27 Burst results for "Isaac Newton"

"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Helpful. Constructive or destructive influences of religion in his work can end in his life. Well there you begin to touch on a complex question The role that god played would be interesting question to answer. Should go and be able to speak with this invisible character who doesn't exist but putting that aside for the moment it. We don't like to talk about others while they're not here so right. Newton is a deeply religious man on unusually so of course with assignment and clearly his upbringing and perhaps his early experiences have exacerbated that in a number of ways that he takes a lot of things personally and and he finds perhaps solace in thinking about a sort of governing. Abstract rulemaking exacting deity I think there is little question that his conviction that you can figure things out has a fair bit to do with his profound belief that this room maker doesn't do things arbitrarily. Newton does not think that miracles have happened since maybe the time of christ if then and not in the same way he was for instance an anti trinitaria he did not hold that christ headed divine being but was rather endowed with certain powers by the rule-maker and whatnot and He did not think that. Some of the Tales of the old testament with various miracles and so on occurred in anything like that way. Some may have some may not have Like everybody else of course. He did think the creation had happened about six thousand years ago. Where really oh yeah sure well biblical chronology can give you a little bit about that little controversial but sure interesting. The deity created the universe six thousand years ago and that didn't interfere with his Playing around with the sun and the moon and the or no. because he's figuring out he's he's watching the brilliant construction that this perfect entity did six thousand years ago has lost lhasa minus years. Well if you go with bishop washer at four thousand four bc. Want to be precise about it. We always the. This is a serious problem. Precise okay let me ask another ridiculous question if If new nor to travel forward in time and visit with einstein and have a discussion about Space time in general relativity that conception of time that conception of gravity will do you think that discussion will go alike. Put that way. I think newton would sit there and shock and say. I have no idea what you're talking about. If on other hand there's a time machine you go back and bring a somewhat younger. Newton not a man my age say i mean. He lived longtime into his mid eighties. But take him when he's in his forties..

Newton bishop washer lhasa einstein newton
"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"That rely heavily on statistics. Okay let me ask you again for a friend about This alchemy thing. You know it'd be nice to create gold but also seems to Come into play quite a bit. Throughout the history of science at perhaps in positive ways in terms of its impact. Can you say something to the history of alchemy a little bit and its impact. Sure it used to be thought two things. One that alchemy which dates certainly back to the islamic period in islam You're talking on eleventh twelfth. Thirteenth centuries among islamic natural philosophers and experimenters albums used to be thought that All me which picked up strikingly in the fifteenth sixteenth century. Fifteen hundreds in thereabouts Was a sort of mystical procedure involving all sorts of strange notions and so on and that's not entirely untrue. But it is substantially on true in that all commenced were engaged in what was known as chris. Oh poi- yeah that is looking for ways to transform Invaluable materials into valuable ones but in the process of doing so or attempting to do so. They learned how to create complex amalgams of various kinds. They used very elaborate apparatus glass olympics in which they would use heat to produce chemical compositions. They would write down and observe these. Compositions and many of the so-called really strange looking out chemical formulas in statements where they'll say something like i can't produce it but it'll be the sole of mars will come by with the this etc cetera. These it has been shown are almost all actual formula for how to engage in the production of complex amalgams And what to do. And by the time of newton newton was reading the works of a fellow by the name of starkey was actually came from harvard Shortly before in which things have progressed if you will to the point where the procedure turns into what historian co chris. Oh poi- which basically runs into the notion of thinking that made these things are made out of particles. This is the mechanical loss affi. Can we engage in proceess chemical processes to rearrange these things which is not so stupid after all. I mean we do it except we happened to do it. In reactors not in chemical processes. Unless of course it had happened that cold fusion had worked which didn't my right but So that's the way they're thinking about these things. There's a kind of mix and newton engages extensively in those sorts of manipulations in fact more in that than almost anything else except for his optical investigations. If you look through the latter parts of the sixteen seventies the last five six seven years or so of that is more on that than there is on anything else. He's not working on mechanics. he's pretty much gone. Pretty far and optics. He'll turn back to optics later on so optics and alchemy. So will you're saying is isaac. Newton liked shiny things. Well actually if you go online and look at what. Bill newman. The professor indiana at bloomington indiana has produced. You'll find the very shiny thing. Called the star regulus which newton describes as having produced according to a particular way which newman figured out and was able to do it. And it's very shiny there. You go proves that their gasquet ball god religion and its role in unions life. Was there.

newton newton co chris affi starkey olympics chris harvard newton Bill newman indiana isaac Newton bloomington newman
"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Okay let me ask you again for a friend about This alchemy thing. You know it'd be nice to create gold but also seems to Come into play quite a bit. Throughout the history of science at perhaps in positive ways in terms of its impact. Can you say something to the history of alchemy a little bit and its impact. Sure it used to be thought two things. One that alchemy which dates certainly back to the islamic period in islam You're talking on eleventh twelfth. Thirteenth centuries among islamic natural philosophers and experimenters albums used to be thought that All me which picked up strikingly in the fifteenth sixteenth century. Fifteen hundreds in thereabouts was a sort of mystical procedure involving all sorts of strange notions. And so on and that's not entirely untrue but it is substantially on true in that all commenced were engaged in what was known as chris. Oh poi- yeah that is looking for ways to transform In valuable materials into valuable ones but in the process of doing so or attempting to do so they learned how to create complex amalgams of various kinds. They used very elaborate apparatus glass olympics in which they would use heat to produce chemical compositions. They would write down and observe these. Compositions and many of the so-called really strange looking out chemical formulas in statements. Where they'll say something. Like i can't produce it. But it'd be the sole of mars will come by with the this the etcetera etcetera. These it has been shown are almost all actual formula for how to engage in the production of complex amalgams And what to do. And by the time of newton newton was reading the works of a fellow by the name of starkey was actually came from harvard Shortly before in which things have progressed if you will to the point where the procedure turns into what historian co chris. Oh poi- which basically runs into the notion of thinking that made these things are made out of particles. This is the mechanical loss affi. Can we engage in proceess chemical processes to rearrange these things which is not so stupid after all. I mean we do it except we happened to do it. In reactors not in chemical processes. Unless of course it had happened that cold fusion had worked which didn't my right but So that's the way they're thinking about these things. There's a kind of mix and newton engages extensively in those sorts of manipulations in fact more in that than almost anything else except for his optical investigations. If you look through the latter parts of the sixteen seventies the last five six seven years or so of that is more on that than there is on anything else. He's not working on mechanics. he's pretty much gone. Pretty far and optics. He'll turn back to optics later on so optics and alchemy. So will you're saying is isaac. Newton liked shiny things. Well actually if you go online and look at what. Bill newman. The professor indiana at bloomington indiana has produced. You'll find the very shiny thing. Called the star regulus which newton describes as having produced according to a particular way which newman figured out and was able to do it. And it's very shiny there. You go proves that their gasquet ball god religion and its role in unions life. Was there.

newton newton co chris affi starkey olympics chris harvard newton Bill newman indiana isaac Newton bloomington newman
"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:19 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Of newton because he didn't publish this thing. Although i he became quite well known as quite brilliant young man in part because people heard about his work and so on a when another young man by the name of godfrey live nets visited london and he heard about these things i it is said that he independently develops His form of the calculus which is actually the form we use today both in notation and perhaps in certain fundamental ways of thinking it has remained a controversial point as to where exactly and how much independently leibnitz did it live. Knits aficionados think and continue to maintain. He did it completely independently newton when he became president of the royal society. Put together a group to go on the attack saying no. He butts taken everything. We don't know But i will tell you this about Twenty five or so years ago a scholar. Who's a professor at indiana. Now name domenico melli got his hands on a live. Knits manuscript called the ten taman which was leibnitz his attempt to produce an alternative to newton's mechanics and it comes to some conclusions that you have in the newton's mechanics will he published that but meli got the manuscript and would meli found out was that leibnitz reverse engineered the principia and cooked it backwards so that he could get the results he wanted. Now's for the mechanics. So that means his mind allows for that kind of thing some people. They're breaking so today. You're starting suddenly romo. Some people think so. I think most historians of mathematics do not agree with that A friend of mine rather well known. Physicists unfortunately died a couple of years ago and they might now enberg at uc. Santa cruz had some evidence along. Those lines didn't pass muster with many of my friends who are historians of math. In fact i added with a historian of maffei technical journal and we were unable to publish it in there because we couldn't get it through any of our colleagues But i am i remain. What is it about those tense relationships and that kind of drama. Einstein doesn't appear to have much of that drama. Nobody claimed. I haven't heard claims that they've grabs because such crazy ideas of any of his major Inventions major ideas being those. That are Basically i came up with i or independently. There's not as far as worn that many people talking about general relativity especially in those terms but with newton. That was the case i mean. Is that just a natural outgrowth of how science works is there's going to be personalities that i'm not saying about lines but maybe i am that there's people who steal ideas for the.

newton leibnitz meli domenico melli godfrey nets royal society enberg maffei technical journal london indiana romo Santa cruz uc Einstein
"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Probably not thinking terribly deeply about it based on what he said along with others like the architect and mathematician. Christopher ran a hearken back to the notion that well maybe there is a kind of magnetic relationship between the moon and maybe the planets and the earth and gravity and so on vague but establishing a direct connection somehow. However it's happening forget about it. Newton wouldn't have cared about that if that's all they said but it was when hooked mentioned this different way of thinking about the motion away. He could certainly have thought of because it does not contradict anything. Newton is a brilliant mathematician. And he could see that you could suddenly start to do things with that that you otherwise. Wouldn't this lead eventually to another controversy with hook in which hook said well after newton published great print. I gave him how to do this. And then newton of course got ticked off about that and said well listen to this. I did everything. And because he had a pick a little idea he thinks he can take credit for it. Okay so his ability to play with his ideas mathematically what solidified initially tuition that you could have was the first time he was born the idea the action at a distance the you can have forces without contact which another revolutionary idea. I would say that in the sense of dealing with the mechanics of force like effect considered to act at some distance. It is novel With both hook and newton a at the time the notion that two things might interacted a distance with one. Another without direct contact that goes back to antiquity. Only there it would thought of. Morris is sympathetic reaction you know to a magnet and a piece of iron. They have a kind of mutual sympathy for one. Another like Like what love. What are we talking about. Actually they do sometimes talk like that. That his love the mets. I see now i talk like that all the time i think love is somehow in consciousness center forces a physics that yet to be discovered. Okay now there's the the other side of things which is calculus. The begin to to talk about the newton brought a lot of things to this world. One of them's calculus..

newton Newton Christopher Morris mets
"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"You know. I think you might find interesting because it's from. It involves that guy named hook. That newton had an argument with and He had lots of arguments with hook although hooked very very clever guy and gave him some things stimulated him later anyway hook. Who was argumentative. And he really was convinced that the only way to gain real knowledge of nature is through carefully constructed devices and he was an expert mechanic. If you will at building such things now there was a there was a rather wealthy man in Don sig by the name of hevelius. Latin is name. He was a brewer in town and he had become fascinated with the telescope. This is thirty years or so twenty or thirty years after the telescope had moved out and become more common and he built a large observatory on the top of his brewery. Actually and working with his wife They they used these very elaborate lee constructed grass and metal instruments to make observations of positions of the stars and he published a whole new catalog where the stars are and he claimed it was incredibly accurate. He claimed it was so accurate that nothing had ever come close to it. Hook read this and he says wait a minute. You didn't use a telescope hear of any kind because what's the point Unless you do something to the telescope or dots with stars you just use your i. Your ice can't be that good. It's impossible so what had hooked due to prove this. He said what you should have done is. You should have put a little device in the telescope that lets you measure distances between these dots unit. Do that and because you didn't. There's no way you could have been that good. At two successive meetings of the royal society. He hauls the members out into the courtyard and he takes card any make successive black and white stripes on the card and he pays the car up on a wall and it takes them one by one he says. Now move back looking at it. Presumably with one eye until you can't tell the the black ones from the white stripes That i can then measure the distance. I can see the angles. I can give a number then. For what is the best possible. Would we would call perceptual acuity of human vision and it turned out. He thought to be something like ten or more times worse than this guy have alias had claimed so obviously says ho cabela's well a years ago I calculated Hevelius numbers and so on using modern Tables from this and so on and they are even more accurate than hevelius claimed and worse than that the royal society sent a young astronomer named halley over to don sig to work with them and halley writes back and says i couldn't believe it but i could. He taught me how to do it. And i could get just as good as he. How is it possible while here. This shows you something very interesting about experiment. Perception and everything else hook was right but he was also wrong. He was wrong for the right reasons and he was right for the wrong reasons. And what do i mean by.

newton royal society lee Hook ho cabela hevelius halley don sig
"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

02:42 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Oxford and elsewhere is that qualities are there in the world. They're not in us. We have senses and our senses can be wrong. You know you could go blind things like that. But if they're working properly you get the actual qualities of the world now that break which is occurring towards the end of the sixteenth century in his most visible in descartes is the break between conceiving that the qualities of the world are very different from the qualities that we perceive that in fact the qualities of the world consists almost entirely in shapes of various kinds and may be hard particles or whatever but not colors not sounds not smells not softness and hardness. They're not in the world there in us that break. Newton is picking up as he reads descartes. He's gonna disagree with a lot descartes but that break he is among other things picking up very strongly and that underlies a lot of the way he works later on when he becomes skeptical of the evidence provided by the census. Yeah that's that's actually a. I don't know the way you describing soap. Awful to this makes makes me realize how liberating that is as As a scientist at somebody's trying to understand reality that our senses is just our senses are not to be trusted. That is to be investigated through tools that are beyond our senses. Yes or that improve our sense of who've our census in some ways As pretty powerful for. I mean that is For human being that's like einstein level for for human being to realize you can't trust can't trust my own senses at the that time. That's pretty trippy. Coming in it's coming in and i think it It arises probably you know a fair number of decades before that Perhaps in part with l. chemical experimentation and manipulations that you have to go through elaborate structures to produce things and ways you think about it But let me give you an example you know..

Oxford Newton
"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"At all. Because reverend smith took his mother away to live with him a few miles away leaving newton to be brought up more or less by his grandmother over there and had huge resentment about that his whole life. I think that gives you a little inkling that a little bit of trauma in childhood. Maybe complicated father son relationship can be useful To create a good scientist could be although this case it would be right. The absent father non father relationships speech. He was known as a kid. Little that we do know for Being very clever about flying kites and their stories about him putting candles and putting flying kites and scaring the living devil out of people at night by doing that. And things like that making things most of the physicists and natural philosophers i've dealt with actually As children were very fond of making and playing with things. I can't think of one i know of. Who wasn't actually that very good with their hands and whatnot He was His mother wanted him to take over the manner. It was a kind of farming manner. They were the class of what are known. As yeoman's there are stories that he wasn't very good at that one day one of the stories is he's sitting out in the field and the cows come home without him and he doesn't know what's gone at anyway at relatives and He manages to get to cambridge sent to cambridge. Because he's known to be smart. He's read books that he got from local dignitaries and some relatives and he goes. There is what's known as a sub size. What does that mean well. It's not too pleasant. Basically a subsidiser was a student who had to clean the bedpans of the richer. Kids go right. That didn't last too long. He makes his way And he becomes absorbed in some of the new ways of thinking that are being talked about on the parts of descartes and others as well. There's also the traditional curriculum which he follows and we have his notes. We have his Student notebooks and so on we can see..

reverend smith newton cambridge yeoman
"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"The question is how deep does it go if you are very mathematically inclined the prevailing notion for Several decades now has been what called string theory But that has not been able to figure a way to generate probative experimental evidence although it pretty good apparently at accommodating things and then the question is you know what before the big bang or actually word before doesn't mean anything given the nature of time but but Why the why do we have the laws that prevail in our universe. Well there is a notion that those laws prevail in our universe. Because if they didn't we wouldn't be here that's a bit of a cyclical but nevertheless compelling definition and. There's all kinds of things like the. It seems like the unification of those laws could be discovered by looking inside of a black hole because you get both general relativity and quantum mechanics quantum field theory in there Experimentally of course. There's a lot of interesting ideas we can't really look close to. The big bang can look that far back. This caltech and mit will lie go look in gravitational ways perhaps allows us to march backwards and so on yet so the exciting space and there's of course the theory of everything like with a lot of things in science captivates dreams those who are perhaps completely outside of science. It's the dream of discovering the key. To how the you know the nature of pow everything works and that feels that feels deeply human as perhaps the thing the the basic elements of would make a scientists in the end. Is that curiosity that long to understand. Lemme ask a you mentioned disagreement with weinberg on the reality. Could you elaborate a little bit. Well i obviously. I don't disagree with steve weinberg on physics itself. I wouldn't know enough to even begin to do that. And clearly you know. He's one of the founders of the standard model and so on and it works to a level of accuracy that no physical theory has ever worked at before. I suppose the question in my mind is something that In one way could go back to the philosopher immanuel kant in the eighteenth century namely can we really ever convince ourselves that we have come to grips with something that is not in itself knowable to us by our senses or even except in the most remote way through the complex instruments that we make as to what it is that underlies everything can we corral it with mathematics experimental structures. Yes Do i think that a particular way of corralling nature will inevitably play itself out. I don't know it always has put it that way So the basic question is can we know.

Lemme steve weinberg weinberg immanuel kant
Christie's to Sell Isaac Newton's Notes for Greatest Work in London

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Christie's to Sell Isaac Newton's Notes for Greatest Work in London

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Christie's will auction Isaac Newton's notes for his greatest work next month Christie's has announced hand written notes containing Isaac Newton's jotted revisions to his master work the Principia will go up for auction July eighth in London Newton's mathematical principles of natural philosophy published in sixteen eighty seven set up the laws of gravitation and motion Christie's expects the revisions to sell for between eight hundred fifty thousand dollars and one point three million dollars the first edition of the book sold at auction for three point seven million dollars in twenty sixteen the page and a half of notes for a planned second edition includes comments and diagrams by Scottish mathematician and astronomer David Gregory hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi Isaac Newton Christie Newton London David Gregory Mike Crossey
New Force Of Nature Leaves Physicists Over the Muon

What A Day

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

New Force Of Nature Leaves Physicists Over the Muon

"Cancel culture might becoming for sir. Isaac newton assisting have discovered a new fundamental force the results are from the fermi national accelerator lab in illinois which has been doing experiments on me. Wan's milan's are subatomic particles that are similar to electrons hundred times heavier. Maybe even two hundred one times have year after a full year in quarantine. Thank you. this is why. I'm a professional physics. Comedian i go to the conferences. The experiment involved measuring the wobble of milan's any big magnetic field based on the most current model of particle physics. They should have wobbled at predictable. Rate when scientists recorded wobbling rate. That was faster than expected. They were led to hypothesize enu fundamental force was at play. Of course if you're not on hive like me might not mean a lot but people in the physics community are very excited. They say this finding has the potential to clear up galactic mysteries like dark matter. Look all good. Keep it up guys. Just let me know before you do something that all into a black

Fermi National Accelerator Lab Milan Isaac Newton WAN Illinois
"isaac newton" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:47 min | 8 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"You can find great videos on youtube of people. Walking quickly across non newtonian fluids like cornstarch mixed with water the initial force of step on it causes the viscosity of the fluid to increase very briefly allowing you to walk over it. If you walk quickly if you standstill then you'll just sink the fact that these are called newtonian and non newtonian. Fluids should give you an idea. As to the importance of isaac newton's contribution he probably would not be awarded this prize by himself. There are many other scientific fields at noon influenced but it's hard to grant him a prize because he didn't actually do anything. In those fields for example there are laws intellectuality and magnetism which are very similar to newton's gravitational equation. They were clearly inspired by newton. But newton didn't actually do anything with electricity or magnetism likewise he was the first person to theorize artificial satellite. But it was really just an application of his gravitational theories there is however one more nobel prize that he probably would've earned the final nobel prize however isn't for science. He would be an economics. Newton didn't spend most of his life working on all the scientific discoveries i listed. He spent most of his life working on things like alchemy and trying to decipher biblical prophecies. He also had a very prestigious job for over thirty years as the head of the royal mint at the time. England and other countries had problem with coin clipping. This is where people would shave off the edges of a coin. They would keep the shavings which were made of the same precious metal and then try to pass on the slightly smaller coin. New oversaw a new coinage system in england where the coins had milled edges. These are small on the edge of coin. Many coins still have these today including the us quarter and dime the edges ensured that if anyone tried to clip the coin it would be very obvious because the milled edges would be removed and the coin would become smooth. This may not sound like a big deal right now but for the seventeenth century. It was a huge deal. It was a landmark in stopping coin. Debasement and inflation so ten potential nobel prizes is pretty good. It's one less than what i gave. Einstein but i can't think of many people who would be awarded theoretical nobel prizes than sir isaac noon. The associate producer of everything everywhere. Daily is thor thomsen. As five star review comes from apple podcasts. In the united states listener po jones writes binge worthy the first and only podcast. I've ever downloaded all the episodes. I usually listen to five or six day and enjoyed all but one.

thor thomsen england five five star Einstein Newton po jones six youtube today newton isaac newton first seventeenth century over thirty years first person England one more newtonian isaac
"isaac newton" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:36 min | 8 months ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"In a previous episode. I went over the number of nobel prizes then. Einstein could've one or should have one assuming they gave out posthumous awards. This was a relatively easy exercise. In so far as einstein actually did win a nobel prize and i was able to limit the discussion. Mostly things that did win a nobel prize but einstein. Just get credit for this. Exercise is much more difficult. Isaac newton died in seventeen twenty seven and the first nobel prizes weren't given out till nineteen o one. Moreover the world of science was really different in the seventeenth century compared to what it was in the early twentieth century. Newton was making discoveries in very basic things compared to later discoveries. You wasn't fact picking the low hanging fruit in the world of physics nonetheless. It was newton. That did it. He laid the foundation. Would scientists still being taught today so because this is such a theoretical exercise. I'll define something as nobel prize worthy if it's a discovery that was a significant advance in science. Or if it allowed for significant advancements in science. Because i'm doing this almost three hundred years afternoon staff. I have the benefit of hindsight to see which of his advancements have stood the test of time. Let's start with one of newton's biggest accomplishments in the one which might cause the most controversy in this discussion calculus as i noted in my previous episode on who invented calculus newton certainly invented calculus independently. But he never publicized. The controversy lies in the fact that there is no nobel prize for mathematics. However there have been prizes given out for the development of techniques that allowed science to advance for example the nineteen ninety-three prize in chemistry was given to carry mullah's for development of the pali. Mary's chain-reaction technique for dna replication..

Einstein Isaac newton einstein Newton early twentieth century Mary seventeenth century newton nineteen ninety-three prize today three hundred years seventeen twenty seven mullah nobel first nobel prizes one nineteen o one
Orbits are roadways in space: Heres why you should care

The 3:59

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Orbits are roadways in space: Heres why you should care

"So you have nice explainer on how orbits working and you talk to one of these professors who called orbits roadways in space. I i like that. I like that idea. How does orbiting around the earth work in. How do scientists and engineers actually ensure something like a satellite maintains a stable orbit around us orbits. I think are under appreciated. What you might not realize spaces actually pretty close. It's only about sixty miles up. Which yeah okay. That's a lot but you know if you get in your car and drive sixty miles. It's not going to some entirely new zone in the universe right but space is very different. It turns out the hard part about space is not getting up sixty miles. It's getting so that you're moving. Horizontally fast enough to stay in orbit. You come right back but if you go horizontally fast enough you stay in orbit. And that's where that roadways in space comment is germane because what it means. Basically you're going fast enough that you don't fall down and hit the earth you don't go you stay up there and it's it's pretty neat. There's some atmospheric drag but mostly if you put a satellite in orbit it just keeps whizzing around the earth. And that's pretty remarkable one of the actually. I was researching this story. What am i. The my favorite parts of it was looking at what is called newton's cannonball so isaac newton right gravity lights l. This stuff back in the sixteen hundreds he had actually a really good thought experiment that reveals a pretty clear way. How orbits work. he said. Imagine you're up at the of a very high mountain and you shoot a canon ball horizontally now if you shoot it. With a certain speed goes near flies a little ways and plops down hits. The earth fired a little harder. It goes farther and it's the earth but if you fire it at just the right speed the gravity that pulls the cannonball down exactly balances the curvature of the earth so it just keeps on going around the earth now and the real world. That's not possible because during the mountains. High enough in there's a resistance and all that kind of thing but it still shows. I think pretty elegantly. What in orbit is it's this balance of of an object spacecraft falling down because of gravity but also moving horizontally fast enough that it that it keeps on going around earth in in an orbit. Well that's an interesting trick because you talk about moving horizontally at the right speed. When i see rockets launched their. They're launching up vertically right not not horizontally. So how do you get from that. Tremendous bruce up vertically to a point where it goes horizontal and stable enough to actually maintain its orbit chirp. This is one of the tricks of rocket. Rocketry says why when people talk about rocket science. It's not easy right rockets. Actually almost immediately start turning sideways right after launch so at launch they go up and they use a lot of fuel to go up but the majority of the fuel they use is to go sideways so when you watch space shuttle or space x or any of these rockets you'll note that it starts tipping over towards the east usually and it tips over more and more and more and more. If you watch a spacex launch they actually have a very nice Three d computer view that shows the track of the rockets and you can see that very rapidly. It's going sideways more than it's going up. So the vast majority of the energy needed to put a rocket into orbit is pushing it sideways. Not up if you look at some of these rockets like new shepherd from blue origin. Jeff bezos says rockets startup. Those just go up and down. And that's actually a lot easier than going sideways. Which is what spacex does when it gets a satellite into orbit or in iss launch capsule with some astronauts in it. It's a lot harder to go sideways. Yeah you know you talk about this rocket science. This is not easy stuff calculating you know when it needs attorney or how it gets to the pre velocity. It actually maintains or like. How difficult is that to calculate. It's pretty difficult and you. It's not just the calculation it's also the execution so you have to steer the rocket and what you have to realize about a rocket is. It's you're sitting on top of a controlled explosion so you can think of something like unisom. Tnt blowing up or something. It's catastrophic huge release of energy. A rocket is the same kind of thing. It's a chemical explosion and you just control it just enough that the thrust in one direction. So it's pretty hard to get this balanced just right. It's easier these days because you have advanced. Computers have accelerometers all over the place that no just exactly how much thrust is pointing which direction and you have radar tracking stations that can give lots of details about the launch. So it's easier than it was gonna by apollo missions fifty years ago or something like that but yeah it's still hard.

Tremendous Bruce Isaac Newton Newton Jeff Bezos Spacex
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
"isaac newton" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on WTVN

"Salon now tell us it's perfectly safe to go and burn down the police station in Minneapolis the same public health experts as rush noted on Friday Sir Isaac Newton the fellow who develop the three laws of motion the apple felonies cared so Isaac Newton not coming up for auction is his proposed treatment for the plague this is not posted nineteen it's the old school black death he said won't choose the black death is towed vomit lozenges he's got a two page recipe for it first you need a toad and you have to suspend the towed by its legs this is the recipe spot on the Rush Limbaugh show it's a new regular feature so we're getting towed vomit today I used to spend a toad bites legs in the chimney for three days until it vomits up off with various insects in it you have to catch the vomit on a dish of yellow wax when the tow dies you grind the body into powder mix it with the vomit and then make it into Los Angeles and this will drive away the contagion and draw out the poison this is Sir Isaac Newton he's a great guy the law of gravity and all the rest of it and he's come up with this recipe of toad vomit lozenges as a way to treat the black death he did this in sixteen sixty seven but his notes are now coming up at auction at Sotheby's in Portsmouth in England and the bidding is currently at sixty five thousand dollars and I don't know I have hi I'm but to the best of my knowledge I've never had a toad vomit Los ange but right now I would bet on that rather than any of the advice coming out of the World Health Organization or the CDC no one knows nothing it's quite extraordinary three months into this thing all day it's on services no it's not in services you don't need to worry about school it's a crime now if you go out without a mask don't worry a symptomatic people are the ones who were the reason we only to be locked up for the last three months now we found out we finally found out after three months of you being out in the house arrest of that in fact a symptomatic people don't translate over did we say that only twenty four hours later on when I'm turning on a dime and reversing that stick with the toad vomit lozenges folks Sir Isaac Newton knew what he was.

Minneapolis Sir Isaac Newton Limbaugh Los Angeles Sotheby Portsmouth England Los ange World Health Organization CDC
Isaac Newton

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Isaac Newton

"On this episode five minutes in Church history. Let's talk about a scientist Sir. Isaac Newton. He was born in sixteen forty three. He died in seventeen twenty seven he was actually born in the exact same year of the death of Galileo. He was born in originally humble circumstances. His father died three months before he was born in sixteen sixty one he went off to Cambridge. He had a grasp of Latin and a very curious mind. He would pass the time sketching clocks and windmills and other kinds of gadgets. Once he got to Cambridge he studied astronomy. This was the era of Copernicus and Kepler and of course he studied the classic Philosophers Aristotle and Plato. He kept his notebooks and in one of them. He wrote amicus Plato. Amicus Aristotle's Maga's Amici Veritas. Plato is my friend. Aristotle is my friend. Truth is my best friend. And he also let Cambridge embarked on studying mathematics. In fact he would come to the way in this field he is credited for inventing the study of Calculus as he called it the calculus of infant hassles and it was also while he was at Cambridge that he studied the motion of the moon and the planets and he recognized this force. That was acting on these planets orbit. He was discovering what would come to be called the law of gravity. He would go on to publish. His books is famous book in Seventeen. O four the book called optics and in There. He puts forth his theory of colors. A very interesting a young student in the colonies at the College of Connecticut. We know it as Yale. University would get a hold of Isaac Newton's book optics and he devoured it. This of course is Jonathan Edwards. And he wrote his own little scientific paper he called of light rays and this was all from. Reading Isaac Newton and Edwards draws this corollary from just being amazed at how the actual physical human eye processes light rays. This is what Edwards had to write hence the infinite art that was exercised in the formation of the eye that has given it such an exquisite sense that it should perceive the touch of those few rays of the least fixed stars which enter the eye which all put together won't amount to the million million million million million to part of the least moat of such an exquisite sense that it should distinctly perceive an image upon the retina that it is not above the eighty million millionth part of an inch wide. That has so nicely polished the retina that it should receive so small a picture upon it when the least pro Tuba Rinse or an evenness would utterly destroy and confound it here's Edwards amazed at the human eye but far more amazed at the God who created the human eye and the God who created the universe and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for Edwards and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for so many other people as Alexander Pope. The poet has it that nature and nature's laws lay hidden by night. God said let Newton be and then there was light Newton as the father of modern science. Believed that no way would science give us less room for God or somehow make less space for God and understanding of him? In fact it was the exact opposite for Isaac Newton. The more he studied God's universe the more he was led to acknowledge and worship God. Newton once said gravity may very well explained the motion of the planets for the can't explain who set the planets in motion. God governs all things and God knows all that is or all that can be known. That's the Great Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton Jonathan Edwards Cambridge Aristotle Scientist Seventeen Kepler Yale College Of Connecticut Alexander Pope
5 Cathedrals

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 1 year ago

5 Cathedrals

"On this episode of five minutes in Church history. We are going on quite the journey. Let's explore five cathedrals in Europe ready. Well we'll start in Florence at the Santa Maria del Flora or the Duomo di Ferenza as Tian's would call it. This cathedral was started in twelve ninety six. It was finished in fourteen thirty six and one of the final structures that was put into place for this Cathedral. Was the famous dome. It was designed and built by Brunelleschi. Who had studied geometry and physics but for much of it by his own account. He relied on his own intuition. And well it worked The Dome was built in. It still lasts. It's made of brick. It has its white ribs in its terra cotta tiles and it serves as such a great backdrop for so many spy movies. So I'm sure you've seen it or the site of that Cathedral. There and Florence goes all the way back to a church that was likely dedicated in three ninety-three by none other than ambrose of Milan and that's the cathedral at Florence. Well let's keep moving. We'll go to Paris and to Notre Dame in two thousand nineteen. It was all over the news. Of course because of that fire it will take millions to rebuild and it will take many years to it as restored. It was first built back in eleven sixty three it epitomizes that ribbed vault and flying buttress style those cathedral structures that are so crucial. It was the site of a temple to Jupiter and the early Roman days and then it was a church and then it was a cathedral in seventeen ninety three. This is the time of the French Revolution. It was rededicated no longer as a church but as the cult of reason and all of the statues to marry were replaced and they were replaced by Statues Lady Liberty Well. It stood that way for many decades and then along came a novel. Victor Hugo's the hunchback of Notre Dame in eighteen thirty one and when that novelist published drew attention to the cathedral and its restoration so Paris. Well let's travel a little north and let's go up the Rhine River and let's go to Cologne. Germany and Statistics abound about this cathedral in Cologne. Germany are you ready? It is the tallest twin spires church in the world. It is the second tallest church in Europe and it is the third tallest church in the world. Those twin spires reached five hundred sixteen feet. Construction began in twelve sixty four. Here's a statistic for you. It has one hundred eighty five thousand square feet of space. This is a huge building. It was so huge that the allied bombers use those twin spires as a landmark further bombing raids during World War Two. The cathedral survived it. Took some hits but it survived in. It stood in a pile of rubble that was the city of Cologne. If you go there today you can climb all the way up to the top for viewing platform. If you're willing to climb five hundred and thirty three stone steps you can also hear. It's eleven massive bells. The largest of those bells weighs twenty four tons. Well let's cross the English Channel and we'll go over to London to Westminster Abbey. Westminster Abbey has a number of people buried in it and the number of people memorialized in it. Over three thousand people have plaques inside Westminster Abbey and many of them are actually buried there. Isaac Newton the poet Robert Browning kings and Queens and princesses and princes and of course inside Westminster Abbey in Jerusalem chamber in the sixteen forties. We have the writings of the Westminster standards. Well let's reach north a little bit. We've gone from Florence to Paris to Cologne to London. Let's go to Edinburgh to Saint Giles. Cathedral it dates back to eleven twenty four. But it's glorious. Moment came in the sixteenth century. It was the seat of the Scottish reformation in fifteen fifty nine. John Knox was installed as minister at Saint Giles. What a great story. What a great story. All of these cathedrals have to

Westminster Abbey Cologne Florence Paris Europe Germany London Saint Giles Rhine River Santa Maria Del Flora Victor Hugo Duomo Di Ferenza John Knox Tian Ambrose Milan Edinburgh Isaac Newton Jerusalem
"isaac newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So with social distancing the new normal what is there to do to keep busy handle social distancing in our own way. Some in fitness community are determined. Malley stay in shape but socialize similar doing virtual yoga classes. Others are turning to art and I have found. The coloring is very very soothing. And some are even more creative and since today's Saint Patrick's Day why not hunt for a Leprechaun and then there are those truly rare birds. Like Sir Isaac Newton. He wants turned his time in quarantine into an opportunity to change. The way we understand the world around us we're all living in the ripple effects of history a butterfly flaps its wings in China in the nineteenth century and your Uber driver misses the turn for the airport or a twenty two year. Old Genius is forced to stay home from college and ends up becoming a father. The father of modern science. Welcome to flashback. A new podcast from ozzy the creators of the thread. I'm Sean Braswell and I'll be your visiting professor taking on a journey through history that will change the way you look at the past and even at some of its most disastrous events in the great plague hitting one in sixteen sixty five Isaac. Newton wasn't a sir or a scientific legend just a college student at the University of Cambridge. And when the university closed its doors and Senate students home for the Seventeenth Century version of social distancing Newton return to his family estate to spend his time working on a few of his own pet projects. The young scholar thrived at home calling the year. Plus he spent away as his year of wonders among other things news time to work out calculus and his theory of gravity aided by the apple tree right outside his window noon return to Cambridge the following year with some groundbreaking theories under his belt ideas that would make him a college fellow. Then a professor in ultimately the founding father of a new scientific age history is littered with stories like Newton's Year of wonders. Stories about unexpected turning points and hidden connections you just have to know where to look. That was the world we saw was the only world saw and occasionally do a little digging. I heard about Hitler's personal physician fit Morrell and I found extraordinary that he's case notes. On Adolf Hitler's health had been lying in the archives for the better part of sixty seventy years and they revealed. The most extraordinary story in the first season of flashback will connect the dots on some of the most incredible unintended consequences in history. We'll hear about dangerous books. It assumes that you're interested in this conspiracy that explains everything that's wrong with the world and their explosive legacy a massive car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oakland City about virtuous intentions the Ymca steps into the gaffed says. We'll we'll volunteer in the vices. They can produce stacks of cash piles of weapons in a mountainous cigarettes and about remarkable individuals who can reshape entire industries. Today comes back not just apply but again aiming to be the best. We'll learn about how some of the past greatest unintended outcomes. Continue to impact us today. What we have now is really a almost endless environment for this kind of propaganda. Stay at home and change the world or at least the way you look at it. Learn ABOUT HISTORY. Unintended consequences.

Sir Isaac Newton visiting professor Adolf Hitler Malley Saint Patrick China Cambridge Isaac Senate Sean Braswell University of Cambridge ozzy Oakland City Morrell
The United States of McDonalds

Gastropod

12:45 min | 1 year ago

The United States of McDonalds

"For ME GROWING UP IN CHICAGO. McDonald's was always around. We had birthday parties at McDonald's because her apartment was on on the small size I went to McDonald's after work in high school and after school. It was the go-to meal when my mom Um and I were driving far distances and we needed something to eat and so I have probably spent most of my life inside of McDonald's so the fact that I wrote a book about McDonald's. McDonald's is actually not that surprising. This is Marsha chatwin. She's a professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University and her new book. The book about McDonalds. It's called franchise the Golden Arches in Black America and speaking of the Golden Arches. There's another new book out called drive through dreams. James A Journey through the heart of America's fast-food kingdom it's by journalist. Adam Chandler the Golden Arches are thought to be according to independent survey more recognizable as a symbol. Both then the Christian crosses around the world recognizable or no. I didn't imagine we'd ever focus an entire episode on McDonald's but here we are Dr Together. Adema Marsha Taylor story about McDonald's that is about much more than McDonald's making it perfect for gastropod and we of course our guest repod the podcast. That looks at food through the Lens of science in history. I'm Cynthia Graber and I'm Nikola twilly and this episode. We're getting to the bottom of how McDonald's took over America. The story starts with WHO invented the hamburger burkart. And how did it become so ubiquitous that it gets bigger from there this episode. We're asking his McDonald's basically America's national cuisine and if it is is what can it tell us about who we are as a country less. How did the tax payer ended up funding the spread of McDonald's in the inner cities and why we're civil rights groups on board? Well whatever idea you have of of. How huge fast food is you should double or triple in your mind because the statistics are bonkers? They're completely bananas us. Eighty percent of Americans eat fast food every month. Ninety six percent of them eat fast food every year which is more than the number of Americans that participate participate on the Internet atom. Says there's not a single place in America that eighty percent of Americans go to at least monthly not a library or Jim or any house of worship according according to the Centers for Disease Control which is not happy about this stat. More than a third of American children eat food every day and for the population as the whole. It's roughly the same thirty six percent of us. Eat it every single day out of all the fast food available to us in the US. The biggest I the most popular chain the one that serves literally one percent of the world's population every day of course it's McDonald's which according to somewhat recent stats sells seventy five burgers every second and Serbs sixty eight million people per day. There is no real way to get your head around numbers that large. But what's weird is that's is makes McDonald's the biggest almost everything everything. It does so marshalled as the McDonald's is even the largest distributorship toys in the world just because of happy meals. At how do they get that big to answer that we we have to go back to the beginning. It all starts about one hundred years ago with the invention of the hamburger. Well there is a lot of debate as is debate about anything culinary in this world about who invented invented any particular item there are many authors but a lot of historians culinary or otherwise. We'll give credit to Walt Anderson. And he was a fry cook in Wichita who one day in one of those kind of Isaac Newton Aha moments got really frustrated when he was cooking a meatball on a griddle and smashed it flat right with the SPATULA and the result was a burger that cooked through really quickly and he put them in these specialty buns. And that's sort of the most recognizable version of of the Burger that we have well Anderson's meatball. Smashing moment was a breakthrough. He went onto lunch white castle. And that what is believed to be the very first fast food chain in the nineteen teens and twenties. There weren't fast food chains. Americans lived in a very different world less connected less cosmopolitan. I'm a politician. Even as late as nineteen twenty five only half of all the homes in the United States had `electricity even fewer had indoor plumbing. People weren't used to dining finding out regularly. Generally speaking there wasn't a unified culinary culture. There wasn't one item. We had ethnic enclaves that had their own specific blends of items that that were cherished and part of a tradition but in the nineteen twenties America was starting to change. The model t was becoming more affordable and the number of people who owned cars more than quadrupled. Adam told us that nineteen twenty was the first year that more Americans lived in cities the not the US was starting to become urban. The First World War was the first mechanized war and the nineteen twenties. He's was the machine. Age Technology promise to streamline and modernize every aspect of American life the nineteen twenties was also. The beginning of radio's Golden Age and more and more people started to tune into music and mystery and comedy shows. Radio started to create a national culture at the end of World War One reserved this unifying aspect to American elect. Technology was bringing about and the hamburger was part of that was part of finding a national diet. The hamburger did have one hurdle to overcome Americans. At the time. I'm was scared of ground meat. They were scared of it. Because they'd all read the jungle by Upton Sinclair and they were nervous about the quality of the food. The jungle was a really important book from the Early Nineteen Twenties. We talked about it in our episode. On the history of preservatives. It told the tale of a semi-fictional worker in a Chicago. Slaughterhouse and the nightmarish conditions there for both the workers and the resulting meat while Anderson than meat ball smashing genius behind the hamburger. He was fully aware that Americans thought ground meat was likely full of dirt and and dead rats and even workers fingers so what he did was he designed these stores that all look the same. They had stainless steel interiors white tiles and they look like castles and white castle was meant to kind of convey this stately safe grandeur of a place where you could go and it would be the same everywhere you went so it was meant to reassure consumers. Who didn't really know what was safe to eat? And that really set the tone for what would come in the future of these industries of franchising of seeing something wherever you are in saying. Oh I knew it. I'm going to get here. This is familiar to me. White Castle was the first to open in franchise fast food restaurants. But it isn't the biggest today as you all know. That title goes to McDonald's. McDonald's brothers were these two men from New Hampshire sure who had kind of seen the extremes of the great depression and they headed out to California to see where they could strike business. Gold Dick and Mac McDonald headed West in nineteen thirty. They were in their twenties and their thought was. Maybe they can make it big in the movies. That didn't find as much success as they'd hoped they were two sons of a shoe factory foreman and they found success more for in the business side of production the catering. They went from that into the restaurant business. They opened up a barbecue. Stand in nineteen forty and southern California and and it was one of the drivers of the era. That people are often familiar with car. hops in major at boots and a young guys cruising in in cars and people hanging out and just kind of a big scene and they were successful. First restaurant was called McDonald's and it was in San Bernardino which is just east of La. It's meaningful that. McDonald's started in southern California because southern California was really where a lot of changes that overtook. America were happening kind of on on steroids by the early nineteen forties. The Great Depression was finally over. San Bernardino is shifting from being farming town to more of a manufacturing and service industries industry center people were moving their into the growing city and suburbs and increasingly. They had a little disposable income but also San Bernardino was on route sixty six and so it was a place where a lot of people were traveling throughout California as well through as the rest of the country. So Dick and Mac McDonald. Were doing pretty well for themselves. But but then after eight years in the restaurant business. They surprised everyone by deciding to close their popular successful restaurant and entirely revamp it. The re diagram to what the kitchen would look like they use this assembly line model that White Castle and kind of employed and they cut the menu items from twenty five to nine. They also fired all all of the young women who are car hops because they felt like they were flirty and they would distract from the work that was happening there. They also wanted to pivot away from being a teen hangout to family friendly place. They got rid of silverware because people would steal it or break it and they went to wrapping Burgers in paper and they wanted to create the most efficient kitchen possible in order to serve as many people as possible. And so the revision of the McDonald's drive in is what we are living with today a highly automated mechanized kitchen and that is able to produce high volumes of food and a very short period of time. What they did was they basically just souped up the kitchen and turned it into a factory? An assembly line dusted with Hollywood magic. And the result was they could serve food for cheap even cheaper than their previous menu items had been. I didn't know what to make of it but it caught on very quickly. This new McDonald's factory style restaurant didn't just catch on with eaters. It became a total phenomenon. Within the restaurant industry. Eight people were coming from all over the country to kind of hear and see what was going on because there were these whispers in the industry about this place that was so popular and and you know there were long lines and people were talking about this place. That was not just serving a lot of people but serving a lot of people quickly so eventually the founders of Burger King Taco bell a couple of other chains that didn't quite make it ultimately stopped by and they copied with McDonald brothers. Were doing as Z.. Listeners know some of those copycats are still around today. One of the businessmen who came to see it was none other than Ray KROC. He was a salesman and he sold the mixing machines machines for milkshakes and the McDonald Brothers had bought a shockingly large quantity of these machines so great thought he'd go and see what they were doing with them. Ray had been in nearly every kind end of commercial kitchen available. At the time. He'd played jazz at speakeasy. During prohibition he'd sold kitchen and restaurant supplies around the country so he came to the McDonald's restaurant in San Bernardino we know and he saw the crowds and he was completely blown away by it and so immediately said this needs to be national. This needs to be everywhere. Ray convinced the brothers. Let him start working with them before long. He bought them out. And the tool that ray us to fulfil his dream of taking this model national and then global global was the franchise so franchising is this concept that a parent company provides all of the blueprints and the instructions and the recipes for a product or service and the Franchisee pays Hayes for the right to deliver that good or service to an audience. Ray KROC didn't invent this franchise model White Castle had already been using it and in fact many experts think that at the root of the idea goes back to the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages tax collectors did the work of the church and collected tithes and the kept some of the money for themselves at the start of the twentieth century. Rick Coca Cola had used the franchise model to make their sugary drink available at drugstores across America. But it was ray KROC who really took this franchise idea and ran with it. The franchise model. I think is amazing because it allows companies to pass on all of the liability to this other party so so that was sort of the way in which McDonald's grew really quickly and also took a lot of the risk out from opening places and this is the way they maintained control over franchisees so it was consistent. You didn't have rogue franchisees trying to sell Pepsi when you had a contract to sell coke and so it was a complicated system. But it's what turned McDonald's into the the biggest in the fastest growing fast food restaurant. The

Mcdonald Mac Mcdonald America Mcdonald Brothers San Bernardino White Castle Ray Kroc United States Walt Anderson Early Nineteen Twenties Chicago Adam Chandler California Golden Arches Mcdonalds Marsha Chatwin Georgetown University Professor Of History
"isaac newton" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"The sun can only be seeing basically during a class when the wanna blaring light or the sun is is blocked out by by the moon. They took images they went home. And then they looked at the same stars. When the sun was an different part of the sky, and they found inside predicted that Starlight gets bent by heavy object in this case by the sun by a tiny amount, but they were able to measure that and basically they found that gravity Ben's white while and I became famous basically overnight when this is an ounce in November of nineteen nineteen. There were headlines light stars. All skew. You in the heavens. I mean, there are a headlines in all the newspapers around the world. And I think part of it was that this was after World War One, and you know, the British doing this testing this theory of of German-born, scientists was a kind of a way of unifying countries that had been at war. So there was drama because of the wartime, but there was scientific drama because they you know, they saw this this crazy thing which and if gravity bends light from stars that means that something about Ravi or massive objects is actually warping space time is crazy bizarre idea of Einstein's seem to be cracked. And I the way I think of it is solar eclipse of nineteen nineteen. These new black hole images kind of book and his century that I think is like no other in history of science or history. The physical sciences how close Ron Isaac Newton get to some of this. Now, it's interesting Newton's theory. They're heat you can take his theory and predict if you think of. Of photons, which are particles of light is having some kind of mass. We now know that's not true. They're massless. He in his theory predicted a certain amount of bending, but it was only half the amount that Einstein had predicted. So Einstein was right and Newton was Wong. And it's also true that the theories are vastly different. I mean, Newton talks about gravity as a force between two objects a force. It happens instantaneously, for example. Oh, the pole of the sun on the earth. He said that that togue isn't instantaneous talk. If something happens if the some would lose half, its mass, you would feel that immediately on earth. Einstein said, no, nothing, you know, nothing can be transmitted faster than light. It takes time for something on the sun. If it changes. To be felt on earth. And and again instead of talking about a force Einstein said that it's it's the crew richer space time things don't fall to the ground. Or if you think of shooting a ball, and it's a parabolic pastor things don't fall because of force things fall. Because hey space time is crew in such a way that objects will follow a certain path. It's not that earth is exerting a gravitational force, but earth is warping stays time that it's almost as if gravity is geometry, would you agree? Ron with the thoughts that everything in the universe has a place in a has some order to it all has a function. It's so of from from the way physicists or are. You know have developed the laws of our discovered, I should say the laws of nature it it seems. So so far. I mean, we do not. There are many many puzzles, obviously that we have not solved, but it seems like everything is governed by physical laws and buy something. Yeah. And of course, that leads up to the question. How did it all start? My gosh. If we just take God out of the equation for a moment do that. How did it start? Well, I mean, we talk about a big bang that. There was bang bang, Bang Soo says, you know, a hot and dense object, and you know, you shouldn't think of it as you can look. Down and see the universe being tiny, the tire universe was just very small. Then it's not like you can look down and see that. Oh things at once down in the past. I mean, the whole universe was that small and that there was some kind of explosive vent. And there was this giant expansion. Some people this explosive type of rat..

Ron Isaac Newton Einstein Bang Soo Starlight Ravi Wong
"isaac newton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The next greatest podcast? What is needed in the podcast world? Yes. As someone who works in business development. What's the answer to that? So I think actually what's really needed in the podcast world. Like, some trashy reality TV style podcasts. Oh, yeah. Like podcasts are very cerebral. Very like academic in some ways. But like people are really missing out on just that guilty pleasure podcast catcher. You want to ruin podcast. That's fantastic. All right. Julia. When you ring in we'll hear this your opponent is Chris sear? You're a stand up comic and writer, Chris you proposed your wife in an olive garden parking lot. I did. Yes. I mean, she's my wife. Okay. It worked. I mean, it could recommend this course of action. But it worked for me. Did she think it was romantic now? So. At the time. She didn't tell me it wasn't romantic. But over the last twenty years, she's implied it. All right, Chris when you ring in we'll hear this, Jillian, Chris whoever has more points after two games. We'll go on to our final round our show is seven years old. So our first game is about childish insults. A seven year old might make it's called sick. Burns from big brains. Will imagine what it would sound like famous highbrow thinkers delivered lowbrow digs so ringing indentify the person. Here we go. In seventeenth century physics. Who said your mom is so fat when she saw an apple fall. She ate it instead of formulating the law of gravity. Chris, sir Isaac Newton..

Chris sear Isaac Newton Julia apple writer Jillian twenty years seven years seven year
"isaac newton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back with the theoretical physicist. Sean Carroll is retired about his work. The big picture, John. You are a booster for Isaac Newton. How come? Well, I do think that Isaac Newton was the greatest, isn't it? Maybe the greatest scientist and greatest mathematician, whoever lives le-le-let's splash, quite a claim and the only sort of did science for his life. He more or less retired and from science and moved to London and became the leader of the British mint in hunt down counterfeiters later in his life. Why did he get involved in all of this? I mean, he was a great thinker. What turned him on? It wasn't an apple. The story goes that he probably invented the apple story himself does he he'd like to burnish his own image? He had quite the ego. He was one of the original sock puppet. Actually, I think Newton would write reviews of his own work in signed them with different people's names, though that he would come out looking good. But you know, he was a competitive guy. He's a brilliant guy. He was fascinated by religion as well as by science. Most of his good work was sort of a response to a challenge in one form or another someone said like we don't know the answer to this problem. No one will be able to solve it or you can't do this. Or how would you ever go about doing that? And he just sat down thinking stuff out, Sean. Do we have Isaac Newton brains today? Yeah. Probably. But you know, there's a lot of stuff going on you have to be in the right place at the right time to be Isaac Newton. And he was you know, he came right after Galileo, and others had laid a lot of groundwork Galileo was really mind himself. But he he didn't have the mathematical genius. That Newton had much more intuitive physical thinker probably people like that around today. But you know, what they're doing? Maybe they're radio in one of the chapters and sections you talk about caring. How does that fit in? Well, I think that you know, the the point of view that I advocate in the book is naturalism that there's only one world the natural world. And it'll be as the laws of nature the laws of physics, whatever you wanna call them. And a lot of people get turned off by this point of view. They think that it. Does it sucks out meaning and mattering and purpose from the world. So I try to point out that even if we are made of atoms that obey the laws we still care about what happens to us about what happens to other people. And that's the real source of why we judge certain things to be right or wrong. Why we give purposes to our existence so forth. It's the fact simple fact, undeniable that we actually do care what happened to open to other people you address life after death the existence or non existence of God, I want to get in. I want to spend some time on both of those. But overall, what is your thoughts? On how life has evolved is a roll of the dice. Or is there some intelligence behind it? I think the I buy into the more or less conventional scientific explanation for this. There's two things we need to understand one is the actual beginning of light the origin of life, but find his call Abio. Genesis the transition from non life to life life being something that can breed not breathe, but soaking energy from its environment sustain itself, and then eventually replicate itself and once life can replicate itself can hand down the information that makes it itself to another generation with a slight modification, then the second piece kicks in which is our winning evolution natural selection. The genetic information that gets passed down from generation to generation is not an exact copy. It will be slight changes from time to time. Usually, those changes will be bad, but occasionally, they will make the organism even more fit and interesting. And so that's how. Go from a single cell organism four billion years to go to all the wonderful diversity of life. We see today in does it continue to change. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Like all forms of life are definitely changing some faster than others. It depends on what your environment is. When your environment changes a lot. Then the your genome tends to change quite a bit. And so when that physical bean dies a lot of us believe that it goes off into a different plane of existence the spirit world, right? What does physicists Carol half? So I do not believe that I'm gonna take the minority point of view here. Oh, boy for many wait till we opened up the phone lines on this one. That's the guy. I'm happy to have the conversation. I think everyone should be thinking about this stuff. I think that, you know, the crucial insight for me is that life is not a thing. It's not a substance that fills you up and energize you life is a process like is something that happens. It is very much like a enormously more complex version of a burning candle. You know, the candle can be burning Oregon not be burning. It's still the candle, but when it's going on and burning that's a different kind of process happening. And the same thing is true for a living organism. It's a collection of stuff atoms and molecules acting in a certain way and going on and at some point that process stop, and that's the end. That's there's nothing more after that. So it's all over. Yeah. That's right. So the last chapter book is called three billion heartbeat because average human being just on average. Now has a life span that is measured in human heartbeat three billion. And if you think that that's it. If you think that that's the entirety of your life. And every one of those heartbeats becomes quite precious. And you should do your best to make the life that you're actually living right now something special. Doesn't that feel kind of empty? No. Why would it? I guess that's why you're the scientists. You know, I tell the story I give the example in the book at the writer, Chris Johnson points out of the movie, it's a wonderful life. I love that movie. Yeah. And it's a it's an obvious religious message in it's a wonderful life. I would think so they've by an angel who who currently the spiritual message, that's right spiritual Tiberi, but what Chris Johnson points out is that what actually makes George Bailey realized that his life has meaning is not thumb devotion to a higher power demonstration that he has had an impact on the actual lives of actual people living in the town of Bedford ball. It's the real tangible impact in the world around him really really mattered. And I think that's all that ever matters. The people we know and love and care about the world that we live. In fact, that is what matters. So then we move onto the big question about God. And its creator, the creator of everything I'm going to guess that you don't believe in God. That is correct. You guess breakfast? I did I know that. Well, if you read the book. Giving that away. But you don't get a lot of points for that. But now did you ever believe in God when you were a kid? I did. Yeah. I mean, I grew up in a fairly standard, Episcopalian household and went to church, Sundays trinity cathedral in Trenton, New Jersey and love the big wooden pews and stained glass windows, and the hymns and the whole day. What changed your mind your views? It was gradual. But you know, I learned more, you know, by by changing views, mirrored, humanities changing view as I learned more about how the world work. It just seemed increasingly implausible that God played a big role in it. Then as I became convinced, it universe doesn't need to be created or sustained or guided it can just be then the purpose of God seemed to evaporate, but doesn't it baffle you that that phrase alone that it just is. Isn't that strange that something as vast as the universe as complex as the universe as organized as the universe as wonderful as a universe? And that includes us. Just happened. Yeah. I think this is a really put your finger on. But I think is one of the biggest reasons like people do believe in God. I mean, it's helps provide an explanation for why the university. Now, what a non believer would say is. Okay. But then why does God exist? What what is where did he come from? And a well trained theologian has a set of answers to that. There's a certain dance you can do about how universities tinge into didn't have to exist. But God is necessary. And so forth. But at the end of the day dot is necessary. Universe can just be. And this is certainly the lesson of the last five hundred years of studying the universe that we've seen that. You don't need. A mover to explain motion in the universe. Motion is natural existences naturally. It is a huge change in mindset from what you might think of as your understanding of the intuitive everyday world that I'm very happy to grant you and so people find it difficult to do. But once you make that shift in paradigm, go. Yeah. Okay. That makes a lot more sense. So I've Ma I'm not very religious. I think I'm very spiritual. But I'm not very religious. And I have a difficult time trying to contemplate what is God. What's it supposed to be? Yeah. I don't think it's a man. I don't think it's a woman. I just think it is. My mother wants told me Sean that God always was always will be in a kind of sounds like a definition for the universe. Doesn't it? Well, always was always will be you know, we these these are these kinds of questions. Is that we have to approach them keeping in mind that once we go very very far outside our everyday experience, our intuition, and our feelings for what is natural and unnatural. I'm more or less useless. Right. Me. We're so far outside the everyday world. So when you say that something always is always wasn't always will be. That begs the question of whether or not time itself is eternal or finite. Integration. Was there a beginning time itself? So the universe. I think exists whenever time does and not one time dozen. But I don't know whether that span of time is finite or infinite survive always believed that there's something behind all of some kind of driving force. I don't know what it is. But there's something there. You know, when we talk about life after death. I mean, I can't tell you how many calls I get from people who. Aren't making things up. I mean, these are cases that are happening where they see ghosts. They see spirits. They see strange things happen. And I can't negate that. Maybe you can. But I just can't say that they're all not or they're seeing things something's happening to these people. I don't like to say that they're nuts or they're seeing things their diluted or anything like that. I mean, people might be very sincere. There are obviously a lot of cases that are fake. It does happen. Sometimes there have been some bestsellers recently where claim to get evidence for heaven. And then later admitted that they just made it all up, but I think that's not the majority of cases, I think the people are being honest with themselves, but the truth is. Beings are just terrible at accurately. Reconstructing what they think that they saw the study after study has shown how bad eyewitness testimony really is that accurately portraying things that happen. Our brains are very very successful in the huge number of late. So we have to.

Isaac Newton Sean Carroll apple physicist scientist Galileo John London Chris Johnson Trenton Carol half Oregon Bedford New Jersey writer George Bailey five hundred years four billion years
"isaac newton" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"isaac newton" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"Coke. I try to hear about this, you know, kind of need God, man. So I think that so in short is fine is a time traveler, I mean, how do you know that much have that big of a different of scope one brain of billions of people the odds that but that's one of the billion. That's how you explain it, right brain. He's got just like Isaac Newton Isaac Newton. This guy was so fucking smart. He literally invented calculus calculus did not exist until apple hit this motherfucker on his bushy ask goofy looking air. Oh, and he's like what the fuck is gravity. Like, why did that apple fall? Nobody ever even thought about that. They're just like, oh, you know. Here's the ground is just walk around on it. And he's the first dude was like, no like, why does shit fall to the earth? Right. You know? Wow. That's fascinating. Then he made. Calculus is the math as to what he created to support it and calculus, you know. Everyone's like, oh fucking calculus is coming up. That's the hardest hit to learn that motherfucker. Like, no, I made that when I was like twenty two I made all this recipe. Yeah. Some have in the kitchen. Dang you to Mankin. Yeah. So that's interesting. Then so his whole thing was okay. At that point in time. You can watch something. And then you could figure out the the stuff behind it. Like why does? So why let me make? Yeah. I think he was like the the father of a physics, basically, he invented. I am I, you know. Yeah. And and just a disclaimer for all the physicist for all the scientists watching us who are talking about what ignorant fucking asshole. I am. Yeah. I'm ignorant fucking asshole. So you've probably got some things wrong there. Yeah. And if you think I'm I am so yeah. Someone's working on Expos video right now about how Isaac thinking Isaac Newton invented calculus Nazi propaganda. I'm trying to think about Isaac Newton. But here's the thing. So, you know, I bet time travel though, if I really had to think about it to have that different one super brain is you're saying like if some guy came in right now and said, hey, what you guys don't realize is like, maybe it's the guy wrote the book that like your feelings are connected to your muscles. And there's this simple little exercise of this this equation that we don't even realize it could take us to a whole new level of how to exist. Oh, damn boy. Yeah. Okay. Nausea, Saint Laurent, bro. He might have been a dang lady. Now, this could he could have been a dang lesbian. Oh, and what about you don't think? Well, I yeah. Why are these geniuses have the bomb stare because man, you gotta have this shit Stein bomb s hair? Look at that shit. You fucking kidding me? And that's like a ladies co two in it yet is bro. Pretty schick? It is a nice code. Did. He's got the best quotes to rub. Your in my face. I did all my ass. What I tell you guys smart motherfucker. I think he was in sigma Epsilon NU to you guys that quotas for. He crazy. What was he enterprise? Everybody's genius. But if you judge a fishbytes ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it stupid and lake that in that. Take that in for Matt. I don't people make up quotes, by the way. This is the thing. People would be like, oh, our ice Stein said this, and then you gotta take a lot of impact. But it just some key like fifth-grader. Yeah. Imagination is more important than knowledge. I remember he said that I think and that's true in his case. Because of the thought experiments was my favorite thing. Russell they have it at DisneyWorld when I was a kid, and we ate a little bit of you know, said I got awesome. It was awesome. Dude. Dude. I'll tell you this when you're on acid bre Japanese people are the most welcoming I'll say that by far. Well, I guess they don't there's they don't make very many assumptions about what they expect..

Isaac Newton Isaac Newton schick apple Isaac Newton Stein Mankin Russell physicist Nausea Saint Laurent Matt
What Is Light?

BrainStuff

04:35 min | 3 years ago

What Is Light?

"Light. In addition to being a bright, Patrick, sunshine on your window. Sill is a metaphor for enlightenment and exploration, which is a bit paradoxical for phenomenon that even after thousands of years of inquiries and endless experiments. Scientists still can't quite explain is it a particle or wave or both or neither do we need a new word for it. Your eyes tell you a lot about the way light behaves. It travels so fast that seems instantaneous about one hundred eighty six thousand miles or three thousand kilometers per second. It blazes through air and space and laser like straight lines. But it also bounces reflects and refraction, and when it interacts with the right medium like a camera lens, it make her we know that it's made up of tiny units that we call photons, and we know that the term waves can describe its movements. But neither of these words really encompass lights auditees in ancient times. The Greeks used philosophy to attempt to address lights wide range. Of behaviors perhaps they thought light is actually composed of little bits of stuff that bounce to and fro the idea never really caught on then in the sixteen hundreds French philosopher Rene Descartes became convinced that light was essentially a wave one that moved through a mysterious substance that he called platinum Isaac Newton thought that light was a particle, but he was at a loss for a way to explain many of its properties. Like the way it refracted and could be split by prison from a single beam of white light into a rainbow of many colors of light. This was largely before the rise of empirical studies in science wherein, we attempt to answer questions about the world around us by designing experiments that demonstrate well how stuff works back in the day. Science was a matter of philosophy people coming up with about how stuff works and basically arguing about the ideas merit to be fair. Our modern microscopes computers and other equipment help just for example, lights behavior becomes more evident, depending on where you're observing it in the vacuum of space. Ace light zips along at the aforementioned one hundred eighty six thousand miles or three hundred thousand kilometers per second. But point a beam of light at a very dense bit a matter say a diamond, and it can slow to only around seventy seven thousand miles or one hundred twenty four thousand kilometers per second much easier to observe relatively to try to explain in. These are modern times. What light is let's I remember some science basics waves are not a thing or substance. They're a property of thing. A wave is a compressing and stretching of a particular medium, a like an ocean wave that drives toward the shore or the ripple spreads out across the surface of a pond when you toss in Iraq, you can see the waves with your eyes feel them with your body. And sometimes when a sound wave happens in the air, you can hear them with your ears particles on the other hand are not quite so easy to define particle can be a tiny bit of matter. A matter broken down into its smallest and most basic units water, for example, is made up of countless party. Guls particles that are affected by waves. What's really happening when you watch a wave in the ocean or ripple in a pond is that each particle or molecule in this case of water is being moved and thus the medium of the ocean or pond is being compressed and stretched in sequence and we see waves, but light as experiments have proven also consists of particles that we call photons the behave like waves. Let's unpack that there was a famous nineteenth century double slit experiment in which researchers beamed light through two slits and observed the way the light struck a screen behind the slits what they saw was that the streams of light affected each other like two hands splashing water in the same sink as if they were waves interfering with one another. But then in the twentieth century scientists began their pioneering explorations into subatomic particles. Like neutrons electrons, Albert Einstein wondered what would happen? If you emitted light one photon at a time in the double slit experiment. What scientists saw dumb found? Did them the single photons went individually through the slits, but the way that they struck the screen over time showed the same interference pattern that occurred with full-scale beams of light streaming through both slits this behavior can't be explained by the physics. We use to describe particles and waves in the macro world around us, it's in the realm of quantum mechanics. The physics theories that describe what goes on at the very smallest subatomic levels, and which we humans still don't really understand. So ultimately, if you want to answer the question, what is light you could call it both a particle and wave and you'd be correct. But as for fully explaining why and how it works. We're still working on

Sill Rene Descartes Isaac Newton Patrick Albert Einstein Iraq One Hundred Twenty Four Thousa Three Hundred Thousand Kilomet Three Thousand Kilometers One Photon Two Hands
The Hottest Stories on the Internet Today (Monday June 18)

Flashpoint

02:47 min | 3 years ago

The Hottest Stories on the Internet Today (Monday June 18)

"Hawking's ashes were interred between the graves of charles darwin answer isaac newton and his family members dignitaries and a select few members of the public celebrated his life a european space agency antenna in spain beamed his voice out into space toward a black hole hawking's mechanical but very familiar voice was accompanied by music composed for the occasion by van jealous the greek composer who won an oscar for chariots of fire stephanie who taught at asian college pleaded guilty this week in a michigan circuit court to a charge of unauthorized computer access authorities say yaas locked into other people's email accounts without permission over a four day period last year at the college reset everyone's passwords and assigns everyone the same temporary password and other professor learned what y'all had done and told school officials the seven episode jeopardy winner was later fired yasa's winning streak in two thousand twelve was a record at the time for a female contestant it was later broken wonder woman took place during world war one now the sequel is set some seventy years later warner brothers has released the first images for wonder woman nineteen eightyfour including gal gadot back as the title character and the return of chris pine as steve trevor even though his character apparently died in the original how small dumbo director tim burton's live action take on the classic tale of the big eared elephant who could fly the popular pachyderms arrives theaters next march double duty for julia roberts the oscar winning actress is set to star in and produce the feature drama little be based on the chris cleave novel show play a british magazine editor who connects with a young nigerian girls seeking asylum no word when little be will hit the big screen in hollywood i'm david daniel news when you want it twenty four seven w g o w news is our first name usually the eleven fifty rush limbaugh live loon till three on eleven fifty w g o w a m twenty eighteen campground there's families here there's other folks here just part there's parties going to be happening this weekend daryl you're throwing one on monday yes so for the other party which is going to be the final party of fork fast at a party that i'm throwing as the after the athletic event correct including a beer mile yes i and a few others there are two competing calendars that i know.

Spain Limbaugh David Daniel British Magazine Chris Cleave Julia Roberts Director Dumbo Chris Pine Warner Brothers Michigan Isaac Newton Charles Darwin Hawking Daryl Hollywood Editor Tim Burton Steve Trevor
Department Of Homeland, Westminster Abbey and Charles Darwin discussed on Special Programming

Special Programming

01:39 min | 3 years ago

Department Of Homeland, Westminster Abbey and Charles Darwin discussed on Special Programming

"Looper says many visitors during this crucial summer tourism season are canceling their plans after hearing of the fire and these are small businesses don't have a lot of the lastest bounce back on after a month of bad sales the state's delegation says they will be trying to bring relief funds to the community from fema and the us small business administration for npr news i'm dan voiced in drank oh on wall street stocks closed slightly lower f recovering from heavier losses earlier in the session the dow jones industrial average fell eighty four points the nasdaq composite index lost fourteen and the s and p five hundred to three points this is npr news figures from the department of homeland security indicate that almost two thousand migrant children are being detained in the united states without at least one parent parents and their children were separated after entering the us illegally across the southern border attorney general jeff sessions says it's part of his department's zero tolerance policy sessions is being slammed by some members of congress over that policy and by civil rights leaders for using a biblical passage to justify it british physicist stephen hawking was laid to rest in london on friday npr's debbie elliott reports that memorial events included a transmission into outerspace hawking's ashes have been interred between british science greats isaac newton and charles darwin at westminster abbey the gravestone is etched with hawking's equation describing the interplay of a black hole one thousand members of the public from around the world were selected by ballot to join family and friends for the.

Department Of Homeland Westminster Abbey Charles Darwin Isaac Newton Debbie Elliott London Stephen Hawking Physicist Attorney Looper NPR DAN Congress Jeff Sessions