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Hong Kong marks handover anniversary under shadow of security law

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:58 min | Last week

Hong Kong marks handover anniversary under shadow of security law

"Could Beijing finally getting it away and silencing Hong Kong's democracy protests once and for all the Chinese President Xi Jinping has signed off strict security laws, which critics say will place the likes of the right of free speech and an independent judiciary at risk. The law has already had an effect one of the leading voices in the pro democracy. Movement Joshua Wong said he's left. One protest group what I'm joined by Monocle Asia editor and Hong Kong Bureau Chief James Chambers by Isabel Hilton. The editor of China Dialogue Welcome both backed Monaco for twenty four at James, let's begin with you. You are in Hong. Kong whether has been A marking of the twenty three years since British rule ended. What's the atmosphere like today? Yes, what was meant to be called establishment day a day of celebration for Hong Kong returned back to mainland, but for a lot of people here it's a solemn day to protest against. Beijing and usually there's a big march that takes place around three PM Hong Kong time in about an hour and leave from Victoria in Causeway Bay and on March to the government headquarters that hasn't been given permission to go ahead to see the police because of the COVID, nineteen restrictions but there are people starting to gather in Causeway Bay. and the police have already made their first arrest under this new national security bill. On the question, we're all asking waiting to see how this bill would be enforced. And I guess the the worrying onset is. Enforced very harshly. The first arrest was a guy who's who had a flag that just said Hong Kong independence on it. So there's no doubt that the police are going to use their full powers under under this bill to dampen down any goals. For Hong Kong independence, and it's going to have a massive impact on the ability of of activists and pro democracy protests in Hong Kong. To to to operate as they have done. For the last twenty three years. Where unlikely to see a big march this year like we did in years before because the police on hand, the right police are on the ground and are very quick to to arrest people. Isabel. It's not long since we were all given the details of what's in this bill. Could you just summarize it for us? Please well indeed. I think almost nobody outside the National People's. Congress was given the details until after the bill was rushed through a rigorous fifteen minute session. it criminalizes any act of secessions, version, terrorism, or collusion with foreign are external forces. The problem with all of those is who decides Schwarzenegger as secessions, version, terrorism, glues, and and exchange, said the question of how the law will be enacted. Is ABS will be? We'll be applied is absolutely critical including which judges. How will the? How will the legal authorities in Hong Kong React Carrie, Lam has the opportunity to appoint judges that she chooses. And the bill, also the acts now also contains a rather sinister provision. Which says that in got his described as complicated cases at Beijing can simply takeover the prosecution of the law now again. All of this is is. Subject to subjective judgment from Beijing, Beijing designs what collusion with Foreign or external forces Beijing decides. What subversion is and Beijing, can prosecute cases? There is no guarantee that they will be held in. Public is provision for them not to be and. Given the state of of the rule of law in China. I think this is really really serious concern. It's also we should remember the. Legal State in Hong. Kong has been robust and widely respected and indeed lawyers have frequently taken to the streets to defend their. That profession and the application of the law in Hong Kong in very large demonstrations when they felt that Beijing. was encroaching on it, and so the capacity to appoint different judges to these cases is signed that I didn't think Beijing trusts Hong Kong's lawyers who are after school didn't principles of rule of law and equality before the law and all those good things. To do it's will.

Hong Kong Beijing Hong Kong Bureau Isabel Hilton Editor James Chambers Xi Jinping Causeway Bay Joshua Wong Monocle Asia National People President Trump Schwarzenegger Covid Congress China Carrie Victoria Beijing.
"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:44 min | 3 weeks ago

"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"It turned out that he could not practice surgery in his own hometown of Monroe Louisiana, and so he set out on a course to to journey out to California where he hoped he'd be able to live out the life that he dreamt for himself He had a family by that time, and he but he as often as a case in migrations, the men will sometimes set out on their own and sort of scout out situation and he did that. But it was a very long. It was a very long drive as anyone would know but he ran into. heartbreaking. Heart heartbreaking rejection on the road out to California that made him question whether he was doing the right thing and question his place in the country. Overall, he couldn't stay places that over and over again he would. He was turned away from hotels, and he was turned away from hotels, time and time again and this was out. What decade with this? This was the nineteen fifties this one thousand nine hundred. And he like many, I mean like law. There's a there is a A an artifact that's getting a lot of attention now. A book which is referred to in the book and that was in some ways. A guidebook was sort of a triple a guidebook mapquest. All of this combined into one. And It was something that was necessary for African Americans as they were making their way through the country traveling without being able to. Find places to sleep no guarantee of being able to get gas for your car, no guarantees of wear, or if he be able to eat, and so these were all of the the hazards that they faced and this this green book was created in Nineteen. Thirty six by this postal worker in New York Victor Green. Who Beautifully as he printed, his first copy said that he looked forward to the day when it wouldn't be necessary. So in our you have. I think just. The notion of refugees and migrants people you've said that the the language of political silent, and is absolutely apt here for. For what people were undertaking? And it's just not. As, much as we know a lot of these stories and a lot of the things that were wrong. That feels like a new recognition. It does I think that because it happened within the borders of our own country, we don't think about it as first of all. It was kind of immigration although these were the, this is the only group of Americans who had to act like immigrants in order to be recognized as citizens. they were forced to to seek political asylum within the borders of their own country because they're there. They were living in a caste system in the south, did not recognize their citizenship and some of them travel farther than than current day. Immigrants Might, but that was really not the point. The point was that the country actually was kind of two countries in one, and that's what they had to do and I often say that the that this book that they've you know. The book is viewed as being a book about the great migration and overtime. As you know as I've talked about it over the years I've come to realize that it's not about migration. The great migration is not. Not about migration and really probably know, migration is about migration. It's about freedom, and how far people are willing to go to achieve it. This is the means that they feel. They must take in order to find freedom wherever they can find it, and and for that reason I think that the focus on migration where where whether it's. We're speaking about the great migration of this era that I'm speaking of our current day. I think that we. Often misjudges. Do not understand what's happening because we're not recognizing really what they're wanting their motivations and also seeing ourselves in them. Yeah and. You know again. I mean you've pointed out. Things like. Driving past a white person or the there were black bibles and white bibles and. That it was illegal to play checkers with a white person and then on the other. End of the spectrum, the one thousand nine hundred gubernatorial candidate Mississippi, who declared if it is necessary, every Negro and the Negro on the state will be lynched. So this is these are the conditions under which people were living, but in the book and I think there's something. This book is such A. It embodies this paradox. That people that that writers know that storytellers know that radio actually knows that the more particular. You can get with your particular your story. The more universally, it can be received in the. That that others can join their life and their imagination with what you have to share. And so some of the moments. There were these moments for me in the book. that. We're just so human, right? There were so relatable that made all of these other horrors. Come home, right, and so one of them for me was. Always name's. Robert Joseph pershing foster because he. Changed the! Name he was using right so but Dr Foster. Who went onto become this brilliant doctor. So when he's a child. fire breaks out in the basement of his school. And the city just said that they weren't gonNA. Replace desks and the teaching supplies, and this is a kid with a beautiful mind. Who wants to learn and? At the time, a local woman says well know we shouldn't do that. Because if those negroes become doctors and merchants or by their own farms. What shall we do for servants? That that this intelligent boy is growing up with that and another just another moment with George Swanson Sterling was. You asked him. what he hoped for in leaving and he said. I was hoping I would be able to live as a man and express myself in a manly way getting chills without the fear of getting lynched.

California Monroe Louisiana Victor Green George Swanson Sterling Mississippi Robert Joseph pershing New York Dr Foster
"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Journalist. Isabel Wilkerson the author of the warmth of other suns. I WanNa read actually the last paragraph of the book. And! and. Just destroy flecked with you a little bit on that. Over the decades, perhaps they're wrong. Questions have been asked about the great migration. Perhaps it is not a question of whether the migrants brought good or will so the city's they fled to or were pushed or pulled to their destinations, but a question of how they summoned the courage to leave in the first place, or how they found the will to press beyond the forces against them and the faith in a country that had rejected them for so long. By their actions, they did not dream the American dream they will it into being by it definition of their own choosing. They did not ask to be accepted, but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few others recognized, but they had always been deep within their hearts. So you trace these stories of these individuals. These, particular stories of this universal drama. And you really as you said. What did you say you channel these people in her brain? And, heart and heart, and so, what did you learn? What do you carry around with you about what it means to be human through these lives that you carry with you now? Well I I, really have came to believe into no I that we all have so much more in common than we've been led to believe and that we've been sadly tragically assigned roles as if we're in a play, and this is. This is what these people do this. What these people do what these people do! And the tragedy. Is that regardless of which assignment you had been put into? That might not have in your strength at all and I just have gained in such. This has been out for six years I spent fifteen years on it. researching and writing it I have never grown weary of talking about it every time I talk about it I gave new appreciation and gratitude and amazement at what they were able to do. One of the things that I hope to do was to bring the invisible people into the light. Light they never were being written about. We just skip from in a civil war to civil rights in this entire part of our country's history and their lives, generations actually of people skipped over, and not recognized and I felt that it deserved its own place and recognition. I believed that you know the sort of bringing invisible people into the light would help all. All of us to understand and see ourselves better, because we've been so affected by what they did, and what these people did, I mean by sheer force of will, they were able to make the emancipation proclamation live up to its name in their individual lives to the degree that they could and means that they were able to do what you know. What the? The, you know what a President Abraham. Lincoln was not fully able to do, and they were able to do what the powers of north and south were not really fully able to do and they it was about their agency, and they're making a decision for themselves and declaring themselves to be citizens which they had always been, but it never been really truly recognized. And I wanted tell you that we I was talking about these people from other different backgrounds who feel such a connection to them, but to the people I women who's she said? I may reminded her was exactly like her Norwegian grandmother. I mean so. But one of the very unusual things that that has happened. That seems appropriate for the conversation that we're having is that. So many children or grandchildren children primarily of the great migration have come up to me and told me with the sense of healing and completion that this book was the last book that their parent read before. They're they died. And you would think that it would be incredibly tragic and sad, but it's the exact opposite. The children were grateful that their parents had had the chance to read this before it was too late. Remember these are people who didn't talk about their experiences that it's also it's not i. mean these three here. You show how people continue to create lives full lives. Even with these circumstances and through these circumstances. And he don't out a react when someone says. This is the last book that you know. My mother or father read before they died But they said was such joy and gratitude, and they say that it allowed them to come to terms with all that they had endured, and to and to give their suffering some meaning, and to recognize that they had not been alone, but that they had been part of something bigger, some connection to you know immigrants around the world other people who'd come up from the south as they had, and and and others who had. been able to. Express their freedom and their individuality, and the and the way they had chosen the that it was a peaceful and their view, fulfilling and healing way to have left this planet. There's something new said Oh. You talked about how. Part of what drives you as an aspiration to find strength in the discovery of what is true. and. I think what you're describing is. How ever hard the truth is! It does complete us. It isn't a necessary path to. Not the first to say, but it seems to set some people free. That's great lasted. About workers and thank you so much and what did.

Isabel Wilkerson President Lincoln
"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Once again, an overwhelming introduction and a beautiful beginning beautiful with those readings. As. Important as the fact that we've both won the national humanities medal today that we both loved Star Trek the next generation. And I think possibly. The Nobel Committee should consider. A posthumous award for gene roddenberry since they're expanding the definition of literature. Just lost my pen. I'm so happy to be back here tonight. And this is an extraordinary event. And I kind of got lost in this book once again this afternoon. The warmth of other suns. Which Isabel Wilkerson published in two thousand and ten. This is. It's an epic act of reporting and writing. Thank you so much. Over fifteen years. Yielding a majestic work of narrative nonfiction. It's the story of. The migration of nearly six million people from the south of the United States to the north, one of the biggest under reported stories of the Twentieth Century told through the Lens of three lives. But this is history that touched on every American in some way. And that is also route, and that is also revealed in these pages. But as large as this exodus was, and that Biblical word is APT. There was no Grapes of Wrath written to commemorate it, and that's really what what Isabel Wilkerson has done for all of us now in the twenty first century. It is a book about the human spirit. It is a book about truths. We forgot or didn't pass on. But that speak to and shine a light on the human and social crises that are newly visible at the heart of our life together in this country. It is also a book about the Eternal Human Drama of migration that continues in our time here and around the world. And you. Yourself are a child of this great migration. and I wonder if you could just talk a little bit about that, and also you know I always asked this question about the religious or spiritual background of someone's childhood and I think that as I've As my cumulative conversation has progress, I have a much more expansive imagination about what that is. The spiritual background of one's childhood. So I just wonder. If the fact that your child, if this migration flowed into what you now might imagine as the spiritual background of your childhood I do think that they're intertwined I. Mean I'm I'm a daughter of two people who uprooted themselves from the old country of the south. From different states and relocated and remade themselves in the new world, which was Washington DC for them. And In doing so that meant that. They were kind of leaving behind parts of themselves in order to take on this new persona I mean that's what my parents often do. They take on the identity of the new place that they hope will work out for them. No guarantees a leap of faith into the unknown. when it comes to the family background, it so happens that my mother's father was a Baptist Minister Oh. And my father was in Georgia and my father's. My father grew up in Virginia also in a Baptist Church. But his church was so formal and. Controlled and traditional that even the Episcopalians thought they should loosen up a little bit. And while they didn't, they didn't carry on. All of those formal rituals When they got to the north, they did pass on the traditions in the traditions of of You know going forth and forging ahead, no matter what. Of Dignity and grace and family, of striving always and also overcoming, you know always overcoming setbacks and rising up. in in spite of all that it also happens at my father was a pilot. He was at Tuskegee. Really And he actually was, he actually taught. Tuskegee airmen. He wasn't airman and he also taught. Did, flight training for them. And I think there's something about being the daughter of a pilot that makes you feel that you know metaphorically you could fly to. I like that. So. Let's just establish just quickly like the facts, the contours of this of this story. At the start of the Twentieth Century Ninety Percent Black Americans were living in the south. By the end of the great migration, which is. From Nineteen fifteen to nineteen seventy. Forty seven percent. We're living outside the south. Is it is this nearly six million people. How is that heart? It's probably hard to count. It is I mean the the general generally accepted number is about six million. That's an underestimate because a lot of people would not have been captured in the census to begin with right, people would have come up and then found that it didn't work for them or found that it was too difficult to make the adjustment and then returned. Yeah, and so there are there are estimates of you know as much as eight or nine million six million is what we can affirm. And this sentence from your book. By the time the great migration was over few Americans had not been touched by it. It's hard to imagine what our country will look like. If there hadn't been a great migration there, depending upon which aspect of our society WanNa think about certainly in popular meaning music music was reshaped by the great migration. MOTOWN exist as a result of it very gordy. His parents were from Georgia. He migrated to Detroit where once he got to be a grown man, he wanted to go into music and He decided that he didn't have the wherewithal. Go all over the country. They didn't have to because they're. They were in Detroit. All of these young people who had come up. With their parents have been born in the north, and they grew up hearing the music that hit sustain the ancestors, the despair tolls, and the Gospel Music and the Blues Music and they decided they wanted to do something different and he. Hit Daddy..

Isabel Wilkerson Georgia Detroit gene roddenberry Tuskegee airmen Nobel Committee Twentieth Century United States MOTOWN Baptist Church Tuskegee Washington DC Virginia gordy WanNa
"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"You so much Fred. Luke, David Alicia and Lauren. In God leaves moving novel the Beautiful Possible. Congregational Rabbi Saul carom explains to his wife, Rosalie one of the reasons. He reveres Leonard Bernstein. He explains to Rosalie. How a single large gesture! The sweep of Bernstein's hands at the perfect moment, his own arms that's solves. Arms raised to offer a blessing at the end of services. Can blaze a hole through the sky and change the direction of a life. With their work, Isabel Wilkerson and KRISTA. Tippett have blazed many holes and change the directions of many lives or changed the way many of us understand the lives of others with whom we share this American this human experience. Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel, Wilkerson is the author of the warmth of other Suns The New York Times Bestseller and winner of the Twenty Ten national book critics Circle Award for nonfiction. Brings to life one of the epic stories of the Twentieth Century through three unforgettable protagonists who made the decision of their lives during what came to be known as the great migration. The book made news around the world when President Obama chose warmth for summer, reading on Martha's Vineyard Twenty Eleven. And two thousand twelve. The New York Times magazine named warms to its list of all time. Best books of nonfiction. An early twenty thirteen the New York Times Book Review declared that warmth was published only two years ago, but it shows every indication of becoming a classic. Wilkerson won the Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau chief for The New York Times in Nineteen, ninety, four, making her the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win a Pulitzer, prize and the first African. American to win for individual reporting. The, judges of the Lynton History Prize conferred by Harvard. And Columbia universities which Wilkerson one for warmth described the work like this. Wilkerson has created a brilliant and innovative paradox, the intimate epic. At its smallest scale, this towering work rests on a trio of unforgettable biographies, lives as humble as they were heroic in different decades, and for different reasons they headed north and west along with millions of fellow travelers in powerful lyrical prose that combines the historians rigor with the novelists empathy, and I'd have to add with the poets Lyricism, Wilkerson book changes, our, understanding the great migration, and indeed of the modern united, states. And just a few weeks ago. Isabel Wilkerson was honored once again when she received the two thousand fifteen national humanities medal awarded by President Obama. KRISTA Tippett was also awarded to honored to receive the national humanities medal awarded by President Obama in two thousand thirteen. Much beloved for her inquisitive illuminating interviews with theologians, philosophers, physicists, writers, dancers, activists, environmentalists, spiritual leaders, and a wide variety of serious gifted men and women, whose work has a powerful impact on the World Krista Tippett is the author of three books speaking of Faith Einsteins God and our most recently published book, becoming wise an inquiry into the mystery, an art of living. Following this evening's conversation with Krista Tippett in Isabel Wilkerson books will be available. Thanks to Mala, props bookstore and cafe for purchase and signing the book table is in Carmichael. Hall right across the way from Humanities Lecture Hall and I should also note that almost all of the writers from the festival are still here, and they will also be happy to sign books, and they'd be very happy to sell a few books as well. As I said last night. This evening's conversation is being recorded for possible broadcast as a future episode of Krista Tippett Award Winning Program on being which we can listen to at seven am on Sunday morning. If we have the strength to get up, and if we don't have.

Isabel Wilkerson KRISTA Tippett Pulitzer Prize President Obama Leonard Bernstein New York Times Book Review national book critics Circle A Rabbi Saul carom Humanities Lecture Hall Rosalie Vineyard Twenty Eleven Fred Lynton History Prize The New York Times magazine Luke Carmichael Isabel Hall Lauren David Alicia
"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"isabel" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'd like welcome. Now. Chancellor Mary Grant to offer us a welcome, and she'll immediately followed by Fred with a few words of welcome from wake forest. Thank you rick and welcome everyone to UNC Ashville for this wonderful evening of conversation and enrichment I'm delighted to be able to open up our space here to do these things, and I'm even more so delighted to have such a great colleague like Rick. Chess held around of applause for quick. One of the wonderful things that I get to do in my role of of being chancellor of this university is work with tremendous faculty and staff on this campus. And so when I came to UNC Ashville about a year after being here, we did my official swearing in. It takes a while. They WANNA make sure it's GonNa work and so I asked Rick To. Say A few words on my behalf. And he one of the things that was common was to give a benediction or something like that, and he wrote an absolutely lovely piece that was entitled Not Benediction and and it was just beautiful, because it worked off of the words of the motto of our school, which is part of it synthesizing quite a bit. We look towards the mountain, and he just wrote this absolutely exquisite piece. Which I think describes what we do every day here. At a Liberal Arts University, we help our students to think deeply while looking up to the mountains. At the same time, it's a very special place and to have all of you here over the last few days has been a treat. It's been a delight. It's been an honor and a privilege. This is when we do our very best work and public higher education in Liberal Arts when we bring people together to think to engage to take that pause to reflect, and so it is indeed very special that we do this as a community. Community and we open this up to our neighbors to our friends to our community members in do it in partnership with our good friends, at WC, so it is just a great privilege to have all of you here and to spend this evening with wonderful office. We're going to do five flash readings. I'm very excited to see what that is about. When I walked in here this evening, I will admit I had a little bit of a panic because Rick said Mary just changed the program up a little bit. We're going to begin with music. That's when I panicked so. Alicia, I'm so glad it was you and not me because it turn. It turned out beautifully. But to be in this room this evening with such talented writers authors, Thinkers Im am just I can't wait to hear and be enriched nourished by that and to be in this room with both Krista. Tippett and Isabel Wilkerson to national humanity humanity medalists I think that is just really amazing and. I will have to do a little fan fan gushing here, Krista. Began every Sunday with you and because we are in this listening area with WC. Every Sunday morning at seven am I start my day with a cup of coffee and listening to Krista Tippett and I think it's because in your own words. You have talked about the power of Radio of having these intimate conversations in a way that makes it accessible, so thank you for doing that and for enriching all of our lives and for being. Being here in Isabel. It is just such a thrill in an honor to have you with us this evening, so thank you for being here. At UNC Ashville. Thank you for this special weekend a tremendous. Thank you to our partners at Wake Forest University into Rick Chess and Gurney. It is a pleasure and an honor, and I welcome you to.

Rick Krista Tippett Ashville Chancellor Mary Grant UNC Ashville Rick To wake forest Rick Chess Wake Forest University Liberal Arts University chancellor Chess Liberal Arts Isabel Isabel Wilkerson Fred Alicia official
The Sober Lush

Recovery Happy Hour

05:32 min | Last month

The Sober Lush

"Hi Everyone. Welcome to recovery our where we talk about life beyond the bottle and what happens after we stopped drinking. I'm your host, Tricia, and the only thing I regret about not drinking is the time I wasted figuring out if I wanted to stop. Thank you for joining me. Today's introduction ties right into our interview. We've got the two authors of the brand new book. The sober lush out today, and we're talking about creating and celebrating a big and beautiful sober life, and this has been the mission of the podcast since day one almost two years ago, talking about life beyond the bottle. What happens after you stop drinking? You know I don't like the. The discussion to camp out in our old lives when we were drinking. Because the thing that made you miserable can't be your focus for the rest of your life. Don't get me wrong. Those stories. They have a place. You know they do serve a purpose, and that's why do make sure that each guest each week tells their story and keeps in under five or ten minutes. But after. After you've quit drinking after you've unlearn that habit. After. You've created a life where not having alcohol around becomes normal. There's gotta be something more. We don't want to become martyrs who are wallowing in our lives of deprivation. Alcohol alcohol-free life full of pleasure and joy full of indulgences and things that wake up our senses full of adventure and freedom. And let me be very clear. This doesn't happen overnight. So for those of you. Who Email me asking? Hey, when does the good part start? I don't have a clear cut answer for you, but the closest thing I can say is not immediately and be patient, but learning your way through sobriety, and getting to that point eventually I hope you'll find a way to get to know yourself and learn what you like and what you don't like. Often you'll learn that. You don't like some things that you used to like when you were drinking. Amanda Talks about this exact phenomenon in the interview. Often you'll find that there's a part of yourself. That was numbed by alcohol. And maybe you'll learn that. Your personality is a little different than you originally labeled it as. An in the moments where you're bored and wondering okay, what do I do with my time? Now I hope you'll start to search for the simple pleasures that feel decadent, because they are easily accessible in sobriety things that were impossible to appreciate when you were drunk or hung over. I spent all day Saturday this weekend out in the country about an hour and a half outside of the city man Brandon I got up early and drove out there to a monthly swap meet, and then visited with some old family friends of his. We spent about five hours out in the hot sun, walking through booths of new furniture vintage junk in just about everything in between. We shared giant cups full of cold, fresh squeezed lemonade and lime made I dip in dots for the first time since nineteen ninety-two. We purchased dollar. Fly swatters and fancy paper straws in containers of flavored popcorn. When it got hot, we found pockets of shade and people watched. Later on we went to his friend's home. That's on a ton of acreage and drove his truck all around the property to see his buffalo donkeys, and try to in spot, the family of Fox's that are living underneath one of the buildings. I watched a turtle duck in the water. As we drove by the pond, we studied vines climbing up the giant ancient pecan trees, and we laughed as the dog tried so hard to her. The buffalo who were not having it. Later on we went to a winery to see more of the family and a glass of cold ice water, and she snacks from the car were all I. wanted while everyone else was drinking wine. And I stopped and I actually asked myself at one point. What is my body? Really want right now. And it was cold water all the way, and for a fleeting moment I remember that if I had been there when I was drinking I, would've wanted water, but I would have ordered wine instead because I had to. I would have compromised what I really wanted with what I thought. I needed because I didn't rule my own life alcohol did. Later on when we drove home, we listened to the new Jason Isabel Album Sing along and I cried a little bit, which is pretty typical and listening to his music, because crying feels good sometimes and I can feel my feelings now, clearly enough to know which ones need grief to be processed. And when we pulled into town back at home, we ate at

Tricia Brandon Jason Isabel Amanda Talks FOX
Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:12 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

"The US President Donald Trump has said. He believes join us. Handling of corona virus proves it wants to make him lose his reelection bid in. November trump has been blaming China for the global pandemic since. The outbreak began to unpack all this. I'm joined by Isabel. Hilton the editor of China. Dialogue unto Bike Load Harrington who senior lecturer in American politics to Demonstrate University. Welcome both back to monocle. Twenty four glow. If I may start with you what is it? Trump is doing is trying to find someone to blame for his poor polling numbers and also for the difficult economic situation the. Us is facing. Now yes I think that would be a lot to do with it. M A as as I've been watching all of this unfold. I DID WONDER EM. You know how he would try to frame the blame. I suppose you could say because obviously the the party would be to deflect any blame away from himself and I I did think they were a number of options you know he could have gone for perhaps blaming the previous administration. That's always convenient 'em but that's a bit too historic. No so no and he could have blamed the the Democrats example or any of the Democrats would again that sort of puts attention onto opponents which you might not want to do and so the the the kind most substantial source of flame I suppose in perhaps the most obvious from his perspective would be to blame the Chinese and obviously U. S. China relationship was already A complex and and strange shall we say and but it's obviously gone to new heights. No but trump is you know looking towards Novembre realizing that you know this now is going to be the defining issue of his presidency or via four year. Or perhaps more and I'm he needs to start fighting back so he has now. I guess I have to ask this question from you. Do you think there is any credibility whatsoever to Donald? Trump's latest claim that he seen evidence corona virus actually originated in Chinese laboratory. Well all I can say is you know. I really moments of of of dangerous stress for for for the world like this. We can only listen to experts and scientists and you know people who who sort of this kind of thing for a living so I would be slow to take the president's words on board based on that and now code ninety nine deeds initially give Donald trump and approval bump but things have changed quite a lot sooner seventeen they have and you know. I suppose a very convenient response to that might be. You can say well I don't believe the polls which is a you know something that he came out with the other day now. Obviously you know. He's had his sorts of 'EM AUNTIE EM mainstream media platform since day one and his supporters at really embraced that I think it's part of his appeal that you know he's He's other he is outside that Sort of Knowing the news bubble if he kind of makes his own news and so so choosing to not believe the polls is very convenient. I do have to say though. I mean when you look at his daily pulled raising generally speaking. They're pretty consistent you know. He's in the low forty s all the time. This current crisis hasn't really moved out in in any meaningful way and I think you know He. He lost a little bit of support way back early on in his presidency near the start but ever since then his supporters have remained. I would say unconditionally loyal and I think things would have to change quite a lot between now and November. And maybe they will you know economically if nothing else am before his his his loyal and support base will step away from him and then obviously his opponents sort of has his own em issues and shortcomings so trump would probably be very very keen to get back on the campaign trail as soon as possible. Because that's where he really shines those rallies are wearing these people come in you know when they have a very sort of a A positive connection I suppose he's being deprived the moment

Donald Trump United States China President Trump Isabel Demonstrate University Harrington Editor Senior Lecturer
A 2020 Olympics Delay Seems Inevitable. Is a 4-Week Decision Needed to Get There?

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

A 2020 Olympics Delay Seems Inevitable. Is a 4-Week Decision Needed to Get There?

"The ticket Olympics all headed towards the first postponement since the modern games began in the nineteenth tree attention is now turning to how long the delay can be expected as a work seeks to rein in the effects of the corona virus pandemic in Bucks Isabel Reynolds has small Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abbe is seeking to speak to IOC chief Thomas Bach today after noticing a delay might be inevitable I think the trumpet was IOC member Dick pound he told USA today that the decision to push back the July August event has already been made the official announcement is expected within the next

Isabel Reynolds Shinzo Abbe Thomas Bach Dick Pound USA IOC Official
"isabel" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:22 min | 4 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Special thank you to Isabel barrow my colleague here at element financial engines who substituted for me on the air here these past couple of weeks while I was in Australia everything was fine when I left a month ago I came back to this mayhem somebody better clean this up I cannot believe how much the world has changed in the past thirty days I'm sure you feel the very same way well we know what the impact is already from a personal finance perspective and we have seen major measures being announced by the federal reserve by the White House and by Congress we're seeing announcements by the IRS that we're not going to have to pay taxes by April fifteenth up to a million dollars per taxpayer the White House is going to be releasing more than a trillion dollars in economic support but here's the thing all of the stimulus is designed to improve the economy to help the economy avoid getting worse there's a huge difference between economic recovery and stock market recovery and this difference makes all the difference because the economy is not right now in a recession that's to come why then if the economy is not in a recession is the stock market plummeting like this it's because the stock market acts in advance of the economy the stock market looks out into the future several months ahead so if the stock market feels that corporations are going to suffer financially they cut the stock prices right now and that's what we see happening the first quarter really wasn't a problem for corporate America because Kobe didn't really happen until the last part of the first quarter so when they announced their quarterly results at the end of this month it's not gonna be that big a deal but when they're asked how will the second quarter B. that's when they're going to lower the boom and the stock market anticipating that is causing stock prices to go down right now knowing that corporate profits are going to evaporate over the next several months so the recession hasn't yet started but the stock market decline has begun so the stock market moves in advance of the economy therefore when the economy is still in a recession the stock market seeing the end of the recession coming we'll begin to raise stock prices the stock market goes into a demise first and comes out of it first as well and that's why we need to recognize there's a big difference between the economy and the stock market and there is therefore a big difference between economic recovery which is what the White House and Congress and the federal focused on and stock market recovery this reinforces why diversification is so important if you have a sixty forty portfolio sixty percent your money in stocks forty percent in bonds then you're not down twenty eight percent you're only down fifteen no notice I say only as if only down fifteen percent in a month is exciting but it all demonstrates the importance of diversification it's also important to recognize the folly of trying to maneuver your portfolio on a daily basis back on March second the stock market the Dow Jones industrial average jumped thirteen hundred points the next day fell eight hundred the day after that was up eleven hundred the day after that down a thousand this is crazy and it's been going on all last week as well on March ninth down two thousand the next date of eleven hundred and then down fifteen hundred and then down twenty three hundred and then up two thousand and then down three thousand and then up one thousand this is ridiculous this demonstrates when you see massive volatility of the sort with the stock market rises thousands of points and then falls thousands of points one day after the next and does this every other day in a row it demonstrates that nobody knows what's going on nobody knows what direction this is taking and some investors are desperately trying to capture the short term opportunities that they perceived in the market place they're trying to catch the wave unfortunately when people try to catch a wave they often get wiped out so is it any surprise second Sumer confidence is down in the United States since the beginning of the year consumer confidence is down eight percent it's down twelve percent in Japan six percent in Germany ten percent in the United Kingdom and five percent in France everybody everywhere is less confident in the economy than we were at the beginning of the year and it is incredibly obvious why I know by the way if you weren't shaken enough by all of this along comes the American property casualty insurance association they've just released a report saying that.

Isabel barrow
China expels American journalists from publications

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:02 min | 4 months ago

China expels American journalists from publications

"But I in a move which may have grim repercussions for the global health. Emergency China has expelled a number of American journalists from three major publications. This is the combination of the media. Row which has been brewing for some time. Isabel Hilton Editor China. Dialogue brings us up to speed. On the circumstances leading up to the current action is about. How did this begin a world? Good morning while the background is that under Xi Jinping in life has gotten steadily more difficult. It's an authoritarian regime and and indeed the Foreign Correspondents Club in Beijing Issue Report on on conditions in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred which which detailed how how very difficult to work but this particular row actually is triggered by a headline in the Wall Street Journal in February when an opinion column was published under the headline China the sick man of Asia which could use an absolute if furious response in Beijing and Beijing them promptly expelled three journalists from the Wall Street Journal Beijing Bureau. Those sweet journalist had nothing to do with the opinion piece or the headline. But it was signed. If you like of Beijing's fury and Beijing's desire not to be blamed for this global crisis. What then happened was that the United States responded and that's an unusual thing to a previous administrations have dealt with this kind of situation by taking the moral high ground if you like and saying well. United States believes in press freedom and we deplore China's actions of but the moral high ground isn't really familiar territory to the trump administration. And so they've gone for more reciprocal approach and restricted the numbers of journalists who could be employed in the United States by four state-owned media. So that would use the numbers from about one hundred fifty to around a hundred They will have to leave in the next few days and this final news of of closing down essentially the bureau of the US major newspapers expelling thirty journalists at once that is the latest move reciprocal moves by China. So here. We are now going dark in each in each other's countries. I'm sorry to use this word. That's so overused at the moment but this is an unprecedented move by China. It's a very serious move. It is a very serious move and I think that it's also a sign Really that China both feels confident enough that it is that he'd has the global story under control. I mean if you look at the other thing that's been going on in the last in last week to ten days. China has been making absolutely furious efforts to present itself to the world as the savior so sending medical teams to Italy and Spain. Coming across as the benign actor rather than the origin of over global pandemic where is of course in the United States trump calling this the China vice virus has has has inflamed the situation further China? I think in the past and under a previous party administration would have just written out the American The American engines because obviously there are bigger things at stake. Here this is. This is the next thing down from breaking off diplomatic relations. You know the United States even under the trump administration which routinely insults the press but the United States has traditionally taken the freedom of of its journalists to operate another country as a as a very important index of the health of of diplomatic relations. Because it's kind of built into the US Constitution that freedom of the press matters now as I say even under the trump administration this is not something that the US can take likely

China United States Beijing Beijing Bureau Wall Street Journal Xi Jinping Foreign Correspondents Club Asia Italy Spain
Here's what this US coronavirus survivor in Seattle learned when she was sick

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

07:34 min | 4 months ago

Here's what this US coronavirus survivor in Seattle learned when she was sick

"This next story this segment you gonna listen to hear folks should give you hope I mean you hear nothing but dire news bad news all this woman we have on the line now this nice lady Elizabeth Snyder she's from Seattle she has a doctorate in bio engineering and she survived the coronavirus Elizabeth good morning to you hi good morning Bernie and said it's great the package what is the I love New York City and I I want to come back in now that the flights are cheap and I recovered I have immunity maybe I'll be there in the near future I like a lot you got a great attitude I know I don't even know if you have a muted I've heard of examples of people getting it twice I hate to bring it down but in your case you're very very upbeat you survive the coronavirus tell us about your deal tell us about how you first became aware that you actually had this virus yeah that's a great question so I actually initially when I got sick I thought I just had a nasty flu like symptoms Burberry and line with what you would get if you came down with the flu and I initially did not think I have a corona virus because I had no cost they had no shortness of breath I had no respiratory distress or any respiratory issues those really only when I started chatting with a group of friends of mine who all got sick at the exact same time three days after attending a party that we started to get a little suspicious and many of my friends went to the doctor I myself did not go because I was recovering on my own and I think that I thought I had the flu my friends have gone to the doctor and the doctors just tested for flu it came back negative we're all getting a little bit frustrated enough that police one of my friends found that there was a local research study here in Seattle called the Seattle to study and it's a joint collaboration between university of Washington Seattle children's and perhaps they were just testing for the flu as part of a study on community transmission of influenza but they recently started testing for coronavirus so we also spent ten ten naval quads simple to just kind of you know cross our fingers and hope for the best we were curious to know if we had current virus but we weren't you know particularly sure we had it and sure enough I got a call this past Saturday on March seventh from the research coordinator with the study saying my sample tested positive Lizabeth Snyder thirty seven years old live now in Seattle Washington had the virus corona and does doing much better today survived of course I thought was kind of cute when I read the story of how much a list that you know your symptoms subsided by the time you found out you had corona you'll you're not at your work you're actually getting better already so when you found out you how do you like I don't know it's kind of cool I'll be like probably site depicts permit yes that's correct I would say at first I was a little shocked because as I mentioned I just thought that I had the flu and perfectly honest if I hadn't been tested that what I would have thought and yes when I got the call on Saturday I was feeling better I was upbeat and the sun came out in Seattle I was enjoying my Saturday in fact I was planning to have a friend over that evening to play board games so yeah I was a little shocked but I was not scared I didn't panic I wasn't worried because as I said at that point I had pretty much you're covered I did kind of think it was pretty cool in a way because at that point I knew there weren't that many people in the United States that had contracted it and as you mentioned at the beginning of the segment I do have a PhD in bioengineering I did molecular biology research in college and graduate school and I work for a biotechnology company here in Seattle so I think from an intellectual curiosity perspective I thought it was kind of interesting so a Lisbon Snyder from Seattle again a doctorate in bio engineering of course Washington state one of the highest the highest number of cases of coronavirus and Lizabeth to tell us about for example how many days you suffered from this coronavirus and how big did it get while you're going through it so I fell down thank and found that I was feeling unwell on it you pay it was Tuesday February twenty fifth there's actually three days after that okay that party that I mentioned in the evening my temperature spike two hundred and three so that was a little alarming I can't remember the last time in my adult life I've had a hundred to three degree fever so I thought queen and it was the most severe apart from that however I just had a headache I had intense body aches I had a lot of fatigue I started feeling a little bit contracted and these are all symptoms of a common cold or you know and nasty flu and I did not have any respiratory symptoms as I mentioned earlier I didn't have a cost I didn't have shortness of breath I didn't have any chest tightness so thankfully the next day after I started feeling sick my fever came down to a hundred and one they just add did self care and I took over the counter medications and drink a lot of water I would say that the entire duration of my illness was about eight days and that's when I immediately one evening I was watching television and I automatically kind of felt this sort of like fog you know that you get all over your body and in your head when your steak it's a sort of listed and I felt my energy package back to normal well you know to be honest here you fall in the category of people who what you want those what you're supposed to thirty seven years old eighty I I I gather you're in good shape having had a bunch of medical history issues before so it's not shocking that you will have this for seven or eight days and your okay I think what what people are going to say is I hate it when grateful Isabel Schneider but you know my uncle's eighty and he just had a heart attack or his lungs aren't good and then she's going to make it sound like it was kind of cool I got it is not that big a deal but I know you're on record saying listen listen I was okay that doesn't mean that other people shouldn't take the proper precautions that's correct you know one of the takeaways but I have from this experience is that the symptoms are varied and just because you don't have you know cost and shortness of breath and chest tightness doesn't mean that it's not coded nineteen and so you know I think at this point right now the best thing that we can do in the community is anyone who is experiencing any of these terms and please try and stay home from work train arrange something with your employer if you have limited time or if you can work from home in please do so by yourself for fourteen days because there are people in our community who are elderly and your no fault of their own have you no underlying health condition or someone who's a concert you know or you know have had major surgery and they're the most vulnerable but I would say that you know I think as this thing progresses we're gonna find more and more people coming out as testing positive people like myself who who have recovered so it remains to be seen how quote unquote deadliest viruses compared to influence that but you know I think that this whole experience should remind us that this is not something that we should practice just in a time of crisis like right now at the cove in nineteen outbreak this is something we should practice all year long when you get sick or even a

Elizabeth Snyder Seattle
Lyon Is the Real Capital of French Food

Monocle 24: The Menu

04:09 min | 4 months ago

Lyon Is the Real Capital of French Food

"Week. We hit to Francis third largest CT. Leon challenges the likes of Paris with food and drink selection. Our Guide is Monaco's Maddalena Polish. When you think of fine dining in France Paris is probably the first city that springs to mind. But for those in the know. It's Leon Francis third largest city that clinches first prize is the country's gastronomic capital. It boasts more than four thousand restaurants. Fifteen of which have Michelin Stars. Leon spoils choice in Tom Savitri. So it's wise. Start IN THE CENTER IN. Leon's press cheol or almost island the first port of call when dining out. Leon is a visit to one of its countless versions his red and white checkered tablecloth zero hallmark of the press skills winding cobbled streets. You need to the city. These cozy destroys originated from small ends frequented by traders in the seventeenth century visuals glow with an intimate convivial atmosphere and serve generous helpings of authentically and as cuisine wholesome home cooked meals which favour fresh produce an adult out without pretension or extortionate price tags on the rue saw. Joan London is Labou. Sean defeated West Chef Julia. Isabel and Laura Peyot march to the legacy of the famous mothers of Leon who emerged in the nineteenth century. These women of humble origins who having been released from household surveys opened their own restaurants and enhanced the reputation for excellent food defeat US contemporary dishes that remained faithful to authentic bushland fat but with fewer calories for a set menu of twenty eight years. You can indulge in a parade of salad bowls before choosing a substantial main such as canal red mullet with shellfish salsa with a hearty vegetarian lasagna replete. With strong nights childhood nostalgia. A selection of liquid cheese is followed by choice of desert which fused shopping sweet flavors like lime cheesecake with peanut paste dark chocolate cake with candied mandarins. This bustling each Twinkles CHOM and fills up quickly each night. So it's always wise to book ahead the best way to get to know the central peninsula is to discover it on foot on a morning walk up at St Rolling. Slate is the perfect antidote to the food referee tone by evening individual for energy. Please check out. The specialty coffees in delicate pastries of La Guardia. Cafe on through happy rotate. For Hot. He started the day. Head to diploid nestled near the Sun. This cafe Russell's up your quintessential millennial brunch with a twist. Classic Avocado Tastes his pad with roasted squash period. Will pancakes meat? Smoked Salmon and cream cheese dip Lloyd Sunday brunch mini features sugary surprises like chocolate coated chestnut model names with copious amounts of cheese egg and meat. It's fair to say that traditional Lyonnaise cuisine is not particularly vegan friendly if the rich food and vast quantities of the Schanzer left you in need of something greener and lighter than Asian fusion restaurants by SA- by on the Petite Rue de France. Is the perfect counterweight. It serves Southeast Asian Street Food and top US and deserves praise for its fast service. Leeann can be at mart and it's full splendor at night when reflections of its artfully illuminated buildings REP lacrosse. It's rivers. You can observe the spectacle from the character. Full Monkey Club cocktail bar which overlooks the road. A short stroll from the upper house dimly lit and decked-out like Victorian Boudoir. This sultry settings perfect for a nightcap is jungle. Patent rules aligned with curiosity cabinets. Houseplants and rip leather seats abound. The Monkey Club finesses the alchemy of cocktail making specializing in old school. Spirits Drinks Manouchehr on from Victorian literature off the Queen of Hearts. Our a drink of Hendrick's GIN partying. Sarah Flying Fresh raspy and champagne food is the lifeblood of Leone. It chefs take pride in its rich culinary history while at the same time applying modern twist taught classics. It's a synergy of preservation in progresses unle- on its title a gastronomic coughed of France. And Dare I say it over your so issue yet? Another trip to Paris and go exploring around Leonti trees

Leon Francis Paris United States France Paris Maddalena Polish Michelin Stars Leon Petite Rue De France La Guardia France Victorian Boudoir Hendrick Sean Joan London Monkey Club Sarah St Rolling Leonti Trees Leeann Slate
Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 4 months ago

Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

"Today's warrior was an evangelist. Who became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights? Let's talk about joyner truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabel Balm free she was born into slavery and Ulster County New York in Seventeen Ninety seven in eighteen o. Six at the age of nine years old sojourner was sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars so join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands. Sojourner was sold once again this time to a man named John Dumont interestingly because Turner grew up in New York state originally settled by the Dutch. She actually only spoke Dutch while living with Dumont she finally learned to speak English at that time. Support for emancipation in New York was growing. Dumont promised that he set so joyner free before it became the law to do. So but eventually sojourner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in New York. She was forced to leave her other three children behind when she later reflected on the escape sojourner said I did not run off for. I thought that wicked but I walked off believing that to be all right. During her journey to freedom sojourner made her way into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon after learning about her predicament. They took so joyner and her baby. In until the states emancipation of slaves took effect the van wagon and treated joyner kindness and compassion sojourner later said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher during her. Stay with the couple. She became a devout Christian around that time so joyner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth because she felt to represented her mission of fighting for Justice. So joiners famous words. Truth is powerful and it prevails echo that sentiment. After moving to New York City sojourner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church. Joining the African Methodist Episcopal Denomination sojourner also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being literate so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement. She spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance civil and women's rights in eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron Sojourner gave her most famous speech in called anti a woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted a common argument. That women shouldn't have equal rights because Jesus was a man in her speech she asked. Where did Joe Cry? Come from he came from God and a woman mandate have nothing to do with it when the civil war broke out Joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army for her efforts in the war. And the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet. President Lincoln in eighteen sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen. Eighty three at the age of eighty six.

Sojourner Joyner Akron Sojourner African Methodist Episcopal De John Dumont Ulster County New York Isabel Balm New York City New York President Lincoln Joe Cry Union Army Ohio Isaac Methodist Church Isabella Maria Van Turner
"isabel" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

11:57 min | 5 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

"Have anything to compare them with. The the only thing that matters to me is. When is the termination date? Because I don't want to sign a contract that is almost forever as I did with the House of the spirits in the United States. I'd I signed a contract for the house of the spirits with minimum minimum money forever and it has it took years and years to renegotiate. Renegotiate the book back to get back the copyright. And how did you do that. The agent the agent duty. I see how did you figure out how much to be paid to do you. Just sort of trust the agent with that process as well that you're GONNA get paid fairly for all of your work. Well I just learned that I am the the right to that sells most books in Spanish yet. I'm not the best paid. Some men are better. Pay Me and that I just learned that and that's making me very angry. Not because of the money but because the fact that I'm paid less probably because I'm a woman and so that that I'm not going to tolerate so yes so going forward I mean how do you rectify that. Well you fight for it for you fight for it and you you look for another publisher of you. Don't get what you want but I'm in a very privilege situation because I can. I can do that. Most people cannot. That's really the difficult so it sounds like that's some advice for female writers. Everything's secretive and confidential on then Unless you're lucky you don't don't find out how much other people are. And then if you are not really a absolute bestseller you have no leverage to to fight for anything you said that one of the benefits of having resources is being able to help other people and you mentioned your foundation that you set up in honor of if your daughter. Can you walk us through how you decided on a foundation. My daughter was twenty eight years old when she had a crisis and and ended up in a hospital in Madrid in Madrid. Yes and they'll they gave the wrong drugs. There was neglect in the intensive care unit. And they well. She ended up with severe brain damage in a in a coma and they tried to hide it in the hospital. Five months slater. They gave me back my daughter who's practically a corpse. This was before nine eleven so I was able to get my daughter. Modern in a commercial united flight with a nurse oxygen and older Burford nearly other person in coma needs. I'm bringing her over to the United States. All the way took alley -fornia connecting flights in Washington and And take care of her at home until she died and when she died. I wrote a book called Powell. Which is the story of the family? The story of the country everything on her story. Also and the book was very well received. It's it's not a sad book although so book about her death and So I I said all the income that comes from this book I won't touch because it's not mine belongs to Bali and then I put it in a in a bank account an India. Some something in happened that made me realize this is what I want to do. This is what I would have done with this money. And so I created a foundation and the mission of the foundation into invest in the power of women and girls and we work now because of everything that is happening in this country we have had to focus much more and so now we focus on reproductive rights which are threatened on immigration women and girls and children and Try to protect women from exploitation and harassment abuse. How did you emotionally survive? Everything you went through with your daughter's death I'm so sorry. How did you find the strength to keep going during that time? I don't think I had an alternative. What do you do? Are you're going to commit suicide. Some people do but most people don't most people survived sorrow and most people keep on living I I would if I look back I would say that. What saved me mostly was love? The love of my mother was. It's always present. She just died on very old The love of my son Nicholas and three grandchildren that were born at that time so when you have. Babies Paolo died with two of her of my grandchildren on her bed. They were sleeping. They're having this yes. I'd have feet so We took care of power in the family room and the kids somehow so that their aunt in that bed like like the sleeping beauty and they never question. It was so natural for them. They would play with their toys on the bed and there was a got there so in a way. I think that's saved me. The seeing seeing how life continues in spite of everything and your mom had said something to encourage you to write my mother. We wrote to each other every single day for decades. I have twenty four thousand letters from my mother in boxes by year in a in a garage. Actually and I know there are twenty four thousand because Recently we had to archive them because some of them were Getting deteriorated and so In the process we more or less found out how many there are. It's not an exact number but its approximate and on my mother. When I was in Spain with powder I wrote on my mother every day as I usually did and at the end of the year when Paul died she she gave me back? My letters and with based on those letters hike would write that memoir because in my mind everything was just a dark night until I read the letters and so what happened day by day and my mother said what. Are you going to ride on January eighth. Because I started on my books on January Eighth Powell AH died a month before I said Mama. I don't think I can right. I said well if you don't ride you'll die unlimited you. This is the worst thing that can happen. This is a long long dark tunnel. Now you have to walk alone one step at a time tear after tear appear but you will get to the end. I promise you will just keep walking a nothing helps. No PROZAC no therapy November over vacations in Hawaii. Nothing helps you have to live the pain. And then she said she added something that was absolutely true. She said at night thing that happens in the future to you we'd be comparable you've already survived the worst shifting gears a bit We want to talk about something. Some people say you shouldn't talk about with women and that is of course their age. I have no problem with. I am so proud to be seventy seven on alive and still in the world. What's one thing you think? Young women don't understand about aging that maybe they should consider thirty snorter frightening turning thing that it happens slowly and you adapt to each stage. And every every age Haas Haas its perks and its problems I was talking with my daughter-in-law was pretty woman. And she said at forty five became invisible visible and I realized that when I walk in the streets people were looking at my daughter or at my husband and and not at me anymore. At the beginning it was like a shock she said but then it will so so wonderful. It's comfortable it's great. I don't have to worry about so many things. I'm not trying and to be sexy. Oh to compete with anybody. Well my case is different. I never wanted to be invisible and I always was so I never had the problem of becoming in visit But but I I feel good about my age on and I keep telling everybody I'm seventy seven because I'm proud out of the life I have had and The fact that I'm healthier. I'm curious that I am engaged that I can climb the stairs ears that will that fall in love or that is just great. Isabel if you had to pick what is your favorite benefit of aging that you. You know what you are not going to. Do you learn to say no no to other people not things that you think of yourself you say do you say to the to the superego. Leave me alone just I would say it with the F. Word because it's now I don't care about what other people think about. What my Super Egos flagellating me with? I say no and I I know about myself what I can do and what I cannot. I don't even try to do things just because because everybody else does them. I love it. That's great. So what motivates you to keep working. Because you're still very prolific. Would I love that. My my work I love telling stories stories That when I sit down to ride the first center so of a new book I say to the spirits wait. I'm going to tell you a story. I'm that's the beginning for me of of the process. I'm going to tell you a story. I love it. I love the tailing love hearing stories. I have audio books in the car and just hearing the voice of someone telling me a story is wonderful so that that keeps me going. The foundation keeps me going on. Of course the fact that that I have this wonderful little family my son My daughter-in-law all who travels with me and she's my boss. He's tough so I do all this book tours like a poodle on a leash she and now I have a husband that I love so all that keeps me going. What's your writing process? Still I start on a certain date and I ride many hours sedate today. I don't want to be interrupted because it's like dancing. You start dancing and you get the rhythm you get the the the groove you know and With writing it's the same you. If you interrupt you have to start again to get the rim rhythm again so I work many hours. Yeah easily eight and but before I could try much more now. I can't even sit for that wrong but now I stopped when Roger Comes home. That's the time to stop That's great so what would you still like to accomplish. I just want to live today. Maybe tomorrow and I don't want to be a widow. I hope to die before Roger does on. That's amazing is about thank you so much for joining us. Thank you if you'd like to hear more of secrets of wealthy women. You can find us on apple spotify Google podcast or your favorite audio provider. If you like US subscribe shares on Social Media and give us a review. I'm Veronica Dagger. Thank you for listening..

United States coma Roger Madrid Washington publisher Haas Haas apple harassment Powell Spain slater Burford India Veronica Dagger Paolo
"isabel" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

10:22 min | 5 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

"Hi Veronica Dagger and this. Is The Wall Street Journal Secrets of wealthy women where women share how they tackle career money and the world. Today we're excited to welcome. BESTSELLING Chilean American author. Isabel Allende into secrets Isabelle was a hit author. Right out of the gate. You might remember her debut novel House of Spirits which was turned into a film with Meryl Streep Reaped Glenn Close on Tonio Bandera. Jeremy Irons since then Isabel has written twenty four books and sold more than seventy four million copies around around the world that makes her among the highest selling Spanish language authors. Ever Isabel has a new book out called the Long Pedal of the C.. which tackles the themes aims of immigration love and home? And she's here to talk to us about all of that. What it took to start a new career in her forties? And how she's kept going into her seventies. Thank you for joining US Isabel. Thank you for having me there on. It's my pleasure so let's start off by talking about your new. You book a long pedal of the see. How would you describe it for the listener? It's love story on a story of displacement. It's a story of a couple apple. They are refugees from the civil war. In Spain. In one thousand nine hundred ninety nine they come us refugees to cheer where they have many years of a good life. And then there's another. There's a military coup in Chile and there's some again they have to become refugees for the second time. So it's it's a story that goes into circle This immigrant and refugee story is an experience is very personal for you right so you move from Peru Peru Chile when you were a child and when you're young woman you had to flee to Venezuela during the coup Chilean nineteen seventy-three. How did those experiences experiences shape? You and shape. You're writing. I will not be a writer today without the experience of exile having to leave everything behind on started gaining ending another place made me very aware of memory of everything that I had lost the people that had been displaced scattered all over world. Those who had disappeared those died and all the the the the the the things that made me a person that we're yeah no longer there and I have to reinvent myself on in the process I wrote this first novel. The House of the spirits which joie exercising memory in style in trying to recover all the losses really powerful your work has so much the of the autobiographical element to but also has this magical or mystical element to it. Where does that come from within you? I had a Gracie grandmother. My Grandma. My grandmother was all her short life experimenting with with the paranormal. So for example every Thursday there there would be Santos at home she would call the spirits and according to the legend she could move there the ashtray. Without touching it and there there was the table table of the spirits which I have now in my house. That is a very heavy oak table from Spain that also according to the legend Schuch would move with the force of her mind. I need to people to move the table and I have never seen even shake a little bit and So I grew up with the idea that the world is mysterious magical place in my life. I have seen so many things that have no explanation. Mike what coincidences prophetic dreams destiny. Why are you thrown in a certain direction when you never thought you would go that way? There's something magical about this journey of life. The story along pedal of the C- feels very relevant today. Right because we've been watching major immigration removes not only in the United States but other parts of the world like Europe and Africa. Is there a connection between your experiences and the stories you right and what's happening today. was that intentional. Are y'all only write about things that I care for things that I'm trying to understand circumstances is that I'm trying to explore people that are interesting and the people who are interesting usually are people who are who have been in extreme situations and and have brought out from inside resilience and strength that in normal times. We don't need to us so we don't. We don't know we have that inside. Can you elaborate on how those extreme situations helped make people interesting. What do you mean by not? I have a foundation and the mission of my foundation is to invest in the the power of women and girls and I get to see extraordinary people for example people women who have gone through horrible things things in Congo. They have been tortured mutilated gang-raped. They have fistulas. There cannot be operated on on this women who who are totally traumatized and beaten up by life get up on their feet and they not only keep on living they dance hence they go back to their communities and some of them become leaders in their communities. So that's the kind of people that I want to write about because unless you have tested how do you know who you are. That's so true. I mean that leads me to my next question because I was wondering despite all the moving around and upheaval. Oh you had in your life. How did you figure out your true self and your identity? I duNno mitral cells. I the true self changes in life there are periods in life in which you are a different person a my the same person I was when I will say young mother there certain essential things that you you carry on all your life but but circumstances on an age makes you change. I think that now I see I'm seventy seven seven now so I I look back at my life and I can have a better idea of who I was in different moments on the person I am today. Okay today I feel like a teenager again. How does that come about feeling what I what? I'm very very healthy. And now I'm in love so When when people ask me well how is it to fall in love? Your age is the same as falling in love for you are a teenager but with a sense of urgency. You have no time to waste no time for pettiness. Jealousy for little games for the for intolerance for impatiens. Because you have how. How many years do I roger? Maybe five six seven if we're lucky let's enjoy it. If I had known this when I was young I wouldn't have to divorce in my best interesting. Never thought of it that way so like we said in the beginning. Oh you have sold more than seventy four million copies of your books warrior. I seventy four million dollars. That's my question. How did your financial financial life change? He didn't immediately because my husband at the time was broke he he went bankrupt and with great debt so The income of the House of the spirits for the first few years went to pay debts on to live. Of course so I didn't see much of a change but in my lifetime I have seen what it means to have resources Don't only older people you can help. I could. For example support my parents is to harvest blended old-age and that's something I would not have been able to do without the success of the books on the foundation is also what what gives me most Choi but my life is very simple. I live in a very small house with one bedroom. I drive a small car. I don't I don't collect anything anything I don't. I have learned because I have started from scratch so many times that things don't matter at all you know when I left Chee Lin after the military coup we just close the House and lived with the idea that we would come back. We never thought that dictatorship would last seventeen years and and of course everything disappeared. And I. You never recover it really Veronica. I don't remember what was in that place any of the staff of the time and then I left again I left Venezuela. I don't remember either so the objects that that are that you leave on on the journey. Don't matter at all. The only thing that matters people coming up Isabel explains the money lesson. She learned after the success of her first book her advice for other female authors. And what she still wants to accomplish. I'm Danny Fortson from the Sunday Times of London and this is a podcast about Silicon Valley in eight parts. Can't say something interesting knows about San Francisco. Yes please tech's I think she's a sociopathic layer which CEO is more. Jesus like we're going to run for president. It's the right to the past present and look at the terrifying plans for our future. Is it more or less powerful than bioterrorism. uh-huh terrorism or a nuclear weapon. What are you waiting for? Subscribe details of Silicon Valley. Right now on apple podcasts. When you wrote your first book did you do any of those contract contract negotiations yourself? No no had an agent on. I don't even read the contracts to this day really I the contracts coming on ISU You the agency has gone through them. And then my son and my daughter-in-law who are the pillars of my life. They take care of that. I don't read the contracts because not only to this is not that I don't care is that most of the time I don't even understand them.

Isabel Allende apple Spain US Venezuela Veronica Dagger Chilean American author Meryl Streep Jeremy Irons Peru Peru Chile Chile Silicon Valley C.. The Wall Street Journal Secret Glenn Close ISU Tonio Bandera Santos
World Health Organization holds press conference on coronavirus outbreak

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:47 min | 5 months ago

World Health Organization holds press conference on coronavirus outbreak

"World Health Organization has been meeting to coordinate international responses containing and combating the novell corona virus outbreak scientists. From all over. The world attended the Congress in Geneva this week but will there. There is consensus on the fact that science must lead the fight back. Diplomacy may yet get in the way. China analyst Isabel Hilton Who's editor of China. Dialogue joins me now to look at the detail of the story. Thanks for coming in Isabel. This row concerns Taiwan the island that the Chinese Communist Party seizes part of one China under Beijing's authority but officials in Taipei claims self-ruled democracy. And that of course is the heart of the problem it is and you know and the other part of the background. Is it for several years now. China has been building position in the United Nations and all its agencies and steadily chipping away at those Relatively typically small but symbolic countries that recognize Taiwan as an independent country sir. Taiwan got booted off the Security Council missile when when Back in the seventies when China entered this global diplomatic sphere now when it comes to the W. H. O.. This of course really really matters. Because you're dealing with a with an epidemic which affects Taiwan and the same thing happened with saws Taiwan when ruled by the Gorman in dengue which was originally a mainland party and loser in the Chinese civil war until nineteen forty nine when it went Taiwan occupied Taiwan one. When Gorman Dong is in Barron Taiwan then China relaxes its position in terms of Taiwan's participation in these bodies because the Gorman Don Also regards Taiwan as an integral part of China students the DP which is the Taiwanese part he gets elected. Beijing becomes much on hostile and starts starts to exclude Taiwan from this kind of participation. So in this epidemic for example the W. T. the WHO has classified assefy. Taiwan is part of China. Which means that it was subject to all the travel bans that China was subject to despite the fact that it had you know just to score of cases cases where China has thirty thousand currently And so it. It began to suffer from the same kind of exclusions without having access to the scientific typic- and medical exchanges that it would have needed. It does need In order to control infection. So it's a very very a bitter angry exchanges over this. Now there are internal ructions within China to the Chinese doctor who was silenced by police. Trying to share news about the virus long before the Chinese health authorities disclosed. It's full threat. died yesterday. Many including China's judicial title authorities have wondered whether the epidemic could have unfolded differently. Had He not been silenced that critical juncture ahead of the lunar year holiday. How rare is is it for the judiciary to rebuke? The police. Always seeing now major internal ructions. Well what you're seeing. Is everybody looking for someone else to blame. Because this man became I'm a hero quite rightly he was early on the case he was humiliated in called into the police. May disci- offer confessions saying let you know none of it's true. He then continues his his work gets infected alive social media feed then set up outside the hospital because he'd become known by by then hundreds of millions of people were following his condition as he got ill he was. He continued to give interviews from isolation so he became a complete eight national hero. The symbolic you know upright official. Who Speaks Truth to power and evil power suppresses now that is the narrative that's taken hold and that is very dangerous for China just to go back to the W. H. O. The? Who's pronouncements of Kitty. Kind of been coerced by China because W. H. O.. Director General WHO's an Ethiopian. The country heavily dependent on on on China. has has given extraordinary praise to the Chinese authorities for the speed be do their response in the scale of their response. He's pretty much alone in that judgment because it's quite clear that for the first four weeks the Wuhan authorities suppressed press the news so that they could carry on with activities being planned which included a massive banquet for forty thousand people in in the middle of you know when they epidemic was well underway and the WHO changed its its statement on human to human transmission. which is a key element element that Chinese authorities said at the beginning of this? There's no evidence of human to human transition which meet transmission. which meant that? You had to go to that wet market in order to catch. Gotcha this would evidently Andrew that. Who fell into line with the Chinese government on that. This huge party went ahead and the whole thing out of control where wait still is. It's out of control now. The the head of the. Who actually has form on this. I know that in the past. He has supported African dictators. And so on and in fact I'd like like to turn to Africa now because the fifty four countries collectively are home to one point two billion people of whom an estimated one million Chinese nationals. And yet so far when you see the map and it's all lit up about where there is a corona virus in the world. Africa is completely blank. There are no reported cases of it whatsoever with such large Chinese population. There I find it extremely difficult to believe Richie implausible and no reported cases is the key doesn't mean there are no kisses and and you know there. Is this concern that that a China can lock down the country every now for how long but you you know. China is everywhere. And because there's been so much movement because people want prevented from travelling Before the declaration of the emergency it means that almost anywhere where where Chinese have been coming going. You have a risk of of this of this taking hold in countries where there there were. Public Health is is is not up to dealing with a highly transmissible Disease so you you know. Pakistan is another case in point. Where where you have serious concerns very close relationship? Lots of Chinese coming and going and this this could be the next phase uh-huh and I mean we're we're looking at some African countries repatriating citizens others making a big show saying that they won't and that they have complete faith in the Chinese government. So once again you've got this kind of diplomatic failure going on and these countries accosted or not repatriation. Their citizens are the ones that can't afford to well absolutely can't get a plane they know or whatever but once again you're seeing China going global with its own internal approach which is essentially to suppress the news. You know it's it's it's in control of of public all as they would put guiding public opinion as being a key element in in the party's strategy politically to survive five. Of course it. Has You know rather bad effect on. Its its ability to manage the substantive issue which is how many people get sick and die in some areas of the world the virus also seems to be tapping into racist sentiment with Chinese people who may not have visited the country in years. If ever been criticized there was a horrible. The story coming out of Wales yesterday. Some children of Chinese heritage were prevented from going to school. And I think that's now being reversed but but this is a trend. We are seeing we are hosting it and we've seen a lamentable cases in Italy there was a conservatoire that that put up a notice saying it had suspended classes for quote quote Unquote Oriental Students. And these are people who are living in Italy however you should also look China because if you remember it. Five million people have Wuhan the week before the Chinese authorities admitted water crisis. Was this dock. They can't get back to hunt Khan and they are in places in China which treating them. Even worse had been cases where apartments it'd be nailed up to stop people from Hahn going out. They can't they can't find hotel rooms. They are being shunned and ostracized within China and they are completely in limbo because they can't travel econ get back home and they're very very unwelcome. Welcome where they are and very unwell. Some of the some of them may well be unwell but certainly the regarded as going to play Mary's wherever they go. And that's you know And the next phase as if this does it to incubate period so given that people did so many people did leave the area in advance at the little holiday I think that would the next phase in China will be to see a surge in infections in those provinces where people have visited and of course. There's a much wider panic. We're seeing shortages. The face masks globally in Hong Kong. I understand toilet paper now competitive bizarre. What quite why toilet paper that connects to kind previous story about science and not knowing where to buy toilet paper because she was so looked after by seventy seven so I think that may be more to do with politics of of Hong Kong than real showed his but I wonder how the authorities can best manage? What's not only a health crisis but also one then of of misinformation under fear and discrimination it's unfortunately that I think that horses bolted? You know there are there are kind of well. Established practices practises where you have an emergency. Be It a natural disaster or an epidemic and it's very important to establish trust with the public excited the public and have listened to you does what's necessary and it's extremely important. Basically it says you must be a very quick week in in terms of of distributing information and that information must be accurate and you must be responsive China. The party is already. He's at every level. Have broken those rules so trust has gone the public does not believe them. They're being caused as the villains in this Inside China and certainly in Hong Kong and in Taiwan and. I think it's going to be very very difficult for the authorities to to recover from that and what they're doing now is simply going back to repressing the news again. It's not going to work Isabel. Thank you very much indeed. That was Isabel Hilton. Still to come on the program. While Jerry is pardoning pardoning prisoners a flick through the papers plus subas

China Taiwan Isabel Hilton Chinese Communist Party Chinese Government Isabel World Health Organization Barron Taiwan Geneva WHO Novell Africa Hong Kong Beijing Taipei Congress Gorman Dong Outbreak United Nations
Rotor Focus

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

09:32 min | 5 months ago

Rotor Focus

"Hello and welcome to. Who Aviation Week's check six podcast where this week? We are at the Heli Expo. Twenty twenty conference in Anaheim California I'm Guy I noticed. The senior Serb based in Los Angeles and with me is Mike Hershberg Executive Director of the Vertical Flight Society and Tony Osborne who've courses our London bureau chief and well known rotor heads expert at four so gentlemen thanks very much for for being here Just like to say that sadly of course the start of the show was inevitably overshadowed by the tragic accident last week and which took the life of Basketball legend Kobe Brian. His daughter and several several other people on the S S. Seventy six. That crashed north of La so was a terrible moment And of course it did slightly overshadow the start of the show but and did put some sort of focus perhaps also on safety and the renewed focus. That industry always strives for but because of that accident accidents And because the accident is still being investigated the at this point. There isn't that much we can talk about on the podcast but Just is to say that. Obviously it was a tragic event. And the industry's recognizing that we we. We saw some several of the companies sort of moment silence before the press conferences. And so on. But it hasn't really been overshadowed the event in a way that perhaps we thought it might ride. Just think of one thing. There's a number of safety workshops were done on this past weekend. FAA Administrator and others it it allowed them to highlight safety even more SAFETIES core focus focus of the helicopter industry but is going to be I think a rallying cry to redouble our efforts for the Industry Roy Absolutely Mike and and so moving onto the events of the show itself of course This pretty well. The biggest news that broke in terms of the industry was the surprise acquisition of the Swiss helicopter Copter Company by Leonardo so Tony of course we're in the middle of all of that. Yes it was a real surprise. I mean they had a press conference tonight before they no clues were revealed it was. It was quite a shocker. That the next morning sort of been clearly been bubbling away for a few weeks or even a few months. We'll see aviation. We have been invited out to Sicily the month before. If you've read your most recent edition Asian of the magazine you'll seeing that Doing their flight test and Sisley. But this is a real big deal for Leonardo. It gets them back into the light helicopter market and so finally just got could be awol one nine Koala which is just one the US Navy Pilot training competition partition But now by securing the s eight zero nine. They don't have to develop a new one themselves. They literally bog in it costs. Release something like five hundred million to a billion euros to develop a new helicopter and they've got one for one hundred eighteen million euros essentially that Isabel and was is that a bit of a surprise the promise of all of the aspects of that story the fact that it was such a bargain basement price culture initially been looking for four additional owners had their their owners Lynnwood. They've been funding them for the past decade. I mean we I saw what was then. The Marinko says I helicopter in two thousand eleven and they managed to prove to produce a flying prototype in in four years and there was a lot of skeptics when I showed up here in two thousand eleven even but but since then I've gone from strength to strength. They had had some challenges. I mean they're on prototype free now and that's the one that really seems to be working. And that's the aircraft that seems to have given confidence to investors and in particular not to Leonardo that this might be a viable product. Roy Of course they did exhibit exhibit. Some design changes. Could you just talk about a few of those. Yes so we. We saw some changes to the upper. cowlings this is essentially a single engine helicopter POW by Honeywell H. E. S. nine hundred engine so two point eight five metric ton aircraft. So they've essentially made some changes to the top of the aircraft after justice of the aero-dynamics to better ride smooth ride which is something that they want. They want to try and get a smooth ride as possible because they wanted to make it easier. Easier to develop an autopilot which will then give them a single engined insurance rules and capability Rydin and Mike. Did you get a chance to go and see it on the exhibit floor. Aw I did Now also visited them at their headquarters at secon Switzerland last month and I was really impressed really by the team So they've hired a lot of X Airbus and Leonardo Bell really from from everywhere and they've really changed the the the makeup of the team that it's instead of being a Swiss helicopter using Swiss suppliers is a global helicopter using global talent and global suppliers so I think think That the new road ahead the new the the The new prototypes. That are flying. I think they've really turned the corner in the last year and obviously their her Their new owners saw that as well pretty important to remember as well. This is going to remain an autonomous unit. Going to be separate of Leonardo this is pretty. The more crucial aspects is that Copter wants to try and remain small in quite agile and speedy so Hopefully away away from the Bam off. The Leonardo it can still develop an bringing new technologies pretty rapidly. Leonardo management of talked about the copter being used as a as as a testbed for hybrid technologies for electric propulsion. And so on so the next steps should be interesting and with the backing of a big group that should help push sales els change the supply chain. It could be a game changer. For for the copter draft and Well of course talking game changers and the segue potentially into the electric field Although there weren't as many e veto type concepts here this year the with the the bell nexus showing up at last year's event There was of course still some activity and Mike. You're you're leading the charge really and telling the world about the veto revelation. You came up with some startling. earthling statistics To open the show with the could you tell us a bit more. About how many numbers of of new entrance right so the vertical society's been tracking EV development since two thousand thirteen timeframe we had our first workshop in two thousand fourteen so this past week or the week before the show. We had our our seventh annual electric. Vitale symposium So we've been tracking things closely and we have a website that tracks the all the developments the aircraft so the beginning of the week we had two hundred fifty two different concepts listed By the end of the week we'll have a few more as more things of have have come to light But yeah it's That tracks everything you know. Let's see later this area so not all of those are really be likely to end up on a product right But yeah almost two hundred companies or or inventors are looking at this base and didn't do say that it's the if you average out the rate at which they've been added added they seem to be coming out of the woodwork about two two per week to March one hundred year so every January two fifty. Now it's one hundred and fifty last year about fifty the year before so it's It's almost like a mass hysteria where everybody is so excited. Needed about The potential of electric vitale. That anybody who has this idea starts to design something or maybe even flies a drone or something subscale but It's really much more complicated than that and You really have a really holistic view of of an airspace. product development because safety is really key and understand system. Safety Design is really Was GonNA make a viable product right and of course. We did talk to a few of the company's traditional national helicopter companies like instrum for example who've Just told us that. They're talking to some veto manufacturers about being able to provide production facility or at least a way of certifying and even Helping them through to the reality of of the of producing the defying an aircraft or at least in a veto vehicle right. So they're really exciting. Thing about electric vitale is. There's a lot of investment money coming in from Silicon Valley another millionaires or other investors which is fantastic to have all this new money coming into aerospace defense money or or big. Oem Money so it's it's new money so they have a lot of really exciting innovative ideas but they don't necessarily know how to certified aircraft or aircraft production facilities so companies like instrument and others. Who are interested in this new space? certainly should be open minded and and look for partners For this kind of new Urban Urban Your Madonna aircraft

Leonardo Mike Hershberg ROY Vitale Heli Expo Anaheim California Tony Osborne LA Vertical Flight Society Sicily FAA United States Los Angeles Kobe Brian Bureau Chief Executive Director Leonardo Bell Silicon Valley
Dos Santos calls new corruption allegations 'extremely false'

BBC Newshour

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Dos Santos calls new corruption allegations 'extremely false'

"Angle is chief prosecutor says he intends to issue an international arrest warrant for Isabel dos Santos the billion and daughter of former president dos Santos if she fails to cooperate with the major fraud investigation in which he has been charged Mr Sundhage regarded as Africa's richest woman denies accusations of mismanagement I'd misappropriation of

Prosecutor Isabel Dos Santos Mr Sundhage Africa Misappropriation President Trump Dos Santos Fraud
China Promises To Regain Control Of Taiwan

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:27 min | 6 months ago

China Promises To Regain Control Of Taiwan

"China has repeated. Its Promise to regain regain control of Taiwan after voters reelected president sighing. When Chinese state media said the president resorted to cheating repression and intimidation to get votes? Were joined in mischievious by Isabel Hilton editor of China Dialogue. Good to have you back in this year is this was a very convincing. Victory for her wasn't it. I could hardly be more convincing. And not they need to cheer chief record. Numbers of votes For any Taiwanese politician She also won a convincing victory in the Congress winning twice as many any seats as serious. Rival Gorman down and what is it that brought this. This huge victory is pretty much. Hong Kong You know the the the example of Hong Kong the the failure of One Country Two Systems in Hong Kong the Kuomintang have traditionally being the Party. Reunification the Kuomintang are the the the The relic of the Chinese civil war which was between the Kuomintang and and the and the Communist Party. They agree that China is one country in Taiwan belongs to it they just disagree about who should run it so the Kuomintang's historic position of being there the rightful ruler of all of Hong Kong. Where saying when is a Taiwanese politician politician and takes different view of history in a different view of democracy in a different view of of Taiwan role in the world? And that is is what particularly the young voters in Taiwan and they came out in record. Numbers Dave look at Hong Kong. They say well. You can't trust China. It breaks its promises what we have is freedom and democracy here and we wish to defend that that's what it is seen as a steady pair of Hanser. She's pretty steady. There were where to other parties that did rather badly One one is one was a a much more radical independence party and that Did very badly. So she's seen as somebody who defends the status quo essentially. She's not going to declare independence because that would be that that would trigger a global crisis But she is going to resist pressure from Beijing to talk about the the future of a close future with with with the People's Republic. So I think you know like a number of international crises. The best solution certainly for the time being is the status quo for Taiwan. He mentioned the idea ever close future with the People's Republic China's reaction promised to regain regain control of Taiwan. That doesn't necessarily time. We've what you've just said I'm but Kennedy genuinely says it we could have react. We could have expected that reaction yes she didn't for Xi Jinping to acknowledge it this is. This has been a very embarrassing victory this gala victory has been very embarrassing Xi Jinping because it it it is rebuked not only to his approach to Taiwan but to Hong Kong and You know unless Beijing finds a way to modify its. It's policy in Hong Kong. This will go on feeding into the Taiwan political situation and and entrenching Taiwanese view of the mainland so so that puts Xi Jinping and rob difficult position of having to acknowledge that he is wrong. Whereas you know Xi Jinping thought invincible in and cannot make mistakes so so I think what we're looking at is what is the? What is the tone scale of the response given that China is not going to reverse its policy? Xi Jinping Champion has declared in the China dream. China's May he's making China great again. The reunification with Taiwan is they would put. It is a key part of that and the it's it's kind of shared for the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic which is in two hundred forty nine so there is time on the other hand any any move to kind of slacken off the pressure on Taiwan would be viewed as weakness on the mainland. So I think what we'll see is a certain amount of low level harassment Rasmin so where China has had a number of successes in other in other Fields if you look sad Chinese see for example the kind of sub military pressure of water essentially armed fishing boats taking on for example Taiwanese fishing boats off yet news fishing boats there are fifteen very small countries. It's still recognize Taiwan As as the Republic of China we will see increasing pressure on them to switch to the People's People's Republic We might see some harassment of extensive trade and business relationships which exist between Taiwan and China neurotic Taiwanese unease doing business on the mainland. We've already seen a cocktail moment of tourism to Taiwan from the mainland. So you know there are a number of ways in which which Beijing can express its displeasure short of precipitating further confrontation Anita. How much is this actually high on? Its list given the fact that that China has has an awful lot more than it has to concentrate on the moment. We Got Hong Kong as you've mentioned which played directly into the hands of signing when we also have the US trade trade war we have in. China is busy with stuff can actually afford to put Taiwan on the back burner little. Yes I think it can. I think you're absolutely right. There are immediate crisis and there will go on being meet you crisis. It's you know th the economy's not going very well. There's some troubling signs in the financial sector that we might be in a in for a few bankruptcies and there's very limited trade deal is about to be signed the United States. I don't think China wants to jeopardize You know a kind of calming down of the. US China trade war. So do any move on. Taiwan would obviously do that. And so far we've seen or other muted reaction as you said. They accused diving when of dirty tricks describe. This is an anomaly. There was a wonderful phrase from Shinwari which said You know these temporary versus A. They're just a bubble in the tide of history. And you know she shouldn't count on this being a kind of permanent state of affairs so they're standing back and saying well you know these things happen but we can get over it and our long-term policy history is with this. That's that's interview that said we had trump making positive notes about Taiwan for quite a long time right from the beginning of his presidency. And yes you say that. The number of Countries now fifteen who who actively recognize Taiwan as a state and large companies such as airlines have now diverted their attention to to Beijing. But if you you have this state or this place which is allowed to just take along quietly. Is there a chance as a little bit of soft power will allow Taiwan to actually bring a few more countries back into the fold really curious you should say that because the because prog recently Decided to twin with with the Taipei rather than Beijing which is fanny kind of substantial. Move for the for the Czech Republic And and a bit of a rebuke. I think it was so one. Shouldn't underestimate the quiet soft. The effect of the quiet soft power of Taiwan inside China there are a number of of individual visitors from the mainland. Who made a point of going to Taiwan to observe the elections? Because you know they're curious about the only real substantial elections take place in the Chinese world and that will you know that one shouldn't underestimate the quiet effect of that It it's quite. It's quite the powerful thing Talking of quiet. Donald Trump has been unusually quiet on the subject of the Taiwanese elections but the people around him have been pretty robust in their supportive. Talion when so you know the US representative in in In Taipei met very quickly There have been you know it'd been in using language like no shared values of democracy and freedom the kind of thing honestly that one hadn't heard from trump for quite sometime but you're hearing from his officials officials and there have been hints from the US military that their commitment to the defensive Taiwanese as robust as ever last year saw a large number verve of quite significant arms sales and indications of military cooperation. So there were. There are lots of reasons China to sit fairly quiet Wyatt on this one. I think his Bell Hilton. Thank you very much indeed for joining his monocle. Twenty four

Taiwan Beijing Hong Kong China United States Republic China China Dialogue Republic Of China Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton Donald Trump Kuomintang President Trump Czech Republic People's Republic
Two Attacks At Religious Events

KYW 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 6 months ago

Two Attacks At Religious Events

"Radio that's already still searching for the motives today behind attacks and religious gatherings near Dallas and another former New York City survivors of yesterday's church shooting your fort worth Texas have been praying hard to play that we can get back I have to no thank god that live Isabel Ariel was inside when a gunman killed to church members and was then killed when others returned fire the shooting was one of two religious attacks over the weekend the other by a man with a machete and a Hanukkah celebration in Muncie New York CBS's Tom Hansen elderly man was seriously injured in the stabbing he's still in critical condition as far as we know four others were also hurt including the son of a rabbi but as we've heard time and time again from this religious community they refused to be silenced by the violence that happened here after a wave of anti semitic attacks in and near New York police commissioner Germont Chasez officers are on high alert without getting into specifics of deployment there will be many offices deployed we will keep the Jewish community saying Peter king's CBS

Dallas Isabel Ariel Muncie New York CBS Peter King Texas Tom Hansen Germont Chasez
New EU chief takes helm amid rising suspicion of China

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:09 min | 8 months ago

New EU chief takes helm amid rising suspicion of China

"New president of the EU Commission also funded lion will have spent her first night in office last tonight. Having already we think held urgent telephone call with Beijing. The expose last week on the existence of Detention Kemper Muslim leaguers has brought China's track record on human rights right to the top of our funding lines to do list. Let's look at what she in. The Commission can actually do. Let's hear from Isabel Hilton. The editor of China Dialogue. Welcome back the studio Isabel. Doing no of this phone call to take place between Oslo Funder Lion and Beijing yesterday. We don't although she did she has made Much of Saying that it would so I imagine it would also imagine she'd get pretty dusty response from Beijing. What was the intentionally the? The purpose of the phone call was literally. That's really her first day in office yesterday on the Sunday indeed. I think that there is a feeling in Europe That China has been. It's sort of general after say trend against China in the last few months in in a concern in Europe that China has too much power and abusing its power to undermine global norms including on human rights and that Europe needs to take more bust view. So I think that what we're seeing in that commitment over these really appalling abuses That you know that's what we're seeing. A new commission come in with the determination to stand up to China just remind us of what was said what was revealed last week in this expose. On the treatment of weakened Muslim there was a cache of documents. Som Four hundred which went to the New York Times A further batch that went to an international consortium of Investigative Journalism Journalists and although Ah the existence of the camp said being extremely extensively documented for more than two years now the detail of the organization and including many a a personal and telling details which included in. What do you tell a university student going home for the summer? WHO finds that? He's Oh her entire family his disappeared so it was the kind of meticulous rupp very chilling planning State directed absolutely top down To to to lock up one in ten or as far as we know of the weaker population so although the camps were known about. There's something about you know the revelation of the of the of the bones of this policy that that made people deeply deeply uncomfortable and actually highlighted the degree to which China has go away with this so far. Is Anybody greatly surprised. However about these great revelations I think many people suspected that there was a but the fact is as you say as you've been saying continually there is this buildup of evidence against China that it is Going against the beliefs Explo- uh ex- exploiting the global norms. It's sort of surprises. That surprised me that as underline sort of took it upon herself to make a fresh. I should tempted something that everybody sort of knew about anyway. Well it's true that the camps were known about because they say that the detail of the documents Really confronted Particularly Europe actually with them with the inaction although we have in fact through the year Seen a growing effort particularly by Europe to confront China over Xinjiang at the The Council on Human Rights the UN Council Counseling Human Rights Meeting in Geneva There was a letter signed by more than twenty countries calling for China to release the detainees China has put in an enormous effort in the last few years to undermining the principle of universal human rights and particularly at the UN. So for example China has been trying to advance the the premise that notable rights to equal and the right to development and state sovereignty so victory entry trump's individual human rights and that goes directly against the universal principle. It it implies that poor people Don't have rights or or don't don't desire rights which is which is nonsense and that that's completely any it's an important breach and China has managed to mobilize countries search which have An economic dependence on China to support them in Geneva in mounted very well documented campaign trying to shut out civil society actors NGOs who might criticized trying to put in a government sponsored NGOs who would sing the praises raises of China's policies and explicitly saying two countries which Had any kind of economic dependence on China there quite a lot now that if they showed stop and criticized then you know deals would not go well if they showed up and praised then they would benefit so you know. There is no doubt that China has managed to Marshal Marshall a lot of opinion on its side in the has been remarkable silence for example or endorsement for many Muslim countries. They have not criticized at China. I know I on on locking up a million Muslims for being Muslim and that's pretty remarkable So you know. We are confronted with with the situation situation in which if these rights are defended. It's come down to the European Union Australia and Canada and even the United States is not reliable ally in this so I think that for the new commission the European Union. It's a bit of a moment saying do defend the system or not. What does the e you you do? Though in terms of concrete action I mean we've seen a trade war bursts out between the United States and China and neither side into becoming coming out well from it now. The European Union's Heft when it comes to trade is enormous but you can see immediately the any sanctions that you might put on. China will be met with equally tough measures. I think that I doubt that we would see a trade war. Exactly I mean it's true that the European European Union has is an enormously important trading block for China's largest trade partner but European Union. Although doesn't speak because one over trade Except for you know the kind of You wide regulations but individual countries tend to make their own make pursue their own interests with China But the fact that the e U is willing publicly to criticize China the e you could for example push at the UN. I'm for sanctions against individuals. Who are involved with this trade? It could name and shame companies that are dealing That are installing technologies in Xinjiang And in fact it could under the principles of of human rights and business. It could sanction companies over human human rights abuses. So it's not without weapons and and I think you know put China China very much dislikes being called out on human and rights abuses in a moment when it's trying to present itself as the benign actor On the global On the global scene so simply having you who are being vigorous in terms of its criticism changes the atmosphere and gives cover to some other countries which might wish to but don't quite have the courage ridged criticize China. Finally we have the member-state ambassadors who already in Beijing being invited to Xinjiang which is where the majority if we miss them live at the beginning of next year can anything be settled on then. yes Although these visits of course are heavily managed and it wouldn't be the first time time we've had official visits to Xinjiang in which The visitors the official visit confronted with people who sing and dance and say that they're happy to be there so I didn't think anyone. Anyone has enormous illusions about about what you're seeing And I think the you made its point by By giving the Sakharov prize the alarm toady a who is a weaker intellectual as an economist at a university in In Beijing who in twenty fourteen was sent to in jail for life had all his assets confiscated leaving his family destitute in a in a savage sentence against a man who had always been of voice of reason and moderation and who was well known to journalists and indeed to ambassadors and human rights workers So I I think that you know laying down these markers important The visit will you know I. I don't know quite what such visit will achieve except that it's important wouldn't go on insisting on visits but I think that as I say The ambassador isn't Aachen have many illusions that the people that they speak to a free to speak Or they will uncover any great surprises. It will be very very carefully prepared

China China China Beijing China Dialogue Europe European Union Xinjiang Isabel Hilton UN Geneva Eu Commission President Trump New York Times European European Union European Union Australia Investigative Journalism Journ Editor Rupp
Epstein jail guards reject deal to admit to falsifying records

KYW 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Epstein jail guards reject deal to admit to falsifying records

"And to federal prison guards responsible for guarding Jeffrey Eckstine could face charges in his death and I've been off offered a deal by prosecutors his correspond across the collision the two correctional officers rejected that plea deal from federal prosecutors sources familiar with the case say the deal required them to plead guilty to records falsification charges warm this is a big victory nine nine percent of the time when it inmate dies in jail no one is held responsible that's a journalist Laura Goldman and friend of Isabel Maxwell sister of Epstein's coconspirator Gullane Maxwell she's also curious as to how empty it's five hundred seventy seven million dollars state would be split among his accusers who might be entitled to his proposed accuser compensation fund Eckstine died while in custody in New York in August the city's medical examiner initially ruled F. dean's death to be a

Jeffrey Eckstine Laura Goldman Epstein Gullane Maxwell New York F. Dean Isabel Maxwell Five Hundred Seventy Seven Mil Nine Nine Percent
Missing Virginia teen found safe, suspected abductor in custody

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Missing Virginia teen found safe, suspected abductor in custody

"Of Virginia team has been found safe after being missing for ten days correspondent Jim Ryan with that story is a bill Hicks disappeared from her home in Louisa county Virginia on on October October twenty twenty first first her her mother's mother's ex ex boyfriend boyfriend Bruce Bruce Lynch Lynch was was immediately immediately a a suspect suspect a a few few days days later later Lynch Lynch and and the the fourteen fourteen year year old old were were seen seen one one county county to to the the north north and sheriff's major Donnie lo said when this bill was spotted she appeared to be unharmed last night during a traffic stop Lynch and Isabel Hicks were pulled over she is said to be okay he's been arrested Lynch is being held on charges related to the adoption of a teen

Bruce Bruce Lynch Lynch Donnie Lo Isabel Hicks Virginia Jim Ryan Bill Hicks Louisa County Virginia Fourteen Fourteen Year Ten Days
Japan justice minister resigns in election payments scandal

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

Japan justice minister resigns in election payments scandal

"The old so the December general election in Japan of falling off to the resignation of a second cabinet minister in the space of a week Bloomberg's Isabel Reynolds has all these details justice minister caps you can Calais stepped down following the magazine's allegations of illegal payments to campaign work is the latest in a series of scandals that's also forced out prime minister sins are based economy minister talk of a December election had amassed a head of a full calendar of events next yeah in Tokyo is a bonus plan by daybreak

Japan Bloomberg Isabel Reynolds Justice Minister Tokyo Calais Prime Minister
 Japan justice minister resigns in election payments scandal

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

Japan justice minister resigns in election payments scandal

"The old survey December general election in Japan of full enough to the resignation of a second cabinet minister in just a week Bloomberg's Isabel Reynolds has the details justice minister caps you can Calais stepped down following the magazine's Alec Asians of illegal payments to campaign workers the latest in a series of scandals that's also post as prime minister Shinzo based economy minister talk of a December election had amassed a head of a full calendar of events next year in Tokyo is opponents claim by daybreak here

Japan Bloomberg Isabel Reynolds Justice Minister Prime Minister Tokyo Calais
"isabel" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

18:12 min | 10 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Latino USA

"My job as a rider as an activist as if he land for based as a feminist is to create awareness and say okay. This is what I see. This is the world I know. This is what's happening abroad. Come with me. Let's see let's look from NPR and through media media it's Latino USA. I might gain Horsa today. A portrait of Award winning Chilean writer is Indian in nineteen eighty two. He was living in in Minnesota as a political refugee. That's where she wrote. Her breakout novel Lagasse speedy does the House of spirits which later was adapted into a film film. She seems to spend most of her time in another world. Since I was a staff I know not because she can't speak she. She just never wanted two two throughout her extensive career. She would go on to write twenty two more novels many of them infused with or specific blend of magical realism and myth but is actually started writing by working as a journalist in cheating better was born in video and grew up in Chita but in nineteen seventy three she fled with her family to Venezuela after her uncle former Mattila in President Salvador Allende was overthrown in a bloody coup and died the regime says the socialist leader took his own life as the president kind kinda came under attack but some although not and his family dispute that say he was gone down by finishes men since then she's become one of the most influential authors of our time to as the first ever spanish-language writer to receive an Honorary National Book Award which is one of American literature's most prestigious honors and former President Barack Obama awarded her the Presidential Medal of freedom in twenty fourteen novels in memoirs Tele Families Magic Romance Oppression Violence Redemption. I sat down with India not talk about her. Life's journey the country she left behind and what it's like to become a renowned author Italian. They're welcome to let the USA thank you very much for having me so Isabel. Can you take us back to Chile to when you were growing up and paint a picture of the memories that you have that time I think that the first memories of childhood I would marcus forever. Many other things have happened to me in my life but what mark me really where the first years of my life in my grandfather's there's housing. My father left my mother. When I was three years old. He abandoned the family and we never saw him again. He totally totally totally vanished. My grandmother died and the House became house of Mourning for eight years. My grandfather dressed in black from head to toe. She painted the furniture black. There was no music no flowers. No parties hardee's no desert. It wasn't housing morning. I don't think that was a common thing at all. In Chile at the time or ever that people with more like that all that gave me that idea that everything is possible media that the world is a very mysterious place and that if that happens happens in real life why not in literature so what has been called magic realism literary device in my case and I'm sure that in the case of many other Latin American writers it was a reality. That's how we grew up and you know what's interesting is that you do write about the spirit world and what gets left behind so there's a lot of that kind of mystical and mysticism in your writing but you actually started out as a journal title is doing work that was basically rooted in fact and that was all happening before you became a writer. I might I was a lousy journalist. I should I have never done that. What do you mean what made you such a bad journalist. Oh lied all the time. I made up stories. Yeah I put myself in the middle of everything anything. I couldn't be objective. I didn't believe in fact but you knew you said I'm ruining this profession. I've got to get out of it. No I was expelled. Let's say what happened. Is that I was. It's a journalist and I thought I was a great journalist because I had no insight and my own problems. So were you working journalist when your uncle the President Salvador Gorai. Nda of Cheetah was overthrown again was the world's first democratically elected Marxist on September Eleventh Nineteen seventy-three his dead headquarters was pulled out from the National Palace during us-backed military coup yeah yeah yeah I was a journalist and we have censorship. I mean censorship for everything everything but mostly for the press so it was very hard to work as a journalist in those circumstances but especially with my name it was particularly difficult and then we you had the military coup in Chile and I had to get out mm-hmm and I couldn't find a job as a journalist inventor Sweden. I left because I was scared. I was in some blacklist. I I was threatened. I felt that it was just too risky. So I lived with the idea but in a few months I would be back because Chile had such a long democratic tradition that we could expect that the military would go back to their barracks six and we would have elections again which did not happen for seventeen years every year thousands of John and and mark the day but ended the rule of socialist leader Salvador Allende and started the seventeen year dictatorship over Gosta finishing so then in what was it like to actually to emigrate to Venezuela in the context of actually being a refugee to move to Venezuela warm green abundant rich. It was the second richest country in the world because of the oil boom a country that was ready to party all the time people would would find any excuse to have a drink until dance and to play music and that's not the Chilean spirit. We are serious people. You know we talk politics. We are very different so for me. It was a cultural shock and also the fact that when you leave your country in a hurry as a refugee you leave behind everything not only your country but or your past no one knew who I awesome what I had done before and nobody cared your refugees. He's way worse than being an immigrant because as a refugee you have very little choices a Sunday may grant you have chosen to go to a place and start a new life. You don't look back as a refugee. You're always unpacked ready to believe again to go back to your country so take us to that point where you're struggling as a journalist journalist and then you move into this fear of writing like what was that like to walk away from journalism say. I'm GonNa do this the writing I I didn't know what I was doing. I was living in Venezuela as a political refugee. I was working administering school which is not the kind of job that I'm good at but then my grandfather was dying. I couldn't return to him. Farewell and I started writing a letter that turned into my first novel Doc. I had no idea what it was. Food wasn't memoir. I had no plan. I just wrote like in a chance for a year and at the end of the year I had five hundred pages on the kitchen counter stained with coffee and Soup and that was my manuscript and Argentina brighter though mass allowing Martinez was passing through Venezuela and you heard that I had a manuscript he said you you know what if you want to get fabulous. You need an agent. no-one come published today without an agent and he gave me the name of Campbell says in Barcelona and so I found her address address and I sent her the manuscript and she accepted to be my age inch. She said something interesting. You said this is a very good book but everybody and write a good first book. The riders proven on the second book in the first book. You pour out everything you have and you don't say anything you think for the future so the second book that makes you really around and that's how it got started coming up on. USA We continue our conversation conversation with Isabel Allende and why her most recent novels have central characters who are refugees. Stay with US nothing right yes. NPR's codes which is a podcast about race in America. That's about all of us are histories. However represented the ways. We've worked together and I and worked against each other. You'll learn you might get mad. You'll definitely laugh but don't take my word for it just listen to NPR's code switch Hey we're back and when we left off we learned about Saturday in this life as the journalist in Chita before she was forced to flee as a political refugee to Venezuela where she wrote her first novel. Since then she's moved to the United States where she has now sold over seventy three million copies of her novels in this part of our conversation. I talked about some of her more recent recent work and how in these times she's been drawn to writing about the immigrant and refugee experience across the globe. Let's get back to our conversation. This has been a particularly challenging time for those of us who are either refugees or immigrants and you've talked about how this experience of displacement and actually it was the thing that forced you in many ways to become a writer and I've been wondering is available. What are you thinking as you look at the faces. This is of these migrants who have been displaced the people who are asking for refugee status in the United States. It breaks my heart my three latest this books all deal with refugees in different moments in the world when people have had to flee and find a home somewhere else and on how difficult that is now we are getting these masses of people that running away from this broken countries and the United States doesn't want to help doesn't want to give them what they are owed. It breaks my heart specially when I see the young kids that children can you talk a little bit about in the midst of winter. This particular Taylor novel is about an undocumented watermelon in the United States. Tell me a little bit about the inspiration behind the midst of winter the doctoral have. I hear Lena Auto Data in the book. She's a young what the Malan girl in a village in a poor village in what was completely taken over by the most powerful gang. The government is inefficient. The police is corrupt. She has no safety anywhere. Her brothers are assassinated. Her family is decimated and she left left alone raped and beaten up with her grandmother. I saw the grandmother says you have to get out because you know these people are you can identify them. Just get it out. I saw the girl starts a harrowing trip alone across all of Mexico in terrible circumstances and cancer the United States where she lives in clandestinity she lives in hiding and documented terrified of being fought underreported and of course exploited because of her situation and the other two characters one Chilean journalist who has lived lived in exile during the time of the dictatorship so she knows what this is about and professor of political science who is the son of a Holocaust survivor her so he also knows what it is. We refugee on these three characters go together in some kind of adventure that it forces them to take risks in that moment they opened their heart and they find solidarity compassion friendship laughter after Love he said you have dealt with so so much loss you've lost children and I just wonder how you dealt with this loss in your life and in your writing matt yet most of the the time when I have been placed in those crossroads in life when something horrible a dramatic or tragedy happens. You don't have many choices. There's no turner tip but to survive and to trace it the best way you can. I feel that I have received so much that life is so brilliant and wonderful wonderful that it compensates for every loss that I have had and when I am in that stage of loss I always feel that ah I have inside the potential or the seed for happiness. Uh In my book in the midst of winter. I started the book with a quote by Albert Camus that says in the midst of winter I finally finally found in me an invincible summer and I think that that summarizes how I have seen my journey in my life life I have been in long winters emotional winters but I've always had been been suitable summer inside and if I give it a chance it will Leila merge and I think we all carry that that possibility so I found it interesting that in an interview with the Guardian you talked about how even though you've had all of the successes a writer. It's only been relatively recently that you say that you've actually actually become confident as a writer. Can you talk about what that means for you. I want to ask you know. Every story has a way of being told what you used for for one story. You cannot apply another one. There's no formula for this instinct and I always had the feeling that the story came to me like a gift aft I'm Ben. My job is to work around it so that I can find the narrative voice that I can find the why you're telling it but the story comes intact in a way and only recently I have found out that if I sit long enough with something I will find the way I will find another do voice and I'm sure that if you ask any creator of any kind they will tell you the same thing that you you have to reinvent yourself and reinvent your craft every single time so that makes you very insecure. At least it makes me very insecure for for a long time but now you know what I don't care so much. I just want to connect and that's it. If I connect with someone honestly early on I can communicate that feeling to another person. I've done enough. You did thank you so much for joining me on Latino. USA Oh thank you it's been your pleasure in this latest novel along pedal of the C- follows two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish civil a war in search of a place to call home.

writer Venezuela United States Chile NPR President Salvador Allende Isabel Allende Chita journalist inventor Sweden Minnesota National Book Award Lagasse President Salvador Gorai president Albert Camus Barack Obama National Palace hardee toe
"isabel" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

11:24 min | 11 months ago

"isabel" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Shots spectators daily politics podcast. I'm isabel hardman and this is the sunday round up the major talking point today has been resignation of the work and pensions secretary amber rudd wrote is not just relinquishing a cabinet post also the conservative whip and plans to stanton standard independent the next election routes departure comes after twenty. One of her colleagues were expelled from the party after critical vote last week andrew spoke to about about her decision. What was crucial thing that made you leave. Two things really andrew first of all the fact that twenty one of my colleagues had the whip removed and the reason they had the whip removed is the second reason that made me leave which is they couldn't see sufficient concentration and planning on actually getting a deal. You're right. I support the prime minister in getting a deal at if not leaving without a deal but the fact is there is a huge amount of planning and preparation around no deal. I've attended a number of those meetings. We are really stepping it out. Which is the right thing to do but i have not seen enough work going into actually trying to get a deal when earlier in the week. I asked number ten for summary of what the planning was for actually getting a deal. I was sent a one page summary so it's the combination of the fact that there's not enough off work going into actually getting a deal which i think is is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do and secondly expulsion of twenty one of my colleagues who are good moderate conservatives in essence. This is about trust. You're saying that you do not trust boris johnson to honestly try to get to deal with the EU. I'm not going to use that words because i believe that he is trying to get a deal with you. I'm just saying what i have seen in government is that there is this huge machine prepared for no deal which is fine oy you might expect in the balance between getting a deal or no deal fifty fifty in terms of luck but it's not that it's like eighty ninety percent of government time going into preparing for new deal and the absence of actually trying to work to get a deal is what has driven twenty one of my colleagues to rebel and i need to join them so you think honestly he is joined to get a deal. It watch deal. I think he prefers to get a deal. That is the question i have no idea i have no idea because what we know is that angola lamarcus and the EU have said get your proposal and we have not given them a proposal whereas all the work that needs to be done to try and come up with alternative arrangements for show where the landing places all that work that needs to go behind it and instead. We're just hearing. We ought to get a deal but there's very little evidence of the chancellor's. Such javid expressed his disappointment at rhodes resignation. I was very saddened by the news yesterday evening. That amber had decided to leave government. She's a good person. She's my friend not just smile colleague but i have to say what's i respect her deeply. I don't agree with her on what i thought was her central point in her letter which was she said the government wasn't taking seriously the issue of getting a deal with the EU and an but i was good to hear from her today that did i say that the the prime minister is doing this seriously. There is a very widespread suspicion not just from our bureau but many other people that really the government is not trying hard for radio. You hear all these voices from brussels. We see no new proposals. We see nothing coming forward. The two sides are diverging not converging to put that to rest. Can you tell me give one shred of a suspicion of a whisper of what the government's position actually is on that day. What is the i mean that view. It couldn't be further from the truth rain rain. Will it tell the trump from day. One from the point this new administration was formed the central focus offer government has been to make sure that that we leave the EU on october thirty first and that is we want to have a deal we absence oh poor deals but said there's no. There's no evidence that government's trying to get the deal. Give give me some evidence. What's the evidence. Is that the prime minister on day one. He set up a group his messina ministers most senior advisers that have been meeting two to three times a week working almost exclusively on getting a deal. There's been numerous meetings. They say nothing numerous bilateral meetings with member states. I've had a number of meetings and discussions the prime minister for example. He is going to dublin tomorrow. There's more meetings in brussels next week and there has been progress. I also interviewed the shadow chancellor. John mcdonnell ma asked why neighborhood refuse to vote in favor of an early general election last week. The truth of the matter is you. You don't election. I because you think you'd lose it. No knows i wanted to election are wanted as soon as we possibly can but sometimes sometimes you do have to put the country before party and the key thing for me now and i think it isn't just across the opposition parties and within the conservative party itself is we've got to prevent boss johnson forcing through a no deal bill because of the damage it could do for very explicit you think that despite the active politics will come into force next week boris johnson would simply run on the clock out and leave without a deal while pretending that all about an election potentially and looks out for what amber amber has just said the lack of preparation for a deal and the concentration on and nodia looks as though that's his strategy. If you don't believe boris johnson you could sort that out by legislating for the date of election the highschool physical when can deal with this tomorrow. We don't believe we can pin him down. I don't trust him an inch and i don't think anyone does. I think we've got a prime minister. Mr now who say he won't even abide by the law by the law of i've never heard that before. We're in a situation now where no one can trust rest while he's in place what can happen so what we've got to do. Now is us every mechanism we possibly can to rule out or no deal and that's what we're trying to legislate on bursary but also once we've got that situation we can then i think fractional time we can have a general election last week. The commons passed bill put forward by labor. MP hilary benn whereas compels deprived to ask for an extension to article fifty. If a brexit do cannot be reached the foreign secretary dominic robb told sophie ridge that the government would come out fighting against the legislation. Do you accept that the legislation passed by parliament law passed by parliament compels boris johnson to ask for an extension rather than seeking no deal if he can't get a deal for personal. The key thing with an extension is <hes> agreement on both sides. I think it's very difficult for the legislation into <hes> micromanage in detail how that conversation will go. We will adhere to the law but we also because this is such a bad piece of legislation the surrender bill jeremy corbyn back. We've also wanted to test to limit what it does actually go flea request the russian and what does that mean look very kathy at the implications and our interpretation of it to may colts team. I mean actually across the board. We will look very carefully. Legally a what's it requires and what it doesn't require. I think that's not any of the lawful thing to do so so there's multiple thing to do and again i'll repeat that legislation is lousy it envisages multiple delays it would effectively try and force us to accept conditions from the EU however vindictive a punitive oh harsh they may be and that's we if we ended up extending we promise make a he won't do it it would cost the taxpayer gross figure a billion pounds each month station will not extend any circumstances. Is that what you're saying. He's been very clear this week say in that way in that he would either ignore so the legislation put forward or always going to behave norfleet government of course you'd expect that and anyway we challenged in the courts but we are going to do with that relations test very carefully what it doesn't doesn't require and that's not only the lawful thing today. I think it's the responsible thing to do. The responsible thing to do is to support they station which weakens on a go seeking position in brussels but labour's shadow attorney general shami chakrabarti was infuriated at the government's approach that what do you make of the position i think it's extraordinary ordinary and the foreign secretary legal background himself the idea a sitting prime minister in one of the oldest democracies on the planet would say i will ignore the law and he was no ignoring the lord's just testing a little bit. Is that what we say to our kids as what we say to poor working people vulnerable people people in this country. Oh it's not breaking the law. It's just testing a bit. I think the position is irresponsible and elitist the idea. There's one law for boris johnson and his mates nights in another law fair for everyone else's pooling. I mean what they would say is that they are trying to enact of. The people that are trying to do upon is trying to block which is i. I said what they say that every tinpot dictator on the planet throughout history has used the excuse of having the people on their side to break the law to shutdown parliament and all the rest of it is absolutely extraordinary and i think it's very i'm british as was the purge of the twenty. He won the twenty one. NPCR conservatives. You know they're not secret. Kuban easters and i just the way the dominic robb mentioned jeremy coupons name about about hundred times in his in his interview as if as if jeremy corbyn is is the scary one. I think a lot of people will look at the <music> behavior these this number ten in recent weeks and decide that the person who's being on british and anti-democratic is boris johnson and finally the newly-independent impeach justine greening told rich about the manner in which she was sacked by chief whip. Mark spencer came to know what happened. When the news breaking that you'd be stripped the conservative whip i mean he's spanked. You hardly get in touch well. I was traveling on the district. I camaldoli do and i had a call from the chief whip. I wasn't able to take it on the tube so he simply left a voicemail. What did he say say. Just informed me that the whip was being withdrawn. I think it might of been polite after fourteen years to try to call me back perhaps a second time but the bottom line safety is that i i think we all would be our night. I'm very clear what my role is in my role list represent my community community in parliament and that's what i did so. Did you have any conversations after that. Boris johnson tried to get in touch with you dominic cummings nobody else's this is called you about quarterback who known just the voicemail just a voicemail and how does that make you feel well..

prime minister boris johnson EU brussels secretary amber rudd jeremy corbyn chancellor andrew isabel hardman angola dominic robb hilary benn javid John mcdonnell ma dublin messina dominic cummings justine greening
"isabel" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"The back of your mind. Let's engage more with higher quality conversations with virtual community. But also take action maybe you can take that little tip from me of maybe it's just one of each year. But for me to events every year for myself for my growth for my support of my mission in who I am who I wanna be. And also this is a great opportunity to again, remember that? You outside of all this stuff that we've talked about today remembering that, you're not alone. And that there is something special about you. There's a a life force. There's an energy that helped to create you and really starting to understand how valuable and how much that really means. Because there are so many different realities that you could be experiencing right now. But you were here, and you have the capability to hear my voice and to to elevate yourself and just again, remembering how special and powerful you are. But you need to get to that place where you eventually have that divine. Yes. And you say yes to your greater mission. You say yes to living a life on purpose? You say yes to really tapping into your unique beauty and your unique greatness. Because you have a gift you have talent you have a capacity that has never been seen before in the history of all things, and you were here right now to exp. Press that, but it's only going to happen when you say, yes, all right? And it's time. So I appreciate you so much. Thank you for tuning into the show today. If you've got some value out of this make sure to share it out with your friends and family on social media, tag me tag Isabel letter. Not thought of the episode, and please no we've got some fire. We got some incredible episodes coming up. I some incredible guests and show topics. Offer you you so make sure to take care have amazing day not talking to. And for more after the show make sure to head over to the model health show dot com as where could find all of the show notes, you could find transcriptions videos for each episode. And if you've got a comment, you can leave me a comment there as well. And please make sure to head over to items leave us rating to let everybody know that the show is awesome. And I appreciate that so much and take care. I promise a key giving you more powerful empowering great content to help you transform your life. Thanks for tuning in..

Isabel
"isabel" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on The Moth

"This is like a little tangent do anything, but like it looked like real jams? So we kept thinking it was anyway. So this was the thing that occupied like the majority of our thoughts and lives, and we would start to talk about our lizard at the dinner table, and we talked to our lizard about wig with our friends, and it was named Opal. And it was really cute, and we literally I would come home from school. And my sister would like drop her backpack and run upstairs and just stroke it for the rest of the afternoon. This is like two thousand seven I like didn't have an iphone. I didn't have anything to stare out. So I just stared at my lizard. Or actually what lizard it was a bearded dragon. If anyone calls it a lizard. We'd be like very like What's what's up to here? drag? So my so my dad was like, really like, okay. We need to get exercise like to make sure he's healthy. I'm so we bought him a leash and every Sunday, we would like walk it around the neighborhood on and family, and like became known as like that family that like had a bearded dragon that walked it and not a lizard with every Sunday our neighborhood new us. They knew OPEL. It was really Hugh. We obsessed with him loved him. Then one day we noticed like, okay. Wait a second. He's a bearded dragon. But he's still green. It's been like literally three and a half years. Like, where's this or that's literally the whole point that got him because he was going to be orange. Opal like what's going on? And we noticed every day. It would just get slower and slower, and we're like no like something room like. And then one day it just like it's is didn't open and my sister was like like like I've never seen this much. My dad like literally do not cry through all Schindler's List was like saw. And we're like, okay. Like, literally, we need we need to do something. Like, we need to get like at a funeral together. Reach invite the neighborhood. So we invited the whole neighborhood. The funeral. We made it a little coffin. It was like me none of tissue paper, and we went to our backyard. Everyone was like oh bone like we saw him on the leaves. You're so cute. And so they all gather around my dad said a speech. My sister wrote a speech, but it was too choked up to say. And we're lowering it into the dirt. I'm like literally putting like dirt on its head. And when you going into the ground, we're all crying. And then all of a sudden it jumps up. Money around our backyard, and like were all screaming. What if? And my sisters like oh my God. Like, we're about to bury you alive. So just dying. If you don't know what to do. And then two days later died. We have yet to get another pet. That was Isabel debris Isabel graduated from Brown University earlier this year, and she's now a reporter for Associated Press based in Jerusalem, the events in this story happened almost a decade ago. And Isabel says that a few years after Opal she bought a vacuum packed frog for her high school science experiment, but she thinks that probably doesn't count as a pet Isabel. I would like to say that I think you're free as a pet owner to decide what constitutes a pet. It'd be pretty weird if you were walking a vacuum pack frog around town. So hopefully, you'll try being a pet owner again in two thousand nineteen Isabel because pets are so important that is it for this week on the moth podcast. We hope you'll join us next time. And we hope you have a story where the week Dan Kennedy is the author of loser goes, I rock on and American spirit. He's also a regular host and storyteller with the moth..

Isabel debris Isabel Opal Isabel OPEL Dan Kennedy Brown University Associated Press Jerusalem one day two days
"isabel" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"isabel" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Isabel, Ted, but local liberty and a murder mystery writer Johnny was very critical of the mode Isabelle's fictional Ryder's character committed I'm sure I to take you to smug self satisfaction in his voice, he told Isabel. I'm afraid you're slipping is a murder mystery writer Isabel at last one was well, well, what what does do complicated, you're gonna kill somebody. Do it simply how would you do it? Oh, I don't know. I dunno know, just use the most obvious method. Most important thing is that no one should suspect me, for instance. Well, for instance, poison of just youth first one that comes to your mind's, a, arsenic arsenic. Oh that would never do Johnny the police zoomed the body in Gloucester four years after the victim's death, and they were still enough poison even in the fingernails. But did they get the murderer? No, I don't believe they did this very minute. There are hundreds of people who've committed murder walking about freely. Thousands of us oppose those measures are happy. John. Oh, I know. Oh, I don't know. Why shouldn't they be here of discovery, Johnny so long as arsenic leaves trace? It seems to me the by now somebody should've discovered a poisoned the contrast. You must have one Isabelle by. I I'm planning a very interesting cops and my next book, Johnny. Change this update pieces about I saw that stock look in your eye when I've mentioned an untraceable poison come on. What is it? I wouldn't tell a million years. I won't give you any risks until you do. So you may as well. Tell me now. Copy very long now until Johnny kills me. He learned the name of the untraceable poison permissible. And after bringing me homie went for a walk into vintage.

Johnny murder Isabel Isabelle writer Ryder Gloucester Ted John million years four years
"isabel" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

WNYC 820AM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"isabel" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

"Not talking about oppression wondering whether jona my high school boyfriend was not asking me to have sex because he was a good kid or because i just didn't want to have sex because when you are sixteen at is actually medically impossible to think of anyone except yourself for longer than thirty seconds because of all these things i probably did not think too much about her about melanie i mean i wanted to have sex i felt i was ready we were ready we were sixteen were in love we'd been dating for a year but i needed him to ask i needed him to want it wanted show badly that he would do the thing you were never supposed to do the thing that we had been warned about again and again in health class put pressure on me pressure boys must not pressure girls girls should not pressure girls now one must pressure anyone to do anything ever but i wanted him to pressure me i wanted to have sex without choosing fully to have sex i wanted to avoid responsibility just a little bit for my wanting the day that isabel turns in her paper about the slaves we do not celebrate or linger it is on to the sermon on the mount christianity sneaks up on us as up on the romans we read each line then discussed i gloss over the bad news about rich people because i am sensitive and whisker ahead to the part about the light about not keeping your light head she considers says so jesus is just like worship me worship me yeah pretty much oh my god he's like fiance or something he's bigger than beyond say she contemplates this for a minute and then her face screws up we can you imagine if you were beyond say she clamps her hand over her mouth agog if you actually were her until this moment it has never occurred to isabel that beyond stay as an actual person until this moment beyond say has been a behemoth an empire a brand there is too much beyond safe for beyond say to be contained in one person of all the mementos from bar mitzvahs on isabelle's dusk.

isabel isabelle thirty seconds
"isabel" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"isabel" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features journalist and author isabel wilkerson recorded live at ted women twenty seventeen don't miss heads new podcast work life with adam grant each week adam takes you inside fascinating work cultures to find ideas we can all use to make our work better this week we explore how humility on professional and college basketball teams propel a group to greater heights an interesting idea for any workplace subscribe to work life that's one word with no space worklife with adam grant on apple podcasts or wherever you listen imagine with me this scene it's a scene that played out in nearly all of our families it's a scene in which a young person somewhere in our family tree somewhere in our lineage had a heartbreaking decision to make it was a decision to leave all that they had known and all of the people that they loved and to set out for place far far away that they had never seen in hopes that life might be better migration is usually a young person's endeavor it's the kind of thing that you do when you're on the cusp of life and so there is in all of our families this young person somewhere in our background that person is standing at a doc about to board a ship that will cross the atlantic or the pacific ocean that person is loading up a truck that will cross the rio grande or that person is standing at a railroad platform about to board a train that will cross rivers and mountains out of the jim crow south to what they hope will be freedom in the north.

adam rio grande isabel wilkerson
"isabel" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"isabel" Discussed on Bookworm

"But literatures being reinvented in our time we don't know what it's going to be but we know would it will no longer be for a while it is not going to be an implement of intellect but an implement of feeling and i think that we lived through enormous beautiful bountiful experiences of literatures intellect and now this is literature as personal story i hear that young riders are calling it auto fiction that it's a step beyond memoir and beyond autobiography back into the fiction that had smarted originally that it's very class based this country is a bow to witness a great resurgence of the literature the lower classes hope the literature of the people who came here thinking no one wanted to hear the story and finding out that it may be the most important story to tell i'm michael silver blood and you're listening to book form from the studios of peace sooner derby i'm talking with isabel allende about her book in the midst of winter will continue after this short break here be monsters the podcast about so the closeness of these two why would they so close what could they possibly have been doing where they carrying something where they holding hands that dr roma is one of the very few that captors a moment in human history we will shine a vignette in time find here be monsters at key c r w dot com slash podcasts i'm michael silver blood this is bookworm and i'm talking with isabel allende about her latest book in the midst of winter a novel sparked by a fateful traffic accident it spans countries in debt gains tanks in issues of human life immigration and humanity or bringing together two kindred souls it also concerns human trafficking yes where do you learn what you nor belt the trafficking the slave trade well my first contact was after i rhode island beneath a sea which is a book about slavery and i got contacted by abolitionist movements and i learned that today in the world there are more slate than ever before and then i started learning about human trafficking which is not as we think only little girls sold in brothels.

isabel allende human trafficking dr roma
"isabel" Discussed on Heavyweight

Heavyweight

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"isabel" Discussed on Heavyweight

"The most motivated could only packed the suitcase exit the front door and make it only so far as the curb and why why can't any of us destroy the letters is it because we believe in stories about love the beauty of youth the idea that somehow contained within this little suitcase a relationship still exists when that's a stand in for a relationship that we've all had and lost i've been looking forward to giving isabelle back these memories but isabel doesn't want my unsolicited gift instead she is offering a gift to me permission to do the thing i normally cannot do to simply let go of the past being unable to let go of the past fuel small somehow and marks you as petty the kind of person who holds onto grudges and painful memories but in that net of memory beautiful things get trapped two moments in emotions that once moved you or a version of you a first love a great meal or that one folly evening when you pick up in innocuous looking suitcase for that had been sitting the your desk for months and leave your office early with a spanishspeaking friend we wanna make your answer and head out into the dark street looking for the perfect brooklyn street corner on which to let it go over there have it under that sri let okay hang on i'll be right back part of eu hopes that someone else some unlike you will find it and treasure it at least for a little while.

isabel eu isabelle brooklyn