23 Burst results for "Irving Berlin"

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:37 min | 3 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the Irving Berlin song book and Change Partners. Must you dad every day with same fortunate man. You have done with him since the music began. Won't you change partners and dance with me? Must you dance white oak? Lo lose with your legs touching his fain days. Can't you see I'm longing to be in his plays? Won't you change partners and thence with may ask him to sit this one out. And while you're out, tell the waiter to tell him he's wanted on the telephone. You've been lying. In his R ever since heaven knows where way. World huge change partners and you may never want to change partners again. Ask him to sit this one out. And while you Oh, tell the waiter to tell him his wallet on the telephone. You've been lying loved. Yeah, it is our ever since heaven knows where way won't you change apartness? You may never want to change partners again. Change partners again. Some many places and so many faces So many parties and show those since I had met. You tried to forget you. Where it will end. No one. No. I went to London town to clear up my mind. Then on to Paris. For the fun I could find. I found I couldn't leave. My memories behind Where can I go? Without you. Tried singing Germany. But that wouldn't do Went to Vienna, but I found you there at even in Switzerland. Your memory came through. Word. Can I go without you? I want to travel. I want a Roma Hi Taste the rainbow across the scene. I'm tired of faces. Um, quit old places is is if you can't be the With me. Goodbye to Germany. Due to front ends. Farewell to London town. There haven't its eyes I'll trade the sights I've seen 41 loving glance. Where can I go without you? So many places on so many faces, But where can I go? Without you. Music.

Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

"Well hello kristin welcome back to the podcast while it is so good to be back with you. Thank you for having me. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your podcast as it has grown. You've done some really exciting things and talk to some incredible people and so it's been a real joy to watch it will relations by the way. Thank you for being a listener as well as a guest but yeah it's good to have you back and so what was it. That drew you to dorothy fields. And why did you want to write a book about her well. To be honest. I started studying. Dorthy fields a master's candidate at the university of kentucky and one of the bugaboos about graduate school. They expect you to have a research project and the real catch is. It needs to be something. No one else's ever researched before so it can be pretty tricky because If it's something that no one's ever researched before how are you going to know about it right. And how are you gonna find research about exactly so you're really starting from scratch. So i went to graduate school bride. Probably twenty three twenty four year old new. I wanted to study. Musical theater was in the theater. Department had no idea what that specific topic would be that. I would research for the next two years. Actually i was planning on doing a phd. So would have been the next four years. I knew it would be related to musicals. I knew what related to the golden age of musical. So i was thinking cole. Porter irving berlin oscar hammerstein. I loved lyrics and Each of these wrote lyrics so that was something that was already drawn to. But every time i talk with my advisor she was We know everything about quarter. Everything's been done about oscar hammerstein. There've been books written about and by irving berlin says she would just keep shooting down and rightfully so. Because i needed what was going to be my contribution right. What was what was going to be my something that i could add to the academy so to speak. And so as a person of faith. I literally prayed and prayed and prayed and prayed and one day in her office. It was as if i saw this blinding vision across my eyes and it just was the name dorothy fields and i knew nothing about dorothy fields. Except that i recognized her name from the show card from sweet charity. Nineteen sixty six charity And i had seen that show card. So much of course had the cd collection. So i am the the cd case very much like the show card. And so i just blurted out. What about dorothy fields adviser stopped. And said i don't know anything about dorothy fields and so that was two thousand three. I went home and it was the very early days of googling there. There was not much on the internet yet. But there was enough that i could see my goodness. This woman wrote the way you look tonight. This woman wrote. I'm in the mood for love. This woman wrote on sunny side of the street. This woman was the brain power behind any. Get your gun. She came up with the idea to do a show about any oakley. And so i went back to my adviser at a different class to that night and told her. What do you think about this. This is what i found out. She says let's do it so it's been almost two decades that i've been at this but i continued that work not only for masters but also for my doctoral dissertation which i ended up doing my phd at the university of georgia. But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason. Why perhaps she didn't seek the spotlight and it wasn't until later in her career. She became concerned with legacy and she hired a publicist at and that happened in the late. Nineteen fifties as. I think her her brother died unexpectedly. Her husband died unexpectedly her her dear friends and collaborators beginning to die and i think she realized at that point. Hey maybe i am concerned with being. And i do need help to accomplish that.

Dorothy Fields Oscar Hammerstein Dorthy Fields Porter Irving Irving Berlin University Of Kentucky Kristin Musical Theater Cole Berlin Dorothy Oakley University Of Georgia Lexington Athens Hammerstein Cole Porter Porter
The Great Gatsby and All Your Favorite Works from 1925 Have Now Entered the Public Domain

Mark Levin

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

The Great Gatsby and All Your Favorite Works from 1925 Have Now Entered the Public Domain

"Public domain day when works from 1925 are now free fall to use and build on the most notable works from 1925 entering the public domain this year are the Great Gatsby in Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway as well as works by Agatha Christie Instant Claire Lewis. There's plenty of music, too, with works by Irving Berlin, Duke Ellington and George and Ira Gershwin. Blues from W. C. Handy and Ma Rainey works from 1925 were supposed to go into the public domain in 2001 after being copyrighted for 75 years, but Congress extended their copyright Taunton 95 years. Which brings us to today, artists who want to create their interpretation of public domain works can do so without fear of a lawsuit, leaving a range of creative possibilities.

Mrs Dalloway Claire Lewis W. C. Handy Woolf Agatha Christie Irving Berlin Ira Gershwin Ma Rainey Duke Ellington Virginia George Taunton Congress
"irving berlin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:41 min | 9 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Are they twinkled his dimples How merry. His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry. His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow and the beard on his chin. This white This is snow. Stump of a pipe. He held tight in his teeth and the smoke. It encircled his head like a wreath. He had a broad face and a little round belly that shook when he laughed Like a bowl full of jelly. He was chubby and plump, A right, jolly old elf, and I laughed when I saw him. In spite of myself. A wink of his eye and a twist of his head soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread. He spoke not a word but went straight to his work and filled all the stockings, then turned with a jerk and laying his finger aside of his nose and giving a nod up opportunity, he rose. He sprang to his sleigh to his team gave a whistle and away. They all flew like the down of a thistle, but I heard him explain. There. He drove out of sight. Happy Christmas to all and to all a good night. Little God bless you. Merry Christmas, you two. All right, look. Irving Berlin, wrote This song The most. The biggest selling Christmas song may be the biggest selling song of all time and all of the versions that have been done over 100 million copies of this song. Including Bing Crosby's have been sold. And the Christmases past and the ones to come. Who knows they're still selling copies of this song. Irving Berlin called it the best Christmas song ever, he said. In fact, I think it's the best song ever. He was very humble man..

Irving Berlin Bing Crosby
"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:52 min | 9 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With unity All Cavalcanti w N Y c and new standards dot org's live it Bird Land. Cirillo May for Irving Berlin. Sky smiling at me. Nothing but blue sky is do I see Day, all of them time. Thing, But this guy is from now on I never saw the sun shining so bright I It never saw things going so right Notice a days when you're in love my how they fly. Oh, think nothing. But this girl is strong, huh? Yeah. Sky smiling with me. Nothing but blue sky eyes do a C Room day. Oh love bingo. Nothing would do very from them. I never saw the sun shining so bright never saw things. Go with sarin notice, then days rain by when you're in love my health..

"irving berlin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As the big hit, and it was fair success. But I also had a song in that corn white Christmas, and that song won him an Academy Award. And it's still the best selling Christmas song of all time, which is interesting, given the fact that Irving Berlin and even celebrate Christmas It was a Jewish man who immigrated from Russia as a child and Christmas was a very sad and solemn day for him. While many American families opened the gifts around the Christmas tree, Irving Berlin had his own tradition. Every year, he visited the grave of his son, Irving Berlin, Jr. Who died on Christmas Day. 1928 at only three weeks old. Perhaps it is this truly human melancholy. That gives White Christmas staying power 79 years after it first appeared on the radio, you're still likely to turn it up. Rather than all your day. May All York must be why I'm keeping soul. Well, Peter as we all, including Tanya mostly broadcast from lonely corners of our homes. Thank goodness we have a lifeline we do and wouldn't have it without.

Irving Berlin All York Academy Award Russia Tanya Peter
"irving berlin" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:36 min | 9 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on 710 WOR

"All right. So Melissa Errico Now she is one of the great Broadway stars. I saw her God, I was the kid covering Broadway, but it went just waiting to butter up your guest. No, You were a kid. Well, she was a kid, too, but all into encores, and I think she was in Call me, madam. She's saying this brilliant Irving Berlin comedy song called The Macarena and I looked at her and thought one. She's beautiful, too. She sings like an angel and three. She has great wit. So Melissa Errico joins us. She has a couple of new songs out Michelle a grand. One of my favorite composers, he wrote a song called You Must Believe in Spring that Melissa has done now and another one by Alec Wilder. This is Lend your Your dad was a song. Your dad, uh, edited a song magazine. Yes, Your dad would know Alec Wilder Wilder, and he would know blackberry writer to here. So let's listen to it before we bring Melissa and let's listen to a little bit of her two songs that she's just released. Never get over losing you. But I had to learn that life goes on on and memories will do him like Fuck gotten song. Tell a BlackBerry winter reminds me you are God Wow, If you think that's beautiful here, Here's the other one just as a tree. Sure its leaves will reappear. It's knows its emptiness. Yes, just a time of you here, and that's called. You must believe in spring. Great stuff. So, So, Melissa. I understand from the themes of these songs that you're telling us that we will come back at some point, you know the winter and the full comes along, but the spring will come along sooner or later and we will be back. Check. Check. Yeah. Okay. Thanks for being with us. Oh, hello. I'm Melissa. Hello. Um, I on the air now. Yes, believe it or not. This is a real radio show but those songs about but the song's Melissa, and then there was the real, you know, but I thought you picked them because they are a poignant You know, kind of.

Melissa Errico Alec Wilder Wilder Irving Berlin writer
"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 11 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Singers and mama don't allow it. It's after 11. We looked the other way. Two standards and W N. Y C. Very young, starry eyed Bing Crosby casts his baby blues up at Irving Berlin's blue skies. Lose me. Nothing but Blue's wass. But Inning's over. Never saw him. Noticing that, uh, when you're in love Oh, my No. I never saw this. Never saw so. Noticing the one you're in love. Ah, all of them gone. No. Ah, everybody loves somebody sometime. Ah, everybody.

Bing Crosby Irving Berlin Blue
"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot or Sarah Vaughan Irving Berlin's They say it's wonderful. So So that on no, Never That's no no In a so they say. Someone. A man. So It, Wass. I, uh, lost doesn't mean to Come with you. I know, uh too. No, but we're just Darling. No news. Running won't know the news. Johnny Hartman.

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Chim Chim Torri for Mary Poppins originally and a good vehicle for Kat Edmonson on her album of Just earlier this year. Dreamers do The Everly Brothers Dreaming and Beverly Kenny with Irving Berlin, Paul Cavalcanti, a W N Y C and new standards dot ord with Duke Ellington's famous orchestra. Why famous? Why listen?.

In Jazz-Movie Endings, Some Story Elements Just Keep Bouncing Back

Fresh Air

04:51 min | 1 year ago

In Jazz-Movie Endings, Some Story Elements Just Keep Bouncing Back

"One cable this month Turner classics is presenting a series of movies with jazz connections as it happens our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead has a new book about movies that tell jazz stories so we invited him to talk a little about the subject in the first of two segments he looks at what he calls the stock jazz movie ending a basic plot element subject to many variations here's Kevin over ninety some years of movies about jazz some plot points and story elements keep coming back we see young musicians had been meant toward by African American elders who work basement clubs and want to play the way they feel when the man just wants him to play the music is written it's the movies so there are romantic complications sometimes tied to divergent musical tastes such problems may be resolved in a version of the stock jazz movie ending a big New York concerts or parties at odds are reconciled it turns up by nineteen thirty seven in the romantic comedy champagne waltz Fred MacMurray plays a saxophonist who turns old Vienna onto jazz killing business at the waltz palace next door and wrecking Fred's romance with the waltz kings are pressing her granddaughter in the end they're all on stage in New York romantic and musical differences are resolved is gigantic jazz and classical orchestras mash on a swinging the classics mashup of tiger rag in the blue Danube it's kitchen music clear storytelling symbolizing the wedding to come in the nineteen thirty eight Irving Berlin song fast Alexander's ragtime band moving the reconciliation between bandleader and singer to Carnegie Hall the gold standard for classy venues in the movies that template came back with minor variations for decades in nineteen forty sevens the fabulous Dorsey's battling brother bandleaders Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey playing themselves patch up their feud just long enough to play a double concerto just as the real Dorsey's cooperated long enough to make the movie a couple of months later came the film in New Orleans with the most over the top New York concert ending which clears the way for an opera singer Merion jazz Booker at Symphony Hall the singer acquire three pianos the Philarmonic orchestra and woody Herman's big band all cram onstage to murder the film's instant hit song which we've already heard Billy holiday do rather better the New York concert capital turns up through the nineteen fifties a jazz movie tradition as in the Benny Goodman story or St Louis blues or WC handy's disapproving people finally accept as blues music once performed in concert alongside Mozart and Mendelssohn more variations came later in nineteen seventy twos lady sings the blues after an analyst U. S. tour Diana Ross as Billie Holiday is finally allowed to play New York again at Carnegie with violence the real holiday did play Carnegie Hall but without the fiddles in twenty sixteen Nina is always held on as Nina Simone who's been living in better French exile plays a free concert in Central Park and discovers her people still love her reconciling Nina Simone and America no reconciliation ending has grander implications

Turner
Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

"Annie. Oakley was born phoebe and Moses on August thirteenth eighteen sixty in Dark County Ohio when Anne was sits. Her Father Jacob died from pneumonia and his mother. Susan wise soon remarried but her second husband died suddenly two with eight children and very little income. Anne's family was sent to the county's poor farm. These institutions predated federal safety nets like Medicare and social security residents often dealt with miserable living conditions while battling the cultural stigma of needing help and he was placed with local families where she would work in exchange for room and board. She started hunting at eight years old from the start and he was a gifted shot selling her game to local restaurants to help support her family. At fifteen annie's hunting skills paid off the mortgage on her mother's farm that same year she traveled to Cincinnati to compete in a shooting competition with Frank e. Butler Butler was a traveling marksman who made bets with local communities that he could beat anyone in a sharp shooting match. Anne made all twenty five shots. Butler missed the final one. The two started courting and married soon after eighteen seventy six and he was sixteen years. Old Butler continued butlers tour of the country with Anne acting as his assistant despite her skills and he was responsible mostly for holding up items for Butler to shoot. All of that changed our. May I eighteen? Eighty two when Butler's partner fell ill anne filled in on stage and from then on and he was officially part of the act after touring for a year with the sells brothers circus. Anne and Butler joined Buffalo. Bill's wild west show. It was Anne who had been given the name little. Shir shot by LAKOTA. Sioux leader sitting bull really rose to fame. Butler eventually chose to serve as her stage assistant and manager even by today's standards any stunt were jaw-dropping. She would shoot glass balls and coins out of the air and cigarettes out of her husband's mouth her show often opened with her skipping onstage lifting her rifle and in one shot snuffing out the flame of let candle. Anne and Butler remained with Buffalo. Bill's show for sixteen years. The tour took them all around the world. They performed for Queen. Victoria's golden jubilee in England and travelled through Spain Italy and France. Every time she stepped on stage and he proved that women were more than capable of using firearms challenging the disciplines. Masculine reputation. She publicly encouraged women to learn how to use a pistol and to carry it in their purses arguing. Self defense was empowering in nineteen one after returning to the United States and Butler were in a train crash. Any injured her back and stopped touring two years later in nineteen. Oh three it was reported in Chicago that Anne had been arrested for stealing a man's trousers and selling them for cocaine. Despite the story being entirely false the woman arrested had used the fake name any Oakley News outlets ran with it. Anne sued every paper that ran the false accusations over seven years. She won fifty four or fifty five cases in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. The United States entered World War. One and he wrote to the secretary of war. Henry L Stimson offering to fund raiser regiment of female volunteers to fight. She also offered to help. Teach soldiers how to accurately shoot. Neither offer was accepted in nineteen twenty two any began preparing to tour again but a car accident delayed her plans after a year of recovery anti finally returned to the stage soon though any fell sick and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. She moved back to Ohio to be closer to her family. Annie Oakley died on November Third Nineteen Twenty Six. She was sixty six years old. Her husband Frank. E Butler died three weeks later the two had been married for fifty years in nineteen forty six a fictionalized version of Annie and Butler's love story debuted on Broadway as the Irving Berlin musical. Annie get your Gun Ami thing you can do. I can do better. I could do anything better than you. Yes I can yes I can to this day. The show is still regularly performed by theaters around the

Butler Butler Anne Annie Bill Annie. Oakley Frank E United States Jacob Susan Wise Buffalo Medicare Pneumonia Oakley News Dark County Ohio Moses Cincinnati Shir Sioux Henry L Stimson
"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Irving <Speech_Female> Berlin New York <Speech_Female> genius <Speech_Female> is published by Yale. <Speech_Music_Female> University press <Speech_Music_Female> please <Speech_Female> support our show <Speech_Female> by ordering the <Speech_Female> Amazon referral <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> link on our website. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Let it <Speech_Music_Female> roll. Podcasts DOT <Music> COM <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <hes> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Everybody <Speech_Music_Male> this is Brian Regan <Speech_Music_Male> host of the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> side gems <Speech_Music_Male> which is now a prime <Speech_Music_Male> member of the Pantheon <Speech_Music_Male> family of podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> I've been a free <Speech_Male> Lance Entertainment Journalist <Speech_Music_Male> for twenty five years <Speech_Male> now and I <Speech_Male> often end up in conversations <Speech_Music_Male> that go off on tangents. <Speech_Music_Male> Suddenly <Speech_Music_Male> you're discussing someone's <Speech_Male> outside passion <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or hobby something you didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> know about <Speech_Music_Male> and it leads into revelations <Speech_Music_Male> about their character <Speech_Male> and about <Speech_Male> their life outside of <Speech_Male> their art. I've <Speech_Music_Male> often had to cut those details <Speech_Music_Male> out because the story <Speech_Music_Male> district word count <Speech_Music_Male> for a specific <Speech_Music_Male> focus. So here <Speech_Music_Male> the entire <Speech_Male> focus of the podcast <Speech_Male> is just on their side. <Speech_Music_Male> Jam Or side Gems <Speech_Male> for example <Speech_Male> Alison. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chance Frontman William <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Divall. Spent some time <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> talking to me about reading <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> history which led <Speech_Music_Male> him into talking about <Speech_Music_Male> his public <Speech_Music_Male> school education <Speech_Music_Male> and how it was so terrible <Speech_Male> in high school that <Speech_Male> he actually managed <Speech_Male> to get into a private <Speech_Male> school for free <Speech_Music_Male> to his life. Could <Speech_Music_Male> take a different course <Speech_Music_Male> in this series of <Speech_Male> podcast. You're going to be <Speech_Male> hearing my interviews with <Speech_Male> musicians of <Speech_Male> all different backgrounds <Speech_Music_Male> genres <Speech_Music_Male> talking about everything <Speech_Music_Male> from surfing <Speech_Music_Male> to collecting antiques <Speech_Music_Male> to stargazing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I hope you enjoy side <Speech_Music_Male> jams. Please <Speech_Music_Male> tune in regularly and I'll have a lot of interesting guests in store for you.

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Of talent was there. Were there more treasures on earth in his archives. Do we know I mean. Have people sifted through his unpublished works in any comprehensive way? Are they even extent? Well there's A. There's a bank Irving Berlin collection the library of Congress in just about every piece of paper that he ever put his pen to. I think his I think that his music has been very thoroughly Gong through. I think we have isn't nate. What we have is such a Cornucopia of brilliance of greatness That I think it's greedy for us to ask for anything more so I don't think that unlike J D Salinger who knows who knows what What great were great salinger works might might still be published? I don't think there's any hidden mysterious lost Berlin work that he was too shy to published during his lifetime. I think that I think that better angels whether his or people who were working with him always came to the fore and persuaded him to publish what he shouldn't published. Well that's reassuring and I'm pretty happy with the amount of topics that we hit about his career and the industry but one of my goals was to talk about Berlin as a person and I think you can't cover that without talking about these incredible tragedy sees face. I leave his father at a very young age which terminated his education and literally put him out on the streets within a couple years because he felt he wasn't contributed enough to the family that they'd be better off without him and then the death of his first wife right after their honeymoon. He takes her to run a honeymoon and she takes all typhus and dies a few weeks later. And you know this is not a guy that we think of as as an artiste. He's not somebody who you know. He's not Sylvia plath. He didn't reach into his our heart and tear out songs. But in that case he did break that pattern and and wrote a song called. When I lost you. That was very personal. Yes it's a beautiful walls that he wrote nineteen twelve after the death of by Of his of his first wife Dorothy he was twenty four years old. It's a gorgeous song. It has been recorded many times since it holds up it is. It is a awards whose lyrics have simplicity that he that he had to really really work very very hard to achieve it. Holds up It was perhaps the one instance the one instance in his life were Berlin admitted that he wrote a song about his own personal experience. But I think it's important to know and there's one there's a loss. Glenn's life was really marked etched deeply by loss not only the loss of his father's first wife but when he married again There was an infant son. Three weeks old died on Christmas Day of Crib. Death in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight there was that terrible loss and I think that that laws arguably underlies the bittersweet yearning feeling of the Song White Christmas I think balloons entire curve of of of of of ballads certainly contains contains elements traces strains of of sadness that that are that are deeply informed by the loss that he suffered in one of the great songwriting tools. That employed to terrific effect I think was the shifting of a major to minor within songs. It's also by the way is also by the way a device that was very much used by Lennon McCartney who both both suffered the loss. Each suffered the loss of a mother when they were in their adolescent so loss loss had a lot to do with Lennon McCartney balance as well okay. Let's go ahead and here when I lost you. This is Frank Sinatra's version from nineteen sixty to many decades after the song written.

Sylvia plath J D Salinger Berlin Irving Berlin Lennon McCartney Frank Sinatra Congress typhus Glenn Dorothy
"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"On his radio show and gone out of his way to call him Paul and have all Rogerson call him being which was very controversial at the time you know and get in the mills brothers on his Radio Show. I mean these guys have done a lot for integration and to advance the cause of African American musicians but the rules had changed under their feet. You know they're middle aged guys in their forties. And so I think some of us have seen the rules change in the me too. Era can sympathize a little bit. Yes The rooms were changing under their feet. They were doing the best they could. They had They had good hearts but they had old fashioned instincts. They were products of their time and their culture and they were products of an America that for the first The first fifty five years at least of the Twentieth Century was deeply unapologetically racist unapologetically. It was a wasp dominated. Culture White anglo-saxon Protestant Italian Americans weren't even officially considered legally considered white until the nineteen forties It was It was an awful time in so many ways and again as you put it so eloquently it. The the culture was changing under their feet. They adapted at the best they could and this happened to Pearland and numerous ways not just culturally but the business changed under his feet multiple times like you know. We talked about how he came up in the sheet music era and it was sheet. Music and records were a secondary promotional tool but primarily. There were selling sheet music for people play and sing around their piano at home and also to listen to the record. If to a record of of the song by multiple performers any hit song have multiple versions. Come out by many performers and then the radio comes along in the nineteen twenties when he's well into his career and in the Broadway musical changes and you got people like drome current producing things like show boat In the late twentieth. And you get Gershwin up in any again. You Know Poor Game Bass into a full. On modern musical opera and Berlin rises to the challenge. She moved to Hollywood in the early thirties. And Ed's funny that you brought I kind of came to him and you talk about this in the forward through the Marx brothers and he provided the songs for one of the early movies coconuts. Which is a terrible gig because you know song is GonNa Shine in Marx brothers comedy but he they rise through this and and eventually hooks up with Fred astaire and goes on this amazing run of hit absolute classics absolute classics and yet at the same time Berlin missed Broadway badly. He felt like a fish out of water. In Hollywood he adored astaire where the same brilliance that he did the same kind of intense work ethic that Berlin did any adored writing for a stair. But again you felt very much out of place in Hollywood. He missed New York badly he wanted. He wanted to go back to Broadway. Let's hear Fred Astaire to putting on the Ritz Avenue on that famous thoroughfare with their noses in the air hi hats and our colors fight spats and lots of dollars spending every far. Rwanda ta with your blue and you know where to go to. I don't you go. Where fashion sits putting on the Ritz types aware. That was Fred astaire singing irving Berlin triumphant putting on the Ritz and he does get back to Broadway but it's not until after World War. Two that he writes his first modern musical. Annie get your gun. Tell us a little bit about. It was a coincidence. That Berlin got. That GIG was a terrible coincidence because The show that was to have been called. Annie Oakley out was to have been written by Jerome Kern in conjunction with the brother. Six great brother sister librettist's and lyricists Herbert and Dorothy fields and jerome. Kern was walking to lunch in Manhattan without is to meet his wife for lunch. One day in one thousand nine forty five and suddenly dropped to the pavement on Park Avenue. with a brain hemorrhage and he died a week later So the great current is dead at an early age and a Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. Who were were producing that show. They had written. They had ridden Oklahoma in South Pacific. And now they had they had sort of transition to becoming producers they were producing Annie Oakley. Try to think who they could hire to write to write the music for the show. And the first person everybody thought Rodgers Hammerstein and the fields is was early prevent. But the thing about Berlin was Two things one. His name was always above the title. He had achieved that level of of fame and power in Hollywood and on and on Broadway and to he wrote and should we should take note of this too. Because they're very few people stand alongside of them in this regard this Cole Frank Lesser but very few people he will use again lyrics. It's like double genius. Not just genius so But they persuaded themselves and they persuaded Berlin Anyway and Dorothy and Herbert fields very gracefully stepped back and let Berlin write the lyrics and Berlin went down to Atlantic City and produced a score of for Annie. Get your gun in some incredible time. Like two or three weeks the entire score and it was a great score from a guy at the beginning had no idea who any. Oakley was and said that he had he didn't know how to write hillbilly music but he wrote in you wrote a great and the phenomenon of that you're reading your account of that production and the fact that he almost pulled two of the great great songs from that number. There's nobody there's no business like show business and anything you can do. I could do better. Because he got mixed feedback from his his his team around him and that brings us back to the really big numbers. Which which Irving Berlin? You know as incredible catalogue that can match. Gershwin etc etc. Max. Any pop singer but he also wrote two songs y Christmas and God bless America that sort of transcend pop culture and inserted themselves right at the root of American culture. I mean God bless. America is basically the National Anthem and at various times there have been official attempts to replace the Star spangled banner with Berlin. Wouldn't have anything to do with that when he was alive But if I was a betting man I might bet even odds it in the next hundred years we change our mind and make God bless America. The official song and White Christmas is the most successful recording in history by a distance. You can't fathom it was a top ten hit for twenty straight years and the Bing crosby recording and what is the meaning of Irving Berlin this Jewish immigrant who comes in and writes these absolutely integral American songs and this was controversial people like Charles Lindbergh and the America First Movement? They were denouncing idea. That a Jew could write songs like this in America. Yes they didn't They they didn't They didn't denounce White Christmas. There was vigorous blowback against God bless America when it was introduced in nineteen thirty eight nine hundred thirty nine. This is a time. When there was a powerful America. First Movement a powerful movement to keep America out of the war that was beginning in Europe. It was only Pearl Harbor that drew us into the war. But for a buck for three years before that An awful lot of people in America didn't want to To go to war to shed a single drop was American blood to save England to save European Jews and And made a lot of powerful speeches on the radio and in In big big venues like Madison Square against Against any Any effort to to help out the Europeans or the British in this war and so when Berlin introduced God bless America and America took to it right away. America was so So joyous adhering most of America was so joyous at hearing this song but much of America at the same time. rebelled against hidden and yes said the nerve the nerve that this a Jewish immigrant had a writing a song about God. What did he know about God? God bless America. It was seen as an active presumption by a lot of people and I blew my segue there because the point I started make was Berlin. Kept God bless America in his drawer. Twenty years he routed the nineteen eighteen and thought. There are too many patriotic songs right now because of World War One and just the idea that seventy could I consider not not including. There's no business like show business in the play and then to sit on. God bless America for twenty years. I mean what? An incredible wealth.

Berlin America Annie Oakley Irving Berlin Fred astaire Hollywood Rodgers Hammerstein Gershwin Twentieth Century America First Movement Pearland Dorothy fields Rwanda hemorrhage Jerome Kern New York Oklahoma Herbert Paul
"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"That take you by the hand up and that was the Great Bing Crosby and Al Jolson having fun with every Berlin Alexander's ragtime band and I think that's one thing I wanted to get across is that we have such a compressed view of the past In in twenty twenty. And even you know you're a boomer Magen extra bet. I think we tend to look at all of this music of the first half of the twentieth century through this lens of Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald and this sort of art song interpretation of what we call now the great American songbook. But I think it's very important to remember this wasn't the great American songbook in the nineteen twenties. These were the hits of the day. This was the currency this was pop pits and Berlin is having to do everything he can to compete with Gershwin and rutgers at all and as well as Louis Armstrong and bing crosby and and the specter of real jazz and he's got another hit you know we're GonNa we can't cover his whole career because it's just too much but I want to jump ahead to his confrontation. I wouldn't say confrontation but his triumph in the jazz era. Which was everybody's step and you call it. White Jazz explained that terminology little bit. Well Berlin new his abilities. He was confident in his abilities. One thing he said and he said it in Nineteen Fifteen. When he was twenty seven years old he said. I know rhythm and he was not kidding. He did understand rhythm when he wrote everybody step. He was writing a song that you syncopation very effectively. He would also use it. Effectively very effectively a few years later when he wrote the great putting on the Ritz If you listen to that song and then listen to it again just listened to where the where the beats fall and where the emphasis fall in that song. And you'll annual realize that Berlin really did no rhythm but the song everybody stuck as it was performed in the show was performed in and I think we also want to note that these songs of the great American Songbook were written almost entirely not as free standing songs but to a purpose for purpose for either songs or or movies for shows for musicals. Everybody step as it was performed in a in the show by a vocal trio called the brock sisters three young ladies from the South who sang in very tight harmony And they were white. They were black. was It was charming. It was delightful It remains delightful but it. It didn't have exactly what you would call so I think so took awhile to arrive in Berlin's music. I think it really took until Until probably until nineteen thirty three with Berlin and Moss Hart's Great Revue as thousands cheer and the great at the waters and African American. Who really made her debut Her Broadway debut in that show singing a song called Heatwave And she did it very sexily very easily and she did it the way it needed to be done. But there's a difference between everybody's step by the brock sisters and heat wave by a biathlon orders and he also wrote a song for waters called suppertime that talk about that. I mean that's probably the most socially conscious piece Berlin of Berlin's great songs that's probably the most socially conscious and a self conscious statement that he made. Yeah well this was a show The revue as thousands cheers was a genius idea by Moss. Hart and Early Berlin. It was a musical in the form of a newspaper and so their idea the great idea so great. It's hard to believe nobody had thought of it. Before was to mount a musical on Broadway stage in the form of a newspaper and it was it had a this show it had a society columnist gossip column. It has sports column sports page. It had it had the weather everything that a newspaper had. And each of these sections of the newspaper of the Fictional newspaper In the play as thousands cheer was ahead Berlin songs that were appropriate to that section the second act and and the the crowd it was the midst of the Depression and the people who could afford Broadway ticket. Were rich people. So that was an audience. Broadway audience full of wealthy people in join this The TIRICO sometimes sharply satirical Musical remains were used Feelings weren't spared but it was all in the in the spirit of good funds and this wealthy audiences enjoying the show and then came. The intermission man came. Act to an act to began with a cheeky. Little skit about Was slightly risque was about a young engaged couple on their wedding day and the peaking at the skit was that they are waking up together which was very daring escape back in nineteen thirty three well. That skit finished up and then a curtain descended and own. The curtain was printed a black big black headline that said unknown Negro Lynched by frenzied mobs and the audience If you've ever seen the producers the Mel Brooks movie when the Song Springtime for Hitler is Sung and they show a shot at the audience sitting with their mouths open. The audience must have looked like that that night as they are watching thousands cheer because this headline and then. Ethel waters presentation of this great song. That Berlin had written like nothing he'd ever written before because it is sung by the waters in the person of a wife waiting for her husband to come home but he's not gonna come home because he's been lynched. It's a powerful song terrific song it predated. Billie holiday's great strange fruit another song about lynching by ten years and it's just an amazing piece of history and amazing leap forward in Berlin career and it was even a statement to have ethel waters in the plan of first place that correct that is correct and three of her White Co stars. When the show was in tryouts out of town in Philadelphia refused to take their bows with Ethel waters a for one reason because she was black and Berlin heard about it and informed her three white coast ours that in in in that Because they are choosing not to take their bows with at the water's there would be no bows at all well. Three White co-stars changed their minds and they all took their bows together. And I wanted to get that in there because you know Berlin and like many members of his generation Benghazi when it comes to mind is not often. We don't often look back at Berlin and think of him as a civil rights hero and in part because of things like the Abraham number in a Holiday Inn with bing crosby which is one of his great cinematic triumphs. It's Irving Berlin Holiday Inn it ago sheets. Great deal with Hollywood he. He's got complete creative control. He's got being crosby. He's got white Christmas and he's Got White Christmas and you double my gun. They're not known. I was going to drop that card in the second bet. Sorry but that's okay but he. He's got white Christmas. He's got a song about Thanksgiving He's got a early version of Easter Bonnet and but also got this number Abraham with bing crosby singing in black face the whole a whole whole bunch of people singing in black face and crosby crosby who by the way revered revered black musicians was a great a great jazz singer himself at the beginning of his career revered black musicians I thought that the whole thing was just good fun and Berlin thought. The whole thing was just good fun. This was a different America. We we have to. We have to take care not to see that America Through the eyes of today's America. Or if we do we have to realize that it was a different place and so this is not to forgive black face which is unforgivable. But it's to understand That in those times it was. It was a tradition in which by the way to make things thoroughly complicated. Black performers often participated themselves. Now this is a whole complicated question. The question of black performers putting black face to perform to perform musical numbers but but it was It was a reprehensible reprehensible number reprehensible part of that movie and when they show the movie these days it's it's just it's simply been edited out. Yeah I turn it to my daughter recently. An add forgotten about Abraham and. We had to stop and have a whole teaching moment about that. You know she's six years old and and you know as very in Congress and Berlin even got in trouble at the time not for the black face but because the song used the term darkies yes and no because being a similar things like having Paul Robeson.

Berlin Bing Crosby Irving Berlin Holiday Inn Abraham Moss Hart brock White Jazz crosby crosby Frank Sinatra Magen bing crosby Ella Fitzgerald Al Jolson Louis Armstrong Mel Brooks Gershwin Ethel rutgers America
"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Fun to let it. Roll host Nate Wilcox today. I'm joined by James Kaplan author of Irving Berlin New York Genius James. Welcome light to be here. Thanks for having sure and this is a really nice book on a big topic. I mean Irving Berlin astrum. Kern said doesn't have a place in American music. He is American music and at least up to the nineteen fifties. That is absolutely the case. I mean this guy had a career from nineteen o nine still active all the way up to nineteen sixty six had a hit play in the early fifties an incredible random and nobody in the modern era except may be. Paul McCartney could even be comparable. Yes I draw. A lot of comparisons actually between Lennon McCartney and Irving Berlin very similar work ethics ver very similar of brilliance at constructing songs and a lot of similarities in the way that constructed songs and yet unlike. Mccartney who had never ten incredible years and and you know Lennon had another five years or so and McCartney's maybe had another ten. I mean Burland kept it up and was at the top of his game through the teens through the twenties answered the challenge of Gershwin Kern and the the modern Broadway musical that integrates his story with the songs all the way up. You know into 'em beyond World War Two. It's it's just an incredible achievement. And he's just a Roy. Likable Guy and reading. This book really brings that across. I mean this is a guy with what you call an innate moral compass and avoid the temptation of most of the temptations of fame and money to an unbelievable degree. How do you explain? It's true And but I would I would I I. I would like to be very very careful about About emphasizing is yes his his high degree of morality and ethics and Pointing out at the same time that he was in a business a business that remains extremely competitive full of sharp elbows and nobody was more competitive and sharp elbowed then Berlin. He had a keen eye for the best business opportunities. He was sharply competitive and he could be very tough. Absolutely analysis. You know found his own music company very early on in his career. I think he had maybe two or three hits by the time he finds found his own company and there was a founding member of ask cap the publishing union that you know brought all the songwriters together and collect the royalties and BMI comes along in the forties to compete with it. But essentially you know Irving Berlin found co-founded modern music publishing yes. He was really present at the creation of the American songbook. And in your book. You talk about your own personal sort of discovery of Berlin and ties in with with the The New York theme that you were working as an intern for the New Yorker I'm out of the title wrong. But you're on the junior capacity at the New Yorker. When I I used to I used to handle a now. Outmoded machine called a typewriter I. I was an editorial typist at the New Yorker and Kids today don't know what they're missing with those IBM Z. Oh and but this was one song. The first song that you bring up in the book was one. I hadn't been familiar with which was very early. Irving Berlin strong and I hadn't realized he had recorded performances. But you found a record going back to nineteen o nine of Irving Berlin Singha Sonko called. Oh how that could love what what you know. What fascinates you about that recording. Well the first thing that fascinated me about that recording was how unbelievably old it was. I didn't even know. They made records in nineteen nine anti ear. This record that despite the hisses and pops inevitably that came through in the reproduction process and let us not forget that That went phonograph. Records were first made in that very early. Nineteen hundreds there was. No such thing is elect electronic microphone. These were made Singer sang or orchestras played through the bell of a gigantic speaking horn. Beg a Cone Light Assembly. That translated the vibrations of the boys are the music To a needle that etched the vibrations into a wax disc That was then That was then converted into a SHELLAC discs. That could be played on. This new fangled instrument called a phonograph. So all of this process was necessary and yet piercing through. This process was the unbelievably light. Witty engaging voice of a kind of genius who is coming up with this very funny popular songs very funny take on the silly ethnic songs of the early nineteen hundreds. The title itself gives you a hand. How German could love was about a very curvy? German lady who is singer was infatuated with and it's such a such a beguiling performance and in the book you call it modernism on the hoof startling. Formal innovation smuggled into into a seemingly banal idiom elaborate on that a little bit. What does that mean modernisers? This twenty years twenty one year old. He's twenty one years old and I ask you or any of the listeners. To think of themselves at twenty one I think of myself at twenty one when I could just about time I shooed. This is a guy who's twenty one years old who is not only a fully engaging with the art of songwriting. But he's he is making fun of it. He is both. He is both succeeding in it and Satirizing it at the same time and so again back in the very early twentieth century you had these waves. Upon ways of immigrants arriving in America Ellis Island and as a result of that kind of in reaction to it and also paying homage to it there was a great fad for ethnic songs songs written in the voice Voices OF GERMAN AMERICANS ITALIAN AMERICANS JEWISH JEWISH AMERICANS AFRICAN AMERICANS Kind of making fun of these minorities but Celebrating them at the same time. And this was a song that was sort of done in imposs- style with an own pas band playing in the background but at the same time Mel Brooks could have written the song. It is is just hilarious. So it's Berlin not only writing ethnic song but having his way with it and showing how brilliant He promises to be. And let's hear a little bit of it. This is Irving Berlin singing German. Could WHOA got speed German at all by the Durban key? Franklin off for me getting more yet was irving Berlin himself singing Ohio that German could love very song in a very rare recording of irving Berlin as a performer. And I thought it was important to include that because frequently we start the Irving Berlin story restart talking about Irving Berlin with Alexander's ragtime band and it's notable to me that he had multiple hits notably So when my wife goes to the country and my wife has gone to the country that fit more into that sort of after the ball or sidewalks of New York era or the George Cohen. Yet Yankee doodle Dandy solid saying that he would supersede and sort of blow away with Alexander's ragtime band. Can you talk about that transition from the early Tin Pan Alley to the ragtime era and how Berlin pity is that well? I think the first thing we want to do is is say. Very carefully and emphatically that ragtime was rank. Time is a lot of controversy. About ragtime and ragtime has a lot of a number of definitions but by the definition of The great genius Scott Joplin who was kind of the The procreate the originator of ragtime Alexander's ragtime band is not a ragtime song at all. It's a rather it is a song about. Ragtime is a song about a band leader named Alexander an African American bandleader named Alexander. And it's a sort of. It's a march really. It's IT IT IS A. It is a call to participate to enjoy to sing along to dance along to ragtime and it is kind of A. It's kind of A. It has a quantum leap from anything Berlin or anybody else had written floor. It comes along at precisely the right moment. One thousand nine eleven only two years after. Oh how that German could love for. Loon is now an old man of twenty three rather than just twenty one and he has been writing songs for a few years. He is making very good money writing songs. Such grant money that he's now able to go on vacation to Florida. He's on his way to Penn Station to take the The Orange Blossom Limited down to Florida a train down to Florida. That's how you traveled in those days but he has a couple of hours before train time so he stops by the office and he has a snatch of song that's playing in his head and here. We should note that Berlin Aerobic Music in quotation marks. He didn't know how to write music or read music. He had songs in his head. He would work with a musical secretary. Somebody A man. Who would sit at piano? Berlin would stand next to him. In the -TUNI- had in mind and the guide the piano would play the notes and begin to harmonize it play chords that Berlin would either approve or disapprove of. Tell the guy that change. He went to the office and he wrote down the lyrics to a song that it had in his head and he had the musical secretary. Play it and memorialize. It many went on vacation to Florida. This whole thing. This stop by the office to write down the song to take down the notes in the words of it took maybe twenty minutes. He goes on vacation. He comes back and this song is put into sheet music and it is then recorded On the brand new technology of phonograph records. Just coming just coming in in Nineteen Oh eight. Nineteen Nine. Nineteen ten and nineteen eleven. And because of the sheet music of Alexander's ragtime band and they'd phonograph record of Alexander's ragtime band. They twenty-three-year-old Irving Berlin becomes not just a national sewa celebrity but an international.

Irving Berlin ragtime Alexander Berlin Irving Berlin astrum Irving Berlin New York Irving Berlin Singha Sonko Berlin Aerobic Music Paul McCartney Lennon McCartney Florida James Kaplan Nate Wilcox Kern Guy Burland Gershwin Kern secretary
Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

"Shining. Oh hello from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Manica deemed the first lady of Song. Today's Dreamer was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States. For more than half a century. She went thirteen grammy awards and sold over forty million albums. Her voice was flexible. Wide-ranging accurate and ageless. Let's talk about Ella Fitzgerald Ella. Jane Fitzgerald was born on April twenty fifth nineteen seventeen in Newport News. Virginia to William Fitzgerald and Tempe Henry Ellis parents separated shortly after Ella's birth and she and her mother moved to Yonkers New York where they eventually moved in with Tempe longtime boyfriend. Joseph Dasilva three soon became four LS half-sister Francis was born in Nineteen twenty-three. The family struggled to make ends meet. Both parents worked multiple jobs. L. Occasionally took on work to their apartment was a mixed neighborhood. Where Ella made friends easily? She considered herself more of a Tomboy and often join neighborhood baseball games. Sports Aside Ella enjoy dancing and singing with friends and would perform at lunch and on her way to school in Nineteen. Thirty two ELLAS. Mom Tempe died from serious injury. She received in a car accident. Ella was devastated. She eventually moved in with her aunt Virginia and when her stepfather Joe died shortly thereafter. Ala stepsister. Francis came to live with them. To Ella was in a dark place. She started skipping school and her grades dropped. She got in trouble with the police and was sent to a reform school where she was subject to beatings by her caretakers. Eventually Ella escaped from the reformatory. She was fifteen years old broke and alone during the Great Depression. In nineteen thirty four Islas name was pulled in a weekly drawing the Apollo Theater for a chance to perform and compete an amateur night. Two sisters who the dance in the sisters in the world call the edgewood sisters and they closed the show about I when I saw those ladies. Dan I says no way. I'm going out there and try to dance. Because they stop the show. She was planning to dance but when the Edwards sisters closed the main show. She changed her mind fearing she couldn't compete with their moves. And when I got out there somebody follow up nobody else. What is she going to do? She made a last minute decision to sing and ask the band to play. Hoagy Carmichael Judy. Heavens hurt to me. By the end of the song the crowd demanded an encore and Ella had found her calling one of the people in the band. That night with saxophonist and Arranger Benny Carter wowed by her natural talent. Benny introduced a lot of people. Who could help launch your career? The era of big swing bands was coming to a close in favor of bebop. Ls successfully made the transition using her voice to sound like another horn in the band. She began to experiment with scat singing. Eventually turning it into an art in nineteen thirty eight Ella recorded a version of the nursery. Rhyme a-tisket a task it. A million copies of the album were sold it. Hit number one on the charts and it stayed on the pop charts for seventeen weeks. Ella was suddenly famous her wife. Changed Professionally and personally while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie's band in nineteen forty. Six Ella fell in love with bassist. Ray Brown the two got married and adopted a son Ray. Junior through the two later got divorced. They remained lifelong friends L. O. Worked with all the jazz greats including Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Nat King Cole Dizzy. Gillespie and Benny Goodman from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty. Four Ella recorded eight songbooks in which she covered other musicians songs. Including those by Cole Porter Duke. Ellington the Gershwin's Johnny Mercer Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hart Ella continued to work throughout her life by the nineteen nineties. She had recorded more than two hundred albums she received the Kennedy Center honors the US National Medal of Arts and Francis Commander of Arts and letters award. Thank you and I'm so proud to be in class with all these younger ones coming up. Ain't gonNA leave me behind. I'm learning out a wrap in her later. Life Ella suffer from diabetes. She was hospitalized. Congestive heart failure in nineteen eighty six and for exhaustion in nineteen ninety. Nine hundred ninety three. She had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to complications from diabetes. She never fully recovered from the surgery. And on June fifteenth. Nineteen Ninety six at the age of seventy-nine Ella Fitzgerald died at her Beverly Hills. Home fans all over. The world mourned her death. A wreath of white flowers was placed next to her star on the Hollywood walk of fame and the Marquee outside the Hollywood bowl read. Lmu will miss you

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Ella Fitzgerald Ella Hart Ella Dizzy Gillespie Virginia Grammy United States Carmichael Judy Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Francis Jane Fitzgerald Jenny Kaplan Benny Carter Mom Tempe Manica Diabetes Benny Baseball Cole Porter Duke
The Marlboro Woman

Household Name

08:44 min | 1 year ago

The Marlboro Woman

"Before the Marlboro Man. Before the Marlboro woman. Even women didn't really smoke. In fact in some places. It was even illegal to help me tell that story. I wrote Aria Bendix into the studio with me. I'm already so on. It gets toasted here as well too. So cool cool. So why don't we start? Warriors a reporter at business insider. Who's covered the history of smoking and Marlborough? Why don't we start at the turn of the century? What was the association between women and smoking so there was a strong negative association between women and smoking. It was not something that polite woman did. There was a lot of societal disapproval. That was definitely the big thing but there was also a few legal attempts to sort of prohibit women from smoking in public in nineteen. Oh four there was a woman who was actually turned in by her husband for smoking in the presence of her children and she faced thirty days of jail. Time for that and then a few years later There's actually a short-lived ban in New York City that prohibited women from smoking in public. So it really was. Smoking was really seen as not a thing. That a lady. Oh well raised woman would do woman of good moral standing. So then what changed? So what changed was World War One inside the White House. President Woodrow Wilson compared with advisors then signed the proclamation of war against Germany and that was really when women started to take on up. Actually enter the workforce for the first time and take on jobs that were traditionally says he'd with men behind every man or the woman at American women were daintily mightily and they also changed their appearance to reflect that so women started to have shorter hair started to wear pants and then they also started to pick up cigarettes by one thousand. Nine hundred thousand American women had won the right to vote but even within the Feminist Movement for some smoking was taboo. Some of the activists for women's rights actually went to great lengths to distance themselves from women who smoked Lucy. Page Gaston for example was a vocal opponent of smoking and drinking alcohol. She wasn't trying to ally herself with women who were redefining femininity. Instead she wanted to empower women who embodied the old Victorian ideals of womanhood who would use their vote to advocate for temperance and respectability and enforce their high moral standards on the broader population. So where does the story of Marlboro Start? So it starts with Philip Morris which used to be British Tobacco Company in the One thousand nine hundred twenty s they really wanted to get a stronger foothold in the US market so they came up with the idea of the Marlboro Brand and in nineteen twenty four. The introduced it as a cigarette brand for women. Nineteen twenty four was a really tough time for a newcomer to be making a play for the US cigarette market at all. Never Mind Marketing to women. That's because it was already pretty locked down by four big tobacco companies. Actually there used to be one gigantic company a monopoly until the US Supreme Court and a bunch of trust. Busting Congressman. Put a stop to that in the nineteen teens. Anyway by the Nineteen Twenties Marlboro. Was this small fish making its debut and upon full of. I'm just GONNA go with this great white sharks so it set its sights on the other. Small fish in the cigarette pond women and since suffragettes Lucy Page Gaston. Were not going to light up anytime soon. Marlboro had to find a way to make smoking socially acceptable for women. It had to make cigarettes. Which many saw as symbols of vulgarity and promiscuity actually feminine by Victorian Standards So one of the first advertisements that they came out with was this quote unquote mild as May campaign may like the month of May delicate breezy dainty elegant for find polite. And there's something amazing about how Marlboro. Sins that message through these ads. Like if you look at them. The women picture aren't even smoking but it almost doesn't because they look so glamorous every one of them sort of had like this dark lib this perfectly quaffed hair. The secret was sort of daintily hanging off their fingertips looking a little bit seductive but it was also somewhat reminiscent of the Victorian ideals of Amenity. That sort of caring us into the nineteen twenties. You see this sort of stereotype of a lady. A very elegant woman that marble woman is basically like the Modern Day Portland of instagram influence. Our I mean everything that women sort of wanted and aspire to be mild is may was everything. A woman could want in a cigarette. The ads made it look like an essential accessory as natural a woman's hand as the lipstick on her lips. There was a lot of concern that women's lipstick would actually get at the end of their cigarette. So what they did was actually create a grease proof tip that would prevent that and it would keep your lipstick looking nice while you were smoking after that. They also introduced a red rim around the cigarette and that was meant to disguise the lipstick itself. We are miles away from the Marlboro Man. Here that even his Marlboro and its parent company. Philip Morris continued to work on making it cigarette look appealing to women. It had a bigger obstacle to tackle. Most women did not know how to smoke. So Philip Morris sponsored. A lecture series that toured the country and taught women the basics. It hit ladies clubs charm. School's department stores and nurses lounges covering etiquette had opened the packages avoid lipstick smears and prevent fires. Oh my God and slowly but surely marbles efforts started to make inroads so the advertisements are resonating with women Marlboros. Getting letters from women thanking them for the ADS. More women are starting to pick up smoking. But it's actually not doing much for the brand itself. It was pretty much failing as a business they were capturing a miniscule portion of the cigarette market at that time turns out. Marlboro. Wasn't the only cigarette company on the block with the bright idea of advertising to women in fact the American Tobacco Company one of the four giants which used to have a monopoly on cigarettes. It wanted to get women to smoke. Just as badly as Marlboro did and its main brand. Lucky strike was a much bigger name than Marlboro. The president of the American Tobacco Company poured about one point five billion dollars in today's dollars into advertisements in the first decade of the lucky advertisements. So they were funneling money into the brand and that sort of reflected in that sales they were sort of catering to everyone and they saw the same opportunity. Marble did that. They weren't actually targeted advertisements to half of the population which was women so they put out a lot of the same messaging. That Marlboro did a lot of that. Same like feminine ideals of Beauty. They weren't a woman's cigarette brand but they certainly began catering their advertisements to women but nineteen twenty nine both companies had been running ads featuring women for years. Marlboro had even gone so far as to show a woman in one of the advertisements. Actually smoking a cigarette. Just holding it seductively. But even that wasn't enough so to break through the negative by surrounding women in cigarettes once and for all the American Tobacco Company launched another offensive. And this one would below the politics of women's smoking wide. Open the president of the American Tobacco Company calls up this Guy Edward Brenes and he's now known as the father of Public Relations and he was actually fun fact. The nephew Sigmund Freud and so- Bernez comes up with this idea to stage a protest in New York City he recruits all. These debutantes who sort of look like the everyday woman but they're also super elegant and he gets them to basically marched through the streets of New York on the Easter Day parade carrying lit cigarettes in their hand and he called the the torches of freedom so cigarettes were known as the torches of freedom the Easter parade. One of the most important events on New York City's social calendar. Women were there to be seen. They were the newest fashions. Their boldest hats and stranded down Fifth Avenue. Like it was a runway. It was such a cultural touchstone. The American composer Irving Berlin even wrote a song about it and it became the basis for a nineteen thirty three. Judy Garland Fred astaire movie new the grandest Bala Anyway crashing. This event was a big deal and the torches of freedom the woman marching down Fifth Avenue in their finery carrying lit cigarettes. That image caught fire. It was a huge news story and it sort of kicked off the idea of women smoking in public really. Yeah I mean I see it as sort of the fulcrum to change the social tied women in other cities as well not just New York City but now San Francisco and Detroit. Were now taking the streets and smoking their cigarettes or torches a free. They had their own torches. Afraid of

Marlboro New York City American Tobacco Company Philip Morris Lucy Page Gaston President Trump Aria Bendix United States Marlborough President Woodrow Wilson Us Supreme Court Reporter Lucy Irving Berlin British Tobacco Company Instagram Judy Garland Fred Astaire
"irving berlin" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Right to similar stars in a few letters were found Tuesday in the window of the block party store this man told NBC four he surprised by the attacks were city so much diversity that it's hard to digest that this is happening here still today twenty twenty to start the year this way terrible surveillance video shows a white man carrying a backpack in a plastic bag painting on the store window the incidents are part of a surge in anti semitism across the country a company that made and packaged jerky in Rancho Cucamonga for twenty two years has shut down almost four hundred workers at golden island jerky company have been laid off business was owned by Tyson one of the biggest meat producers in the US it was bought by one in Wisconsin the company was that made the decision to move out of Rancho Cucamonga he's at the to paying a mall of been feeding their sweet tooth California frozen poppers owner Joshua Cheney says his book has been hit repeatedly in the last few weeks we've had six break ins two of them being in the beginning when we first opened the first few days from some homeless people his most that these were teens location at the mall just opened last month to sell frozen popcorn candied bacon and caramel apples Cheney says he's not sure he wants to keep selling at the mall democratic presidential candidate Pete body judge isn't technically mayor Pete anymore south bend Indiana swore in a new mayor yesterday but the judge held that position for eight years he announced in late twenty eighteen he would not seek a third term thousands of artistic works are now copy right free in the U. S. the liberated artworks included George Gershwin's Rhapsody in blue Irving Berlin song lazy and the first film.

NBC Rancho Cucamonga Tyson US Wisconsin Joshua Cheney Pete George Gershwin Indiana blue Irving Berlin
"irving berlin" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Our American stories our our special broadcast on how Christmas came to be in this country and I learned a lot and I know you have to and now it's time to close out the hour the final chapter in this story another classic Christmas song from around the same time was written by a Jewish immigrant from Russia Irving Berlin and sung by Bing Crosby this Christmas song is the most beloved and celebrated song ever written it's a song that was heard for the very first time on Christmas nineteen forty one just eighteen days after Pearl Harbor was bombed the song is White Christmas the song doesn't really catch on in the spring of nineteen forty two we've just gone to war but it catches on in the fall of forty two which is when Americans really approaching its one year mark of being a war and he's now hundreds of thousands and millions of G. is going to spend their first Christmas away from home and that's where that song has that real heartstring pulling the static feel to it that the record sales to skyrocket in October November December of nineteen forty two White Christmas is the most successful single ever released and it has been for more than sixty years according to the Guinness world records the version sung by Bing Crosby is the best selling single of all time with estimated sales in excess of.

Irving Berlin Bing Crosby Pearl Harbor Russia
"irving berlin" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Stop so the FM version I actually tried to take a picture of my arms you could see the goose bumps it's better than crying that allows us to love that song he loves seeing you guys sing it too and you will sing it at space either and we are going to have a bunch of songs I know it's just for the Christmas time that I like the idea of a Christmas song or holiday song like little sleigh ride you know yeah yeah right is not explicitly yes Christmas see just like season right I really like the concept yes basically like is cold and stuff you know that's so much no all the non holiday because our neighbors still have their life right yeah exactly religion you know we were both raised it's weird a quick since both of our fathers are Jewish both of our mothers are Catholic more cashews for cash cash okay so let's not the technical term but there's something so universal about the holiday season that's not religious in nature at all this is American write Chicano least coldness and plenty of a of the best Christmas songs are written by Irving Berlin an a and a handful of yes I'm trying to take that Irving Berlin White Christmas thing for it real seriously we make all full Jude to gap Manal holding hands in the studio right now it's all the other hands because if we did it he has to on that note I think we're going to take a break and who knows what'll happen but the don't touch that dial at Jarod we know every story of devotion has a beginning worth celebrating and right now we're celebrating one of our own a brand new store opening near you this.

Irving Berlin Jude Manal
"irving berlin" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"irving berlin" Discussed on Turned Up

"This is on the same ring to it not doesn't um so singer brendel lee recorded the original version of rock around the christmas tree when she was only thirteen years old was that with all the thirteen yearolds recording christmas tune sense of song area we need to put out a christmas so i know that recording and steph annulling she hasn't sound thirteen michelle's young but not thirteen well he also wrote holly jolly christmas and run rudolf run okay so definitely some blatant christmas references driven rudolf another jewish songwriter irving berlin we talked about second go wrote white christmas uh and then julie stein and sami con let it snow which is not even a christmas song at all uh never mentions christmas wealth in polls taken off the list albert hague wrote era mean one mr grant okay so this one is cool abdullah but research into that room mean one so the person singing it who your emulating right now is thorough ravenscroft due to the name at all no i always thought it was the guy that the darth vader's voice it's the guy who did the voice for a tony the tiger for frosted flakes great same guy also did characters for disney rides and shows including both from the country bears gymboree that's awesome yeah naina won't the more you know done thantmyint uh jay livingston and ray evans silver bells we talked about that one tinkle bells mel torme we all know the name melt army he wrote the christmas song which we know as chestnuts roasting on an open fire did you know about that song chestnuts roasting on opened fire it was a it was written in a heatwave in 1944 that's ironic so basically during this heatwave he was just friend is best to do anything to stay cool and decided to write things on piece of paper and how that's how the song came to be he probably felt like chestnut throws thing on an open fire.

brendel lee christmas michelle albert hague jay livingston steph annulling irving berlin julie stein disney ray evans thirteen years