35 Burst results for "Isabel"

Woman Arrested While Praying Silently Outside Abortion Clinic

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Woman Arrested While Praying Silently Outside Abortion Clinic

"John mirac continues to be my guest. We couldn't get anyone more civil on short notice. And I apologize in advance. Now, John, you were just talking about something that is hard for me to process. A woman in England was arrested, ostensibly for praying silently in front of an abortion clinic. That's right. I don't understand on the surface of it. Let's just be clear. It makes no sense. If somebody hates people who love the unborn, they still don't have any reason to arrest a woman silently praying. I mean, how do you even know if somebody's silently pranked? No, I really don't understand. So can you help us? Other than the fact that these are evil maniacs, I don't understand what you mean. According to her, there are these things called censorship zones, which are around abortion clinics in Britain and they make it illegal for any individual to gauge in any attack than any act or attempt to act of approval or disapproval as it relates to abortion. And it includes verbal or written means like prayer and counseling. And this is a quote from Isabel von spruce. It's importantly wrong that I was searched arrested interrogated by police in charge, simply for praying in the privacy of my own mind. I was exercising my freedom of thought my freedom of religion inside the privacy of my own mind. Nobody should be criminalized for thinking and for praying in a public space in the UK.

John Mirac England John Isabel Von Spruce Britain
Axed Balenciaga Campaign Featured Artist Who Painted Castrated Toddler

The Dan Bongino Show

01:22 min | 2 months ago

Axed Balenciaga Campaign Featured Artist Who Painted Castrated Toddler

"But there's another ad that also came under a controversy from balenciaga recently And it's this picture of this image it's part of their now canceled spring 2023 ad campaign showing this French actress Isabel Hubbard I think is their last name I've never heard of her before But she's in this Manhattan office with a stack of books behind her feet up on the table And some things in the background just like in some of these other images you can spot the teddy bears with bondage or you can see the Supreme Court case on child pornography But some things in the background it's this book So what's in the book What is the book It's this book featuring a Belgium artist This painter And what's the kids of that you ask Where you probably can't hear it but I imagine you're asking So it's this Belgian painter whose work includes a 2017 series of images depicting naked toddlers This series is titled fire from the sun and shows young children with blood soaked skin and some castrated So we're talking about different images for balenciaga all showing a common thing Sexually exploiting children in such a depraved and derogatory way

Isabel Hubbard Balenciaga Manhattan Supreme Court Belgium
"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

"Isabel barrow and Isabel. You've been so great at walking us through the different things that we need to think about as retirees and near retirees when trying to slow your working life during a bear market or during a recession, your advice is so spot on getting straightforward expert tactical advice even when it is hard to hear. That's exactly what you'd get from working one on one with an Edelman financial engines planner like Isabel. And you can expect the same experience from any of the over 300 EFE wealth planners across the country. If you'd like to talk with Edelman financial engines, you can call 8 three three plan EFE or visit plan EFE dot com. So Isabel, we got a question from a listener who would like to remain anonymous and he asked, how can a retiree who is forced to take RMDs by law, deal with the bear market like the one that we're in right now and let me just ask you to start by explaining our MDs, right? This is a really common question RMDs are required minimum distributions, and they are related to retirement accounts, so maybe it's a 401k four O three B, IRA. But for those, people who are turning 72 within that calendar year. So it's not on your birthday. It's in the year that you turn 72. You have before the end of that calendar year or if it's your first one up until April 1st of the following year to begin withdrawing. And then once you start, you have to keep doing it every single year, and the number gets recalculated based on your balance. So for those who are at home trying to do it themselves, to find out how much you need to withdraw, you have to figure out the account value on December 31st, the previous year, you have to go to the IRS and get their calculations worksheet. That are updated every year for life expectancy. And then also know that there are maybe different situations that weren't different tables. So there's not just one table. There's multiple tables. This sounds so easy. Right, it's super simple. Just go out and do it on your own. It would be no problem. So then you have to find your distribution factor listed in the calculation tables that's aligned to your age at your birthday in that current year, which one is your birthday when does it fall? And then you have to divide the balance of your account by the factor number that's your RMD. So that sounds like you said, really easy. Really easy, really fun, right? Like something to do on a nice lazy Saturday, or you can do what my mother does, which is just call her adviser and say, what's my RMD this year? That's probably a better strategy. So given all of that, and let's say you decide, in fact, to work with someone and they say, oh, here's your RMD. Are there strategies that your adviser can put into action during a bear market, given that required is the first word in RMD, right? Well, and that's sort of the issue. Because it's required, you can't have the conversation with your adviser and say, hey, I'm not going to take it this year because the market's down. I'm going to go ahead and pull from my cash reserve. No, you're actually required to take it out. So there have been some instances where we've gotten a waiver here and there if markets were really bad, but that hasn't happened in 2022, at least yet. So this is an example of a year where the markets are down and you may still be required to take that distribution, but they don't tell you when you have to take it. As long as it's between January 1 and December 31st, you have the flexibility of when and how you take it. And in most cases, because I will say that there are some types of employer sponsored retirement plans where they may have rules around how you can take it and set it up, et cetera. But in general with IRAs, for example, you have total flexibility. You can take it monthly. You can take it quarterly, you can take it once a year, so you may be able to work with your planner to be sort of strategic in when you take it. And maybe dollar cost average. Take a little bit out every month so that you're not taking it out on the wrong day. The worst possible day to take it, you know? Or trying to time the market. That's not a good idea as it relates to these retirement withdrawals. Now, you do also need to know that there is a penalty if you mess the deadline. So you do have to take these. And if you miss it, it's a 50% penalty of the amount of the required minimum distribution that you didn't take. So that's ouch. That is a hefty penalty. Just because you have to take it and you do have to pay taxes on it. It doesn't mean that you have to spend it. You can take that money, net of tax, and reinvest it. So you can put it into your other portfolio, you can use it as a mechanism and rebalancing your overall asset allocation. It is important as you're talking to your adviser to have them, they're going to be thinking about all of these things for you. But you need to know so that you can adjust your spending or you can adjust your cash reserves or whatever so that you can pay for some of these extra taxes or extra expenses related to it. I have a question Isabel, there are people who start withdrawing from their retirement accounts before age 72. When they're able to, but not required to. Do these same strategies that you're talking about, the dollar cost averaging, for example. Do they apply for those people as well? Absolutely. And the only real difference in these two from a strategic standpoint is if you're under 72, it's not a required distribution. You can still do the monthly. The annual, the quarterly, take it out as often as you need or make sense within your financial plan. The

Isabel Isabel barrow Edelman IRS
"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:01 min | 6 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

"Dot com. So Isabel, we got a question from a listener who would like to remain anonymous and he asked, how can a retiree who is forced to take RMDs by law, deal with the bear market like the one that we're in right now and let me just ask you to start by explaining our MDs, right? This is a really common question. RMDs are required minimum distributions, and they are related to retirement accounts, so maybe it's a 401k four O three B, IRA. But for those, people who are turning 72 within that calendar year. So it's not on your birthday. It's in the year that you turn 72. You have, before the end of that calendar year, or if it's your first one up until April 1st of the following year, to begin withdrawing. And then once you start, you have to keep doing it every single year, and the number gets recalculated based on your balance. So for those who are at home trying to do it themselves, to find out how much you need to withdraw, you have to figure out the account value on December 31st, the previous year, you have to go to the IRS and get their calculations worksheet. That are updated every year for life expectancy. And then also know that there are maybe different situations that weren't different tables. So there's not just one table. There's multiple tables. This sounds so easy. Right, it's super simple. Just go out and do it on your own. It would be no problem. So then you have to find your distribution factor listed in the calculation tables that's aligned to your age at your birthday in that current year, which one is your birthday when does it fall? And then you have to divide the balance of your account by the factor number that's your RMD. So that sounds like you said, really easy. Really easy, really fun, right? Like something to do on a nice lazy Saturday, or you can do what my mother does, which is just call her adviser and say, what's my RMD this year? That's probably a better strategy. So given all of that, and let's say you decide, in fact, to work with someone and they say, oh, here's your RMD. Are there strategies that your adviser can put into action during a bear market, given that required is the first word in RMD, right? Well, and that's sort of the issue. Because it's required, you can't have the conversation with your adviser and say, hey, I'm not going to take it this year because the market's down. I'm going to go ahead and pull from my cash reserve. No, you're actually required to take it out. So there have been some instances where we've gotten a waiver here and there if markets were really bad, but that hasn't happened in 2022, at least yet. So this is an example of a year where the markets are down and you may still be required to take that distribution, but they don't tell you when you have to take it. As long as it's between January 1 and December 31st, you have the flexibility of when and how you take it. And in most cases, because I will say that there are some types of employer sponsored retirement plans where they may have rules around how you can take it and set it up, et cetera. But in general with IRAs, for example, you have total flexibility. You can take it monthly. You can take it quarterly, you can take it once a year, so you may be able to work with your planner to be sort of strategic in when you take it. And maybe dollar cost average. Take a little bit out every month so that you're not taking it out on the wrong day. The worst possible day to take it, you know? Or trying to time the market. That's not a good idea as it relates to these retirement withdrawals. Now, you do also need to know that there is a penalty if you mess the deadline. So you do have to take these. And if you miss it, it's a 50% penalty of the amount of the required minimum distribution that you didn't take. So that's ouch. That is a hefty penalty. Just because you have to take it and you do have to pay taxes on it. It doesn't mean that you have to spend it. You can take that money, net of tax, and reinvest it. So you can put it into your other portfolio, you can use it as a mechanism and rebalancing your overall asset allocation. It is important as you're talking to your adviser to have them, they're going to be thinking about all of these things for you. But you need to know so that you can adjust your spending or you can adjust your cash reserves or whatever so that you can pay for some of these extra taxes or extra expenses related to it. I have a question Isabel, there are people who start withdrawing from their retirement accounts before age 72 when they're able to, but not required to. Do these same strategies that you're talking about, the dollar cost averaging, for example. Do they apply for those people as well? Absolutely. And the only real difference in these two from a strategic standpoint is if you're under 72, it's not a required distribution. You can still do the monthly. The annual, the quarterly, take it out as often as you need or make sense within your financial plan. The

Isabel IRS
"isabel" Discussed on Not Your Average Gun Girls

Not Your Average Gun Girls

04:46 min | 7 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Not Your Average Gun Girls

"We looking at? I have to redefine this all the time because it's very confusing. Most people agree Gen Z starts the year that I was born, which is 1997. So Gen Z right now. You're not old. Don't do that. Don't give me that face. So I'm 25. I just turned 25 on Friday. It goes basically between 12 and 25 is Generation Z right now. We are all kind of coming into adulthood. So over the years, 1997, and I can't do that. That's fine. So basically 1997 or below. Interestingly, the next generation we're starting over the alphabet. It's generation alpha, which are the children of millennials. Please for the love of God pray for us. It's going to be an interesting experience. But Gen Z is about to become the largest voter demographic in America we've ever seen. The most powerful demographic we've ever seen, the people with the most access to the most information at any specific time in human history and arguably the most educated generation the world has ever seen. And so we have a really unique opportunity to equip this group of people with the right information to lead our country and to lead our world, but we're not sure how to get there. And I have a lot of fun content and more coming about that soon that I can't really tell you much about it. But it's fascinating because what every young generation does in America is they rebel against the generation that came before them. Everybody wants to be punk rock. Everybody wants to swing for the fences and stick it to the man and be different. And for millennials, that looked like becoming extreme democratic socialists. And wearing makeup again. That's what it is. We are we are God. A long time ago. If you think about the rebelling against the previous generation, for so long, we've just lumped in Gen Z and millennial as well. They're just all kind of just assumed they were not the same, but just, yeah, they were younger. Yeah. Everybody's just. Well, I'm a millennial. I'm definitely not a Gen Z. Gen Z here is rebelling against the millennial identity. So we're rebelling against this idea that it has to be the collective that we have to fall into democratic socialism and anarchy and that we need the government to succeed. Gen Z is largely entrepreneurial, very liberty minded. If you go on an issue by issue basis, forget about political parties for a second because we don't know how to define those either, just like our gender. On an issue by issue basis, Gen Z is the most conservative generation America has seen since World War II. What if we can figure out how to communicate with them? We have a winning issue. Wait, so can I ask you this? If they're the most conservative group, are you still telling me that those same people who would, I guess a line conservatively are still like unaware of or have a misconception about firearms. Yes. We have a misconception to me because associate pro two a with conservative even though we know the Second Amendment is for everybody and we know that Democrats own guns. It depends on where is that being not taught, but where is that being exposed?.

America
What Alex Stein Saw at the 'Drag Your Kids to Pride' Event in Dallas

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 8 months ago

What Alex Stein Saw at the 'Drag Your Kids to Pride' Event in Dallas

"Viral video over the last couple of days. We covered extensively yesterday of the drag show for kids in Dallas, Texas, there's one man who actually went to the or tried to go to intervene and be an adult and do what was actually necessary. That's Alex Stein number 99. I think I got that right. He's hilarious. Alex, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Charlie, your alleged, oh my gosh, you're calling me 99. I feel like I made it, you know, the man in the myth the legend Charlie, thank you for having me on. I really appreciate it. Your reputation precedes you. The thing when you went to the school board meeting in Dallas is one of the funniest things I've seen in a very long time. And so you went to this drag show, they didn't let you in, so they're obviously, I don't know, homophobic or something, like walk us through this. Well, listen, this is the thing about this drive show. And you know, in our culture right now, they're doing the drag queen story time at the public library. Now, that's disgusting. That's terrible, Charlie. But at least that's out in the open. What this was, this is more sinister than that because they had a clear window and once they did it, they put paper over the window. So they didn't want people in there. And obviously we did get some major provocateurs, Taylor Hansen got in, although Isabel O'Reilly, a few people did get in that where I was in a group with. But they immediately recognized me and didn't let me in. But what I'm saying is Charlie, this had the vibe of when you're in college and the drug dealer gives you the first drug. The first drug is always free and the drug culture, you know? It's like your first hit, like, come to a bar, but the reason why it was so sinister is they were attacking children. Now, listen, if you're gay, you're trans you're drag queen, whatever, go do that in your own time. You don't need to involve little children. So what this was is, this was pure indoctrination, Charlie. And this was an attack on these children, and it gave me the vibrational energy that they were almost feasting on the purity and vulnerability of these children, and they were loving it. Like, you know, like a vampire, like a Dracula almost.

Charlie Alex Stein Charlie Kirk Dallas Taylor Hansen Isabel O'reilly Alex Texas
"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:41 min | 9 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And so I resigned and oh man, that was the big thing. I mean, they talk trying to talk me out of that dark me out of it. No one resigns from school. And I said, well, here's one guy that does. I said, I'm going. I want to go home. I'm out of here. What did you do after the war? Okay, after the war, I went to Penn State. And I graduated from Ben state and Dorothy and I, my dear wife, who's right here with me, we got married and we had four wonderful daughters and we've had a great life, we were married. We're going to be married and September 71 years. That's awesome. Congratulations. Thank you so much. In June, I'll be 97. And in July, Dorothy will be 93. Fantastic. Congratulations on all of those celebrations. I hope they are all wonderful. As you know, Harry, many veterans did not want to share their stories for many years after the war. What about you? Was it difficult to start sharing what you had experienced? Yes, in a way it was and I'll tell you how the started, as I said, I graduated from Penn State. And maybe four or 5 years ago, one of my fraternity brothers passed away and in his will, he left $25,000 to build a memorial for World War II guys on the lawn of my paternity house at Penn State. So myself when I found out about this, I got it a little bit involved because I haven't been too much involved in paternity life for years, although I love that when I was there, so I kind of got involved to make sure that the guys that I knew were in the war were on the names were on the plaque. So in my paternity, there were about a hundred guys in World War II. Now, out of that group, I knew about 60 because some were older, not many younger, but a lot of them were older and graduated before myself. So one of the guys in this kind of spearheaded the thing and I contacted him and then he was a retired army colonel. And he was really really an army guy and so we talked about my experiences and he asked me this question and that and I kind of put together a little bit and gave it to him and out of these paternity guys I said they're under there are two of us living today. The other gentleman is a 101 he's in a nursing home and Pennsylvania somewhere and here am I that's how I started this and then when I put all that together and then my children were what was going on. They said, well, why don't you just write this thing up and we'll do it so my daughter and son in law took all of my notes with myself and we put my little story together which was given to you. So that's how this really all started, but I will say that about 5 years ago I started to wear my war war two half and I really happy I did not for recognition by anyone. But people come up to me and it's so nice that they because they're both grandfathers were in the war and so forth and it brings on some conversation and I think the benefit to them as much as myself and then I get to talk to a lot of Vietnam guys that I like to talk to and they like to talk to a WW two guy. And I don't have to tell you that the line is growing thinner. So indeed last question, mister Isabel, it's been a fascinating conversation and we're so glad that you preserved your story and we're glad to have it here as part of veterans chronicles. What are you most proud of from your time and service to our country? Well, that's a pretty broad question, but. I don't think I can pinpoint one thing. But I am really so proud that I had the opportunity to do service for my country. So many people demean the service and the vein what happens and I'm not in favor of war. Obviously, I'm not. We certainly be better off without it. But I think this is our country and if need be, we fight for our country. Well said, sir, thank you very, very much for your service to our country. And thank you very much for sharing your story with us today. We truly appreciate it. Greg, thank you so much for giving me that opportunity. And I appreciate it. Your questions were right on the money and I hope my answers were closed. Oh, absolutely fascinating conversation. Harry Isabel junior, a U.S. Army veteran of the Pacific theater,.

Penn State Dorothy Harry mister Isabel army Pennsylvania Vietnam Greg Harry Isabel junior U.S. Army Pacific theater
"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"In the leaves, explain what you were thinking and what happened next. Well, yes, I did, and it's explainable, but it's hard to just figure out, I mean, I saw this guy and he was like, you know, a real close to me, maybe 20 yards away. And of course, he was a Japanese soldier and I can still see his face. And I just had a feeling and I still did there were only two people on this earth and I and I had a rifle at my hip and I inspired away and I had the M1 holds 8 8 rounds in the clip. And I fired all 8 of them and the M1 throws the clip out itself and then you reload, which I did. And I fired 16 shots at the inhuman it happened back in time. What were you thinking after that? Well, that was just thinking, let's go, keep going, keep going because you know, all wars are the same, but all wars are different. I wasn't in Europe, but Europe and the Pacific or two different wars basically because you're talking Europe pretty much expansive territories, but when you're talking the Pacific, you're talking a lot of pieces, little piece of dirt there. You've got hundreds and hundreds and thousands and thousands of guys trying to stay alive and put the other guy down. And so there's not much room in between. So this keep moving and moving and hoping you're not the next guy. Harry, let's pause one more time when we come back. We'll have the rest of your story. Here on veterans chronicles, I'm Greg Columbus and our guest in this edition, is Harry Isabel junior, a U.S. Army veteran of the Pacific theater of World War II. Please stay with us. This is veterans chronicles. I'm Greg Columbus, our guest in this edition is Harry Isabel junior. He's a U.S. Army veteran of the Pacific theater in World War II. In the previous segment, Harry described his landing at Saipan and his first one on one interaction with Japanese forces, but of course there are other moments during the battle of Saipan that we want to get to and Harry you have said in your written history that the hardest thing about your service was seeing the young men who were killed and wounded. How were you and the others able to stay focused in what is obviously a very difficult situation. Obviously there's so much sadness because even though you hadn't been together too long, you became quick Friends and the action makes everyone let's say blood brothers and to see a guy get down right next to you who would men your friend and it's a happening and the thing about it is you're there for a purpose and you just have to keep rolling and keep rolling and just keep going and that's what we did. And Harry obviously the United States military shows great respect to the fallen, the vast majority of the time. You tell a story of you and a fellow soldier coming across a fallen American and then you and that fellow soldier got into a pretty heated argument. Tell me about that one. Well, we did and I didn't like it and this guy was a New York guy older. I was a kid. I was 18. I was the youngest one. They called me junior, but this guy came over one of our poor guys was killed. And the guy went right over to him and they just took the wristwatch off of our fellow soldiers, the dead palace soldiers risked.

Greg Columbus Harry Isabel Europe Harry Pacific theater of World War I Pacific theater U.S. Army Saipan Pacific United States New York
"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

07:30 min | 9 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Previously if you follow me. Absolutely. We're speaking with World War II U.S. Army veteran Harry Isabel junior and Harry, you've also talked about watching the naval bombardment of Saipan prior obviously to the amphibious landing. So what was going through your mind and what was it like watching that bombardment knowing you would soon be going ashore? Well, I can tell you one thing. I didn't think there would be one person left on that basis there. I mean, you watch the bombardments in the airplanes and they strafed and they bombed and our ship bombed and I thought no way can anyone be alive. This will be nothing. We'll walk in there and we'll walk up the next day and it'll all be over. Of course, it was obviously much different, but it tremendous. I mean, the effort that we had and our nation that we did, it was unbelievable to watch and then land and face the people that we faced and fight them, it was an unbelievable. Before you could make a landing, of course you had to get into the Higgins boats and from what I understand, that was no easy task in and of itself, so tell me a little bit about that. Well, I can tell you one thing. You're a 100% right. You don't know. It's just something that can't be explained and we, of course, we didn't, that was one thing we didn't practice I mean, we had no training in that. And that night, of course, we knew what we're going to do because it was all explained to us that everything without the actual doing it, but when we were loaded on with this and that, they put a shovel on you, so you can dig a fox to all of you. If you have to and so forth, all of the training preparations and you're kind of loaded down with the items and you get as I describe it to people, I say, look, just think you're going to climb out of a 5th story window on a building and you're going to shimmy down the building itself. But this remember the building is waving and you're going into a little boat that's in the bottom, which you can't see because you're kind of looking a little way bit, but you do see it bobbling around, but you're so worried because a guy under you and there's a guy above you and you're loaded down and you're holding your rifle that you sure don't want to drop and eventually you get down to 5 stories and you're on the street and you're in that boat and it's still bobbing and you get your place in there with about 50 other guys and you've made it hopefully and then you take off which is the landing craft vehicle personnel holds about 50 guys and then we went on our way to when we run the road for hours and hours which was so laborious I guess to wait our time to win you understand. What got me was that diesel fuel and I'm originally from there near Pittsburgh and I for years and years and years I just couldn't get behind one of those days of fuel buses because it brought back that memory of that terrible, terrible smell. So you're rendezvousing your rendezvous and finally started to go right in. Harry lets pause right there. We'll be right back with much more of your story here on veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corbus and our guest is U.S. Army World War II veteran Harry Isabel junior. Please stay with us. This is veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corumba. Thanks so much for being with us. Our guest in this edition is Harry Isabel junior. He's a U.S. Army veteran in the Pacific theater of World War II. He's a veteran of the fighting 69th in the 27th U.S. Army infantry division. And Harry were just in the middle of your story about landing on Saipan, the difficulty in getting into the Higgins boats and the waiting and the waiting and the diesel smell. So take us through the landing now. You mentioned that it took a lot longer than expected, explain why, and then explain how you got ashore. Of course, the landing, none of them are simple, obviously, but we were supposed to Gwen and the front of the Higgins boat is prepared to drop and you run on a run right out of the Higgins boat onto the onto the sand. However, all of a sudden we were expected to go in and this took a couple of hundred yards from the beach I would say and everything stopped and the order came, okay, this is it, everyone over the side. What is this? Everyone over the side? Well, everyone over the side means everyone over the side. So I jumped out and we all jumped out and thanked the good lord. I felt something under my feet. And I know probably, and I do know that some people were in sports in it. However, when I hit the grind, I was one of the happiest guys in time, but I'm kind of overloaded with weight and I just threw all that crap away. I'm calling it crap. I don't even know what it was. I know, as I said, they gave us the shovel to if I needed a box all I did with my hands that was my thought and I knew I'd need water and I knew in my ammo belt was on and it was buckled to me and I knew I'd need that and certainly I didn't want my rifle to get wet so I held that thing above my head and got as much off of me as I could and pretty much just had water and my ammo and my rifle and myself and my steel helmet thank the good lord for this DLL and I just waited in with the other guys, I guess we finally we made the beach. What did you see when you got to the beach? What was it like there? Well, it wasn't very comforting. I think probably that's the first time that a funeral home is when you went to visit it back home where you'd see the people to cease and dead and then all over. I mean, so many Japanese they were just all over the place and there was some mortar fire, some artillery fire there was no we didn't have any small arms fire because you see the marines landed the day before. So we didn't think that to them for them. We didn't have the beach prior to a contend with, but where they were still capable of mortar activity and they still had their artillery because all of the bombing and everything that we did didn't knock them out immediately. You describe very clearly early on. I don't know if it was your very first instance in combat, but it was certainly early on. When you saw an enemy in the trees.

Harry Isabel U.S. Army Harry Saipan Greg corbus Greg corumba Pacific theater of World War I U.S. Army infantry division Higgins Pittsburgh Gwen marines
"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:41 min | 10 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"But timeless timeless movies is my dream. Timeless movies. And unique ones. I love Robert eggers. I think he's brilliant. Again, one of a kind. That's what's really interesting. What I find interesting is finding the filmmakers that are the new generation of the new Scorsese's and Spielberg's wife such an immense amount of respect for, obviously, but who's the new talent? That's what is so exciting. The Argos lanthimos is one of someone that I love as well. Well, I know you said earlier, you like a lot you admire and you say joy, whose work with have you seen the north or that? I have not seen it yet. I see I'm already, I'm sweating because I'm so excited. Yeah, I think she is an astoundingly good actress. And that's another thing as much as I want to work with incredible directors. I want to work with incredible actors and that's really cool. I like among your contemporaries. People like her, who else are some of the ones that you think. I think Florence Pugh is just brilliant. We were talking about Daniel Day-Lewis. I know he's retired, but you're on that. I'm on that. I will force him out of retirement. It will happen eventually. And then, you know, just curious about watching how people do their jobs. How does Joaquin Phoenix actually create a role? Isn't that an interesting thing to want to just observe and learn from? But not just that. There are plenty of people that, yes, aren't big, big names, but they're incredible actors. I really curious about their process as well. But, you know, Damien chazelle. I can watch what blush over and over again forever and ever. And I want to see what he does next. But yeah, of course, those are your dreams and goals. And is there anything people might not expect that we just want to put it out there that you might want to do the people might not? I don't know. Do you want to do a musical? Do you want to, is there something let's just put it out there now? Because someone else is listening. I want to work with Cameron Crowe one day. One. And two, I want to play Edie sedgwick. That is my dream. I had a really tragic life, but she reminds me of Francis, which is my favorite one of my favorite films of all time. I think it's the greatest female performance display of a female character ever. Oh my God, yes, yes. Like this could go on forever. If we get really deep into it, 'cause I know everything about everyone watch Taika Waititi's TED Talk that he did ten years ago about Jojo Rabbit after I read Jojo Rabbit and I made all the connections..

Robert eggers Florence Pugh Daniel Day Scorsese Spielberg Damien chazelle Joaquin Phoenix Lewis Edie sedgwick Cameron Crowe Francis Taika Waititi TED Talk Jojo Rabbit
"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:41 min | 10 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I didn't realize how legendary he was though. I didn't know that everyone talked about his voice all the time and how he spoke. All the time. I feel really he doesn't get it either, which is hilarious. He thinks he's like, I'm just saying words. Why is everyone? It's like freaking out. But it is really distinctive, you know? And I just remember the first time I met him, he grabbed my hand and he looked at me and I went, oh God, okay, I get it. I get it. I totally get it. Because I think what moved all of them about this, you know, he's received how many westerns in his life. He never read one like this. And certainly never won. With an Elsa character before, and that's what moved them all was the narration. At least that's what they told me. And he I remember you looked at me and he said, this could be a wild ride, and then he went, I'm too fucking old to be here. Because it was written for a 45 year old originally. And I think it is perfect that it was him because you needed that wisdom. Exactly. And that age in there. And he, man, did he blow it. Characters bond with his characters. Quite a bit. Pretty special. So this is who you're going to be around for 5 months. Let's just talk about what this role is going to demand of you. Tennessee accent, you're supposed to be the most incredible horse rider, not just the horse rider, the most incredible horse rider. Voicing these narrations, which are not only in that Tennessee accent, but very emotional, heartfelt, powerful stuff, and just like kind of being somebody who can hold their own as a cowboy, which is the way that she describes her self at various points. So knowing that that was what the job was going to entail, how equipped were you before you went to work to do those things or basically what level of prep was needed to be, let's say, a great horse rider. Well, I the minute that I knew that I had to do all of those things. I did them. I texted Taylor, and I said, I need a horse back writer person who knows how to do these things. I need to be on a horse right away. Because how much time have you spent on a horse before this?.

Elsa Tennessee Taylor
"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Had a really remarkable experience, you know, doing a show for that amount of time and creating kind of a family. I'd always envisioned in my head while I was doing all these auditions, you know, as a 13, 14, 15 year old. The bonds you create on set. The Friends that you make, I'm very much an introvert, and so I always keep to myself and I also, when it comes to being professional, I just, I don't care what environment I'm in. I don't care if it's a fun little comedy. I take it very seriously. I think you should always be a professional. And if you want to go to that karaoke bar, find another time to do it. Quite frankly, this is how I feel. But to each their own. So, and I also just want to sleep. I was tired. So I would go back to my room and sleep. And once people kind of understand that, that is kind of the way I function. And embrace it. It's wonderful. They get you. And they know not to overstep and go into your little space. Because again, I'm an only child, and I don't like sharing reviews. So we'll go on back to when you were first auditioning for stuff. Was the dream in your mind? If you can take yourself back, what you were picturing was it being in TV or was it, I see myself on the big screen. Oh, goodness. I don't even think I was, I was thinking about that because I wasn't thinking about actually getting a job. That's the thing. I remember when I got elected and Katie, I totally caught me off guard that I could actually get the job. And I remember I went to a I had no reaction whatsoever when I found out and I had gotten the car with my mom. We went to the grocery store and we got back in the car and I totally turned to her and I started crying for some reason. I remember because it meant a great deal to me. You know, I've been doing auditions for three years and loving it, but nothing was coming out of it. Absolutely. It's like you're seeing.

Katie
"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:02 min | 10 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Hi everyone and thank you for tuning in to the 437th episode of awards chatter, The Hollywood Reporter's awards podcast. I'm the host Scott feinberg. And my guest today is one of the most promising young stars in Hollywood. She's a 21 year old who was until recently known if at all for playing one of the two leads on the Netflix sitcom Alexa and Katie, which ran from 2018 through 2020, a recurring part on the CBS sitcom Young Sheldon during that same time span, and the lead in the 2020 indie run hide fight. But then she was cast as Elsa dutton, the central character on and narrator of Taylor Sheridan's Yellowstone prequel, 1883. And when that ten episode paramount plus limited series began rolling out late last year, quickly becoming a giant ratings hit, it immediately became apparent that a new star was on the scene. Isabel may. Over the course of our conversation may, who bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Lawrence, another actress who got her start on a sitcom and then broke through in a makeup free part out in the wild, reflected on her unexpected attraction to acting and what she learned from being thrown right into the deep end with her first professional gig. How a couple of years later, an audition for another Taylor Sheridan project did not result in her getting that part, but led Sheridan to write the part of Elsa on 1883, specifically for her, how she, a person who had never ridden a horse before, prepared for 1883, and what she learned from the 5 months she spent shooting it in sweltering heat and freezing cold out in the west, plus much more. And so without further ado, let's go to that.

Scott feinberg Taylor Sheridan Young Sheldon Elsa dutton The Hollywood Reporter Alexa Netflix Katie CBS Hollywood Jennifer Lawrence Isabel Elsa Sheridan
"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:56 min | 11 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on KGO 810

"Com you'll see Isabel in a very pretty office setting And right behind you is a very pretty little couch And they're sitting side by side on that couch And you're talking with them about how much money they need to have in cash reserves how much they need to have in investments and how much of those investments need to be in stocks but women but women are generally more risk averse They're more cautious They're less confident We're just more going for it and Gusto and trading and market oriented So how do you resolve the inherent conflict between the natural tendencies of the wife versus that of the husband Oh they have to be willing to take our advice because it's my job as a financial planner to look at all of these things to look at everything with a dollar sign attached And try to help them understand what's the appropriate portfolio And sometimes it's a little bit of a happy medium perhaps between the two right But really again that's my role as a financial planner to sit down and say okay well if spouse a wants to be over here in a 50% stock 50% bond portfolio that's what they're comfortable with and spouse B is over here betting it all on black taking it to Vegas Maybe we are number one looking at potentially some different portfolios for each of them that fits with their comfort level But more likely we're looking at the whole pot working toward their joint goals So yeah there is some conversation that has to be had about look this may be where you want to have it and where you're most comfortable but can we bring you from that very conservative approach to somewhere that may be more in alignment with what your long-term goals are And I think for a lot of people women or men having someone else to manage those assets for you creates a level of comfort with maybe a risk tolerance that you wouldn't have otherwise selected If somebody else is responsible for it that takes the heat off of you you know You're the husband investing over here and the betting it all on black and your wife is getting angry with you every day because it's so volatile You know give it to somebody else and let them kind of take the heat So to speak Yeah in other words he's not going to convince her to reduce the amount of cash she's not going to convince him to reduce the amount of stocks So by allowing you to be the arbitrator the mediator this is resulting in compromise And together if it doesn't work out they can both blame you Exactly It's better than them blaming each other I'll take it That Isabel barrow who's director of financial planning at Edelman financial engines and if somebody wants to reach you Isabel how would they do that You can reach us at 8 three three plan EFE 8 three three plan EFA Isabel thanks so much for joining us on the program today Thanks Rick Thanks for having me You can also reach out to Edelman financial engines by going to their website plan EFE dot com slash Rick Isabel and I had a conversation for almost a half hour If you'd like to watch the entire conversation and I do mean watch because we recorded.

Isabel Vegas Isabel barrow Edelman financial engines Rick Thanks Rick Isabel Edelman
"isabel" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"Crow. Isabel spent a decade gathering research and conducting interviews for her book. It's both a sweeping story of a major event in American history, the Great Migration, and an intimate portrait of what it was like for those who lived through it. We sat down with Isabel wilkerson to discuss her new book caste. The origins of our discontents, which makes the bold argument that cast rather than race gives us a better framework to understand American history. When Isabel wilkerson was working on her first book, the warmth of other sons, she noticed a strange pattern emerging in her research that would become the basis of her next book. A lot of the anthropologists and sociologists who were writing about the Jim Crow south in the 1930s were using a word she wasn't used to seeing in an American context. I was immersed in that world. I was focused in on what it was like to live in that world. And as a result of that, I became aware of how others who had studied that world while it was actually in progress, they were referring to that structure that existed in the American south. They described it as a caste system. As I was talking to the people who were survivors of that caste system and who had defected from that world, I recognized too that cast was the most appropriate comprehensive and accurate way to describe what they had experienced. It was through that recognition of what the Jim Crow south was actually like that I came to the recognition that cast was the appropriate word. How would you define cast and how does cast differ from race in the American context? Well, cast is millennia old. And it's thousands and thousands of years old. In India, for example, it's many, many thousands of years old. So as a concept, cast predates the idea of the concept of race, which is a fairly new concept in human history. Cast is essentially an artificial arbitrary in many respects construction of hierarchy, ranking the people within a culture or a society based upon their connection to whatever is the dominant cast. And when you look at any caste system there is going to be a group that's on the top and there's a group that's on the bottom and those in the middle who are often struggling to navigate between these two poles and often are seeking to identify with and gain the favor of those who are at the very top of the hierarchy. And in the United States, it's very clear, historically from the beginning of colonial times, there were the people who were dominant. And they were the English and those who might have come closest to them. And then at the very, very bottom were transported to the new world, people who would be enslaved. And the recognition, the immediately visible recognition based upon what they looked like made them sadly tragically more vulnerable to being identified as very, very different from those who were the dominant group. And so Africans became the subordinated group. And then there were people outside of that caste system, the people who had been ruthlessly brutally driven from their own land, the indigenous people who were pushed outside and maybe made exiles in the emerging caste system. I mean, it sounds like the caste system really boils down to a power structure that keeps people in kind of distinct. I don't want to say classes, but in distinct power dynamics with one another. And I guess I'm wondering, in contrast with race, which can also reinforce power dynamics, how does cast capture that more than race does? Racism has, as a word, is not very, there's not an agreement on what it means. It's often connected to the emotions of hate, hostility, disliking, prejudice, these are very emotionally fraught perspectives on how we relate to one another. But cast takes us away from the emotion. Cast is about structure. It's about the infrastructure that we have inherited. It is not about feelings. It is really about power and how those other groups manage and navigate and seek to survive in a society that's created with this ranked hierarchy. That's been made invisible to us because it's so much a part of how things work in the country. When you were constructing sort of this idea for a book in framing the U.S. context and U.S. history that maybe is familiar to us on the surface, but in these sort of foreign terms, that creates a new vantage point through which to see it, right? And I wonder how much you were thinking about that when you were working on this book. Oh, absolutely. Thank you for putting it that way. I mean, it's like looking at ourselves from a different vantage point that we never would have thought of before. Because it allows us to see it from a different lens. Using cast as a way to frame American history or look at American history, how can that change the way we approach the problems we're facing today that we continue to face? Whether it's income inequality, racial oppression, having a kind of cast frame of American history, how can that kind of change the way we approach problems today? Cast is, I find it to be a liberating concept in an odd kind of way because it takes the personal out of it. It removes the heaviness of preconceived notions about how we would view ourselves. It's fresh and new and a different kind of way. I believe that in the era in which we live, we need new language to work our way through what it is that we're experiencing. The same language that was applied to the era of cross burning clansmen of the early 20th century might not be the most effective way to deal with the divisions and tensions that we are facing today. This is a really long-standing enduring concept that seems to have survived all of the various civil rights legislation to deal with the various efforts to redress past injustices and current ones. It seems to be through line for how things have continued to be as we live today. It is a continuum. And so that's the reason why I think that cast actually gives us a new framework, new language, a new way of looking at what has always been there, but that.

Isabel wilkerson Jim Crow American south Isabel Crow United States India
How Your Donations for Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Work

The Dan Bongino Show

01:34 min | 1 year ago

How Your Donations for Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Work

"As you know this is political show but not everything in life is political thankfully right And one of the things that wasn't political for me was when I was diagnosed with cancer last year it was a really traumatizing moment as it would be for anyone is diagnosed with lymphoma Here to talk about lymphoma and to help us raise some money to hopefully decrease the number of people who ever have to have that moment again is already Dylan from the LLS leukemia and lymphoma society Ari thanks for joining me really appreciate it Thank you so much for having me I appreciate your time No listen this is obviously a very important topic to me We raised a lot of money for the LLS last year My daughter Isabel thought it was really important because this is such a devastating disease and this year we're looking at top that We have great listeners in this audience The website if you'd like to donate folks bongino dot com slash LLS Ari about leukemia and lymphoma all of the money that's raised Where does it go What is it Is it research Is it assistance What happens with the money Yeah so the funds that our campaigns raise it goes through a few different things It goes to continuing research for life saving therapies like targeted immunotherapies that are saving thousands of lives It goes towards blood cancer information education and support for our patients and our families It goes to support our patients in their communities and also to drive policies that are increasing development and access to new

Lymphoma ARI Dylan Cancer Isabel Leukemia Blood Cancer
"isabel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"We feature a conversation with isabel wilkerson from the twenty twenty portland book festival in twenty sixteen president. Barack obama awarded isabel. Wilkerson the national humanities medal for her first magisterial book the warmth of other suns which chronicles one of the great untold stories of american history the decades long migration of black citizens who fled the south for northern and western cities in search of a better life. It went on to spend months on the new york times bestseller list and has been hailed as a modern classic. Wilkerson began her career as a journalist and became the first african american woman to win the pulitzer prize in journalism. And the first african american to win for individual reporting wilkerson. Joined us at the portland book festival. Talk about her book. Cast the origins of our discontents. It is an astonishing reframing of american history in our founding myths that is vital to understanding what is happening in america today socially and politically wilkerson conversation with writer of viet thanh new an author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction including the pulitzer prize. Winning novel the sympathizer. Here's viet thanh new in such a pleasure to be back here in portland virtually any rate and it's tremendous leisure to be here in conversation with isabel. Wilkerson been a big fan since the warmth of other suns. I'm sure you've heard that a million times before But i just wanna stop by at least talking just for a second about about that bullock in its relationship cast for me Because as a writer. I really admired the warmth of other suns and it's it's masterful storytelling and The way that you have of shifting the language in order to get us to look a new at something that we think we already know so in the warmth of other suns it was this idea of using the concepts of migration and of refugees to understand the movements of black people out of the south and as a migrant and refugee myself. I found that to be just really affecting to get me to think again. About the length of journeys at black people were undertaking in the country that sometimes exceeded the journeys that people were. Were taking from outside the country to come in. And i think in cast. You're doing something similar as well. Obviously with the dairy titled the button. We get that just a moment but in reading the book i was constantly struck by the way you would just shift the language in order to i think especially americans force them to think again about a history that they have oftentimes chosen to forget or neglect or try to cope with in some way i think about your use of language such as using pogroms to describe the massacres of black people describing slavery as an economy of torture talking about plantations as labor camps where people were forced labor Bringing up issues histories of medical experimentation idea that what was being done to black people constituted war crimes and crimes against humanity..

Wilkerson suns isabel wilkerson portland wilkerson pulitzer prize isabel viet thanh Barack obama new york times bullock america
"isabel" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I wanna share them with people i love. Do you write by hand. i still do. Yeah i do. I work on the computer. But i also work by hand I like having a little composition books. I usually have them all around. And especially when i'm traveling and you know then. I transferred from the page onto my laptop. But i i work both ways. The other thing that struck me and We talked a little bit about is the idea of looking back on life and i just. I'm just running into a lot of people. Neighbors because of my age are h. The people are looking backward. Are sixties looking back on on things like you said. Mistakes highpoints all that stuff. It seems to be a common theme these days. And i don't know if the pandemic brought that on her i think felix you're right. Depending was to me a spiritual retreat for all of us forced us to cancel a lot of the noise and our lie and to become in a little more reflective. What was almost like going into monastery or convent of swords and really sorting things out in your heart. But i think also our ages one receiving younger people and older people dying and adapt being so close by with the pandemic that it makes you evaluate. What's important you know. It makes you evaluate the and make priorities in your life. So i have found as much as this time has been so painful that it's also been very sacred and i think that the painful times in my life had been sacred moments when a part of you dies and hopefully another part of you gets reborn and i think we're that as a collective community you know a death of maybe some careless practices and a transformation for us to one realize that we're responsible for others and they're responsible for us or responsible for animals and were responsible for the planet and if we don't take care of them they can't take care of us. Guess what and he's like. You know that. Kind of inter connectedness which religions teach us. Is it absolute where we're seeing that happen now with the planet. So i i feel for those of us who are In our sixties are specially taking look at our live and making sense of our mistakes much from our mistakes. I think i learned more from my mistakes than i do. For my successes. This is just meant to be a very short catch up to you. You know to talk about your book but also to catch up in. Could you have so many fans here and so many people who follow you And all the work that you do like you said all the The nonprofit and and the the work that you do on the side said a lot of people are interested in just catching up to you in hearing you see what's up with your life in the idea and the fact that you know you move to mexico but still putting out you know great literature you still putting out books It's it's always a pleasure to just catch up to you and find out what's going on so thank you so much. Thank you feelings for this opportunity. And i just want to say how much i appreciate your. You're talking to you being on your show at symphony santa. Still you know that's rare. You could feel so at home so thank you and your team for having me. Thank you very much undersea samson. Let sorge having you back again. In person right. Yeah maybe maybe we all go down to san miguel ended do it. There now may come over here. I welcome you. That would be fun. Thanks again so much to both. Sandra nettles and isabella there for joining me. Here on latino marta. I remember you is. The name of sandra cisneros newest novel. Twenty twenty two will see violeta isabel allende while her latest memoir called the soul of a woman is out right now as always thank you so much for listening to all latino from npr music. And let me remind you that we are in the midst of a hispanic heritage month celebration with a takeover of the tiny desk concert series. We call it and tiny ten performances from eight different countries and cultures out each performance at npr dot org slash music and also on the npr youtube channel. We also have a ton of stuff on instagram. Live interviews some shorter reels stories. Check us out on the npr music..

felix symphony santa Sandra nettles violeta isabel allende mexico samson san miguel sandra cisneros isabella npr music npr youtube
The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:34 min | 1 year ago

The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

"Now you may remember jeff daniels from the movie dumb and dumber and if you ever wondered while watching that movie will who's dumb and dumber. Let's listen to this clip and you will know exactly who i think. The bloody sunday for people of color was george ford's murder and white people said. I had no idea that we were only taught one side of american history. Better look into that. So i started reading isabel. Wilkerson tana coats. Carol anderson get educated. Because there's a whole we have an opportunity in this country right now to welcome in a america we really do. I feel the same way that there is strangely. Not only in america not in our the way we approach our civic society but in the arts There's there's reasons and opportunity where things are reopened. That never closed ever before to re dedicate yourself to first principles and white people are the ones who need to hear it. So mockingbird is harper lee to white point of view and it certainly is the story of atticus coming to grips with the fact that one of the big central questions of the play is. There's goodness everyone you just have to care enough to look for it. Is that true today. In two thousand twenty one. Is there goodness everyone not so sure. But you have to choose. Now you have to decide whether you're for eliminating or at least marginalizing systemic racism or you against you have to choose. You can't just sit back and go. Please cut my taxes. Look the other way. Well there's also a choice before that which is to acknowledge exists acknowledge it exists

George Ford Wilkerson Tana Carol Anderson Jeff Daniels Isabel America Harper Lee Atticus
"isabel" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Named Isabel They met at a house party playing seltzer Pong which I'm currently 17th ranked in the Ontario amateur league But climbing you know gotta work my way up to the top weird flex Yeah it is a weird feeling But after a long conversation with her after that Nick had to duck out to go walk his dog and she decided to come along with him Yeah But afterwards it's a mystery why she's not responding 'cause she doesn't have a boyfriend at least as far as he knows And he can't think of a reason why she would be ghosting I can't either So Nick I'm just gonna throw this out there I need you to be a 100% truthful when I ask you this all right Okay Easier dog Bowser physically unattractive A verbalization to call somebody back because their dog's ugly I mean let's be honest There's no doubt in women's red book about how girls get turned off Dogs and the owners they always match But I'm not hearing any answers from Nicholas Do you have an ugly dog or what Maybe chew to the button Exactly Obviously I'm just messing with you Nicholas okay but just before we do this Nicholas do I have complete authority if she does call your dog ugly to call her ugly back You cool with that No You said it not me I'm not taking part No that was interesting I got the approval I'm gonna fight for you and I'm gonna fight for Bowser too You guys wanted Jeff to care Now he really can't.

Jeff 17th Nicholas Isabel 100% Nick Bowser Ontario
"isabel" Discussed on Rap It Out

Rap It Out

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on Rap It Out

"Any last words or shoutouts and advice. Kay i'm going to try to remember that I wanna thank with all my heart. My drummer alec maggie for making the difference at being my wonderful bam mate Who who really electrified My my songwriting I wanna shout out to my hubby. Gino out there who has been very supportive as i've says he's he's cmih evolve over the years musically and Just i just really appreciate his moral a non conditional support. I wanna shout out to my longtime fans. They are so appreciated. And they're the reason i keep going and I wanna shot out to basically everybody who's been showing me support including The various organizations that have been given me grants lately music teachers national association national association of pastore musicians the new england musicians relief fund in the massachusetts cultural council The there's some wonderful people over there just You know had the time of day to check out my music. Mcguire oregon and show me some grant support. So it's been so incredibly amazing specially during this pandemic and these hard times For for the music world. My advice is just to You know what a few years ago. Maybe i'll pass on what put when i a message. I got sort of from the universe about five years ago and that was to stay faithful to my craft like not to abandon my craft not to abandon my music making in. The world's gonna be so many distractions and lots of pain lots of indifference Pay to play all these different things to sort of crop up and like no matter what you craft you know. You're an artist painter writer dancer cook or chef. Whatever it is right you know you know play right. Whatever actor. stay faithful to your craft because I i believe that You will be rewarded. I can't say how. I don't know how. And when but only god knows but i think that staying true. It's kinda like strang true to your love could person you love or whatever it is. You love It just bears bears. Its own kind of fruit mitts on time. I'm most most definite. So i exhort people to stay faithful to themselves. Stay true to themselves during these tough times. Not to Not to get too distracted by everything. I know it's been. It's been real hard hitting in noman worth can do justice to the grief and the pain fi. I think that you know we. We just gotta hold onto the love. Hold on to everything netscape and hold onto everything. Good and others. Yes yes yes. Yeah and not to be afraid and not to be afraid to break away from formulas and try new things and just tried to keep finding your tribe and We live in such a war right now or the so much going on special internet. You know you gotta tune into your voice. I tune into yourself and then then everything else can take more context after. I think it's important not to not to lose oneself in today's internet era. Oh yes Wow i'm sorry this just taking a breather tip taking all you're saying well thank you for those kind words and on the advice invade thank you for all the helped advance in the audience out there really taken in graham. Well that means a lot to me. And i've loved being on your show E- you know spin wonderful chatting with you miss clean and You know just a you know all the best out there to listeners. I i hope to check out my website. Isabel market selling dot com invited to follow my channels And stay in touch with a lot of news because there's a lot head a lot very exciting stuff ahead including more music interviews A potential new single released as well as the album which actually is going to be broken up into two albums and You know sneak peeks of my bandmates and so on it's rather endless obviously. I'm excited for the. I'm excited for that. Thank yes let's keep in touch no problem. And y'all y'all y'all make sure isabel. Music is extraordinary and look out for her new stock reducing the albums. Be show check out. She's amazing. alan social media all of rebel podcast and be enjoys episode. It was very moving so beautiful and stay tuned because there is a little something after this as we talk a little something special combined it by yours truly isabel. Check it out listeners. A really hope. You enjoy my son. Hope you guys enjoy and stay to from one to calm. There is more to come make sure all the other episodes before and the ones are coming after. And y'all have a good one who does have a good day Night if whatever times on your end and yeah. I don't have anything else. So y'all have a good one by everybody. So you guys.

alec maggie national association national bears bears massachusetts cultural council Gino Kay Mcguire strang oregon netscape cook Isabel graham isabel alan
"isabel" Discussed on Rap It Out

Rap It Out

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on Rap It Out

"Hello everybody thank you so much for joining us tonight as we dove into a wonderful podcast episode. Now in this bombing segment. You will get a chance to hear artists showcase because every artists that comes on the shell requires to do a show. So buckle up. Get some popcorn in a showcase hopi guy lebanon and checkup article. You get a chance to Enjoy i hope you'll forgive me. I asked my husband to coming as quietly as possible. You might hear like the slightest noise in the background. I i acquired a spa. That's that's the way that's good. That's good all right. Hey everybody thank you for this lamer. Isabel everybody out there. Hey everybody good to see you while again. This one's going to be very special. Because i am here within the mazing musician singer songwriter. Pianist she's amazing. This is isabel isabel. Hey world hey it's all good to meet you. I'm so honored and so excited to beat you into interview. I'm so happy that you're here. Thank you oh gosh. The honor is mine musically. I really have enjoyed what heard of your show and you know. I'm excited to be here today with you. Thank you for having me for appreciating music and all mccollum problem. No problem you. Music is extraordinary soil outside totally down to do this. I like i was so direct. When i heard about it was like i definitely got to get you guys get to here. I got a that means a lot to hear. Thank you thank you. Thank you if mommy may day. Glad to hear that good right. So let's start at the very beginning and i don't mean i don't mean that beginning but The beginning of music career because as a musician. Everybody has a beginning. Everybody has a start to their music career that makes their music career kind of jumped from there. So i can't stop at this Had joined with music store for you Can you say that again. I'm having the slightest trouble hearing you. Sorry that's okay that's okay most people say that that's okay again. I was saying How did the journey with music star for you. Oh thanks yeah Well a and. I don't mind sharing that. I've really loved music. Since i was very little in fact my earliest memory was of being in preschool. And i remember that preschool teacher came in with a guitar. We all sang. And i remember kind of singing loudly. started loudly and proudly and I also singing that kind of evolved piano playing in my youth and Sort of each love fed off of the the other love Piano and singing and You know. I was intrigued by wonderful musicians while i might be dating myself. The slightest bit if i mentioned liberal about. I just thought he was amazing. Very glittering at the with all those rings and he sounded amazing so and he just had so much. Pizzazz is playing so Yeah and then it evolved into Singing and You know when. I when i was in high school and i did a lot of independent work I didn't always have the most conducive atmosphere. When i am my family when i was growing up but You know music state alive me. Very very strong From writer that said an indomitable spraying or something that lived on inside your heart despite the winter so Music was just this titanic world inside of me no matter what then inc kept evolving studying my instruments and in college You know probably early say my teeth attempting always to write songs and it wasn't until i became a backup singer for a rock band and sort of came through this thing back door Where i learned the craft of songwriting and it sort of took off for me. Because up to that time i had written poetry for years and i was just like a little bit of a of a like dynamite. Sort of finally. Just you know everything. Sort of you know sparking When i learned the craft of songwriting and After that i have never looked back. I i continue to love singing and writing songs. I did go through a period alive I can tell you about more later. If you're really interested then You know just stumbling my band and finding my bandmates and collaborators. It's just like electric. When i met my. My drummer. alad maggie and we seem to have a natural musical conversation going on and That inspired a lot of songs. That's for sure. Polly boasted over all those songs on. My first album is abundant whispers. Oh wow you have such an exciting life. I can see. I'm very widely very good. Thank you well. I'm pro. I'll probably slightly wired today. I didn't have coffee though. So i can't blame it on the coffee just a little bit. Maybe just saw maybe just a little. Maybe coffee may have a little bit and dysfunctional. because a lot of bills can't coffee so her is hard for me. I need a cup of coffee once in a while. Yeah you have a favorite flavor ignorant just depends on my mood swings on swings so whatever i'm happy i have a cup of coffee. A bump south on my little bear or from angry. I'm going to have probably it's a stall teaspoon..

isabel isabel mccollum Isabel lebanon Pizzazz alad maggie Polly
Chinese Officials Blame U.S. for Stalemate in High-Level Talks

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Chinese Officials Blame U.S. for Stalemate in High-Level Talks

"Let's turn now to our panel and let's look first at the relationship between china and the united states who are still figuring out how to talk to each other again following the chest beating and or chest probing the trump years possibly to beijing disappointment while. Us president has been a lot less noisy. Where china is concerned. He has not been a great deal more friendly. Nevertheless high ish level talks between the two superpowers have begun in tianjin. China's vice foreign minister asia fong is hosting deputy. Us secretary of state. Wendy sherman a isabel first of all Vice foreign minister has said that relations between the two superpowers are at a stalemate. Is she right. Certainly not wrong I mean if you look at the list of of things that each is demanding of the other they made no progress whatsoever so the chinese would like for example like the tariffs lifted which quite a lot of people think is a good idea They would like the americans to stop trying to extradite the c c o of of They would like the sanctions against chinese officials over hong kong and xinjiang lifted. None of that is going to happen. Meanwhile the americans would like the two men who are being held essentially hostage for the hallway case to be released and they would like a whole series of concessions that the chinese and not going to grant and both sites are held in a trap of rising nationalism at home so that if the chinese were to back off any of the very assertive moves that they've made over the last two months there would be a. How outrage from nationalist citizens and if the americans were to back off the bye administration was to back off the republicans would shred them in congress. So i don't see it really warming up I think the best they can do is keep talking to each other rather than not

China Asia Fong Wendy Sherman United States Tianjin Beijing Xinjiang Hong Kong Congress
Firmly in Control, China's Communist Party Marks Centenary

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Firmly in Control, China's Communist Party Marks Centenary

"It is one hundred years today since the chinese communist party. The ep came into being. It was created as a result of ironically western influences from the likes of marxist intellectuals so what does today's ccp sand for and how does it influence. Play out in modern day china. Well it's tell us more. I'm joined by the ceo of china dialogue isabel hilton and sophia. Yan telegraphs correspondent in beijing to regular voices on monocle. Twenty four welcome back. Good morning tea both. Good morning isabel. If i could begin with you just explain to us how the communist party came about. Well the the first meeting of the communist party the one. We're celebrating although mao. Actually when he was asked couldn't quite remember the date so this date is slightly arbitrary It it was twelve people Twelve chinese delegates one soviet and one common tern representative who met in the french concession in shanghai for a few days until the shanghai till the french secret police took an interest. They then reconvened on a boat on a nearby lake and that technically was the founding meeting the ideas themselves had been swirling around pretty much since the fall of the qing dynasty which was not the ching dynasty that the the last imperial dynasty china Phalle as a result of quite another revolution which which the communists had nothing to do with But the the swirl of ideas. Since i guess about eighteen sixty in china about how china needed to reform amongst the many threads that were that was Was marxism along with ideas about democracy science. All kinds of different discussions were going on in china and this one Emerge with soviet assistance into the communist party.

Chinese Communist Party Isabel Hilton China French Secret Police YAN Shanghai Sophia Isabel Beijing MAO
Macron Escalates 'Sausage Wars' After Saying Northern Ireland Is Not in UK

Coffee House Shots

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Macron Escalates 'Sausage Wars' After Saying Northern Ireland Is Not in UK

"Despite the good weather and the com- see at not always been harmonious g seven summit in corpus bay. A row has erupted between boris. Johnson and french president emmanuel macron who in a heated discussion about sausages and post brexit trading difficulties reportedly said that northern ireland was not part of the same country as the rest of the u. k. The foreign secretary spoke to andrew more about the incident. So far as you're aware we've spoken to prime minister. I'm sure did president. Matra franz describe northern ireland's being not a proper full part of the uk when you forgive me if i don't divulge the The detail of what was discussed behind closed doors. This and actually i would. I can tell you there. Is you figures here in carb's bay but frankly for months now and years have characterized the woman that under somehow separate country and that is wrong. It is a failure to understand the facts. It is a failure to appreciate what speaking around northern ireland in those times and approaching the issue of the northern ireland protocol in those terms does causes damage to businesses from both communities in northern ireland. Creates deep consternation. And we wouldn't talk about catalonia in barcelona in barcelona or corsica and france in those ways. What we want now is a flexible approach which looks at all of the provisions in the northern ireland protocol not just those that protect the eu but those that protect free flow between trade between great britain and ireland. The ball is in the us court. The pm was very clear about it. We're willing to be flexible and matic. They must come back with the reciprocal goodwill to make

Northern Ireland Corpus Bay Emmanuel Macron Matra Franz Boris Johnson Andrew Barcelona UK Catalonia Ireland Corsica France EU Britain United States
Could We See a New Cold War With China

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Could We See a New Cold War With China

"It is perhaps difficult to altogether. Suppress an amount of derisive mirth. When the people's republic of china inveighs against the unfairness of a world subject to the whims of omnipotent higgins president xi jinping earlier made a series of statements to this effect also making some pointed remarks about the united states using its mighty commercial power to advance its political interests as such treachery obviously has never even occurred to beijing. G speech wasn't obvious enough. Challenge to the newish administration of president joe biden but what are biden's options for response joined with more on this by isabel hilton. Ceo of china dialogue is a bill. How reassured should we be at this point. The china does not it turns out which to become any kind of global amman. Heavens did really terrible source. china Which is to mark the end of the us reign as the global head. Jamin but isn't quite ready to step up so if you look at cheese speech what he what he made fairly clear was that because of geography china was an important regional power and that was a bit of a shot across the bows of japan and perhaps the philippines who've been making unfriendly noises and japan and the united states said had already just this week Agreed that they would work to counter some of china's behavior in the region but the idea that china is ready to take on the kind of global leadership in the way. The united states is exercised. It is is a little premature. I think so it. This is an exercise in containment. Cise in trying to discredit us. Leadership and to discredit the sort of values norms of a global order which china repeatedly claims were set up by just a few powers and china wasn't one of them at the time

China Higgins President Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton United States Joe Biden Biden Jamin Beijing Amman Japan Philippines Cise
China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 1 year ago

China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

"Is very far from unheard of for chinese military aircraft to buzzed the skies around the time on yesterday. However the people's liberation army air force stepped such provocations up a notch. Twenty-five chinese jets a record number into taiwan's air defense identification zone. This hefty squadron included eighteen of china's chengdu j ten fighters and four nuclear capable h six k bombers taiwan's air force scrambled their own planes to shoot the intruders off. But it seems reasonable to suppose that they will be back on. Joined with more on this by isabel hilton. Ceo at china dialogue isabelle twenty. Five aircraft is a fairly significant gesture by china. But this kind of stunt in itself isn't unusual is. How often do they do this. Well particularly this year. They'd been doing it a quite lot. They've been doing it. You know several times a week in recent times and its its military chest beating over fairly unpleasant kind I don't think it means that an invasion is imminent but it certainly it. It has a lot of advantages from the chinese perspective. It keeps the population on edge. It forces the china. The taiwanese air force to respond in some way they got so tired of scrambling a late last year that they decided that they would just monitor from the ground but again you know if you step the pressure up again then then scrambling has to happen. So it it. It's a long campaign of attrition and it's also testing the biden administration so there's a lot of probing testing and chest-beating beating happening at the moment.

People's Liberation Army China Taiwan Isabel Hilton Chengdu Air Force Biden Administration
Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

"At the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is recovering now after being attacked by a cheetah cheetah was being walked with the zookeeper came by. After working around giraffes. Staff members say Isabelle was purring when the keeper approached, But when they got closer, Isabel lunged officials believe her animal instincts kicked in after smelling the giraffes. Zookeeper has already been discharged,

Columbus Zoo Isabelle Isabel Zookeeper
Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Animal keeper at Columbus Zoo injured after being attacked by cheetah

"Keeper at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is recovering now after being attacked by a cheetah cheetah was being walked when the zookeeper came by. After working around giraffes. Staff members say Isabelle was purring when the keeper approached, But when they got closer, Isabel lunged officials believe her animal instincts kicked in after smelling the giraffes. Zookeeper has already been

Columbus Zoo Isabelle Isabel
Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

Latina to Latina

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Author Isabel Allende: 'I write about women because I know them so well'

"I write about women because i know them so well. I've been working with women and four women or my lads and surrounded by strong extraordinary women at the people who are really help me in life who have pushed me forward of all. The women don't see men i can mention. Is my grandfather my stepfather. Who became my best friend and my son who is my the pillar of my life but even the husbands have been great to have husbands but But they have not helped me in the in. My journey have been going to a certain extent. You know. I think it is easy to underestimate the primacy of the relationships we have with other women Wants to present women as rivals that we will do anything to get a man even sleep without best friends. Are our sisters motioned or something. That might happen once in a while. And it's a good novel but he real-life women have solidarity. We meant head which i have not been able to do anything in my life without first of all the housekeeper set. Hit me with my children. That i could get out there and have three out there. Because he sanctity women were at home taking care of my children instead of taking care of children that to begin with then my mother in law lived next door when my children were little an adopted grandmother but live with us and then later in my life of course journalists that taught the craft of writing my agent katamon sales who believed in my book. Those other women on today that i have a foundation who inspires my folks women become of the foundation these venerable at risk women who have gone through hell some of them have lost everything including that children and they get back feet and they fight back and they are able not only to hate others with compassion and generosity back to have some kind of joy they can cook insane a dance sometimes so those women's by constant

Former Olympic Coach John Geddert Dies by Suicide Thursday after Charges Announced

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Former Olympic Coach John Geddert Dies by Suicide Thursday after Charges Announced

"Just hours after Michigan's attorney general charged a former U. S. Olympic gymnastics coach with multiple felonies The coach was found dead from a self inflicted gunshot. The charges against John get hurt included sexual assault, abuse of minors and human trafficking get. It was a decorated gymnastics coach noted for taking the 2012 Olympic team known as the Fierce five. To a gold medal. The case against Get it emerged over the course of the investigation and conviction of Larry NASA are the former U. S national team doctor who abused hundreds of girls and women, often at the gym run by getter near Lansing, Michigan. Witnessed. Isabel Hutchins talked about the abuse she suffered during her testimony at NASA's trial. Back in 2018, the dynamic duo that is Larry Nassar and John Getter have lasting effects on me that go beyond physical ones. My gymnastics career ended Then even though I continued for a couple years after leaving twisters, the name of that gym where the abuse happened, police found get her to body at a highway. Rest stop on Thursday afternoon,

Gymnastics Larry Nasa Michigan Isabel Hutchins Larry Nassar John Getter Olympic John Lansing Nasa
Why is Spain's Covid-19 vaccine rollout going so slowly?

BBC World Service

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Why is Spain's Covid-19 vaccine rollout going so slowly?

"Go to Spain, now one of the hardest hit countries in Europe when the first wave of covert 19 struck last year on although the third wave has hit the country later than many of its neighbors, Spain is now starting to feel its force. With nearly 60,000 deaths registered In addition, Spain is also being affected by the controversy surrounding vaccine does deliveries in Europe Guy head coach reports now from Madrid in Madrid's Isabel Sandal hospital healthcare staff for being vaccinated among them is Claudia Lopez in working here in the candle in the hospital, a malady I'm working a sinner's. I'm really very excited because I had my second boxing on. I'm feeling really well at the moment. This is very important for everyone to have the vaccine. Because I think this is the beginning off the off the end off the carpet, health care workers and residents of care homes and their carers have bean those receiving the jab in recent weeks. Problems with vaccine deliveries in the European Union have meant that the administration of doses is being prioritized even more than before. In Madrid. Vaccine shortages mean that only second follow up jabs are currently being administered how the ADM article is a medical director of the hospital here in Madrid, for example. We are not going to be able to meet our plan. That he lay off the vaccination program that report cushion is going to affect going toe be visible on the number of patients are going to get infected. And on the number of bets. This'll hospital was built in only three months in response to the covert crisis. It opened in December, but it's already under strain. The third wave of Corona virus hit Spain Hard after Christmas, his family gatherings over the festive period transferred into soaring infection rates. Rise in cases now appears to be easing off again in public, Danica But Fernando C'mon, the government's head of medical emergencies, has warned that the highly contagious British strain of covert will be the dominant one in Spain within the next few weeks. Controversy in Europe over deliveries of vaccine doses has had relatively little political impact here in Spain, but there has been outraged you to a serious of scandals caused by public figures who have apparently used their position in order to jump the queue and get vaccinated early. Mayors of several small towns are among those implicated on the head of the armed forces, Miguel and Columbia. Roya resigned recently after it emerged he had received the vaccine. These cases have angered ordinary Spaniards. It's another winter, huh? This is how this race it's a social disgrace on a problem we have in Spain. I don't know if this happens in other countries. It is the kind of thing that you hear about in other areas of life. But this time it's more visible. Everybody that I'm saying it's just really tired of the situation. We are old. Too sick of it, and we don't see the end and I think it's yes, it's really upsetting on it said we'll have sitting that's like saying that you have to act really responsible. And then the people that are in charge are not acting responsible at all.

Spain Madrid Isabel Sandal Claudia Lopez Europe Fernando C ADM Boxing European Union Danica Roya Miguel Government Columbia
Inside The National Women's Hockey League's Coronavirus Bubble

All Things Considered

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Inside The National Women's Hockey League's Coronavirus Bubble

"League is off to a rocky start. It just began its two weeks season in a bubble in upstate New York, and today, one team dropped out because of Corona virus infections. For another team. The tournament is a chance to win a championship that was taken away by the pandemic last year. Remember station GBH. Esteban Gusteau's has more from Boston. As the days ticked down towards the Isabel Cup final last March, the Boston Pride seemed poised to add yet another trophy to their collection with the 23 1 record, a championship felt inevitable. The only thing that could stop the hockey team, it turns out was the coronavirus. The in WHL postpone the final a day before the championship game as the sports world began so wise up to the viral threats. Eventually it got canceled altogether. Pride forward and captain Gillian Dempsey remembers the emotional elevator. As everything settled. It was starting to become more frustrating being like, Oh, man, we never We never got that chance. Now, almost a year since the team's last game, the pride or back on the ice over a two week bubble season in Lake Placid, New York. It looks like a penalty coming. Another power play coming for Boston Bubbles have become common as pro leagues navigate Cove in 19, no travel, no fans frequents covert tests and many other restrictions. Pride President Hailey Moore in the rest of the end of Uhl. The challenge of setting up the protective shell has been worthy of its own trophy. You want to be Sure that the safety of our players our staff, our fans are communities are the top priority. And as things evolved, this was really just the natural but to be able to salvage this season. At Lake Placid, the teams out to win hockey games, but players also have to carry on with their lives. Rookie forward Sammy Davis is continuing work on her doctorate degree. While she's in the bubble. Julian Dempsey teaches fifth grade. The time in New York is no vacation for them. Them seats hot remotely last fall and started hybrid classes this month in Lake Placid. She's teaching on zoom from her hotel room during the day and then taking to the ice at nights. It's a grind for two weeks. It's pretty much gonna be a game every day or every other day, and that that's a tremendous amount of hockey. With the game's underway, the pride have a chance to feel something like normal again, if just for two weeks into maybe claim a crown that never found a head to rest on last March for NPR news. I'm Esteban, who steals in Boston.

Esteban Gusteau Boston Pride Gillian Dempsey New York Boston Hailey Moore WHL Hockey Lake Placid Julian Dempsey Sammy Davis Npr News Esteban
China Is Only Major Economy to Report 2020 Growth

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:34 min | 2 years ago

China Is Only Major Economy to Report 2020 Growth

"For reasons requiring no reiteration at has been a lousy year for the global economy one country however is claiming results which are not merely not dreadful but an improvement on last year ironically and arguably even unfairly it is china from whence the covid nineteen pandemic originated. China claims that its economy grew by a solid two point three percent overall in two thousand and twenty early backsliding counteracted by positively robust. Six point five percent in the last quarter and a thriving seven point three percent in manufacturing one joined with more on this isabel hilton. Ceo of china dialogue is about first of all the perennial question where the communist party's economic. Figures are concerned. Harold seriously are we able to take them salt you know. There have been many scandals in china's economic reporting because if you set targets and you make people's careers dependent on meeting them. They will meet them. They will find ways of meeting them in a way. This announcement is is just a larger version of this. What we're actually looking at is not economic growth but gdp growth. And that's not really the same thing shouldn't necessarily confuse. Gdp with economy lots of things make for gdp growth including earthquakes but then not signs of healthy economy to it is worth drilling down a little into what china was hoping to do with its economy and seeing where this has come from

Isabel Hilton China Harold Earthquakes
Bee Gees' Barry Gibb talks going country with ‘Greenfields’

World Cafe

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Bee Gees' Barry Gibb talks going country with ‘Greenfields’

"On paper. Berry give is a superstar. Sorry i should say sir berry give the only surviving member of the bg's he is one of the most successful songwriters of all time. And yes he has also been knighted but in person berry give is exceedingly humble. He's kind and as you'll hear today deeply interested in and excited by making music. Some back story quickly berry was born on the isle of man and moved with his family to australia when he was a boy. That family included his three younger brothers. His bg's bandmates robert morris as well as his youngest andy their journey has been explored in a new. Hbo documentary called the bg's. How can you mend a broken heart. And now barry has released a new album that brings some of the songs he and his brothers wrote together. In a whole new way on greenfields the give brother songbook volume one. Barry performed songs along with folks. Like dolly parton jason. Isabel and brandi carlile today. Very good and the producer of greenfield's dave cobb. Join me to talk about how this album came together. Dave is in nashville and berry joins us from where he now lives in miami to get things rolling. Here's a song that was first released on the bg's nineteen seventy five album. Main course on this new album barry. Performs with miranda lambert and j buchanan this is jive talkin s live discount so misunderstood john. Young you just heard. Jive talkin barry gibbs singing with j buchanan verana lambert a song originally on the nineteen seventy five album main course that version is from berry's new album greenfield's the game brothers. Songbook one today. I am joined by berry. Give and the producer of greenfield's dave cobb and just so everybody knows whose voice is whose though i don't think it'll be that tricky. I'd like to welcome you individually so berry. Welcome to the world cafe. Thank you thank you dave. Welcome to the world cafe. Thank y'all have to be here. It's great to have you both on now on the surface the two of you might seem like an unlikely pairing so get into how this all came together berry. I understand that your son steven had something to do with you. Getting tuned into the dave cobb universe through the music of artists. He's worked with like chris stapleton and jason isabel and. Brandi carlile it. Could you tell us how that happened. Yeah well i mean just outside this room. Stephen came out a darby her. This and on his iphone it was chris stapleton and just blew me away so i thought wow. That's that's for me. You know as right up my street. And and if i'm gonna make anymore record that's the guy i want to work with and i said who is this guy called dave cobb and he's the probably the biggest producer. Ah in the world right now. i should okay. Sounds good to me. Let's find out he's interested in dave. What was it like getting that call. Like what was your reaction when you heard from berry and his people. I'm a massive. Bg's fan and their early records You know top ten albums for me and specifically to be i and it's something that i obsessed on for many many years. I mean that. I record particularly it has got to love somebody on it and holiday and turn of the century and these songs that to me. I love records at sound like. They're you can't imagine humans getting together and making them. They sound like they're made in remarks or something that was one of those records seminole records getting that call and getting to do. Some of these early songs was just more than i ever wish or dream of mine. Well it was an incredible experience. And i thank you for it and i sincerely hope we get to do it again. I promise not to be show nervous. Very i also read. That stephen can convince you that people would want to work with you which blows my mind because you know you're one of the most successful songwriters of all time. Why would you think that you're very kind but nashville is a different world. It's a different world and if you if you're not accepted in nashville then you not accept it. That's all there is to. Nobody explains it. You're just you know. And and at one occasion. I was in nashville and i met ricky skaggs and got a chance to make a do a track with him and it was called soldier. Son and and I was. I just thought you know. This is where i whether other people think showing this year along

Dave Cobb Berry J Buchanan Sir Berry Chris Stapleton Brandi Carlile Berry Joins Greenfield Barry Gibbs Verana Lambert Barry Robert Morris Jason Isabel Dolly Parton Miranda Lambert Nashville HBO Isabel Andy