12 Burst results for "Isabel Carter"

"isabel carter" Discussed on Nerdette

Nerdette

08:24 min | 3 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Nerdette

"Net is supported by usual wines. Usual Lines are wines for the modern drinker because of the single serve format and bottle design usual is always fresh and now introducing usual reserve a special wine just in time for the holidays this Cabernet Sauvignon hails from one of the most celebrated plots of land in all of Napa, gift it to someone special or keep it all for yourself. Checkout all their winds at usual winds, Dot com, and use the discount code depth for eight dollars off your first order. What do you WanNa talk about it when it comes to this year's election like what? What makes this year standout you? I think this is the first time in a while that people for whom it is usually pretty easy to vote are having to really think about how they're going to do it. How am I going to? Cast my ballot this year and everyone feels a little iffy of GonNa. Make sure it counts especially if I vote by mail. and. So I think. The best thing that we can do thinking from an individual boaters perspective. What they need to think about is help people create a voting plan boat early if they can, and then if they are voting by mail, just stress the importance of. Beating the deadlines by as many days as you possibly can turning in your ballot yourself in person if possible and just following the directions typically because with mail-in ballots. The top two reasons that an individual ballot might be thrown out might not count is if it gets there late or if there's a signature problem either people forget to sign dumble where they're supposed to sign more, their signature doesn't match and the earlier you do that if something is wrong with it and you're tracking your ballot or the board of elections reaches out to, you might actually have a chance to correct that problem. Yeah. So. That's really huge and that's I needed the one thing keeping me up at night the most. On the tier of things keeping you up at night. Is that S- will lose too many mail in ballots because of. Some minor mistake. By people who are doing it for the first time anytime anyone's doing anything for the first time there's a higher likelihood of mistakes. And obviously this is. Big. Election that we want everyone's vote to. Yeah. So. I wonder Aaron as a person who is passionate about voting. What do you say to somebody who? Who maybe votes maybe hasn't all the time maybe is kind of jaded. You know somebody who looks at our our representatives. And who sees that you know our governing bodies in the United States do not reflect. What America looks like, right? How what do you say to encourage somebody may be to to to keep participating even if if things don't feel as representative as they may be should be right. The first thing I say is I get that. I understand how a person can feel that way but that nothing will ever change those in the minority. Voting Group will never be in the majority voting group if they don't all band together and show up. I think it also helps to. Broaden the outlook little bit in think certainly, not just about the president but about your governor and your mayor in your city? Council people we've learned so much during the coronavirus that those people on in the local government. Impact our lives so much I mean before we just point out well, it impacts traffic in your city. Impacts education and holes right economy and our health. So I think. Even if you hate politics in the truth is I, don't really love politics. I. The back and forth of it, I really do not But politics is your education and your health, and it's climate change and its gun safety in schools and I haven't ever met a person who didn't care about those things. and. It's just important to show up. And vote what your values are and there are many other ways to be active. But. If a person doesn't vote for people who they think can do the best job in steering their city. State and country in the direction they want it to go than it's just really giving up a huge opportunity and I don't think people really want to give up that chance when it comes down to it and fully understanding that maybe you have two people. Who neither are your absolute top choice but one of them is probably going to be a little closer and the closer you get. The. Better off it. And then hopefully more people who look like you think like you will run for office. Politicians, serve the people who vote period, and so if you don't vote, they're never gonNA listen to you and I just think the more of us who show up the more represented. It can be and we want it to be right what we want our world to represent what's Yeah. I think you do a really good job of balancing reality and optimism and I appreciate that very much. Thank you. It is the best we can do in these trying times but you know it's important to vote boating makes you feel good. One of the only things that if you do it and especially if you convince some prince to do as well, it's really a lost situation. While Aaron Geiger Sma thank you so much for for doing the deep dive in and telling us a little bit about your research. It was really interesting. Thanks for having fun and. Everybody vote. CanNot say that enough times. That was Aaron, Geiger, Smith, journalist, and the author of thank you for voting the maddening enlightening inspiring truth about loading in America. and. Now about elections, it is also all Wean Week you WANNA share your costume with us. You totally could. He protagonists on twitter or maybe in her awesome new facebook group will do a thread about it. You can find our facebook group by going to facebook dot com slash net h q i am actually not much of a costumes person, but I did keep Two sets of banana costumes in the trunk of My car for just in case for approximately five years so Also something else that is very halloween. We recap to the Blair witch project with Peter Saville and that is coming out first thing tomorrow so. Recap you totally can. Okay. Show is produced by me and just bowl our interns Isabel Carter executive producer is branded banner beat. We'll see you on Friday for Book Club. We're GONNA talk all about out and I hope it's actually Kinda Fun. Even you know burn up. I WANNA. Tell you about a podcast that's going to help you be an adult from why our media NPR X.'s Radio Tovia fish is a mix of storytelling and hilarious no filter advice with guests like call your girlfriend hosts I not too. So an an friedman singer, Jo Jo and comedian w Kamau hosted by twentysomethings nine Turner and Merck new end their newest season touches on topics like imposter syndrome, the election and the importance of setting boundaries check it out at. Adultish. PODCAST. Dot. com..

Aaron Geiger facebook America Cabernet Sauvignon Napa United States NPR Isabel Carter twitter representative Jo Jo Book Club Dot. Peter Saville executive producer president Merck Turner
"isabel carter" Discussed on Nerdette

Nerdette

08:15 min | 3 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Nerdette

"Net is supported by best fiends a new mobile game that will engage your brain with fun puzzles and tons of cute characters. Enter the world of minutia collect characters, level up your team, defeat the slugs, and play over fourteen hundred levels for hours of fiendish fun. Best means is a five star rated mobile puzzle game that's been downloaded over one hundred million times, and you can download best beans now for free at the apple APP store or Google play, that's friends without the our best fans. After, the unite the right rally in Charlottesville critics said the president's rhetoric fanned the flames of hate that was true for at least one white supremacist I mean, I can't emphasize enough. The reason I got into this stuff was because of that man like I think that's me and thousands of other guys. My age were radicalized by president trump how some young Americans fall for the white supremacist movement subscribe to motive from Wbz Chicago wherever you got your podcasts. When I talked to Mary, I couldn't not ask about how she found out that she was a macarthur genius because I love story about complete stunned surprise and I gotta say. Mary did not disappoint. So they'd sent me an and said, we'd like to set up some time to talk with you confidentially about and athropologists that we're considering for Macarthur. Do. I know and I literally I'm like, okay I can fit this in that's. Like me. I genuinely was. On. The so-called my colleague getting this, and this is kind of like that. Yeah I'm sure there's a German term for that. So I got on the call and I was thinking like there's some really great people during this work I wonder who they're considering and I don't even remember what the person said after the first two minutes like this is a ruse, your actually the recipient, and then after that I literally was like swearing for about ten minutes and laughing uncontrollably. That's what my partner told me. I literally was just up here going shit. Doe. L. No you know and just laughing. I still actually can't believe it to be honest I. It's very where. I also had the pleasure of talking to another MacArthur winner earlier this week Dr Damian Fair he's the director of the University of Minnesota's May Sonic Institute for the developing brain and he's asking big questions about how early brain development can lead to know divergent conditions like autism or Adhd or even schizophrenia. What we're trying to do is A. Trying to bridge the type of basic science work that I do with the educators with policymakers with the community wants so that it has been impacts on folks everyday lives in two so that we're communicating with folks on the ground so to speak so that were the types of questions that were asking answering are relevant to the people. Unlike Mary Damian did not get an e mail. He got like a gazillion phone calls. Yeah. About a month ago. Okay and I was just very long workshop had given a talk and there was a bunch of others about challenges in our science and was the. Zoom or whatever. Zoom, a marathon meeting about eight hours Oh God, and I kept getting this call from Chicago and I kept hanging. Because I. Didn't recognize the number of spam. Did it start to annoy you were you like who is this was? It was very annoying and then. At at the end of the meeting the time and I I don't wouldn't normally do this I. Don't recognize my tip you don't answer. I answered in they they said. Congratulations. You. Know what that is. What? I was just shocked. It took me a second to calibrates brain. These people at exactly. Embarrassing at the time it was like Oh man. I'm going to hang up on you guys all day. Long with being called genius and being surprised apparently a major perk of the MacArthur fellowship is that comes with a no strings attached prize of six hundred, twenty, five, thousand dollars that is paid out over five years and I know I know it is extremely rude to talk to people about money especially when they are guests on your podcast, but I just had to ask. So, there's there's a cash prize with with the Macarthur Fellowship. Are you gonNa like buy a pony or anything? Well my daughter has already asked me if I could my point. Good. So. We probably won't be buying any ponies but the My wife and I have been talking about a little bit. My wife is a very successful physician scientists in their own, right. And she's now is has become the director of women's Global Health at the University of Minnesota Oh my gosh that's amazing and she's been developing some programs that she calls global local, which is. Trying to in essence build capacity in underresourced environments, including overseas to essentially spread the kind of work that we do out to folks that are often marginalized, and so we've been trying to brainstorm through a few ways that we may be able to leverage some of this money towards that effort. We haven't nailed down exactly what that might look like but that's just one one idea in the hopper that is much more virtuous than pony. It's funny. I feel like I have a completely unsophisticated sense of like hundreds of thousands of dollars. So I just tend to think of it as like well, yeah you could buy like ten thousand Corgis with that. Amazingly, getting opponent was also not part of Mary's plan for the prize money I. Mean I confess that my favorite MacArthur award winners in the past have been the writer. So Jasmine Ward I, mean you know just thinking all of these people who and even in your class we have nor K. Jemison Jacqueline Woodson who are like to amazes, ciders? Oh. My Gosh, I mean it in for writers I again, like being surrounded by people who are not in academe but right for a living and freelance it's like that. That is that that's liberation I mean that is the freedom to do your work and pursue your interests. So I feel incredibly. Lucky and and privileged in all senses of the word that I have this, and so mostly, I'm trying to think like how do I get this out in the world in a way that will support other people's work. so you're not going to buy a pony. I'm not going to buy a pony although we did get more daycare for our dog so that he's not a background with him on calls. 'cause it's a little kooky making to have a dog barking while you're trying to give public talk quote unquote on. I mean, that is an animal related expenditure did do a little math. You got a super fancy Corgi and you one, six, hundred, thousand dollars I mean he could get like eight hundred, thousand quarries which lake now that I'm thinking of all of those mortgages in my two bedroom apartment, it's a bad idea. It's a really bad idea. That's it for today tune in Friday for Book Club we're GonNa chat with an Helen Peterson she's the author of can't even how millennials became the burnout generation. The show is produced by me and Justin Bull, our interns, Isabel Carter, and our executive producer is brandon.

Mary Damian Macarthur MacArthur fellowship president director University of Minnesota apple Google Wbz Chicago Charlottesville Adhd writer partner Chicago Dr Damian Fair Justin Bull K. Jemison Jacqueline Woodson Helen Peterson Book Club
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

04:29 min | 8 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"This is Stephen Jackson. One of the curious city producers. We're back with another episode of life interrupted Audio Snapshots of daily life under Illinois. Stay at home order. Today we meet Kate. Huffman a six generation farmer weathering the pandemic in Kiani Illinois. My parents built a house on the home farm. And that's the farmhouse. I actually grew up in. I now live across the street in the house. My Dad grew up in in my grandparents. House my dad worked fulltime on the farm side by side with his dad. The legacy is a really big part of who I am and the character behind me. I can remember all the way back. My grandfather was out doing some tillage and I ran over to. What was the big tractor at that time? A John Deere Forty two thirty and I jumped up in there and I sat on the window sill next to him and just going down the field together. One of my favorite things about the farm is as funny as it sounds is just that the smell of the fresh turn dirt just hard work knowing how many people before me as a six generation farmer have done exactly what. I'm doing today in just a little different manner. Farming isn't just a job. You can't clock in and Clock Out. It's really a livelihood you know it gets ingrained in your blood and system It's definitely a hard time. We're going on six years of a downturn economy for the egg industry last year twenty nineteen mother nature wreak havoc across the entire countryside. Had this trade war going on now. We have an oil war going on. The demand is declining quickly for crap. That's going in the ground right now so as Cova nineteen enters the picture. There's a lot dimmer light right now. It's very hard as a farmer to put crap in the ground knowing that you're going to have a loss there's the question of consolidation. There's the question of do I just retired. They're really affects mental health. When you talk about hanging up farming it's not like hanging up a job in changing careers. It's not easy to just hang something up and watch someone else farmer ground. It can get difficult but I guess as in with life you put a smile on your face and give try to remember why you're doing what you're doing. Why am I forming? I'm trying to keep a legacy in my own family. For Generations to come farmers they do have a sense of resiliency kind of built into their blood. Because you know we have a business model based on multiple variables outside of our control you take Mother Nature. We sell a commodity. We don't control that price. We do all of this and so we make a comeback. Every single time the question becomes. How do we make the comeback? Our farmers will find a way. They always do that. Was Kate. Huffman for our series life interrupted. This story was produced by Isabel. Carter and Joe so and that was the last of the series that you'll be hearing in the curious city feed this week. Governor Pritzker announced that all regions of Illinois are on track to enter phase three of reopening and the mayor announced to plan for Chicago which is expected to take more time but things are slowly beginning to change. And we're going to focus on what we do best answering your questions about anything and everything Chicago and of course covid nineteen if you have a question for us you know what to do get in touch at WBZ DOT org..

Huffman Illinois Kate Chicago Stephen Jackson John Deere Kiani Illinois Governor Pritzker Cova Carter Joe
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

05:05 min | 8 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"Life during covid nineteen. The stay at home. Order has changed just about every aspect of our lives including the way we worship and today we meet the woman who is experiencing a very unusual Ramadan this year. I'm Dan Osman. This might not interrupted. Ramadan is a month where Muslims fast from dawn until sunset and the month is centered around spirituality prayer renewing your faith and your connection with God and your connection to our holy book the Koran. It is a month that you feel the blessings and and you really feel those bussing centered around community a lot of the time because it is a month where we engage in communal prayer every night one of the memorable experiences we have. I've read on. Madan is going to the Players in the evening after we break our fast and depending on the night of the month you may see hundreds or thousands of people alot pitch dark outside and seeing the building and the minaret and dome illuminated by the lights around. The mosque against the sky is just a beautiful sight. Honestly I was very concerned about how we would still make it feel special how we would still maintain that sense of community and spirituality. Even though we're not seeing anyone as the month kind of move don I came to appreciate the way that I am experiencing it because there is more focused on your children? We can pray at home as a family. We can have our three-year-old just sitting on the floor next to US playing with his blocks and he can also see us praying so I do appreciate that. And I appreciate sort of pairing things down to the essentials and realizing that's kind of what Madonna's more about my husband grew up in Gaza and Palestine. He did go through school during the Intifada enduring other events in Gaza where they were not able to go out or go to school or go to the mosque or or go anywhere so he very much so appreciates the fact that we are able to do that here and he's tries to communicate that to the kids night. You know kids. They don't they don't get it. They don't realize the difference in their situation and others by. I think it's still good for them to realize onto here that not everyone has the same experience may seem like a difficult situation and it is a difficult situation. There's no denying that but there are. I think levels of difficulty. Ooh It's GonNa be a challenge to see when things can kind of resume the way that we're used to and I don't know how soon that will actually happen. Because our prayers specifically put people in close proximity with one another standing shoulder to shoulder when we kneel and put our faces on the ground. It's like everyone. Is you know touching the same carpet and is a very close to one another and so I am concerned about that but at the same time in a SNAM worship is anywhere so you don't have to necessarily worship in a mosque. There's a verse in the Pura on that says say to my servant that I'm near I hear the prayers of those who call on me so basically saying that all you have to do as Colin Gotten. He will answer you in one way or another. When you really think about the fact that you know God is the one who's in control of all of it and you surrender yourself to that fact. I feel it's a little bit easier to cut through it and to do your part in order to stay sane and stay healthy and take care of yourself in those around you and just realized that whatever's going to happen is GonNa Happen and that hopefully he will take care of you. That was Deanna of Mon- for our series life interrupted this story was produced by Isabel Carter and Joe so with help from me Stephen Jackson. We want to hear from you too. How has your life been interrupted? And how are you getting through it? If you have a story to tell get in touch find us on facebook and twitter or send us an email at life interrupted at wbz Dot Org..

Gaza Dan Osman US Joe Madan Intifada facebook SNAM Isabel Carter Madonna twitter Colin Palestine Stephen Jackson
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

07:10 min | 9 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"Is What Chinese? Cities usually looked like this time of year. Thick smog blanketing the skyline. But this year. There's something different in the air. You may have heard stories about how cities across the globe. Shutdown Dudakovic are experiencing less air pollution. Beijing residents have been enjoying some unusually fresh spring air. This mall scorn the he's disposed. India's extended lockdown has turned skies over New Delhi a shade of blue from the Italian city of Milan and unusually clear view of the Alps. This is the impact of six weeks of lockdown. Ova Finish Dan. We heard these stories and seen photos of the vivid blue skies in Beijing or Los Angeles. He says it might be his imagination but in the last several weeks the Chicago air has looked clear smelled better. It struck me that you know the last time when the skies would smell Swedish they do could have been from way before height of the industrial era of Chicago. So he wanted to know is the air infect cleaner due to reduce traffic and industrial activity under Illinois? Stay at home order. And if so how far back in history would you have to go to find air this clean? We'll get to the second part of the question about history in a minute. But the first part how clean the air now is extra Because Cove nineteen is a respiratory disease and air pollution affects respiratory health so first off scientists. Do CONFIRM THAT. Chicago in general is experiencing cleaner air due to the stay at home order. Here's Scott Collis and atmospheric scientist at Argonne National Laboratory the measurements between taking from space. Tell us that there is at the moment less pollution less Gases in the atmosphere that we not want that are coming out of the industries around Chicago. This gets complicated for one thing. There are different kinds of pollution and well. Some are clearly down. There's not enough data yet to say all types of pollution or showing a significant drop. But it's very clear that nitrogen dioxide which is strongly correlated to smog is quite a bit lower from where it's been in. March and April in recent years however since a whole slew of environmental protections went into place in the nineteen seventies including the Clean Air Act and do to the efforts of activists. Chicago's air quality has improved steadily for the last four decades so even if it weren't for covered Nineteen Kala suspects twenty twenty would've been Chicago's cleanest year in decades still need to crush the numbers. But definitely that's that's a definite possibility so this sounds great but some neighborhoods that historically experienced high levels of pollution due to industry and transportation aren't seeing much of a reduction while some industry is not operating. You still have what has been considered essential which is building buildings and roads and things like that which requires at Fox it requires concrete and those range of things that emit quite a bit this is Suzanne Malik McKenna. Chicago's former commissioner of the environment. She also points out. The definition of essential industries is broad and many industrial companies in these areas have the discretion to continue to operate so at density of pollution and certain communities still pretty densely polluted which again is particularly concerning since Cova text the respiratory system. All that said scientists agree that air for most chicagoans cleaner than it's been in decades remember. This was a two part question. Our Question Asker Dan. We also wondered if you'd have to go back before industrialization to find air this clean and historians say that's exactly right in fact one early Chicago settler Juliette Kinzie documented a transformation of Chicago's Aaron Skies. Over just a few decades Juliette kinzie indeed uses the word pristine to describe her first encounter with a coastline along Lake Michigan. This is historian and Keating. She says Kinzie grew up in Connecticut. Among noisy dirty textile mills. She was taken with the beauty of Chicago when she moved here in eighteen. Thirty four with her husband. Shortly after arriving she wrote about a trip to the forest little north of Chicago maybe Evanston will met. Today she was blown away by the clean air in the vivid green of the trees and spring. The trees which near the lake had owing to the coldness and tardiness of the season presented the Pale yellow appearance of UN fledged goslings here bursting into fully. The ground. Around was carpeted with flowers. The bird sent forth there sweetest notes. In the warm lingering sunshine and opening buds of the young Hickory and Sassafras filled the air with perfume but in the eighteen forties and fifties early. American settlers began trying to get rich off this land. Newly acquired by the US government coursing the POT AMEE and other native Americans to leave one of the first examples. Was William OGDEN'S GALENA CHICAGO RAILROAD? Which went right downtown in eighteen forty eight so the GALENA and Chicago Railroad? Steam engine belching smoke. It's only GONNA BE ONE. Engine could be a big deal at the outset but very quickly you had a twelve lines with dozens and dozens of trains coming out every day at the same time. Chicago got steamboats that produce smoke grain elevators that spilled dust and chaff full of early factories along the river so the by the late eighteen fifties before the civil war. They're going to be parts of Chicago. Particularly those humping the river. You're GONNA have a both air and water pollution. It was somewhere in this period. The eighteen fifties when historians believe air pollution in Chicago actually became worse than it is today getting dirtier in Dirtier up into the twentieth century and starting to improve by the nineteen seventies when regulation takes off so to find air as clean as the air. We've had in recent years and especially the last few weeks you would likely have to go back to the early eighteen fifties in Chicago. As far as Juliette Kinzie. She couldn't stand the air pollution in eighteen. Sixty eight just thirty four years. After arriving her family moved to the edge of the city to escape what she called quote the soot and grind of the Michigan Street House. This episode was reported by me with Isabel. Carter Linear Dominic and Mackenzie crossing production by Stephen Jackson Katherine Nagasawa was the Voice of Juliette Kinzie Music. Courtesy of big lazy support for curious city comes from the Conan Family Foundation. I'm Jesse Dukes..

Chicago Juliette Kinzie Chicago Railroad Beijing Juliette Kinzie Music Illinois India New Delhi Milan Conan Family Foundation Asker Dan Scott Collis Lake Michigan Jesse Dukes Michigan Street House Cova Aaron Skies Suzanne Malik McKenna US
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

04:54 min | 9 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"This is Stephen Jackson one of the curious city producers. Today we're back with another episode of life interrupted personally dispatches from everyday folks living through in nineteen think of them as little sonic lifelines during this strange strange time in this second installment we meet. Susie in Bob sheer proud parents of an ICU nurse on the front line of the pandemic at an early age we recognize something special in Aley. She has a big heart. She's very determined and she decided she wanted to go ahead and pursue nursing give that ago she started in the Level one trauma center where she would meet the helicopters coming in from accidents. She seemed to be happier with sicker people. Who can say that she? She really likes. Those challenges are just to give you a little insight into maybe. Her personality talked to a really good friend of ours. Who's known Haley her entire life? She said how's Hayley doing and I said well I said most of our patients now are cove patients. She said. I knew she'd be in the thick of it. I knew she'd be was kind of thinking. This must be the way parents feel when their children sign up for the armed forces I mean I know that it's not the same but she wanted to go where she was needed. What I worry about most with her is the psychological impact up it. She said every day in treating these patients. It's like Russia Roulette. The nurses can't even touch their skin without patients being draped and gowned and masked and she has talked about the fact that she has helped several of her patients before they go on the ventilator. Call their families to say goodbye and she said mom I know they're talking to their families for the last time. She's used to twelve hour day but I don't think twelve hour days are like this day after day after day. Once a week we spend the entire day gathering groceries and cooking for her and trying to align up meals for her I smoked beef brisket for her and her fiance the day and made a batch of Chili Forum and bigger put in the seasoning near just things that we can make in quantity and they can eat some now. Put it in the fridge and have a little later so we loaded up more in Naperville and we drive it into the city. The first time we did it she saw and we just said it inside the gate and she would just wave to us out the window but then after that once she got a little more accustomed to what was going on and how to deal with the virus she would come outside. Stand Ten fifteen feet away and we talked for a little bit. I three funded squashes. Are they getting better? One was activated. Oh that's good so he's doing better down okay. Caesar Salad few salad than there. I'm just really proud that she's there on the front lines. Oh chilling thank more proud of her now being a nurse than ever before by so. We're not the hug you guys that was Susie and Bob Pa- sheer for our series. Life interrupted this story was produced by Isabel. Carter and Joe with some help from me Stephen Jackson. Also we want to hear from you. How has your life been interrupted? We're especially interested in hearing from people who had a milestone birthday during the pandemic or have one coming up sometime soon. Have you turned sixteen or sixty? Are You Planning Kierra? If you have a story to tell get in touch find us on facebook and twitter at wbz curious city or US an email at life interrupted at wbz Dot Org?.

Hayley Susie Stephen Jackson Aley Naperville Haley facebook Russia US twitter Bob Pa Carter Joe
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

04:37 min | 9 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"Hey this is Steven Jackson. One of the curious city producers. I'M GONNA START WITH A bold statement here so bear with me. Corona virus has changed our lives. We're all living through the same historical moment sharing the same anxiety uncertainty and `isolation and lots of US. Just want to know. How is everyone getting by? We've set out to answer that question in a new series. We're calling life interrupted and each week will bring you snapshots of daily life during cove in nineteen. We're going to put it here in the curious city podcast. So you'll hear between the weekly episodes of curious city in this first installment we meet Lucy Keady. He's found a new use for an old hobby in the room. Where I'm doing. This is an ancient singer sewing machine. This machine belonged to my grandmother. This is actually the machine that I learned how to sell on and the fun thing about this old sewing machine. Is it still works? I don't use it but it could pinch actually work. I started sewing when I was about. Ten years of age. Started with Dow Close Barbie. Close that sort of thing. I've made all sorts of things over the years ordinary things and then fun whimsical things. I made a lot of Halloween costumes. My daughter Claire. When you're for Halloween wanted to be reponsible but repulsed will in the tower so with that up it was all one piece reserve address Slash Tower Husson. Actually pretty comfortable as it turned out when all of this panda stuff started to happen. I think all of us felt a high sense of helplessness. So when a friend of mine from my knitting group told me about a woman that she knew who was organizing people making mask. I thought this is a real way that I could contribute to the greater good. It's a way of freeing up the massive. They're using in hospitals for medical professionals and providing cloth mask to people that might be afraid or endanger of being infected. I have used fabric. That goes back and choose baby clothes that I made my children. I have made a mess out of a blue daisy pattern that I used for a bridal shower for my daughter. It's just kind of fun to revisit some of these fabrics that I have not used or seen from years. I feel that it is. It's just good for when I look at the staunching especially in these difficult days. I think what does sewing machine what it kind of live through. It was there during World War One. It was there during the flu of nineteen eighteen. It was there during the depression. So this soya machine has gone through a lot of history and without learning how to sew on that old machine. I won't be able to use my current machine to make these mask so it all sort of goes around that was lucy. Keating for our series interrupted this story was produced by Isabel Carter and JOE DE. So we want to hear from you too. How has your life been interrupted? And how are you getting through it? If you have a story to tell get in touch find us on facebook and twitter or send us an email at life interrupted at wbz Dot Org..

Steven Jackson Lucy Keady US facebook Dow Claire Keating Isabel Carter twitter JOE DE
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

08:31 min | 9 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"Another one of our team members Isabel. Carter has been chatting with some of the people who reached out to us about their dating habits. So we're going to check in with them right now. He is he. How's it going great? So what do you have for me as he? Who's up I well? Let's first talk about. Sarah McCall Sarah Story is about making new connections in quarantine and not knowing what the boundaries might be and needing to sort of reinvent those for this new moment. Okay so tell me about what? Sarah's dating habits were like before Yeah Sarah. It loves today. She is a person who likes making those connections. It's kind of an activity. Almost a hobby for her to go out and meet with people. Girl for drinks taxed be in touch on and she likes to keep a casual highway message someone on tinder or like instagram deums or honestly like just text someone like. Hey Wanna get a drink Saturday and it would be that simple and those relationships honestly were like could be pretty physical pretty serious just like kind of little things that were in fast and intense and no longer than four or five months so what's changed since Kobe. Nineteen hit. Yeah well as with everyone. Meeting in person is no longer in options. So she's having to move all of that activity online into these virtual spaces She told me that she has been flirting with someone on an APP called. Draw something which is sort of like a pictionary style game She's been making new matches on dating apps and she even send someone a letter l. An actual letter a handwritten letter. Yes a handwritten letter. She sent it out the the postal service and she's waiting to hear back so she's communicating and reaching out to people and making these connections in a new way this these sort of various forms of remote connections either virtual or letter writing. How is that working for her? The rules of this quarantine. Dating story are very unclear right now and it's almost like a space outside of Reality Blake. Everything is out the window and the normal rules. Don't apply anymore. Is it a kind of what happens? During quarantine stays in quarantine kind of a scenario like none of this is GonNa Count. Time is suspended and get a free pass kind of thing. Yeah I think that she is not expecting things to necessarily become long-term relationships but it's very possible that other people could breed more into that a lot of us are making a lot of connections and I at least four. See for me that I'm GonNa have to do a lot of apologising not like because I'm like a player have game or anything but because it's kind of like this grey area where someone definitely could call your office like double down on their feelings at the end of this. Yeah and I just don't know I feel like really prepared for that. Coveted has obviously disrupted every part of life and dating as no different. We're in a space where the rules. The boundaries aren't as clear as maybe they once were and I think that can be a prompt for people to start exploring many connections more widely and freely. But there's also the flip side where that can maybe lead to some hurt feelings on the other side of this. Okay so maybe pay a little closer attention to that. So it's not an unintended consequence but also you know how fun and get that human interaction. You've talked to a couple of other people including a former curious city in turn Allen Mayor who reached out to us. Tell us about what Alan is experiencing right. Now Yeah Ellen has had a really interesting time in quarantine Her story is about being prompted by this moment to reevaluate some of her priorities. And maybe give lost love and other shot lost love like X. that's right Ellen. Made a connection a few years ago when she was just looking to date casually That exceeded her. Expectations might have been the third day he took me to a poetry nights at the hideout and he read a poem. That really kind of knock me off my feet and I started falling in love with him. Then and you know it took us probably another month or so CEOS to each other's faces I love you but we did that. Pretty quick to and we had like a really blissful first half of a year together but as it does life gets in the way things got more difficult about six months in and they eventually decided to pump the brakes and go their separate ways but they stayed in connection and they always kind of had each other in the back of their minds then right before. Kovin head they had actually decided to end things completely but once everyone was in quarantine. She couldn't stop thinking about whether or not. That was the right decision. She decided to reach out to him but before she could she got a call from him actually decided to give it another go. Oh they got back together. I like this story. I like stories of people getting back together. So how are they doing? How are things going? I have to know? Well they're still remote which is difficult but they're trying to keep building their relationship or as she calls at rekindling so they've been doing things like ordering pizza from the same place and then eating together cooking the same meals at the same time. They've started a two percent book club and they're also doing the famous or infamous depending on who you are thirty. Six questions lead to love by The New York Times and Ellen says it's been going a lot better than she would have expected. I'm not glad for these circumstances at all but I do think that because we've had to be so creative in so intentional that it's possible we've actually covered more ground and like made more progress than maybe we would have otherwise because we're getting into some pretty meaty questions and we're doing it in a way. That's very generous. And kind of safe. Feeling okay so it sounds like she feels good about the direction things are going. How did the pandemic clarify her thinking about her relationship? Cova nineteen is definitely been a challenge. But I think it has prompted her to take a risk living through a global pandemic kind of puts things in perspective in a different way. And they're certainly I think a piece of it emotionally. That's kind of Lake. It's the end of the world like the one you love. Thanks to see. Those stories actually really cheered me up and I'm going to spend the rest of my day thinking about love. Yeah for sure so everyone. We hope finding love or at least tonight's connection and good conversation. Just be aware of other people's feelings and remember you're not going to be isolated forever. What happens in quarantine is actually real? Curious is supported by the Conan Family Foundation. Reporting this week from Isabel Carter Mackenzie Cross in linnea Dominic Jesse dukes and Catherine Nagasawa. I'm Alexandra Solomon and one more thing. I really agree with Alan Mayor. Being with the person you love is really helpful to get through the pandemic and I feel really lucky to have my husband to ride this out with even though his timing isn't always greet. Oh what get out. I told you a recording. Better go tell him. It was sweet to offer to make me an espresso hanging there curious citizens..

Ellen Alan Mayor Sarah McCall Carter Isabel Carter Mackenzie Cross Sarah Story Sarah Kobe Allen Mayor Conan Family Foundation Alexandra Solomon The New York Times Cova Lake Dominic Jesse dukes Catherine Nagasawa
"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

08:57 min | 10 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Curious City

"So all of that was from a recent episode of Nur debt and after hearing it started wondering about Greta and her animals. I've met her core D. Scout and I know that scout can be a little anxious and you know a couple of vets did say our cats and dogs might be picking up on their humans anxieties so I wanted to ask Greta if that was happening with her animals as she worked from home. So we chatted and of course record ourselves remotely so Greta Terminology do you use. Are you a dog and cat mom? A pet owner I appreciate that question very much. I don't really like the mom thing I don't think of them as my children. They did not come out of my body. Didn't grow them inside of me There I don't know I guess they're almost closer to like roommates or like just buddies I think maybe my favorite terminology is actually just that. I'm their person you are the person. Yeah I'm totally their person. Yeah like a thousand percent. That is correct. So one thing I know about scout is that I don't know if you would agree with this. But even in normal circumstances she might have like many of us some anxiety that she's dealing with do you think that's a fair assessment. Yeah I mean. I have her on instagram. Under the handle anxious corgi. So you're not the first person to say it She's scared of a lot of stuff like kids in strollers and basketballs and ruling suitcases Anyone who's extremely overeager to like meet and touch hers. You super wary of that so yeah. She's very well behaved but she's pretty high strung. I would say and do you feel like she is picking up any of the anxiety of the moment right now. I think she is not at all no like I think if anything she's like. Oh how great that. You're just you're all the time and we can go on more walks and we're hanging out you know like she's taking a sitting under the desk where. I work all day which has been real awful and yeah I mean I think I think that's kind of like the amazing Solis of having pets right now. In addition to just having the company if you live on like I do but it's the fact that they have no clue that there's a global pandemic you know like she still needs to eat two meals a day and go out several times and have a nice walk and like that's it. Do you think that helps you You know be socially distant and working from home absolutely yeah. I mean they're still company you know and like I still wouldn't mind a hug now. And then but like there it's really. They're really wonderful creatures. Got Probably well. I don't know if you can train either of your animals to hug. That's yeah I mean. The CORGI legs are not optimized talking a great Dane. It'd be a better hunger or a journalist. Yeah Yeah you need something with sort of similar proportions to humans. I think so. Tell me about your other animal. My other animal is I have a cat named seth and I like to describe him as a monster. He's lake super aggressive. Like I can't really touch him most of the time or he'll try to scratcher by me. I like to describe him as a Greif Luff. He's like sort of medium hair. He's not like Sumer puffy and yeah he's like a he's a scrappy cat. I got him when he was a kitten from a trailer in this town called North Pole which is Thirteen miles south of my hometown of Fairbanks Alaska. There's like actually a place called North Pole butts rebel letters to Santa Ago and And Yeah that's where. Seth is from so he's like a scrappy. Alaska like trash cat. Essentially how's he doing in terms of the Cova crisis? He is fine. I do think there have been a couple times since I've been working from home. Were all like turnaround. And he'll just be staring at me from a couple of away Which is a little unsettling and I'm sorta like dude. Are you like plotting against me right now and I was joking with a friend that he's like deeply skeptical that I'm actually working and he's concerned about paying rent. He's like seriously though like. Shouldn't you be gone by now? But but yeah I mean honestly. I think it's actually going to be really hard for them. When I go back to work. How do you think you'd be doing if it weren't for the pets right now? I think it would be a lot harder And I hate to like have a lot of friends who don't have pets and who kind of wish their life. Circumstances were different that they could have pets. And so I you know I try not to be like I. I tried to acknowledge my own privilege. And the fact that I do have these animals in my life But yeah I mean. They're always like the fact that I live alone but I still have someone to come home to you. Know is just like has always been really helpful. But I think now especially when it's so easy to feel so isolated it's just really wonderful to have like two distinct strange personalities around who don't worry about keeping their distance you know. Yeah one of the things I noted. It's not at all scientific. But in a relatively small sample of voices there are two people who seem to have been prompted by this crisis to acquire animal including Tricia. Yeah That seems like you know. Maybe that's a thing right now. Maybe maybe people are feeling that loneliness and making the choice to adopt a animal friend Yeah well I think. In both cases at least the anecdotes of the people who called Internet I mean both of them are friends of mine. They had always been thinking about it But I think there are a lot of extra good reasons to Blake. Maybe become a pet owner now And one of them is the company. The other is like if you're home all day. What a great time to train a puppy you know or to like figure like get to know a dog before just like having to leave them at home for hours on end while you're at work you know and so yeah. I think to like this is also anecdotal. But I've also had to. Co Workers asked me if I wanted to be if I was able to be a reference for them Filling out applications to foster pets which I think is another really lovely thing like especially you know if you've never had a pet before and you're not necessarily in a position you know you work too much normally but now that you are home you're like in a new space where you could try that out just kind of see if it's a good fit like. I think that also is just super cool and like what a great way to sort of volunteer your help. During like such an UN- Mooring and strange time. You know maybe I should do that. feeling the way you said I was like I bet Jesse dukes is about to do this. Got Me thinking I mean. I don't know there's just like I definitely think I derive lake enhanced meaning from life because I am taking care of something that isn't me and my needs you know And they totally like provide for me to in different ways but yeah I think they're extremely helpful and it's just like helping get me out of myself. I know yeah well Greta. Thank you for joining us today. On the curious city podcast. It's been great talking with you. Hey thank you Jesse the nerd it. Podcast responded to the Cova crisis an ongoing series of episodes. They're calling the introverts guide to the good life as Greta puts it. It's all about helping people. Make the best of this very strange very indoor situation so there are interviews and recommendations about enriching things to do at home checkout near dead at WBZ DOT org slash podcast or wherever you get. Your podcasts. Curious city is supported by the Family Foundation. Thanks to Joe to so and Isabel Carter for help this week. Curious city is edited by Alexandra. Solomon Monica aging is usually our reporter although she's on loan to the WBZ newsroom these days Katherine Nagasawa and McKinsey. Crossing are both working on our digital stories when they had dominic intern music this week by Big Lazy. I'm Jesse Dukes. And one more thing in order to focus on. Cova nineteen coverage. Wbz canceled its spring. Pledge Drive but we do rely on listeners. Like you for sixty percent of our funding so if your income is still intact please consider giving wbz dot org slash donate. And if you're already a member consider upping your monthly contribution. Every dollar counts stay safe. Thank you for listening and thank you for your support..

Greta Jesse dukes seth Cova Alaska Greif Luff McKinsey Solis North Pole intern Alexandra Fairbanks Alaska Solomon Monica Blake Co Workers Katherine Nagasawa Family Foundation reporter Joe
"isabel carter" Discussed on Motive

Motive

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Motive

"Motive is a production of WBZ CHICAGO. The show is produced by me can tell Kahn. The editor is Alexandra. Solomon who was more than just an editor on this project. She reported translated went to Spain and a million late nights and weekends with me as we try to untangle the story over the last year this investigation truly would not have been possible without her additional reporting in Spain from Carmen Ibanez Espinosa. The executive producer is Kevin Dawson. The intern Isabel Carter. This episode was mixed by myself and Joe too so as I wanna take a moment to thank all of my colleagues who contributed to edits including Rob Wildeboer. Kate McGee Jessica Pup evac Kate Kayhan Jesse dukes. Lana Dominic Sarah. Bama Kim Scenario Mackenzie Crossing Becky Levi Kerry shepherd and a very special thanks to wbz interim CEO Steve Edwards for his editorial guidance and support. I also want to thank Manuel Martinez. Sylvie growl barred out KIEF and Michael Nathan for voice overs and to Linda lutton Yuli Maldonado Adriana Cardona McGee guide. Michael Puente Ashley Rodriguez and Sylvia Rivera for help with translations as well as VP Management Consulting Group think suggestion bowl and Brennan banned for Digital Support and Colin McNulty. Shelly Stephens for engineering and production support throughout this project last but not least thanks to you. Listeners this podcast is made possible by the financial contributions of wbz listeners. Like you if you have information about this story or any general thoughts or questions you can always email us at votive at wbz DOT ORC and for information resources about sexual violence go to www dot R. A. I n. n. Dot Org.

Linda lutton Yuli Maldonado Ad Isabel Carter editor Solomon Alexandra Spain Kate McGee Becky Levi Kerry shepherd Carmen Ibanez Espinosa Michael Puente Ashley Rodrigue Lana Dominic Sarah Sylvie growl Kahn Manuel Martinez CHICAGO Shelly Stephens Steve Edwards Kevin Dawson interim CEO intern
"isabel carter" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

17:35 min | 2 years ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Hillary. Right. Happy animal house here. I am Hillary. Oh, this animal house where we discuss all sorts of different political scandals throughout Massachusetts history. Now this week we are going to be meeting a new a new political candidate who has really nothing to do with any sort of scandal. But. He came in following one of the biggest art heist it really in recent history at the Bill Stewart Gardner museum. And so we're going to talk to him about his his candidacy about what he is focused on. And also talk to him a little bit about the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum, heist because you know, looking through all sorts of different old articles and Anthony Amaury is quoted a lot in in these articles. So first of all want to welcome him. He is a swamp Scott Republican and you'll have to make tell me if I'm pronouncing your name incorrectly. Anthony more is that right? Perfect. Thanks, great. Anthony so much for joining us. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me over so talk to me. I mean, this sounds to me just sort of looking at your job descriptions that you are called in after maybe a security breach has happened to help people shore up their security is that a correct. Description. I think it's fair. I've done a lot of that in my career, most notably was. One of the first homeland security officials in Massachusetts. After nine eleven helping to rebuild security at Logan airport. Tomorrow. It's something that's been on my mind a lot lately. Sure. I mean, I think about the work. We did at Logan. Was. Back on the threats. We were hearing right after nine eleven. Logan airport were affected by nine eleven nine eleven. Pretty much all set. I think that I worry sometimes that people will forget. What happened on the coke? Sometimes that people remember the unity. We felt in the country following nine eleven. Give me for jumping in. But what were some of the threats that you're hearing? Well, you know, some kids just start. I would say is that it was almost every day. We were hearing about corruption possible plot against. United States that would make your hair curl when it was really scary stuff. I remember they were times when we'd be on coke calls with headquarters in Washington in people on the calls, which are sound. We'll be down in worried and concerned despondent. But very very concerned that something was coming. And when you're faced with that sort of pressure. It's motivating. But it it really seasons. You. In a quick way. Wouldn't trade the experience for anything? But obviously, we should have. And you're saying, you know, talking a little bit about your concerned that people will forget what happened. Yeah. You know? I mean, I'll give you a great example. I know there are a lot of complaints about. I understand myself. But I often when people that know days after nine eleven. After they were polls throughout the country. National polls asking the public. Do you believe we will be struck again? Using hijacked in such in in the ninety percents. How people of course, are we were gonna get hit again hundred days after nine eleven I responded to the shoe bomber. Okay. So it's a lead security agents that responded to that. But no successful attacks against aviation is seventeen years. And I honestly believe that nobody would have bet their money on that in the days after nine. So there are successes to be point Connecticut. But I am going to be clear there were things about TSA. I think they should definitely be doing differently. But overall, the travelling public has been secure is there anything else just sort of considering obviously that day. Diversity will be tomorrow? You know that anything else that you took away from your experience. They're following what had happened when you talk about the the threats that you're hearing where did they involve Logan specifically. I mean, you talked about Asian. Were they more closer to home? Yes. They were threats in Boston. Twitchy robbie. Major cities. Name it quickly. When you're a member of the public you can disregard, but when you're charged with being part of the security apparatus, you can't in you worry about never forget them. And you got the public doesn't become complacent because they don't know what the intelligence community is hearing any given moment. Yeah. And so how long do you sort of how long do that? And what exactly? Was your role. You're you're just sort of helping identify security, maybe issues in tweaking the system or. Well, I was part of a team there was three three or four specifically. But we if you remember right after nine eleven in lightning speed by November. There is a New York about security in it that the federal government we would be taking over major new roles passengers but screening every checked bag that flies in the United States. Check. None. They all had to be screened by electric moons within a very short window. I oversaw the team that put those screeners out there that train the people use the new technology. The cat scans technology worked with mass port mass did this incredible project where they built this in line baggage system in two thousand eighteen commonplace in two thousand one in two thousand two that was a miracle. And local was I I was in charge of screening that we said, we deployed. Twelve hundred students. Essentially overnight. We have this massive federal workforce that worked for me. And that's why when I talk to campaign overseeing lodge, organizations and. Responsive backward. So interesting just to hear. The response, especially when it's. When when the situation is so overwhelming. And so sort of horrific that. You need to do something you feel overwhelmed with just the amount you need to do. And so hearing that I turned into nuts and bolts action is really interesting to you to hear from you. So talk to me about when you were brought on at the Isabel Carter museum. I joined the garden museum a two thousand five days that was just getting years down the road after the heist. Right. But the museum. Was looking for someone like me because I had done charity work, specifically what I just mentioned to you. Logan. But also, I have a background investigations. The museum unique. Unfortunately, in in the sense that it needed somebody who could secure the art that's in the building. And we have thousands of pieces a lot once billions of dollars. But also can do the best education looking into the thirteen pieces in nine hundred ninety. So I assume this dual. First quarter business was modernizing security at the Gardner. We've done that with great success in the second step was. Beginning this investigation. So I've had this more than fulltime job for the last thirteen years. That I love. But I I'm looking to take these skills they have acquired Trump Graham, bring them back into a public sector. Now. Unfortunately, are you ready for the not everybody is going to know that you were hired on course. Many many years more than a decade after this heist happened in they're gonna. Maybe connect to this the security idea. With course, this infamous heist is that that happened. So far are you able to roll with with sort of with a joke? Adopt lean or. That's true. I mean, that's an excellent point Hillary. But I think, you know, I'm fifty one, and I know. Young. After it was twenty years ago. They realized. Director just out of college at the museum and people do understand quickly that always done years after the fact. Reputation for myself institution as as being a trendsetter into security in place. Poor security. Well, I want to make sure that we get a chance to sort of hear how you want or why you feel like your background is uniquely suited for the security estate office. Can you can you give us a quick sort of sense of how why you think it's important for somebody with your background to to take over in the secretary of state's office. I can you know, what you and I have discussed is that my career has been marked by taking a major security challenges. You know, as we said it was there. I worked at the site of the biggest terrorist attack the United States in history. Charity at the place where the largest property in world history took place, and I see the next big security challenges election security. From the state house. You talk about ten point plan. Ensuring that security for our elections as robust, you know, you talked about lessons from nine eleven to one of the lessons that we can never be complacent in. We can't. So you say you. We have to make sure that we're always one step or two or three steps ahead of the game. And that's what I think I'm the way Christians to take this experience doing balancing security with public access. That's that's been the hallmark of my career. And they want to bring that to the secretary of state's office. Okay. And so what's your sense of Z? Cam was seen as as potentially a pretty viable challenger. You know, Winkelmann has has not had a serious challenger, especially when it comes to Republicans and even independence candidates in a while. How do you plan to sorta change Scott? Well, shirley. Galvin is a formidable opponent. He's outstanding in terms of politics. I think I offer something different. Josh, they did I have a lot more. Tool set in my background of managing people in terms of knowing how to improve security programs. I'm also very committed to transparency, and I think I'm gonna work hard to get those messages across. I think it's fair to say without. Either either of the democratic candidates. But I think it was a lot of acrimony. And I think I think the public will see a different tone for me where I really wanna keep things on the civil level. But just explain why I think I am the person that's best suited to the secretary of state's office will bring them into the future. So talk to me, if you could I mean, it is really it was really interesting to go through the archives and. See your name. And and see you talking a little bit about investigating this crime. You're brought on. Fifteen years after the fact, and I'm trying to remember was that around the time when this fellow William the third or whatever. Yes. Yes. No. That was after he his episode the Gardner took place. Nineteen ninety seven. He was affiliated with. Connor. Claim to have access to. But I don't believe that was the case look into that very deeply no miles calmer. Very very well. That was Michigan. We're trying to make some sort of. Barden to to quell mister Connors dissatisfaction with with the fact that he had sold a great number of his misconduct. Taking. So it was really between. You can never Hillary. You can never count anything out an open case you have to keep every avenue open. So we work really hard working with the FBI. We're working hard yet. These back by my daughter's always give me a hard time because I haven't found them yet. I had a fifteen year start. Me. So. I'm working. I'm doing my best to find him. I firmly believe we will get the back. Now, the other interesting thing is that the fellow who really with the FBI who had really done. Most of this case recently retired. Correct. This is John. Gene, kelly. Agent. Kelly has did not retire. He works. I know. I know the one of the prosecutors work on the case with us by. Brian Calvin he's the one who prosecuted Bolger. He retired. He just left to go to the public sector. Yes. Yeah. So but Jeff Kelly is the Boston. So there's Kelly's Kelly's. Yeah. The FBI agent. He's very much active. So talk to me about about then. Sort of the vulgar. There's so many conspiracy theories. And while you say, you want to keep them all open, and I know, for example, that the FBI most recently in twenty thirteen I think came out and said that they know who these two guys are yet really focused is now on recovering recovering this artwork. There is conspiracy theories abound, of course, involving like the IRA involving Whitey Bulger. Can we put those too bad considering that way balls has now actually been caught which is insane? And the IRA doesn't seem like considering that there's that you know, it seems to me. Or the official word was that the artwork hasn't left the country. Well, that's a really good question. I I'd say that, you know, without closing doors anything if there is a door can it's yes. Yes. That's that's never been good angle that talk in the city. Yeah. Can say everybody affiliated with him has essentially cooperated with the government on on horrific crimes. You can ask me about this homicide or these other ten homicides. But don't ask you about that. Geico sketch. Yes. In terms of the IRA that comes up often often to in. I would say that there has never been one scintilla of evidence points to the island nothing zero evidence in terms of history. What happens with these sorts of heist? Wouldn't be the IRA that this would be in the stuff is probably hitting pretty close to where you at high and in Massachusetts or thereabouts. So those are interesting theories they make for good movies in books, but they're not they're nowhere near the top. Kerry. Unfortunately, discuss what we think is is the most likely scenario. What's can you expand upon why that is because it seems to me like if it no longer matters first of all if they're dead, then in and just listeners know. I believe when the FBI announced that they knew who these people were that they said they were dead. If that's the if that's the case..

FBI Hillary United States Massachusetts Logan airport Jeff Kelly Anthony Amaury Isabella Stewart Gardner museu Logan Bill Stewart Gardner museum Boston garden museum Hillary. Geico Whitey Bulger Isabel Carter museum Washington New York coke
"isabel carter" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

17:38 min | 2 years ago

"isabel carter" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Boston Herald radio. That. Ilori? Right. Happy animal house here. I am Hillary Chicago. This is animal house where we discuss all sorts of different political scandals throughout Massachusetts history. Now this week we are going to be meeting a new candidate a new political candidate who has really nothing to do with any sort of scandal. But. He came in following one of the biggest art heist it really in recent history at the isabela's Stewart Gardner museum. And so we're going to talk to him about his his candidacy about what he is focused on. And also talked to him a little bit about the Isabela Stewart Gardner museum, heist because you know, looking through all sorts of different articles and Anthony Amaury is quoted a lot in in these articles. So first of all one and welcome him. He is a swamp Scott Republican and you'll have to make tell me if I'm pronouncing your name incorrectly. Anthony mores that right? Perfect. Thanks, great. Well, Anthony, thanks so much for joining us. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me Hillary, so talk to me. I mean this. It sounds to me just sort of looking at your job descriptions that you are called in after maybe a security breach has happened to help people shore up their security is that an correct. Description. I think it's fair. I've done a lot of that in my career, most notably was. Who's one of the first homeland security officials in Massachusetts after nine eleven helping to rebuild security at Logan airport, and you know, with university tomorrow, it's something that's been on my mind a lot lately. Yeah. Sure. I mean, I think about the work. We did at Logan and it was. I think back on the threats. We were hearing right after nine eleven. Logan airport respected by nine eleven nine eleven including myself. I think that I worry sometimes that people will forget. What happened on the hoax? Sometimes people remember the unity. We felt in the country following nine eleven and. Forgive me for jumping in. But what were some of this Gretz that you were hearing? Well, you know, some I can't discuss I would say is that it was almost every day. We're hearing. About threats in possible plots against aviation. Let's United States that would make your hair curl. And it was really scary stuff. I remember there were times where we'd be on conference calls with headquarters in Washington in people on the calls, which sound we'll be down in worried and concerned. I don't want to say despondent, but very very concerned that something imminent was coming. And when you're faced with that sort of pressure. It's motivating it's daunting. But it it really seasons. You. In in a quick way. And I wouldn't trade the experience for anything. But obviously, we didn't have to happen. And you're saying, you know, talking a little bit about you're concerned that people will forget what happened. Yeah. You know? I mean, I'll give you a great example. I know there are a lot of complaints about the TSA ports, and I understand myself. But I offered remind people that in the days after nine eleven reactor there were polls throughout the country. National polls asking the public. Do you believe we will be struck again are using? Do you think that'd be hijacking in such in in the ninety? How people were certain we were gonna get hit again on planes and one hundred days after nine eleven I responded to the shoe bomber case. I was the lead security issues that responsive to that. But but no successful attacks against aviation in seventeen years. And I honestly believe that nobody would have bet their money on that in the days after nine eleven. So there are successes to be point Connecticut. But I'm going to be clear there are things about TSA that I don't agree with everything. I think they should definitely be doing differently. But overall, the traveling public has been secure is there anything else just sort of considering obviously that day that anniversary will be tomorrow. You know that anything else that you took away from your experience. They're following what had happened when you talk about the the threats that you were hearing were did they involve Logan specifically. I mean, you talked about Asian. Were they more closer to home? Yes. There were threats involving Boston threats involving many major cities. Name it frankly coming in about it. And when when you're a member of the public you can disregard, but when you're charged with being part of the security apparatus, you can't you and you worry about them, and you hope that the public doesn't become complacent because they don't know what the intelligence community is hearing at any given moment. Yeah. Yeah. And so how long did you sort of how long did you do that? And what exactly? Was your role. You're you're just sort of helping identify security, maybe issues and tweaking the system or. Well, I was part of a team there was three three or four specifically. But we if you remember right after nine eleven in lightning speed by November about aviation security, and it meant that the federal government, we would be taking over major new role of screening passengers but screening every checked bag that flies in the United States. And previous to that check. None. They all had to be screened by electronic means within a very short window. And I oversaw the teams that put the screeners out there that train the people to use the new technology. The cat scans type technology worked with mass port Massport did this incredible project where they built this in line baggage system in two thousand eighteen that's commonplace in two thousand one in two thousand and two that was a miracle and local was first, but we deployed I was in charge of screening. So we deployed over twelve. Hundred screeners essentially overnight. We have this massive federal workforce that worked for me. And that's why when I talk to campaign about overseeing large organizations in limbo in responsive. I have that right? So interesting just to here. The response, especially when it's when when the situation is so overwhelming. And so sort of horrific that. You know, you need to do something you feel overwhelmed with just the amount you need to do. And so hearing that I turned into nuts and bolts action is really interesting to you to hear from you. So talk to me about when you were brought on at the Isabel Carter museum. I I joined the the in two thousand five and that was just getting years down the road after the heist rank, but the museum was looking for someone like me because I had done security work. Specifically what I just mentioned to you about Logan. But also, I have a background in investigations and the Gardner museum unique. Unfortunately, in in the sense that it needed somebody who could secure. The arts in the building. And we have thousands of pieces a lot worse billions of dollars. But also can do investigation looking into the theft of the thirteen piece in one thousand nine hundred ninety. So I assume this dual. And I order business was modernizing security at the Gardner and we've done that with great success in the second step was beginning this investigation. So I've had this more than fulltime job for the last thirteen years now that I love. But I I'm looking to take these skills they have acquired throughout my career in putting it back into a public sector. Now. Unfortunately, are you ready for the not everybody is going to know that you were hired on, of course. Many many years more than a decade after this highest happened and they're going to. Mating connect this the security idea. With course, this infamous heist is that his that happened. So far are you able to roll with the with the sort of with a joke? It up Wayne or what are your thoughts? That's true. I mean, that's an excellent point Hillary. But I think, you know, I'm fifty one, and I know when we consider young when When you. you think that was twenty eight years ago, they realized. Director just out of college at the garden museum and people do understand quickly that always brought on years after the fact you understand that I've made a reputation for myself India's toossion as as being a trend setter in terms of security rather than a place. With poor security. Well, I want to make sure that we get a chance to thirty here. How you want or why you feel like your background is uniquely suited for security estates office. Can you can you give us a quick sort of a sense of how why you think it's important for somebody with your background to to take over in the secretary of state's office. I can you know, what you and I have discussed is that my career has been marked by taking on these major security challenges. You know, as we said, it was I worked at the site of the biggest terrorist attack the United States in history. Then security at the place with the largest property theft in world history took place, and I see the next big security challenges election security. They held a press conference last week in front of the state house to talk about my ten point plan for. Ensuring that security for our elections as robust, you know, you talk about lessons from nine eleven to one of the lessons is that we can never be complacent, and we can't. A failure to plan is a plan to fail. We have to we can't rest on laurels. We have to make sure that we're always one step or two or three steps ahead of the game. And that's why I think Christians to take this experience doing balancing security with public access. That's that's been the hallmark of my career. And I want to bring that to the secretary of state's office. Okay. And so what's your sense of you know, Kim was seen as as potentially a pretty viable challenger? You know, William Galvin has has not had a has serious challenger, especially when it comes to Republicans and even independence candidates in a while. How do you plan to start a change that? Well, shirley. Mr. Galvin is a formidable opponent record show is that he's outstanding in terms of politics. I think I offer something different than Josh. They can have a lot more experience. A great tool set in my background in terms of managing people in terms of knowing how to implement security programs. I'm also very committed to transparency, and I think I'm going to work hard to get those messages across it. I think it's fair to say without this isn't casting aspersions, either either of the democratic candidates, but I think there was a lot of acrimony in that. And I think I think the public will see a different tone for me where I really wanted to keep things on the civil level. But just explain why I think I am at the person that's best suited to next kick. The helmet the secretary of state's office and bring it into the future. Right. So talk to me, if you could I mean, it is really it was for me really interesting to go through the archives and. See your name. And and see you talking a little bit about investigating this crime. You're brought on fifteen years after the fact, and I'm trying to remember was that around the time when this fellow William the third or whatever. Yes. No. That was after he his episode took place. Nineteen ninety seven. He was -ffiliated with an art house. Connor. And worth claimed to have access to our. But I don't believe that was the case look into that very deeply, I know miles Connor very very well. And I think that was Mr. young we're trying to sort of bargain to to quell Mr. congers dissatisfaction with with the fact that he had sold a great number of his peaks while so it was really between those two could never Hillary. You can never count anything out an open case. It's just all you have to keep every avenue open. So we work really hard working with the FBI and. We're working hard yet these back. My my daughter's always giving me a hard time because I haven't found to be he's had a fifteen year. Head start on yourself. I'm working. I'm doing my best to find him. I firmly believe we will get them back. Well, now, the other interesting thing is that the fellow who really with the FBI who had really done. Most of this case recently retired. Correct. This is. John kelly. Agent. Kelly has did not retire. No, he works. I know I know the confusion one of the prosecutors worked on the case with us. Crab work was Brian Kelly, and he's the one who prosecuted Bolger and flooding in the restaurant. He retired. He just left to go to the public. Yes. Yeah. So, but Jeff Kelly is the this is Boston sorters Kelly Kelly's. Yeah. Jeff Kelly is the FBI agent. He's very much active in the morning. So talk to me about about that. Sort of the balls are there's so many conspiracy theories. And while you say, you want to keep them all open, and I know, for example, that the FBI most recently in twenty thirteen I think came out and said that they know who these two guys are yet really their focus is now on recovering. Recovering this artwork. There is conspiracy theories abound, of course, involving like the IRA involving Whitey Bolger. Can we put those too bad considering that way boulder has now actually been caught which is insane? And the IRA doesn't seem like considering that there's that. You know, it seems to me a word the official word was that the artwork hasn't left the country. Well, that's a really good question. I I'd say that you know, without closing doors. If there is a door that we can close it's the ball, Jerry. Yes. That's that's never been a good angle talk in the city. But yeah. I often say everybody affiliated with him as essentially cooperated with the government on on horrific crimes act hard to believe that any of them would say, you can ask me about this homicide or these other ten homicides. But don't ask you about that big you right now. Yes. In terms of the IRA that comes up often in I would say that there has never been one scintilla of evidence that points to the IRA nothing zero evidence in terms of history. What happens with these sorts of heist? This wouldn't be the IRA that this would be local peeves, and the stuff is probably shouldn't pretty close to where you and high and in Massachusetts or or thereabouts. So those are interesting theories they make for good movies and books, but they're not they're nowhere near the top Kerry. Unfortunately to discuss what we think is is the.

Hillary Chicago Massachusetts FBI United States William Galvin Logan airport theft Boston Isabela Stewart Gardner museum Whitey Bolger Boston Herald Stewart Gardner museum Jeff Kelly Brian Kelly Anthony mores Gardner museum Anthony Anthony Amaury Connor