even and obviously before that. I mean that was a common thing. Yeah. Even further back. I mean, there's stories in all kinds of classical literature that talk about people attempting to contact the dead to find out information. I mean Christa the class on Necker Nancy called resurrecting macaroni. And he tells this story about the witch and Eric and how she was hired. Well, you you tell it you're the one who wrote it. This is the story of Eric comes from Sarah solu-, which is a an early. A Roman epic poem written by Lucan? Public domain oddly enough, you know, being so all this this, but it it tells of Eric so who is employed by sexist poppies to make contact with the dead. So he can find out whether or not he was going to die in the battle the next day, Eric so was vile creature of of a woman who lived outside of society and hung out in graveyards in caves and would steal corpses. And body parts from battlefields, and employees, the spirits, and inter employees the spirits into joining her army shades on this particular occasion, she sought out a body from the local battlefield that had no wounds to the lungs and drug it to the cave to some in the spirit of the soldier to answer her questions for sexist puppies. Teaching entire course on this fascinating. No, really. It's it. It really is amazing. You mentioned a term a moment ago. Christopher black mirror. Explain exactly what that is. It's. A black mirror is one of the most coolest. But it's the simplest thing to make. It's literally like, you take a picture friend. That has a sheet know has the glass in it, and you paint the far side of the glass with like flat black spray paint. And then you put the put the piece of glass back into the frame, and you look through the opposite side. So like the black mirror itself. It ends up looking under the right lighting conditions. It ends up looking like this black expanse just as this. Void. Just look this endless void that you will look into. And it allows you to kind of trans out and to not focus on anything, you know, because when we're looking around the room, or is instantly focused on whatever we're looking at, you know, whether it's a chair or table or the cat, but when you look into something like a black mirror or even in a in a really really dark space. Your eyes are allowed to kind of phase out and not focus on anything in your in which causes a bit of a trance state, and because the the black mirror itself is almost like the inside of your I, you know, like when you have your eyes shut and you're going to sleep, and you might see as your as your do cod. Runs in rods and cones in your IRA or kind of cooling down from the just from the daily activity, you might see impressions and shapes and forms on the inside of your eyelid. It's it's kind of along the same lines. I mean, a lot of David nation is just about interpreting. Abstract shapes or symbols or? A symbolic language like entira work. Studying pictures and interpreting pictures Lang in a language on its own. So like black mirror is like really cool and really easy to make. So yeah. With with very little expense on the part of the practitioner, you can have a black mirror in short of a day. And now, I know where the Netflix show came up with its name that explains that our Christopher pillow and Tara love McGuire. They are authors of the new book bedroom staying in stored tear love, I wanna talk about your background. We mentioned earlier you are practicing which for thirty years, and you've had some major influences over time Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavoro and William s Burroughs. Let's talk about each of those people familiar with a little bit. She was in New Orleans. I guess eighteen hundreds. Kind of him. Yeah. There's there's also there's two Murray's the mother and the daughter, and they were very very intellectual in shaping of American food are American voodoo. So there's her because I very much have a deep love of that type of practice. Isabel gouty is actually a Scottish witch from the bowl team. I forget the year, but she's listed in the Scottish witch trials. And what's unique about her is that she didn't when she was accused and brought before her accusers. She didn't deny anything. She was like totally psyched about talking about it. And she was like, yeah. This is what happens, and I go here on we dance. And they give me things and they've taught me how to heal and like all of this really great stuff that you don't normally hear about in the witch trials. Really good book by a woman named L. Emma will be called the visions of his belt gowdy that goes into the Wichita records and then executed. I know actually she was not executed and she survived the trials, really. Yeah. Yeah. And then the third person a writer American writer, William Burroughs, will you miss boroughs who is probably most well known for his novel naked lunch. Yeah. It was made into an awesome film in the early nineties directed by David Cronenberg, Williamsburg, rose was one of the beats he hung out with Carolina and Allen Ginsberg, and that whole crew of people, and he definitely had an occult flavor to the things that he right, but not overtly people would think it was an undercurrent going through there. He talks about different realities that people live in and how to shift between them and how sometimes it just happens by accident. And I started reading barriers probably inappropriately early age by wolves. And it really impacted me. And I think it it really shaped my my my witchcraft. When I think of writers of the occult, one of the names that always comes to mind is HP lovecraft. We are both fans of HP lovecraft, and the the Kissling mythos and the things that he writes, he has a very Eldridge Harlem, kind of style cosmic horror. I think is how they actually phrase it. We don't tend to or too much with that type of what people would call it a current just because the elder gods in the in the lovecraft, cosmology are who not a good time. They kind of really just wanna mostly destroy humanity. But there are people who do who do absolutely work with them as their as their chosen paradigm. And they they work within that structure. But we we mostly keep lovecraft entertainment. Yeah. He's become a controversial figure too because it's turned out that he was pretty virulent racist attitudes. That we really would not tolerate today. I guess you know, it can be difficult to separate that from the the quality of the writing it can. And it's a lot of the time. When people dissect things like that from writers or artists from from way, back they removed some from the context in which they happened in and place them in a modern context. And they say things like oh, well had I been around during that time. I then x y and z, and it's like, no, you probably wouldn't have because you also would have been raised in that society in that time and the viewpoints that someone like lovecraft had were reprehensible, he's extremely Zeno phobic very racist berry antisemitic, but strangely, married Jewish woman. And there was there's a lot of arguments among lovecraft scholars who some of them say that he was starting to kind of pull away from that mindset as he was. Older. But he also I mean, he put lung and there's others who say, no, no, no. Up until the day. He died and they bicker back and forth about it endlessly. But I read lovecraft within the modern context keeping in mind. What things were like then? And I don't venerate him like some. I definitely acknowledge all of his flaws and repugnant. On particular people's at the world we continue on a Tuesday night. Our guest, Christopher or appello and terror love McGuire. They are practitioners of witchcraft authors of the new book Beckham. Staying in sword a guide to traditional witchcraft the sixfold path and the hidden landscape. We will continue really a fascinating subject of conversation witchcraft. You're listening to beyond reality radio. Attention all authors. Page.

lovecraft Christopher black Eric Isabel gowdy William Burroughs Necker Mitzi Necker Mansi HP Necker Nancy New Orleans writer Netflix Lucan Bruce Christa David nation David Cronenberg Lang Murray Allen Ginsberg
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

WWL

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WWL

"Years on a path that has been influenced by the likes of Isabel gowdy, Marie lavonia and William s Burroughs. She specializes in hedge witchery and poisonous plants and along with Christopher founded the black tree coven. Christopher Tara love. We welcome both of you to beyond reality radio. How are you tonight? Oh, thank you for having us. We are. Well, hello. Yes, thanks for being with us. And before we get into the subject of witchcraft, which we're going to go into quite a bit of detail over the next couple of hours. I want to talk specifically about the title, which I find very interesting. I looked up some of these terms that it was not familiar with. And if if I'm incorrect in anything that I've said, please feel free to correct me. But as I understand it is kind of the traditional witches broom with twigs tied at the end of broomstick, right? Okay. I mean, we we've heard bedroom and we've heard them, okay? They're both. You say potato all right? And staying it's more of a traditional a traditional word. Fancier sounding, you know. Yeah. For the people on the inside. Okay. Now, a Stang is a staff that has like a fork at the end of it. Yeah. It's like a branch. Okay. And it's you it's generally about like person height, and it's used to connect the above and below it represents the world trade. Okay. As sword. I guess is self explanatory. So these are essentially what the the symbols or images that we associate with witchcraft. Yes. Yeah. Along with a lot of other things in our in our tradition, specifically, the blackberry tradition. Those are primary tools that we use in our practice. So hence the title of the book. Yeah. Let's begin with traditional witchcraft when we use that term. And this is what you talk about in the book, we use the term traditional witchcraft. Let's let's begin there. What exactly do we mean by that? Well, the term itself is is a pretty big umbrella term and it can. It branches off into two different directions. When you use that phrase, you can either mean cultural practices like. What or you can mean magical traditions like kind of people came called this body seventeen thirty four we tend to not use it in the regards of cultural practices because you need a lot more time in word to go into those and do them the Justice that they deserve. And a lot of those practitioners also don't necessarily identify riches. But if you look at it from the other perspective traditional witchcraft, the it's it's generally non wiccan, although there are some people who will say British traditional Wicca falls under traditional which. But it is the traditions their pads that fall under the heading of traditional witchcraft. They tend to be more of an inch introspective nature and the work is more heavily centered in individual Chamonix, practices and connection with the land rather than any actual veneration. A lot of it goes back to using folklore, and which trial records, and literature and mythology and things like that get the tools and information that you need to. Practice traditional which path rather than going through any type of dogma or religious lineup. Now when we talk about traditional witchcraft is this a religion or not? No, I don't I don't honestly feel that witchcraft itself is actually a religion. I know that statement would disagree with a lot of people. I mean 'cause which craft the term has been applied in so many different contexts and in relation to so many different religious traditions that to say witchcraft as a religion, ignores the fact that you Christians from hundreds of years ago where choosed of practicing witchcraft and burned at the stake. So it's it's a little bit of our weird contradiction and understanding so in our print our perspective. And how we talk about it in the book, we specifically present witchcraft as a practice and not as a religion. Okay. I say now, let's take it a step further because you both a spouse regional which raft. Explain what that is a lot of people who get into things like this. They in the dark. Homer books. You see things about taking your pantheon? Into your. And english. And and it's somebody in Des Moines Iowa. To this very far. Energy. And the way that we've you it is why are you going to plug your vacuum cleaner into the electrical? Todd that is down the street. Plug it into the next to you where you're at is going to be so much more powerful, and so much more meaning to you just as a person, and as an as a witch or as anybody filing any type of spiritual path like the land that you live on is much more. Just connect connected to you rather than some some country never been to and probably never will be. So we definitely take a take a very strong look at the land around us for what we do how it shapes our practice and things that we learn. And since we've started actually recognizing doing that. I felt I've just learned a lot about myself as a person over a lot about myself, which I've learned a lot about just how the world works. It's something that I I actually prefer rather than going no very far role. Now when you talk about the land is there, an implication of rural settings or can this be urban suburban? No, it's absolutely noxious world. The land is not just what wild you you find the same type of land energy in the cities. I mean cities are living creatures all their own. They have. Blood vessels and nervous centers. And they become like something that just hasn't been consciousness just like a forest out of concrete and goss- rather than pumping organic. Now, you both live in southern New Jersey are you in a city setting? No, no. We kind of call it. We don't but we don't have to drive like half an hour. Star. And we're pretty close to a major city. Yeah. And you're both in the same location. Right. Yes. Seven. And we just got officially married in September. Congratulations. I did not have that in the information here. So that's. Christopher how did you get started in this? Oh, man highlight type books. Maybe I mean, my my interest in the occult and even the paranormal stretches back to when I was a child, honestly. I saw my first ghost as a child, and it always that that initial thing sparked my interest in all of this stuff, and I always kind of held that interest because of that so timely books, you know, the mysteries of the unknown series. I was a big fan of. But I think like my direct immersion into witchcraft and the occult as far as I think where I'm at. Now, you know, I always tell the interest since I was child, but I think to find the point in my life, and the reason I got into it now because I found. Scott Cunningham's book earth, air, fire and water at the local bookstore. And I did some spells from that. And that's that kind of sparked my interest heavily in magic. And the occult. You mentioned that you saw ghost as a child. How old were you? I think I was like two or three it. I mean, it was it's like one it's my youngest memory really that far back. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. And it burned. It's burned itself in my head because it was something that I saw three consecutive nights. And at the time as a child, I always attributed that to my grandfather who had passed away around that time. So I always, you know, I saw this thing in my doorway three nights in a row at a particular point in my life that that stuck with me. Yeah. Wow. How about you Tara love how did this begin for you? I've always been kind of a weird kid. My family moved around a lot when I was a kid, and I usually I usually referred to my childhood. Having. I was the youngest is three kids. I had two older brothers who were quote, unquote, bad. So there wasn't a line of the tension that was directed towards me. So I kind of just do whatever I wanted and being a weird kid that mostly involve hanging out in the woods by myself and reading books, I always kind of had like a little quick to me where I would sit in the words and start to like stare at the patterns that were made by the light going through the leaves on the trees, and it would kind of put me into like this. What I see now is visions, but I used to call them dreams. Then I read everything I could get my hands on on like every single fairytale and folk towel and different different culture. Mythologies Greek and Roman and on Russian on some. Had to get my hands on just like totally absorbed all of it. And when I was probably around like. Nine ten eleven ish. I actually started writing like my own little spells for things. Yeah. And doing stuff like that. Because I saw that their rights that needed to be wrong in my world power that I had to try and do it and then like growing up and and going through teenage in high school. And and as an adult that just like steamrolling and steamrolling, and I went through a few different types of spiritual paths before I just kind of was just like, you know, what? And involved. Did you have a supernatural experience like Christopher any ghostly citing? When I was a kid. I had I sweeping in my oldest brother's bedroom. And I don't know why I was in there. But I was probably about three or four and there were like a bunch of people out in the living room. And I remember the bedroom door opening and something coming into the that looks like a white shape on all fours like a really large dog. But it wasn't a dog. It was just like doll kind of shaped and it walked over to the bed. And I I don't remember what it ceaselessly remember like the white shape, and it pulled my hair, really hard. And I started screaming like you do. Yeah. And the the shape right out of the room. And I don't remember what it's called. We're gonna pause right there because we have a break coming up at the bottom of the hour. We are just getting started though with our two guests. They are the authors of bees, I'm staying in sword or Basim staying in sword. New book that is out on the subject of witchcraft Christopher or appello tariffs. Holiday inn. Express wants to let you in on a little.

Christopher Tara Isabel gowdy Chamonix Des Moines Iowa New Jersey William s Burroughs Scott Cunningham Homer Todd goss Marie lavonia
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Is co host of the very popular pagan podcast down at the crossroads. He is a tarot enthusiasts. Also is a proud south jersey. Freemason spends his time podcasting writing sculpting and practicing witchcraft with the black tree coven terror love McGuire has been a practicing witch for over thirty years on a path that has been influenced by the likes of Isabel gowdy, Marie Lavoro and William s Burroughs. She specializes in hedge witchery and poisonous plants and along with Christopher founded the black tree coven. Christopher Tara love. We welcome both of you to beyond reality radio. How are you tonight? Oh, thank you for having us. We well. Hello. Yes, thanks for being with us. And before we get into the subject of witchcraft, which we're gonna go into quite a bit of detail over the next couple of hours. I want to talk specifically about the title, which I find very interesting. I looked up some of these I was not familiar with. And if if I'm incorrect in anything that I've said, please feel free to correct me. But as I understand it is kind of the traditional witches broom with twigs tied at the end of a broomstick, right? Okay. I mean, we we've we've heard vessels and we've heard them, okay. They're both. You say potato toast. All right. And. Traditional the traditional word. We'll fancier sounding. Yeah. Stand for the people on the inside. Okay. Now, a Stang is a staff that has like a fork at the end of it. Yeah. It's like a branch. Okay. It's you generally about like person height, and it's used to connect the above and below it represents the world trade. Okay. As sword. I guess is self explanatory. So these are essentially what the symbols or images that we associate with witchcraft. Yes. Yeah. Along with a lot of other things in our in our tradition, specifically blackberry tradition. Those are primary tools that we use in our practice. So hence the title of the book. Let's begin with traditional witchcraft when we use that term. And this is what you talk about in the book. But when you use the term traditional witchcraft, let's let's begin there. What exactly do we mean by that? Well, the term itself is is a pretty big umbrella term and it can. It branches off into two different directions. Use that phrase, you mean cultural practices like hoodoo. Or you can mean magical traditions like chronic people came called the sombody seventeen thirty four we tend to not use it in the regards of cultural practices because you need a lot more time in words, you go into those and the Justice that they deserve. And a lot of those practitioners also don't necessarily identifies. But if you look at it from the other perspective traditional witchcraft, the it's it's generally non wiccan, although there are some people who will say British traditional Wicca falls under traditional which but it is the traditions their pass that fall under the heading of traditional witchcraft. They tend to be more of an inch introspective nature and the work is more heavily centered in individual Chamonix, practices and connection with the land rather than any actual beauty veneration a lot of it goes back to using folklore, and which trial records, and literature and mythology and things like that to get. Tools and information that you.

Christopher Tara Marie Lavoro McGuire south jersey Isabel gowdy Chamonix William s Burroughs thirty years
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"Have a good button okay she was fucking oh that is true honestly she was fucking will this testimony mirrors the long limped men in black with the cold touch that will discuss later on in detail but that is very very much a minute black detail long limbs coal touch long limbs coltan they would they talk about last time we talk a little bit a joint list rhys yeah they look like gumby they have like no knuckles they're all very flat the are they look like they've been made by a factory okay and furthermore even though the quote unquote confession of isabel gowdy is likely fabrication made under duress it still ties into min black lore see the fact that the long limbs cold dark man lived in isabel gowdy imagination speaks the genetic memory of humanity pitch black long limped figures for some reason speak to a primal fear within us oh i mean this whole thing survives even to this day in horror movies from the zina more of the alien franchise to like twenty first century creations like slender man and the baba duke right there's just something about like these it's the shadows terrify oh absolutely and slender man we're going to bring this up last episode because in the end like in a way it seems at slender man is a mirror slash kaleidoscope version version of the original men in black visions and now like i would almost consider the slender man to be real like we had two people stab girl like they slender man stabbings case several of the people have committed crimes the name of slender man and i don't really understand what makes it any less real is the perfect example of topa it's because people when they're young they're perfect idea of man is tall and thin like hurt us pain other people a little bit the fuck in mole the topa was created by a bunch of thirteen year old girls and i'll tell you one thing when when you get older you like them fat yeah you like it because you heap fatman keep fatman around and he's and he's very excited to be there but a part of it is that i think that what you're saying while ignorant is also i'm onto it but a part of it is that the thirteen year old sexual fantasy which is what made all of the weird lemon slash vic about slender man real part of it it's like they they are sexually identifying with letterman but the problem like topa is that eventually grows to have its own fucking agenda and interns and become something like the robots in westworld which is a series that i'm watching and referencing on a regular every time you have either microphone or you're on stage you find a way to shove west rolled into but it doesn't ever make any sense at visit episode five season one series one of the things we're trying to say is that the minimum black may have always been topers but they were created collectively by the primal fears of humanity and the tales that we just told are by no means the only appearances of men in black in the witchcraft era in seventeen thirty in norway a thirteen year old girl claimed that six years before that she and her grandmother had attended a secret meeting with satan by way of pig transport i've been some bad uber's before what is a pig transport you imagine a thirteen year old girl pulling up to you in a pig high like you do wanna get on car go meet the devil yes i have you i think so and satan had brought along two companions whom the grandmother had referred to as quote grandfather's boys that is a wonderful series on x videos right now and.

thirteen year six years
"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"isabel gowdy" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"The year fourteen ninety when a cult practitioners claim to trample crucifixes as they worship quote a tall dark man the next sighting came thirty years later again in france is it france in this instance to shepherds told a tale of tall dark man who called himself the devils bondsman ooh that's a great nickname and bondsman by that's an archaic term for slave oh so he was the devil slave yes devastate little like kinky yeah like a little bit it's a little like bondsman good new term for like the sub right world and you wanna use it yeah yeah yeah absolutely so one shepherd knelt and offered feel t to the slave in his dark master then supposedly the man soon after killed an eight five people j we remember this if you've seen the witch right a part of what the which will would made the witch so good is at the took transcripts from actual court hearings during the time like during what we would now know as the famous witch hunt where during that whole time period but oftentimes the devil was synonymous with a man in leather pants and leather vast and fancy black hat on which i mean just feels like it's the one gay of the village from the eighteenth century like figuring out how to work it like figuring out everybody's life breaking the what he was rice on little judas priest five those are real old country buffet that he had topa us it's actually of course both shepherds were burned alive at the stake for consorting with the devil over one hundred years went by without another record citing but in sixteen forty five the infamous witch is a bell gowdy of scotland described immense suspiciously similar to some modern men in black we know that the witch trials in europe and america were buying large led by up tight establishment figures suppressing and murdering groovy ladies as well as a few groovy dudes but there may just be something hidden in isabel gowdy testimony the whole thing with the witch trial right it was all because they were taking the bad wheat right bad flower it was that got there's that's one story is that that of the week of supplies would get contaminated with fungus i would like to nibble on that though and just see with that trip is like no you're taking it but you be pretty good i think it's supposed to be one of those terrifying trips the trip that tex watson had that caused him to murder sharon tate and you've had angel trumpets no that sounds like a horrible thing that you might get after eating too many grains oh wow wow no but the idea that creates very it's alive okay can i just clarify july fifth right now we all had to july for we celebrated our freedom we all time last night now emphasis on dum dum it's we're doing good but trump it's are naturally growing hallucinogen in florida that are like flowers that you pick anything they create very vivid visual hallucinations where you do stuff like your your bed looks like it's covered in cockroaches so you go when you get the bleach hundred kitchen like you get your bleach underneath the sink and you cover your bed in bleach than you set it on fire and shit like that see so you don't want it you don't want no okay well this is a quote from isabel gatti's trial his members are exceeding the greet in loom noman's members are as long his beak as the an iphone his nature as cooled within me as spring will water what does she describing there a little phallic it is ballot but she's describing members limbs oh okay 'cause he doesn't.

one hundred years thirty years