18 Burst results for "Isabel Allende"

"isabel allende" Discussed on Bad On Paper

Bad On Paper

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Bad On Paper

"For sweaters that were slightly thinner and these are thin, but they're kind of, they're pretty warm still. Yeah. But it's called specifically the ASAP, the asos design, crew neck sweater in rib with fluffy yarn. Yes, and I just typed that into my into Google and like a million popped up. And they're like $30. Yeah, they're so cheap, they come in a bunch of colors. I like the cut of them, like they're cute to wear not tucked in, but they also would look good if you like, talk to the front a few French tucked them. Yes. I'm really obsessed. I got one in orange and I got one in sky blue. And the quality feels good. I wore one all day yesterday and I didn't feel like it stretched out in any weird ways. I was just like, wow, for $30 sweater. It's obviously fast fashion. So I don't know about the sustainability or ethics of it, but I was a big fan of the looks in the price. Right. Are you gonna get one? There's a green one that looks real cute. Yeah, you know I like gray, yeah, yeah? What about you? We are fully out of sweater weather here though. It's so warm, so I don't know if it's like the best idea to buy one. I was looking for transitional sweaters. And I think this is on the colder end of transitional sweaters because even though it is thinner, it is fairly warm. Yes, I laughed 'cause yesterday I hadn't been outside, yeah, I work out at 11 and my trainer was like, it's freezing out today. And then I went outside to go ride an arrow and I'm like, it's 60°. It's not freezing. What about you? What are you obsessed with? I feel like I've talked about Brent Neal here in the past and her jewelry is incredible. She has like these bubble letter and number pieces and I have my lucky number energy pendant, but she just released these snail pendants and this sounds like weird. It's like a very cute little snail. And they are just everything. I think I like them because it's a good reminder to slow down a little bit. But oh, I like that as a personal symbol. Yeah, it's like when I got my compass necklace, that was to assemble of listening to my intuition and following my gut. I like a symbolic piece of jewelry, but I think that that's going to be my next big jewelry splurge. And they're on her Instagram. She hasn't even started selling. I was looking on the website and I was like, I see mushrooms, but I don't see snails. Yeah. She's really become really known for her mushroom pieces. And a mushroom just has no importance to me. And it makes me think of drugs like I'm such a, I'm sold. But the snail I was like, I want the snail. Cute. Yeah, tell me about your reading. You were on vacation. You have quite a list here. I've got a lot to say. So there's two books that I've talked about last week that I have now finished. The first is Olga dies dreaming by socio Gonzalez. We've gushed about this one. It was such a great audiobook. It felt like a performance. I felt like I learned a lot about Puerto Rican culture and history that I just didn't even know. And also all the bad shit that the U.S. has done and how we've treated them as a territory. So I was not taught anything about Puerto Rico in high school. Literally nothing. Zero. So I thought it was like light and fun, but also deeply educational and all the stuff about aids. I don't want to give anything away, but the aid stuff was really moving and just also the bits about sexuality. There is a gay character who's said to his family members. You never said it would be okay if I was gay. I don't know, that just like there's just little things that stick with you and you're like, and it made me think like, did I ever tell him, I guess it doesn't matter because my sister is straight and married, but did I ever really say, if you liked girls, I'd be okay with it. I don't know. But I love this book. It's about a brother and a sister, and their relationship, their complicated family dynamic, their activist mother. I've just, I can't gush enough about this one. And it's like chef's kiss on audiobook because it's just so good to listen to. I also finished filata by Isabel Allende. And this was highly recommended by my mom. She said it was her favorite book of the year. When we last talked, I was like, it's kind of slow. But I was reading about the main character's childhood more. And then as she grows up and becomes a woman and gets married, has children and goes on all sorts of experiences. It really picks up and it's just as beautifully written. What also really struck me was that it's a translation because it's originally written in Spanish. And the person that she hired to translate it like deserves like their own special award because they I assume it was like a really beautiful to read in Spanish and it's just as beautiful in English. I do ever think about that. I have thought about that before where translating I've thought about it more in the context of great works of literature where it's like this was originally written in a different language. And it's still a claimed as a deeply important book and it isn't even in the language it was written. And that's so wild..

Brent Neal socio Gonzalez Puerto Rico Google Olga Isabel Allende aids U.S.
"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:54 min | 9 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I wanna share them with people i love. Do you write by hand. i still do. Yeah i do. I work on the computer. But i also work by hand I like having a little composition books. I usually have them all around. And especially when i'm traveling and you know then. I transferred from the page onto my laptop. But i i work both ways. The other thing that struck me and We talked a little bit about is the idea of looking back on life and i just. I'm just running into a lot of people. Neighbors because of my age are h. The people are looking backward. Are sixties looking back on on things like you said. Mistakes highpoints all that stuff. It seems to be a common theme these days. And i don't know if the pandemic brought that on her i think felix you're right. Depending was to me a spiritual retreat for all of us forced us to cancel a lot of the noise and our lie and to become in a little more reflective. What was almost like going into monastery or convent of swords and really sorting things out in your heart. But i think also our ages one receiving younger people and older people dying and adapt being so close by with the pandemic that it makes you evaluate. What's important you know. It makes you evaluate the and make priorities in your life. So i have found as much as this time has been so painful that it's also been very sacred and i think that the painful times in my life had been sacred moments when a part of you dies and hopefully another part of you gets reborn and i think we're that as a collective community you know a death of maybe some careless practices and a transformation for us to one realize that we're responsible for others and they're responsible for us or responsible for animals and were responsible for the planet and if we don't take care of them they can't take care of us. Guess what and he's like. You know that. Kind of inter connectedness which religions teach us. Is it absolute where we're seeing that happen now with the planet. So i i feel for those of us who are In our sixties are specially taking look at our live and making sense of our mistakes much from our mistakes. I think i learned more from my mistakes than i do. For my successes. This is just meant to be a very short catch up to you. You know to talk about your book but also to catch up in. Could you have so many fans here and so many people who follow you And all the work that you do like you said all the The nonprofit and and the the work that you do on the side said a lot of people are interested in just catching up to you in hearing you see what's up with your life in the idea and the fact that you know you move to mexico but still putting out you know great literature you still putting out books It's it's always a pleasure to just catch up to you and find out what's going on so thank you so much. Thank you feelings for this opportunity. And i just want to say how much i appreciate your. You're talking to you being on your show at symphony santa. Still you know that's rare. You could feel so at home so thank you and your team for having me. Thank you very much undersea samson. Let sorge having you back again. In person right. Yeah maybe maybe we all go down to san miguel ended do it. There now may come over here. I welcome you. That would be fun. Thanks again so much to both. Sandra nettles and isabella there for joining me. Here on latino marta. I remember you is. The name of sandra cisneros newest novel. Twenty twenty two will see violeta isabel allende while her latest memoir called the soul of a woman is out right now as always thank you so much for listening to all latino from npr music. And let me remind you that we are in the midst of a hispanic heritage month celebration with a takeover of the tiny desk concert series. We call it and tiny ten performances from eight different countries and cultures out each performance at npr dot org slash music and also on the npr youtube channel. We also have a ton of stuff on instagram. Live interviews some shorter reels stories. Check us out on the npr music..

felix symphony santa Sandra nettles violeta isabel allende mexico samson san miguel sandra cisneros isabella npr music npr youtube
"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

07:29 min | 9 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"For his organs and that that that was published and that that was published in many newspapers and that was something that the catholic church researched. I didn't have to make it up. I read in the newspapers. I just had to imagine the family of the little boy. There is there some i. I don't remember all the stories but there's another one of the little girl that was buried in the mud on landslide in inam after an earthquake in what in columbia that that will then available. Reese the hill that that sort of the landslide came from that hill and it buried a town and the image the icon of this tragedy was a little girl chap to her chest in the mud and the they could bring cameras to film her from all over the world and they couldn't bring pump to suck the water and get her out and she died there. So you see. The world is full of stories and you just have to pay attention. Mike thanks again to isabella in the for sharing her time and her words with us both on this podcast and in her books next up. Sandra cisneros a writer. Who has been a guest latino before so. This conversation is more like catching up. Sunder cease medals. Welcome back to let you know. It's always a pleasure to have you thank you so much. It's fun the last time we had a. Yes you remember yes. We had a bunch of stuff to talk about it and you talked about serving the mothers to the beatles. Yes that was my childhood fantasies that i would marry. Paul mccartney and i would serve the myla's to the beatles many a young man he ghana's dream addict that that sounds about right. I love that idea. It was one of my favorite episodes. Two and i got to pick the songs remember like played like the songs from my right. Okay remember when. I died a play that playlist. I wanna hear that my spirit's gonna come around. Yank your feet if you don't okay. If i'm if i'm here that that will definitely happen. And you heard so. Sandra you have a new book out. So tell us about the the the essence of the story the stories about Three women with no money in paris and it's about the protagonist code corinna who they nickname rufina and martha from genocide as and power laugh from little crummy town outside of milano and they all are in paris and have no money need each other help each other and sustain each other through kinds of traumas and wonderful and horrible things. And it's the protagonist is actually the stories. Kind of like the protagonist. Was you in her brain listening to her interior monologue and it begins when she is creeping varnish off a hutch in chicago apartment where she and her husband and kids live and she remembers her friend and she goes in the closet and dick's out the old letters from the time when she was young in paris and we traveled back in time to her friendships and She examines her life and the choices that she made so that. That's all i'm going to say without like you know giving away the ending. But it's very beautiful story about people that onto enter our lives very briefly and they stay for an eternity and we don't know why and mistakes that we made in the misadventures adventures. We had marie. Young isn't reflective of some introspection that you're doing a disappointing your life well It's a story. I began thirty years ago. And put away and i don't think i could have finished it. If you held a gun to my head i had. I didn't have that perspective of having lived alive so even though it's about a twenty year old girl it really is about looking back on your life a decade and a half to two decades later and you know i always tell young writers that you know to write about things that happened to you a ten years warm because the farther away story is nuclear. You can see it. And that's because if you were participant or the protagonist of the story you can't see yourself you need at least ten years. I think that's why couldn't finish the story before i didn't need thirty years. I was busy writing novels and biting other books and essays and organizing foundations. And finally i could finish this story with the perspective. That was necessary. Having lived the life things struck me. The first is that. I'm the letters like it speaks to the idea that we don't write letters anymore. Always writing emails and texts and all these things that have abbreviated punch tuition and thought process. And this is a to me. It felt like a celebration of writing letters. You know still write letters. I don't have them as often as i should. But i write them. Especially when i wanna thank someone and it requires energy. Bought time you doesn't you don't rush off a letter. You create a beautiful letter as a gift to the receiver and maybe people don't write letters anymore but they should because you don't You aren't hasty about the language that you use you. Don't send off a dangerous plant seeds of that might make you misunderstood as we often are misunderstood in and in other kinds of short Letters sometimes the tone is lost. When i send things in texan people get angry. And i have to apologize. It's just a mess. Which when you write a letter you're forced to sit with your heart and if you say something incorrectly you can scratch it out. You can start again. You really are transforming your emotions and distilling them to your highest self. And you know we don't have that habit with text on or about you. I have spell check. That sometimes says atrocious. Things kept me tree. I love the idea writing letters and especially for a writer. It's the most natural way that i can express myself and it's highest self. You know i can say things and blunder in then backtracking circle to try to say but when we're forced to sit on paper and write it really does transform us and take us to a deep subterranean pools that we didn't know exist. You know that's that's why we right. That's why i'm a writer. I want to go to those deep profound at places. And.

rufina paris Sandra cisneros myla Reese catholic church isabella Paul mccartney corinna earthquake ghana columbia beatles milano Sandra Mike martha dick marie chicago
"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:14 min | 9 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Yeah i always have that. What i started to book i have that. That's an attractive hero. May hero you know he's dark. He's intens he's idealistic. He has long black hair and then by very soon. You can't stand the guy. He's a jerk. And if i can't stand it why would my female protagonist being love with him. She has to kill him. she doesn't i too. I wanna go back to your phone based in because you mentioned your probation visibility into formation and it's something that i read that really touched me in order to see if this is accurate what i read that. It was inspired by a trip to india but something that happened during the trip to india. Can you explain that yes i. After my daughter died. I wrote a book or power and it became very successful and of course i couldn't touch any of the income of that because it didn't belong to me was my daughters so i thought how can i- owner my daughter but i didn't know i was thinking of a park. I was thinking of different things. And then i did a tip to india and in rural rural trip in registan far away from everything very hot we had hired a driver and the car got very hard so he stopped to cool the engine and my friend taber and i am so a bunch of a group of small group of women near a tree. We walked to the women and you know women connect. We didn't have language in common. But we started touching each other and we had bought a lot of silver bracelets in the market and we gave them the bracelets they were very very poor and they had some children around and then when we were leaving one of the women give gave me these little parcel rags and i thought it was trying to give me something for the bracelets and i said no no. It's not necessary. And i try to give it back. But she wouldn't take it back. So i opened these tracks and inside was a newborn baby. I don't think the baby was more than a day old still had their own biblical cord. It smell of of ashes and feces. I mean so little so dark. So vulnerable was just a little little creature so i kissed the baby. Bless the baby and try to give it back and she wouldn't take it and in that moment. The driver king running on took the baby from my arm. Some push it in the arms of another woman. And i'm dragged me to their car and we are already started cutting. We were driving away when i reacted. I will so shocked. And i said why would that women want to give me the baby and the driver said it was a girl who wants a girl and that was what triggered the idea of the foundation. I couldn't help that baby until this day. Age regretted and i couldn't help that mother. That was so desperate and so poor that she was willing to give away the baby knowing that the baby would be better with somebody else but i said well maybe through a foundation i can other babies like that little girl. Another mother's like that one and And that was the beginning of foundation so the mission of the foundation is to invest in the power of women and girls recommend moore's for second whether any parts that were difficult to write. It might my latest little memoir is the soul of a woman and nothing was difficult to write it. It was all inside me and it was fun to ride it. And i hope that it's fun for the people who need it as well because it's much of his tongue in cheek. There's a lot of serious material there. Because i talk about what ails women on the war against women in the world the unfortunately i published it before the events of the taliban today But but this is. The taliban is a perfect example of our. There is a war against women and how women of the first victims in any conflict. Have you seen the pictures of massive multitudes of people trying to get to the planes. Have you seen any women there. There are men. The women are left behind with the kids on they would. They would fend for themselves. They are the first victims and they will be the first victim of taliban not the men. So there's as. I said a lot of very harsh material in the book. But it's a conversation with the reader and it's like in any conversation around the kitchen when we have having a cup of tea. It's fun awesome. What is your writing process. I started on my books on january. Eighth can you imagine january seventh what it looks like. Oh my god. I'm rank but by january eighth. I have freed my calendar. And i can't really focus on the writing and everybody around me knows because i've been doing this for forty years that that i'm not available starting january eighth and then i can lock myself away and i'm beginning book then. Of course i'm pulled to book tours. A lot of stuff happens. But i have the project and it's always in my heart and in my mind and i tried to work every single day for as many hours as possible when i was younger. That would be ten twelve sometimes. Fourteen hours a day now. It can't now six hours. It's not that my brain is tight. Might but and. I don't want to be sitting down for so long before we this conversation of i have to ask you about two of your books ever luna and then the stories of emma luna the story those two books in particular but the stories are still. I carry that around with me. For many many years has traveled. Just reading stories involve english and in spanish is. They're so inspirational. How did that second book come about did you. Is this something that you just set aside like okay. I wrote this wonderful story about this great storyteller and the left us all wondering what will kind stores which she actually. I got a lot of of letters and messages and people asking well where other stories i mean. This is a book about storytelling teller. On their stories is only her story. I was living in venezuela when i wrote eva luna and many of the of the adventures of i got them from the newspapers because such a great secrecy place. I mean latin america's christian but but they're all the yellow press you know the equivalent of the national enquirer and so forth. They published stories that were of course made up but but wonderful. And so when. I when i decided well i finish even wanna and i came to the united states on a book tour and i really last with a guy that eventually. I married but That i moved in with him without an invitation. I didn't have a room of my own. He's live was a mess so i could only i. I would spend the day sitting in a bench in somewhere or or in a coffee shop or in the car sometimes. I'm the only advantage of short story over the novel. Is that you. you can do it in a short period of time. But it's a very difficult jar. If you are an aspiring writer and you think that writing short stories we get in get you into it. It's much harder. Just tackle the novel from the beginning and so those stories are also based many of them are newspapers for example. There's a story of a little boy that he sold for.

registan india taliban taber emma luna moore eva luna luna venezuela latin america united states
"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:46 min | 9 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"That makes multitasking a breeze schedule meetings and seconds or reference and added multiple docks at the same time and now with their revolutionary. Spn you can jot down notes while video calling no paper necessary. Five g connection. Availability may vary check with carrier civilian is an extreme honor. And a pleasure to have you let you know. Welcome to thank you so much for having me. It's my pleasure and my honor okay. The first question. I have is like how do you tell your own story after writing so many others well. It's very different to write fiction than to write a memoir on there. Some connection in my case because i lie all the time so fictionally sent bunch allies when i tell my own life. I don't even know what's true. And what i've made up but it doesn't matter. I have the right to create my own legend. Don't i so so for me. It's easy to tell my life because she's also us being a life of ups and downs of great sorrow on also success of displacement so i have been always foreigner political refugee an immigrant and that gives me a How could i say that gives me the ability to look at myself on my life. A if i was a spectator i can look at it from a certain distance and that helps. I wanna talk a little bit about the muse or inspiration where you get inspiration for for the stories. That you towing your. I think that i keep repeating certain themes that are like obsessions. I talk about lob. I'm dead restorative justice loyalty courage strong women absent fathers those themes coming different forms. It would be a historical novel. Quite why choose that period that character because somehow it taps into what. I'm trying to to sorting myself. These themes that i mentioned or you could be a memoir or it could be little literary fiction a young adult novel. In every case i go back to those themes. Now where does name spearation come. I think that often for it's something that is in the air. Let me give you an example. Long battle of the sea is a story of refugees. I it's it's based on the life of a man. I knew when i was living in exile in venezuela and his name was victoria bay and Victim told me his story forty years ago but i never thought that i would write it until the scene of refugees and migrants was in the air. And everybody's talking about it and they're sold these anti immigrant sentiment on all this rhetoric that that that impacts me enormously. And then. I remember the story of victor bay and i tried it but so it. It's timing why why something needs to be written now. I'm not before or after because it's in the air. Do you ever fear that. You'll run out of stories to tell know. How could i ran out of tourists. Every human being has a story. I my my Emai- every day. I mean they add up to the hundreds. Sometimes i'm often. I would say several times a week. Someone is offering me her or his story because they feel that their life are special and that someone needs to tell it on. They don't dan writers. And i cannot do that. I have to write about the story. That is inside me that he's connected to me. I don't take other people's four stories. But i'm often inspired by the lives of other people. For example i have a foundation and through my foundation. I get to meet the most traumatized invulnerable strong and resilient women so i don't need to invent those characters they are there. I just need to bring them into the writing but we never run out of stories. I would rather run out of life. That's for sure. Hopefully that will be for a long time. You know what felix. I'll be eighty next year and i was telling my husband today that i feel stronger and more creative than at fifty i. I have a personal theory that you know women are made. Obviously women are made differently than men unites us get Get stronger and more powerful and more intense with the universe as you get older. It just happens. It's just that's been my no. I because when we get older bushman out of the way we don't need them anymore. Okay i will add that to my theory. okay. I do remember reading the quote from you. The you like when you write up when you try to write about a romantic demon book like to kill. Listen i kill helps aware around page one twelve. Because i i can't i find i can't stand the guy..

victoria bay victor bay venezuela felix bushman
"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Today we are going to hear from two. Literary icons isa bell allende and sandra cisneros luma barge over the literary landscape in fact their respective careers have a lot of parallels they both published their first novels around the same time he submitted i n days house of the spirits was published in nineteen eighty. Two and sandra cisneros published house on mango street. In one thousand nine eighty three. Both writers are adamant about writing. What they know in eastbound. Ende's case it's about life and love death and being an immigrant here in the us. From her native chile while sandra cisneros books touch on many of the same themes but a written from the perspective of a chicago native and captured the trappings of bicultural life but while the writing styles are different. Their subject matter doesn't have much in common. What they do have in common is a vast fan base and most likely there are a lot of folks who claim both as their favorites. Today we are teaming.

"isabel allende" Discussed on Happier with Gretchen Rubin

Happier with Gretchen Rubin

03:23 min | 10 months ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Happier with Gretchen Rubin

"I'm gretchen rubin. And this is a little happier in my book about habits. Change better than before. I describe the twenty-one strategies we can use to make or break our habits one important strategy is the strategy of first steps which is all about the right time to begin. The most important step is the first step because until we take that first step we haven't begun but beginning is hard that's why the strategy of first steps is so important. It helps us figure out how to start. I'm always fascinated to learn about different ways. People grapple with the twenty-one strategies so it was very interested to read about how the writer isabel allende use the strategy first steps by finding an auspicious day for her beginnings in one thousand nine hundred eighty one is a billion was living in venezuela as a political refugee after the military coup in chile. And she was working at a school on january eighth. She got a phone call that her beloved grandfather was dying in chile and she couldn't go back to say goodbye in her grief and frustration. She began writing a letter to him. A spiritual farewell and this letter turned into her. First novel she recalled. I remembered everything he had ever told me about his life. The family anecdotes the history of our country. As soon as i began the letter. I realized it was not a normal letter. It was part novel part memoir part family saga and political chronicle. My grandfather died without reading the letter. And i continued to write at night on the weekends in the kitchen of our apartment. I had a day job in a school. And i work twelve hours a day so he didn't have much free time but i was obsessed with the writing by the end of the year. I had five hundred pages of a very dirty manuscript on the kitchen counter. My first novel. The house of the spirits had been born. That novel was an enormous international success. And for luck. When she started her next book she began writing on january eighth. That book of love and shadows also did well so she explained after a few years and a few books. January eighth became a good habit. It gave me discipline by then. My life was complicated. I had to travel lecture. Do innumerable interviews. I was getting tons of mail. So if i didn't organize my calendar i would never have the time solitude and silence. I needed for each book. That's why i have kept january eighth as my sacred day in the year the day i locked myself away and start a new book. I have not started something new every year because sometimes it takes me more than a year to write a book. But i have started every book on the same day for isabel allende january eighth a date that resonated deeply and gave her the right time to begin. She held it as a sacred day a day of remembrance and renewal the right day to begin. I'll post a link to the house of the spirits by isabel allende in the show notes. And i'll also posted a link to my book better than before. If you wanna learn more about this strategy. First steps or the other strategies for a change. I'm gretchen rubin and i hope this makes week a little happier..

isabel allende gretchen rubin chile house of the spirits venezuela
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"Hit us up on twitter and or facebook At overdue pod. Thanks to trent scott christina shelby re arlene ingrid sal jonah a sonatina molly nicole in many more for folks for reaching out to us this past week. Our theme song was composed by nick. Los angeles. thank you nick. Enter folks want to know more about the show. We should go overdo podcast dot com website. There we have links to apple and google are assess. Feed those are always. You can subscribe to the show. Also subscribe in stitcher and spotify anywhere. You find podcasts. We have links to the books that we have read the ones that we are going to read. If you'd like to read along or if you hear an episode decide would like to read the whole book. Obviously there's a lot of stuff that we can't get to an hour. And i feel like we are. We are frequently unable to do justice to books like writing style. Or that's the week. Translate part of our house. Yeah so yeah. If you if you want to read this book or any of the other ones a go there click those links they take you to bookshop dot org we get small cut of that Your local independent bookseller gets the of it. And you get a book the deal. We also have a.

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"It was a left wing person or like a centre-left person who came in trying to change the system. But and tell me if we've heard this story before the left didn't think it was good enough and the right one nothing to do with it because it was too far left You and so. This person was brought down by infighting among people who could have maybe been allies and like scheming from enemies so i ended it comes into power. Nineteen seventy on this like explicitly more explicitly socialist platform and there is an Like actively participates in this and it doesn't come up in the book but it should be known that the us was heavily involves the undermining of the socialist government and then in the military coup that resulted. So let me. Yeah i. I have a little a little bit on that i do want to clarify. I don't know if i'd just misheard you is. I n day named as president in the book. No he's the president is just the president but it's clear from the physical description and also the time and also how everything happens sure. There's only one other character in this. Who's like who's like this and He's called the poet and that is pablo neruda himself. So yeah i n. They had run for president four times yet. Get before finally winning in nineteen seventy. He was called. There are a couple of moments in the book earlier where he's just called the candidate. Oh ooh i like that and kind of everybody sort of knows him because he's been at this forever okay and he finally win tonight. In seventy with a plurality of the vote under what was called the popular unity coalition but it was not a majority so the congress had to actually ratify that he was going to be president and it was something in like the high thirties. So it wasn't even a like forty eight percent not that never necessarily matter but so starting from a position though of not having a a mandate yep and from there like further so in the book esteban is participating in this right wing.

pablo neruda us congress esteban
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"If feel like i have a handle on a couple of characters and a big dog but not really what else is going on well so you you meet this this family and you meet the oldest daughter named rosa and she has green hair and really mike paled like alabaster skin and she just is like an angel here on earth. Okay and you and through her. You meet esteban torre. Who is a guy who she is betrothed to but he has gone off to try and find his fortune like he. He's one of those classic character who's got a name. But some other person in the family like squandered all the money and fame and so he definitely has like ambition. An idea of himself as this person who is destined for bigger things but he has to like yes to go out and work away his go out and get it and also. He's kind of a jerk sometimes. Okay sure that happens. But as esteban away from home he is trying to make this mine produce and he's like his his idea being that you know sometimes a mine well dislike. We'll make you even worse off than you were before buzz. Sometimes you get lucky. And it's just like the fastest way to make a bunch of solid money so he's out working on this mine and clara. Has this premonition that her sister rosa is well. She has a premonition. That someone is gonna die soon. It's going to be a surprise. And it turns out that her rosa and clara's father severo severo s. e. v. e. r. o. Is a sort of a politically important guy in the community has been like planning to make a run for senate for his entire political life. Just like making the requisite connection these are back in the day where you start at the bottom and work your way up and you just just go on cable news channel and say the dumbest stuff that you could think of year and that's how you got elected office. Yeah and then. A bunch of ceos give you money behind closed..

esteban torre rosa esteban mike severo severo clara senate
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"Hey andrew tell me about the book. The house of the spirits. The house of spirit house of the spirit is is spooky. I didn't ask. it's not spooky. Okay there are sometimes like apparitions or are ghosts kind of floating around and that's where the novel gets as magical realism me as it gets. Okay mostly it's not really going like full on into like improbable stuff. Like i feel like the the magical bits are usually more like subjective and nobody can really prove that they happened or not. It's not like they grow christ tears until it becomes ocean. The sure sure sure. Yeah magical realism. So the house of the spirits. Like i said it is this multigenerational novel lot of characters in it from this one family but primarily interested in three so the book like the perspective of the book is mostly coming from Alba trueba which who is the granddaughter of the other major character esteban trae bu- and he is married to clara. Clara the clairvoyant. She's called sometimes because of how she can kind of. Tell the future sometimes and talk to ghosts and stuff okay But those are the three most important members of the of the family. I'm his only really toward the end that you hear like reading this book author out. It's mostly mostly third person. You get a bunch of references to like. Diaries that clara caps. That are helping you know put put Events in order and then sometimes it shifts to a first person. that's clearly coming from esteban. so it's i you know. I just i noted it early on like who's who's telling the story and what's the deal but yeah it's it's mostly alba using like a not testimony. Testimony is not the right word. But like using the memory of esteban trueba and then like the notebooks of clara to like piece together this big multi general history and this this high level. Look at all of these events that affected this family and the country and and everything okay. There is a s. There's sort of a thesis statement of sorts toward the end of the book Where i don't wanna talk about the the entire quote that i highlighted because there's like you know important story stuff that that i want. Wanna get into we talk about the plot but also says of clara. I wrote she wrote. The memory is fragile in the space of a single life is brief passing so quickly that we never get a chance to see the relationship between events. We cannot gauge the consequences of our acts and we believe in the fiction of past present and future but it may also be true that everything's had everything happens simultaneously..

house of the spirits house of spirit house of the s clara Alba trueba esteban trae bu andrew esteban trueba Clara esteban
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"She liked the film. I mean she agreed with the the whole presentation. You can just say this looks like it. Took a lot of effort this look. This looks very technically. Competent is definitely one of those things that you say when you're trying to talk around when a non having a bad opinion about when he gives you a macaroni arts this is well made. This is well this well made or the colors are very pretty. Ebert said and what odd thinking must have gone into the casting of the movie. Jeremy irons meryl streep and glenn close form. A checklist of the quote last actors. You'd think of while reading the famous novel by isabel. I n day widow slits elites to borrow mark. Twain's complain about women's swearing. They know women's swearing. They know the words but not the music which is his. I think he goes on to say you. It's like a touring it's like a theater production when they do like tennessee williams in germany You're you're doing this. Incredibly american play in german and that does have value. But it's not the same. Yeah right there were other theatrical adaptations. And i think in two thousand eighteen there was an announcement of hulu project that i think has been like developed this street. The streaming company things work out sometimes than they don't work out other teams hopefully. She's gotten some advance money on it to make an improbable fifth season of the handmaid's tale. I or something. I've got some other quotes but they might be more useful in context anything else you wanna talk about before we take a break you know. I don't think so. I think everything else is better. Talks about in the context of what the books doing so. Yeah okay so you on your side andrew craig. I know you love podcasts. I love him. And i know you love them. I love to do them. Yes yeah what if there was another podcast that you love it starred like your dad or your kid or like a cool neighbor of yours i would be. I would be curious. That's for sure well but most of these people don't know how to make podcast and you don't have time to teach them andrew and that's where the good folks at artifact come in artifacts audio company that captures your personal stories as one of a kind podcast that you can share with your.

meryl streep Ebert tennessee williams isabel Twain glenn Jeremy andrew craig hulu germany andrew
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"In twenty nineteen after that husband in her separate in two thousand fifteen She said she started. A charitable foundation in nineteen ninety-six isabelle foundation. After her daughter. Paula died at the twenty nine and she wrote a memoir about it called paula. Which a lot of folks have said is very effective in an impactful for people who've suffered that type of loss and it's a foundation that supports women and the rights of children and stuff like that what. She's honorary degrees from all over. She won the national prize for literature in two thousand ten the hans christian andersen or in two thousand twelve. She's written some books for young readers. The city of beasts as a waie book that she wrote in two thousand two and it has two sequels some of her other books include of love and shadows ever luna two words. She wrote a biography of zoro. Andrew like a story of the hero zorro in two thousand five which was then the basis for a musical with music by the band of the gypsy kings. I love it. I want experience it so bad. And what else about her. So this book that i found about this book she started as a letter to her grandfather. Who was dying And she started writing it on. January eighth nineteen eighty-one. We got a phone call that my grandfather was dying in chile and i could not go back to say goodbye. Started a letter to him That i remembered everything he ever told me. He died but he never received a letter. But i kept on writing in the kitchen every night after work in a year. I had five hundred pages of something that was obviously not a letter that became the house of the spirits and now she has this ritual where every january eighth. She starts book like that. He's gonna start a book. i guess i don't know generally every year. Maybe not but she does have a ritual around that it was publishing terrassa ninety two. It was the novel the year in chile and then at one a bunch of similar like book of the year awards in the various countries where it was published germany and france and I think this the translator for this injuries mog dub boat in i think is that her name okay. I had it up in front of me before let me yeah magdi magdi bogan or begin publishing new new york. Nineteen thousand six was the first. Us paperback edition and it was adapted into a film in nineteen ninety three. I believe here's what she had to say about it and not. She wasn't very involved in it. I wouldn't like anybody watching over my shoulder when i'm writing. Why would i be watching over the shoulder of director. You sell the the option for not a lot of money and they do whatever they want. I sold the rights to the house of the spirits. I wrote by hand on the contract. That i wanted bill. August the danish director to do the film She'd seen another film of his. He ended up director movie. But the producers were german. The actors were anglo. The language was english and it was filmed in europe. So it didn't have much of chile however i think it was very well made. Roger ebert did not agree necessarily well so the the film was well made. That is a that that does not mean..

isabelle foundation Paula zoro christian andersen chile luna magdi magdi bogan Andrew new new york house of the spirits germany france bill Roger ebert europe
"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on Overdue

"Deepen the hot hot month of july right now and i'm so hot. Yeah and i read a book which is called the house of the spirits by isabel. Have any like funny non book stuff to talk about this week. It's too hot out hot recording during the day. Which always weird as longtime fans of the show no. Yup we've probably denote in the episode description somewhere this time. Yeah yeah we've never talked about andy. Before as i was going over notes for her i was like i can think of multiple times when i've thought haven't we covered isabella day. We haven't and then. She shows up on jane. The virgin and i'm like we've clearly talked about. We haven't so. I'm excited to talk about this book. This is her first book that she will be good. We've talked about a fair number of like south. american like magical realism adjacent novels. Before or actual magical realism. But not her so his belly. Ende's deal yeah so. She is a chilean american author She got american citizenship in nineteen ninety three. She was born in peru in one thousand nine hundred forty to her father who left when she was three and her mother roundup relocating the family from peru to chile. Her father was also the cousin of chilean president salvador. An day Who was the president from. Nineteen seventy nine hundred seventy three. We will talk about that some more. Yeah at some point in this episode. Yeah because the book is like a it spans multiple familial generations. And i want to say like if i had to guess the period that it covers. It's like fifty or sixty years ending somewhere in the mid seventies. Okay and yeah so it is. It's set and she lay. It takes a lot of like real life events as touchstones that affect the family. Yeah so i don't want to. We don't have to get into it more now but it is going to come up she. Her mother remarried to a diplomat. Which meant that. She moved around the globe. Lot as a kid attended an american school in bolivia an english school in beirut feeling moved back to chile in nineteen fifty eight. She got married for the first. She's been married a few times. I found a fun interview with her in like the guardian from a few years ago. That was like why. Should i get married again in my seventies rules. She seems to have a good be a good sport about that..

isabel peru Ende isabella andy jane chile salvador bolivia beirut
Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

Latina to Latina

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

"I write about women because i know them so well. I've been working with women and four women or my lads and surrounded by strong extraordinary women at the people who are really help me in life who have pushed me forward of all. The women don't see men i can mention. Is my grandfather my stepfather. Who became my best friend and my son who is my the pillar of my life but even the husbands have been great to have husbands but But they have not helped me in the in. My journey have been going to a certain extent. You know. I think it is easy to underestimate the primacy of the relationships we have with other women Wants to present women as rivals that we will do anything to get a man even sleep without best friends. Are our sisters motioned or something. That might happen once in a while. And it's a good novel but he real-life women have solidarity. We meant head which i have not been able to do anything in my life without first of all the housekeeper set. Hit me with my children. That i could get out there and have three out there. Because he sanctity women were at home taking care of my children instead of taking care of children that to begin with then my mother in law lived next door when my children were little an adopted grandmother but live with us and then later in my life of course journalists that taught the craft of writing my agent katamon sales who believed in my book. Those other women on today that i have a foundation who inspires my folks women become of the foundation these venerable at risk women who have gone through hell some of them have lost everything including that children and they get back feet and they fight back and they are able not only to hate others with compassion and generosity back to have some kind of joy they can cook insane a dance sometimes so those women's by constant

"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coli and salmonella outbreaks, it seems we should create lots of good paying jobs for food inspection and investigation to improve our food safety. There's a curious question from Jo Markey says. If I was to take a garden fork and go out into one of the big fields of corn or wheat or soybeans, and turn the soil would I find any worms? No, you absolutely would not find any worms. I've done it. It's a terrific question on guy. I've done it in Iowa with, uh, with a guy named Matt Lieberman, who Who's Figured out ways for farmers to convert portions of their land back into prairie without losing yield, without reducing yield or losing money and not to go too deeply into that. But if you go to one of match peri strips and you turn over the soil, it's alive filled with bugs and worms and and different kinds of microbes. And so on. And then if you go Theo Standard cornfield and turn over the soil. It's dead. It looks like dirt. It doesn't look like soil. You lament in the book, Aziz you have I think much of your work the loss of the small family farm. The diminution that is of the numbers of small farmers in this country. It's disproportionate to what it was in the past. In terms of The receding numbers. What could be done? What do you suggest? What do you recommend? Well, you know, it used to be a dirty where they're dirty phrase, But what we need is we need land reform. We need to get land into the hands of people. Uh, a who've been shut out and be who you want to Do good farming and, um We really need to look government. Our government is the entity that gave all of this land away and it did so and unfair and I could say racist manner. It needs to reconsider. We need to reconsider what done with our land that we need to restore dignity to farming and we need to put land into the hands of people. Who will treat it right again. This is not happening this year or next, although there's an interesting Senate bill sponsored by Booker, Gela, Brandon Warren that starts us down that path. But if you want to talk about solutions, this is this is a long term, A long term solution. Well, we only have seconds left with delicious is what Mr Goodman think about regenerated farming like that feature the movie biggest little farmers that the future and cannot be sustainable on a level that can feed us all. I mean, I call regenerative farming, aggro ecology. That combination of agriculture and ecology and that is the direction we want to go. Listen, Michael, if we only have seconds left, I want to thank you. Because every time I've been on this show I've really enjoyed myself. Including this one. So you know, I wish you the best of luck and same to you. It's been a pleasure to have you on and good luck with this book and good luck with your future. The book again. It's called animal Vegetable junk. When we return, we'll talk with author novelist memoirs. Isabel Allende stay to Michael crashed. Thistles coming up in our second hour this morning. We've made a Kim. The Hollywood awards season is in full swing with nominations for the Golden Globes on the Screen Actors Guild out this week during a pandemic. When people have been glued to their screens, everyone seems to have a favorite and an opinion and we'll talk with critics about their recommendations, and we'll hear from you. What's been your go to show a movie on what the denomination's miss. And as you may have heard, I am retiring after 28 years is host of Forum. You're invited to tune in for my very last form show on Friday, February 12th at 9 A.m.. I'll be joined by some very special guests, and I especially want to hear from you, our listeners. That's February 12th at nine. What's your favorite for memory? Email it now the forum at kqed dot org's That's forum at KQED or Welcome back to Forum very based journalist and author Isabel Allende's books translated into 42 languages of resonated across cultures and countries around the world. Her forthcoming book, The Soul of A Woman is a memoir of her feminism, which he embraced at a very early age is she witnessed her single mother Struggle. Toe Look after three Children. Isabel first appeared on forum with me in 1995 and joins me today as I head into retirement to speak about her newest work and Bienvenido schism. It's always good to have you with us. All of Michael. I'm so sorry that you're retiring. What am I going to do without you? Well, we still have a friendship and that actually prompts me to say something. In the way of an apology. It was wonderful of you and Amy 10 attribute of the Commonwealth Club last week was just a salute to my career in which I was very pleased about and humbled by. But you know, I'm mentioning different writers that I'd interviewed. On. I didn't want to mention you were in because you're friends of mine. Everybody knows you're both friends of mine. I didn't expect the tributes and everything. So then you suddenly appeared, and it looked a little bit tweet. You even said so. She was interviewing me. Stephen said something about it. So I wanted you to be aware of that. And another apology. Actually, I sent you a film by a flat friend of mine, which we're gonna plug your blade player. Girls goes excellent film about Justice Guzman and Chili. And I didn't know it was upsetting to you. I think to see and remind of all those terrible years under Pinochet. So apologies for that as well. No, no, no, You don't have to apologize. It wasn't upsetting just brought back a lot of bad memories, but it's good to remember things where sometimes I ask myself Michael and I think this is something that every person who has been a refugee asks Did I do the right thing? Could I have stayed? Why did I leave? Because you tend to forget in time how bad it wasps, So I feel like that one reminds. You reminded me that there were very good reasons why I left my country. We've had conversations through the years about that and about your going to Venezuela and coming here, and it's been quite an odyssey. In fact, I received people been sending in memories about foreign programs They like. Received one memory from.

Michael Isabel Allende salmonella Jo Markey Matt Lieberman Iowa KQED Aziz prairie Venezuela Mr Goodman Stephen Kim Senate Justice Guzman Golden Globes Pinochet Amy Bienvenido
"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Six minutes now past three o'clock welcome to Tuesday the twenty eighth of April today is going to be a warm one probably the warmest day of the week some cooling is going to come our way tomorrow but today's highs inland into the upper eighties eighty four degrees expected in San Jose today eighty eight in Santa Rosa hi baby foreign napa eighty five in Livermore expect it'll be in the seventies in San Francisco and at point Reyes national seashore today it's KQED public radio upper seventy seventy seven expected for high in Oakland today I'm a size and go welcome to the new day here's a look at what's happening on the California report next time on the California report updates on how the Golden State is coping with the coping nineteen pandemic from the front lines to the home office coronavirus and California taking it one day at a time I'm the leader Molly those stories next time on the California reports to tune into the California report nine minutes before six nine minutes before seven and nine minutes before nine each weekday morning coming up on form later on today San Francisco mayor London breed is the guests in the first hour also Isabel Allende will be stopping by the program remotely and then at ten o'clock social distancing and dating during the pandemic your phone calls Michael Krasny is the host form seven to nine to eleven every week day morning on KQED public radio good morning this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep we are investigating the relentless math.

San Jose Santa Rosa San Francisco point Reyes national seashore KQED Oakland California Isabel Allende Michael Krasny Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep Livermore Molly London NPR
"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:26 min | 3 years ago

"isabel allende" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So for example, the Senate actually had very little official power to approve legislation, but the Senate weighed in on legislation and said whether this legislation was good or bad. And generally speaking people in Roman political life valued that input and acted along the recommendations that the Senate made, but that's a norm. It's not a law. And so there was the potential to say we don't care what the Senate says we're going to do something. Anyway. And what starts to happen in the second century BC is a lot of these norms that have governed the informal interaction between magistrates in assemblies in assemblies and the Senate those norms start to break down and people stop following them and people start challenging them, and in all of those constitutional contexts there are gray areas that the norms provide guidance for how one ought to behave that innocence laws do not, and we have this in our in our system as well. Especially in the Senate where there are a lot of conventions that have guided how the Senate behaves, but they aren't legally binding. They're just conventions that are observed and the constitutional trickery is when one starts looking at these conventions and saying, yes, we've done it this way for a very long time. But there's no law that says we have to do it this way. And it will advantage me at this moment. To ignore that convention and do something different when you speak a conventions. It brings to mind the fact that we have so often described these days in our own Republic as new norms that we never had before. And I want to sort of flesh out the kind of parallels that you've been talking about and writing about here because there was a civil war within a couple of generations in Rome. And there was also I remember my Julius Caesar by Shakespeare, Julius Caesar well enough to remember that the mob violence was so out of control that they knew one of the conspirators was named Cinna. And there was a poet named Senator they decided to kill him because he had the same name, and my violence plays a very significant role in all of this doesn't it? Yeah. And I think that's a feature that of course, we don't have yet. And hopefully, we don't ever have in Rome mob violence, really begins when it becomes clear that the political system is not able to function effectively, according to the terms of the political system has set violence becomes a political weapon when it's clear that the political system I won't be able to punish it and second won't be able to reach a decision that the people engaging in that violence are comfortable with. With the Roman Republic shows is that for centuries a model that encouraged consensus building and compromise with bring enough people on board. So that there was a general sense that political decisions were being made on the basis of wide political opinions and wide popular support. And when you get to a moment where that doesn't seem to be the case violence does start to become an option, and as you get through the later Republic politicians begin to recognize how to use threats intimidation, and ultimately violence more and more efficiently. So by the time, you're in the the moment of Julius Caesar. This is something where politicians are very well aware of how to mobilize a group of supporters how to arm them and how to use them tactically to bring about a political objective that can't be achieved through legislation. Instead, it must be achieved through intimidation the violence continue to erupt and continue to escalate right. Yeah. I mean between nineteen and twenty one BC, which is really where we're focusing on here. What about could you could you say something about what you write about the trial of a Roman commander who actually attacked without legal authority Augusta's got involved in it and appeared at the trial. So the structure that Augusta's wants to put in place as emperor is one in which there Republic functions. And in every way that it doesn't directly impact Augusta's exercise of power. And it's actually politically a very it's a very insightful move because Augusta's it want to be held responsible for traffic problems or bad roads or things that really will happen anywhere for any reason. And so he turns a lot of authority over mundane things back to the Senate after he takes full control of of the Roman state, and he retains for himself responsibility for the things that he deems to be really essential, mainly military commands and can. Troll of the army and provinces were armies are stationed. What happens in particular moment is a commander who is supposed to be working under the command under the authority of Augusta's in essence goes rogue and does his own thing. And in the Republic things like that happened Caesar's war against conquest of Gaul was a commander effectively going rogue. But but Augusta's can't allow that. And so this was someone testing the boundaries of this imperial system and Augusta's. Couldn't slap him down. In the way that say an emperor two hundred years later would slap him down. He had to still. And he said to still pursue this issue in a way that a Republic a popular population a familiar with the Republic would understand. And so there is a trial that says that this person has acted illegally and in the the rules of aroma trial Augusta's has called to the stand. And he's cross examined aggressively. And what Augusta's is able to do in. That moment is you know, he he does secure the conviction of this person because that was given. But what Augusta's then does is. He leaves the city of Rome, and he allows some of the chaos of the late Republic to come back and Augusta's intentionally steps back just enough that he can remind Romans of what the Republic actually looked like a place that was chaotic where decisions couldn't be made. Where problems couldn't be solved. And then he introduces himself back into the environment to solve the problems that he had allowed to emerge. Of course, the verdict was not unanimous that trial wasn't. No, no. And to him. That was a very clear warning sign that Romans needed to be reminded of what it was exactly that Augusta's provided Augusta's was quite the pragmatic, and in many ways, trenchant politician. I think the the the amazing thing about Augusta's is during the civil wars. He was incredibly vicious the killings that he engaged in the confiscation of properties of entire towns. He was an absolutely vicious civil warrior, and it's very rare to find somebody who is that type of person who wins the civil war, and is able to transition into a political figure who can rebuild a political system and the the real achievement of Augustus was having a first phase of his career where he was as vicious as any Roman ever had been and then a second phase of his career where he is able to bring about some sort of reconciliation and stabilization of this society that he had he played a large part in brutalizing. And destroying actually, there's a wonderful story by author who is familiar to many my list? Because she's been on her number times. And as a friend of mine Isabel Allende, which takes that tech. Exactly. I mean of someone who is so vicious and ruthless and murderous homeless idol. Monster. And who then becomes a really like Augusta's very clever political tactician, I'm going to give the phone number and invite those of you who are listening to join this conversation, we're talking again with what who is the author of a book called mortal Republic, it's subtitle. How Rome fell into tyranny and he's professor history. UC San Diego. You may have questions about how the Republican ROY fell into tyranny or the analogies to today, which professor why does draw upon to some degree and not only applicable to the United States, but France and Venezuela, and certainly other republics. There are many of them around us..

Augusta Senate Julius Caesar Rome commander Caesar San Diego official Isabel Allende Senator professor United States brutalizing Shakespeare Venezuela France two hundred years