16 Burst results for "Iris Automation"

"iris automation" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

06:32 min | 3 months ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"This episode is being published during sudden fund. And we'll be deviating from our normal format. What we have is an interview. David vanderhoek i recorded for the uav digest. Now i know there is some audience. Overlap between that podcast and this one but for all you who general here. Not interested in drones. Stick with me for just a minute. Our guest is john damage. The ceo of iris they've developed onboard detect and avoid technology for beyond visual line of sight. Drone flights if piloted in aircraft or going to share the same airspace. This is critical technology that both worlds have a stake in one thing that you will appreciate is that john is a pilot himself and he brings the understanding that you all have into the unmanned space. Just listen to his bio. John has over thirty years of aviation technology. Experience and executive leadership he led new. Business ventures at boeing next. He was chief growth officer at boeing subsidiary. In situ and he was a boeing executive liaison board member to sky. Grid a joint venture between boeing and spark cognition. John was the ceo of two d. Three sensing a leading provider of computer vision based image processing software for aerial surveillance. He's also an faa certified commercial pilot multi engine and instrument ratings and. He's a cfi pretty. Good hey if you're a pilot or naveh geek that's the kind of guy you want in the drone business. Our man on the inside so to speak. Irish autonation is primarily a computer vision and machine learning software company. That's focused on helping. Unpiloted systems detect other airplanes. The company's cassia product is a platform agnostic. Three hundred sixty degree radio computer vision tech and avoid system for unmanned aerial systems. So i invite you to listen to this conversation. I think you'll find it interesting in if you are a subscriber to the uav digest. This is the same interview as an episode. Three hundred and seventy no need to continue unless you'd like to hear it again which would flatter david me. Okay our guest is john damage. He is the ceo of iris automation. They produce the cassia which is platform agnostic. Three hundred and sixty degree radio computer vision detect and avoid system for you a. s. and they also have something they call the regulatory resource center. Which is an online tool that manages. The bbc loss waiver application process. How john's got a really nice long. Fantastic aviation technology career. He led new. Business ventures at boeing next. He was chief growth officer. At boeing's subsidiary in situ and he was a boeing executive liaison and board observer to sky grid which was a joint venture between boeing and spark ignition. John was also the ceo of two d three sensing they're a leading provider of computer vision based image processing software for aerial surveillance in on top of all that he's also an faa certified commercial pilot. He has multi-engine an instrument ratings and he's a cf. I the certified flight instructor. John welcome to the uav digest. Thank you very much. Max and i'm calling in from southern california to stay on team there. We go which probably makes both of your little bit jealous. This time year. I grew up in new jersey so i definitely remember what late february early march felt like This tease of spring but winter holding on for dear life. Well we were at seventy three degrees today. So i actually had the hanger open at the museum which was kind of a nice thing was on the teas. Get the punch is coming all right. Well john why don't we start off talking a little bit about the products and services that irish automation offers Detected avoid is certainly a big part of what you do. Yeah i would say. Detection is primarily what we do we at our core our computer vision and machine learning software company and what the founders of our business realized is that the drone industry was not going to be able to grow exponentially like all the hype held for so many years until drones were allowed to fly more like regular airplanes and The thing that really precludes that from happening today is satisfying the existing regulations as they relate to seeing and avoiding other traffic. And you know what the audience probably knows. Maybe some don't is. There is a specific rule in the current regulations In under part ninety one and that the rule is one thirteen. and be. that says it's the pilot's responsibility Weather conditions permitting to see and avoid all other aircraft. Well the funny thing happens when you take the pilot out of the cockpit in that you've now taken those eyeballs in those sensors out of the aircraft that gives you that what we refer to as the last line of defense against an airborne collision so rightly so Regulators have been very careful not to authorize too many flights of drones beyond visual line of sight until we can solve this problem so that is squarely where irises focused forgive the pun in. That is helping. These unpiloted systems detect other airplanes. So that the autopilots can actually then avoid those aircraft much the same way and frankly what will probably be better than the human pilot can And that's why we're so optimistic and really looking forward to to the value we can provide to the community because while we focus on drones to start The long run is this is a system that can help aviator and i for one as someone who spends a lot of time in low altitudes and small airplanes teaching people to fly I know how bad i am at seeing in avoiding other traffic so if i could get a hold of a system that helped me be better..

David vanderhoek John new jersey Max today Three hundred sixty degree late february john damage over thirty years one thing southern california both worlds irish both ninety one seventy three degrees one thirteen early march Three hundred and seventy Three hundred and sixty degree
Interview With Jon Damush, CEO of Iris Automation

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:18 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Jon Damush, CEO of Iris Automation

"Okay our guest is john damage. He is the ceo of iris automation. They produce the cassia which is platform agnostic. Three hundred and sixty degree radio computer vision detect and avoid system for you a. s. and they also have something they call the regulatory resource center. Which is an online tool that manages. The bbc loss waiver application process. How john's got a really nice long. Fantastic aviation technology career. He led new. Business ventures at boeing next. He was chief growth officer. At boeing's subsidiary in situ and he was a boeing executive liaison and board observer to sky grid which was a joint venture between boeing and spark ignition. John was also the ceo of two d three sensing they're a leading provider of computer vision based image processing software for aerial surveillance in on top of all that he's also an faa certified commercial pilot. He has multi-engine an instrument ratings and he's a cf. I the certified flight instructor. John welcome to the uav digest. Thank you very much. Max and i'm calling in from southern california to stay on team there. We go which probably makes both of your little bit jealous. This time year. I grew up in new jersey so i definitely remember what late february early march felt like This tease of spring but winter holding on for dear life. Well we were at seventy three degrees today. So i actually had the hanger open at the museum which was kind of a nice thing was on the teas. Get the punch is coming all right. Well john why don't we start off talking a little bit about the products and services that irish automation offers Detected avoid is certainly a big part of what you do. Yeah i would say. Detection is primarily what we do we at our core our computer vision and machine learning software company and what the founders of our business realized is that the drone industry was not going to be able to grow exponentially like all the hype held for so many years until drones were allowed to fly more like regular airplanes

Boeing John Damage Iris Automation Regulatory Resource Center BBC John FAA Southern California MAX New Jersey
"iris automation" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

07:57 min | 4 months ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Three and people can order the book there who answers that phone. You answer the phone. There is a warehouse which stocks the books for me out in ohio. So it's not a way to talk to you know though they know how to get a hold of me if if you have a question when she audio book coming out i don't know we'll have to i. I'm thinking i probably need to rob to You know to team read that with you know we. We could sit there and do our our older brother younger brother act in kind of argue about it. it'd be like click and clack tap brothers reading an audiobook max. I don't do that well. Of course it will. Don't you remember back at mit do that. It was the two of you guys. Sorry i'm sorry folks even mentioning that had of course. That was the car talk show which was originally a radio show and i guess is now available as a podcast so very very famous Radio show right. What's up with the geeks. Rob anything Interesting from chicago. Actually we were talking earlier about National aviation hall of fame and They're doing a webinar tomorrow. With a number of aviation journalists You may remember a couple of years ago. I started a facebook page Twenty-first-century century Aerospace and we were trying to figure out how to help People that wanted to become aviation journalists or dig more into it would be able to make it. I mean how we're how do they get started. What do they do. And that was really a problem. I mean it It kind of lost a little momentum but We were a bunch of us are going to talk tomorrow. Thanks to the organizing from national league hall of fame and national aeronautics association And they're all kinds of saying gee maybe we can come together and figure out a way to do this. And i said i hope so because it's not near as easy as it sounds so that's on for tomorrow. We'll we'll give somebody the the url for that once it's Once it's also up on the aviation hall of fame website. That'd be a lot of fun Yeah hopefully you'll miss. They don't say if they don't say things like well. Rob what do you think we ought to do. Yes but it's it's time it's time it's nice for the help Little programming note which. I'm going to change right here right now. On the fly it originally started with no episode next week but i think We have some prerecorded pieces one from mica one from launch pad. And i think we're instead of having no episode next week will slide those two next week. Just a super super short episode And then the following week the episode that would come out on april fourteenth David and i interviewed the ceo of iris automation. And that's going to be an episode of the uav digest. But i think we're going to do is make that also the episode for that would come on april fourteenth now you may not be interested in drones and unmanned aircraft and things like that but this is a really interesting conversation. John is Cf is a pilot He comes from a long mandate nation background. In what iris automation is doing. Now is detecting avoid technology in. I think pilots who fly in the cockpit of aircraft of course are very concerned about Being able to detect and devoid drones and for drones to detect and avoid them in. So it's a. I think it's a very interesting conversation and like i say John comes from a background that You know it makes him more like airplane geek than a drone guy in in some way. So i think it'll be of interest to you. And then the following week the episode that would come out april twenty first That will probably be With our Son and fun show. We're going to go live on on wednesday april fourteenth at six o'clock or is launch pad says eighteen hundred hours at sun. You'll never hear me say eighteen hundred hours. Because i have to do the math in my head to figure out what time of day that is so I isn't that equal to four bells. Oh god don't make it even more complicated. I used to know the bells. Wow i haven't thought about it. That really i hadn't thought about that in a long time David's counting right now to figure out. I've just made that up. I don't know what to try to remember with my father. Being a sailor. I should know this like at the top of my head. Yes no so. Three with four would be four bells. Eight would before bells twelve would be four bells so it's two bells now right. I'll take your word for the bell tolls so that's the april twenty first episode. It'll be from from sunan fund possibly some interviews conversations with some others then in then wednesday april twenty eight. The band gets back together. And it'll be a normal show not that the others in between the abnormal but really. We're normal now who say. When have we ever had a normal show. She's that mean that usually means rob's not there. I think it means that the meds will have arrived. Is that what you're saying. Rob that's a compliment. Rob is like passing out. Oh right i knew that. Hey i have you heard anything about ivar hoc- maybe this year or we're jose. Yeah not yet. The website has though information Well they do say that something along the lines of you know. They're watching the situation. They'll they'll make a decision. So yeah it's That's june usually which is gonna come up pretty quick. I don't think if we haven't found notification about it yet. I don't i mean yeah. It seems kinda second half of the year. We're all going to be very very busy. That's true to make up the first half of two double up and last year. Yeah right little bit a listener. Mail tom roka's see citizen article from david's favourite online publications. The drive this is this cockpit view of a c. Seventeen wild ride through star wars canyon is bunkers so David star wars canyon. Describe that for us well It's called by other names as well. The jet i transitioned star wars canyon. It's for low level practice in california. You're much on a higher altitude than the aircraft flying below yusuke. Great great pictures and it's for high speed low level practice. It's like in wales. Do you also see those great pictures of like f. fifteens in tornadoes in star wars canyon is the us equivalent of it. And it's called. The jed eye transition units which is another term..

california David april fourteenth ohio Twenty-first-century century Three tomorrow two four next week wales two bells Eight this year last year jose tom roka Rob four bells chicago
"iris automation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily over the remaining five years of that regulatory time line and then in the successive years after that. How will your business strategy unfold? We at three. Dr Started by building the components for drones autopilots such than we became than we built. The drones themselves awesome became America's largest manufacturer drones then went to the Chinese. Got Really good at it. We got out of that and we moved over to the software so essentially software company. We just look at the data from from Jones. It's not the drums itself. That's not entirely true. We do actually have one of our cells for for people who can't earn on allowed to buy Chinese drones which is like the US government by and large where we're on the data side and so we used to be that it was quite hard to use a drone gather data. Now it's trivial easy to touch a button. Magic happens and the question is where's the return on investment on that day the highest so we start with construction then we went to the geospatial industries. Like the you know the birth work inspection that we talked about before your sting Pu- public public safety fire. Police picking up his well. We have just scratched the surface of. What's possible here? I think that you know what the regulation allows us to do is to go beyond that sort of visual site perspective so we're looking at like like bigger areas so although we started with autodesk and construction we're now actually working even more with with a geospatial stuff with like with as raise geospatial giant and. That's our main partner in this. Whatever they were doing with satellites years ago? They're increasingly doing with with drones. And the Nice thing about these regulations is that now we can. Now we can fly tens of kilometers you know so beyond visualized site so linear infrastructure power lines gas pipelines roads roads bridges tunnels airports. All that kind of stuff now is. That's now within the reach of what we can scan with drones. So I think you're GONNA see us. You can see more of the world fall within the scope of drones. We've already the battery. Life's already there. You know the flight times already there. The soon the regulations will be there and now you know think of it. We've been looking at pixels Oregon start looking at screens. What are the remaining technical barriers that feel the most acute right now? Ah almost none. I sort of feel like all the technical problems were solved years ago. I'm not that's not entirely true. But you know fully autonomous in including Centene Voids Company skied. Yo Right now doing amazing amazing work. But that's computer vision. Basically you know navigating through forests and through through leaves etcetera just using just using cameras. That's flying low when you fly higher you want to be able to avoid other aircraft and that's a harder computer vision problem. But there's this company called Iris Automation. That's doing that again with with cameras you know. The vehicles can fly almost any distance drones afloat across the mid-atlantic just use different fuel gas engines or hybrids or whatever. The radio links can go tens or hundreds of miles. The computer vision is amazing. GPS get better and better the software's kind of done on On all this this this almost nothing I can think of the drone delivery precision landing all that stuff. We basically benefit from the advantages in a and computer vision out there already so I literally cannot think of any technical problems right now. They haven't at least been solved at the university level. What about security well into fine define security? I mean the military has secure drones and has and has for many years. It's just you know. Do you want to do you want to have it like going. Through satellites nights encrypted sure can be done right now at the security is kind of whatever people want among the commercial space. It's standard Wifi to fifty. Six bit. Encryption encryption you can go you can pay more for for other security on the cloud side. We use fed ramp. There's really it's kind of what he want to pay it all exists. Let's imagine a construction site. I want to map that construction site or ensure the the safety I want to have an understanding of. What's going on in that construction site and so I'm going to use a drone to do that? Walk me through. What the drone is doing as it's flying over or through the construction site? How is the data getting recorded? How's IT getting sent to the cloud or is it like sitting on the drone and then the drone lands and you have to upload it take me through the technical process so I'll I'll describes her the optimal process and so far larger customers? They've kind of got it all all all very efficient. The optimal process is that this is being done every day. Maybe in the morning and the evening so you know the temporal resolution you know not just not just the spatial but because we objective here is to create what's called digital twin back in the day you know. Construction was started on screens with cad file but the moment they started digging it was analog paper. Blueprints need notepads and things like that we want that digital file that the digital plan to reflect reality so you know as they say you know no no no plan survives the first shot you know. Construction projects survives the for spader. Yes something changed. And so if you don't update the digital filed and that digital file you know there's interpreted it it sort of loses its relevance as it becomes less and less reflective of reality. So there's something called reality. Capture and the objective is to have the digital file software. You wanted people commit their software back to you. Know the the you know the master. So the masters nautical so in this case. The it's not it's not aww repository. It's a it's a cad file and that cadfael should be updated every day to reflect reality. How do you reflect reality? Well back in the old days people have to type in. Here's what I did too laborious now you want it. You want the scan to automatically capture reality and then update the file to show what happened to win so that that's what we're doing at at the headquarters they've said okay. This is this is the site and we want it to. Let's say capture the whole scan both horizontal and the vertical structures WanNa capture at in seven o'clock in the morning and at five o'clock at night and so the plan is the sitting some spot in the box. What's going to happen is that somebody's going to walk in the the site in the morning on lock? The gates locked the trailer. Turn on the generator and open the box and take the drone out maybe stick battery and at that point somebody will. Construction worker will touch a button on an IPAD and a plan that has already been loaded to that. IPAD from headquarters is going to be uploaded to Joan. Joan will take off. It'll do a lawn mower pattern hatter nor Peru or circular pattern or spiral pattern depending on what the site is at the point. It'll take about some between nine and ten minutes to do the whole site. It'll it'll take probably about two hundred images flying about about two hundred and fifty feet and then a land on its own at that point is someone who will put the back in the box touch another another button on the IPAD and the injury from that tyrone will go into the IPAD and then automatically buffalo to to the cloud to cloud at that point all those photos then get through a process to photograph maitree all those photos get get sort of analyzed and basically the way photograph works. It's called called structure from motion. But when and you see the same object from different perspectives using the paradox effects. You can actually see the depth you can have that so although the the photos to D- when you combine a bunch of two D. photos you end up with a three three d three D model and that'll be a point cloud or mesh or something like that. So that's automatically generated. Then that is automatically syncs up with the the cad file and when you have these things called ground control points so in the course of flying over its certain features are known had known position they have like an ex or some sort of fiduciary optical fiduciary automatically maquis recognize. And so that aligns this three d model to the same locations and so it snaps into location and now this becomes a layer in the cad file and and you can basically scroll forward and backwards through time and see how and see how things change and because these are meshes they're actually geometry's which can be snapped on. Snap and Khanin in alignment with the underlying catfight and you can say oh. That post was supposed to be here. But it's actually two meters over. There's probably a reason why they moved. That post two meters overdoes rock or something like that. Okay okay well. That's good to know now that now the digital twin says okay guys going forward. No that that post is now. It was supposed to be now over here. So when you put the trench now now put Trenton. I have to move the trenches well and you know when you're when you're going to be cutting the That you know the steel beam to go in that post note. The steel beam can have to be changed as well so now all all that information goes into the supply chain in the scheduling going forward and they make better choices because it reflected reality. Your software is open source or some of it It's it's actually not so the software and the drone so the drone might be using our the the software that we originally you know developed or or the software that we're now are working on as part of the drone code project is part of the next foundation says suffer on the drone is probably open source might be a degi vehicle which is closed source or might be one of one of the open source wants based Tantrum Code. That's just you know to operate the drone and mission and all this stuff. The data on the other hand goes into the cloud. And that's all closers. What's the reasoning behind? And the open source project. Is You just join or CO founded the foundation projects credit. Yeah Okay what have been the ramifications of the open source. I mean just to give some context. I You told quite a great story at at the Open Core Summit Guy I you know. We can't go through that in the entirety but maybe you can give a condensed highlights version of that story. Perhaps the evolution of your code being used by constituencies of various ethical. Flavors got it. Got It okay. Yeah so when I started I started as a as a hobby. Maybe I was. The editor of wired it was doing. My kids became a community. It took off and everything I do as a community has always been open source. You know whether it's you you know creative Commons or or actual code so it was just a default open because it was a hobby you know and and then as it got as it got bigger it became better organized and you know proper code development processes and and maintainers and things like that as it got bigger yet it became clear that we had the opportunity to create attention the android of ABC's Amand Aerial Vehicles. And I was like okay. Well you know this is starting to look like smartphones..

"iris automation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily over the remaining five years of that regulatory time line and then in the successive years after that. How will your business strategy unfold? We at three. Dr Started by building the components for drones autopilots such than we became than we built. The drones themselves awesome became America's largest manufacturer drones then went to the Chinese. Got Really good at it. We got out of that and we moved over to the software so essentially software company. We just look at the data from from Jones. It's not the drums itself. That's not entirely true. We do actually have one of our cells for for people who can't earn on allowed to buy Chinese drones which is like the US government by and large where we're on the data side and so we used to be that it was quite hard to use a drone gather data. Now it's trivial easy to touch a button. Magic happens and the question is where's the return on investment on that day the highest so we start with construction then we went to the geospatial industries. Like the you know the birth work inspection that we talked about before your sting Pu- public public safety fire. Police picking up his well. We have just scratched the surface of. What's possible here? I think that you know what the regulation allows us to do is to go beyond that sort of visual site perspective so we're looking at like like bigger areas so although we started with autodesk and construction we're now actually working even more with with a geospatial stuff with like with as raise geospatial giant and. That's our main partner in this. Whatever they were doing with satellites years ago? They're increasingly doing with with drones. And the Nice thing about these regulations is that now we can. Now we can fly tens of kilometers you know so beyond visualized site so linear infrastructure power lines gas pipelines roads roads bridges tunnels airports. All that kind of stuff now is. That's now within the reach of what we can scan with drones. So I think you're GONNA see us. You can see more of the world fall within the scope of drones. We've already the battery. Life's already there. You know the flight times already there. The soon the regulations will be there and now you know think of it. We've been looking at pixels Oregon start looking at screens. What are the remaining technical barriers that feel the most acute right now? Ah almost none. I sort of feel like all the technical problems were solved years ago. I'm not that's not entirely true. But you know fully autonomous in including Centene Voids Company skied. Yo Right now doing amazing amazing work. But that's computer vision. Basically you know navigating through forests and through through leaves etcetera just using just using cameras. That's flying low when you fly higher you want to be able to avoid other aircraft and that's a harder computer vision problem. But there's this company called Iris Automation. That's doing that again with with cameras you know. The vehicles can fly almost any distance drones afloat across the mid-atlantic just use different fuel gas engines or hybrids or whatever. The radio links can go tens or hundreds of miles. The computer vision is amazing. GPS get better and better the software's kind of done on On all this this this almost nothing I can think of the drone delivery precision landing all that stuff. We basically benefit from the advantages in a and computer vision out there already so I literally cannot think of any technical problems right now. They haven't at least been solved at the university level. What about security well into fine define security? I mean the military has secure drones and has and has for many years. It's just you know. Do you want to do you want to have it like going. Through satellites hates encrypted sure can be done right now at the security is kind of whatever people want among the commercial space. It's standard Wifi to fifty. Six bit. Encryption encryption you can go you can pay more for for other security on the cloud side. We use fed ramp. There's really it's kind of what he want to pay it all exists. Let's imagine a construction site. I want to map that construction site or ensure the the safety I want to have an understanding of. What's going on in that construction site and so I'm going to use a drone to do that? Walk me through. What the drone is doing as it's flying over or through the construction site? How is the data getting recorded? How's IT getting sent to the cloud or is it like sitting on the drone and then the drone lands and you have to upload it take me through the technical process so I'll I'll describes her the optimal process and so far larger customers? They've kind of got it all all all very efficient. The optimal process is that this is being done every day. Maybe in the morning and the evening so you know the temporal resolution you know not just not just the spatial but because we objective here is to create what's called digital twin back in the day you know. Construction was started on screens with cad file but the moment they started digging it was analog paper. Blueprints need notepads and things like that we want that digital file that the digital plan to reflect reality so you know as they say you know no no no plan survives the first shot you know. Construction projects survives the for spader. Yes something changed. And so if you don't update the digital filed and that digital file you know there's interpreted it it sort of loses its relevance as it becomes less and less reflective of reality. So there's something called reality. Capture and the objective is to have the digital file software. You wanted people commit their software back to you. Know the the you know the master. So the masters nautical so in this case. The it's not it's not aww repository. It's a it's a cad file and that cadfael should be updated every day to reflect reality. How do you reflect reality? Well back in the old days people have to type in. Here's what I did too laborious now you want it. You want the scan to automatically capture reality and then update the file to show what happened to win so that that's what we're doing at at the headquarters they've said okay. This is this is the site and we want it to. Let's say capture the whole scan both horizontal and the vertical structures WanNa capture at in seven o'clock in the morning and at five o'clock at night and so the plan is the sitting some spot in the box. What's going to happen is that somebody's going to walk in the the site in the morning on lock? The gates locked the trailer. Turn on the generator and open the box and take the drone out maybe stick battery and at that point somebody will. Construction worker will touch a button on an IPAD and a plan that has already been loaded to that. IPAD from headquarters is going to be uploaded to Joan. Joan will take off. It'll do a lawn mower pattern hatter nor Peru or circular pattern or spiral pattern depending on what the site is at the point. It'll take about some between nine and ten minutes to do the whole site. It'll it'll take probably about two hundred images flying about about two hundred and fifty feet and then a land on its own at that point is someone who will put the back in the box touch another another button on the IPAD and the injury from that tyrone will go into the IPAD and then automatically buffalo to to the cloud to cloud at that point all those photos then get through a process to photograph maitree all those photos get get sort of analyzed and basically the way photograph works. It's called called structure from motion. But when and you see the same object from different perspectives using the paradox effects. You can actually see the depth you can have that so although the the photos to D- when you combine a bunch of two D. photos you end up with a three three d three D model and that'll be a point cloud or mesh or something like that. So that's automatically generated. Then that is automatically syncs up with the the cad file and when you have these things called ground control points so in the course of flying over its certain features are known had known position they have like an ex or some sort of fiduciary optical fiduciary automatically maquis recognize. And so that aligns this three d model to the same locations and so it snaps into location and now this becomes a layer in the cad file and and you can basically scroll forward and backwards through time and see how and see how things change and because these are meshes they're actually geometry's which can be snapped on. Snap and Khanin in alignment with the underlying catfight and you can say oh. That post was supposed to be here. But it's actually two meters over. There's probably a reason why they moved. That post two meters overdoes rock or something like that. Okay okay well. That's good to know now that now the digital twin says okay guys going forward. No that that post is now. It was supposed to be now over here. So when you put the trench now now put Trenton. I have to move the trenches well and you know when you're when you're going to be cutting the That you know the steel beam to go in that post note. The steel beam can have to be changed as well so now all all that information goes into the supply chain in the scheduling going forward and they make better choices because it reflected reality. Your software is open source or some of it It's it's actually not so the software and the drone so the drone might be using our the the software that we originally you know developed or or the software that we're now are working on as part of the drone code project is part of the next foundation says suffer on the drone is probably open source might be a degi vehicle which is closed source or might be one of one of the open source wants based Tantrum Code. That's just you know to operate the drone and mission and all this stuff. The data on the other hand goes into the cloud. And that's all closers. What's the reasoning behind? And so the open source project is you just join or CO founded the foundation projects credit. Yeah Okay what have been the ramifications of the open source. I mean just to give some context. I You told quite a great story at at the Open Core Summit Guy I you know. We can't go through that in the entirety but maybe you can give a condensed highlights version of that story. Perhaps the evolution of your code being used by constituencies of various ethical. Flavors got it. Got It okay. Yeah so when I started I started as a as a hobby. CBS editor of wired. It was doing. My kids became a community. It took off and everything I do as a community has always been open source. You know whether it's you you know creative Commons or or actual code so it was just a default open because it was a hobby you know and and then as it got as it got bigger it became better organized and you know proper code development processes and and maintainers and things like that as it got bigger yet it became clear that we had the opportunity to create attention the android of ABC's Amand Aerial Vehicles. And I was like okay. Well you know this is starting to look like smartphones..

"iris automation" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Yes Mike McConnell we first get up to speed on your incomplete report of a half hour ago yes indeed the top ten markets for vacation homes yes they have the greatest percentage of vacation homes yes we said main was number one followed by Vermont and New Hampshire and then we have Alaska Delaware Florida coming in at number six Montana Wisconsin Arizona and Idaho all states I would choose surprised yeah me too this was news because well the point was that a high was like forty nine out of fifty yeah we'll have any vacation now as we don't like Haitians in Ohio will like company that's I guess he does not get out but I found I found a last could be surprising yes I'd like dell I thought to floor Florida would be higher up Montana Wisconsin most coaches get the lakes right the legs and then the mountains got Big Sky in buffalo yeah but vacation homes in Montana the boys ranch dude ranches that's what they're dude ranches whatever you say anyway back to the reality star retail sales were up yes more than expected up four tenths percent last month broad gains of course most categories suggesting that consumer consumption was already healthy before the anticipated interest rate cuts that we are thinking we're going to get the end of this month eleven of thirteen major retail categories rose that's a lot that is a lie all right does where we have like maybe step one in air traffic control for drones explain blues yes the company that brought you free digital maps and email wants to help you flyer drone this is winning it's an offshoot of Google they have a new after calling open sky that they hope will become the basis for a full fledged air traffic control system for drones now it's been approved to manage drone flights in Australia and wing has been working and demonstration projects with the FAA and other countries other companies are doing this to there's a company called air map and another one called iris automation they're doing the same thing with the FAA but having a robust air traffic system for small drones flying at low altitudes is really critical for companies that want to use drones for deliveries no I want with once this starts happening people are going to put up with it drones are noisy they fly low overhead and they met and they make bombs bark that's what happens if you start getting a lot of them out there people are going to put up with it well we'll see what happens what way we must be a member to be flying down the you know the the median of the interstate or something to stay away from houses but there wasn't of your house but then they can make their deliveries the idea is to bring it right to you that final modeled my point is I don't think people thought this through note drawing pain in the **** of some neighbor had one up one night last week I'm sitting outside of its content and maybe they'll be I want to shoot it down we'll get only been up there for a minute if you shoot down all the drones will just have to get quieter drones quiet drones not a problem as drones stand right now but then the thing is if you have a quiet drone you don't wanna know that something's up there one of my head on and I'm not three a little bit of noise I don't want to look up and see something's kindest hovering there are the Jensen dropping a project I've ever package on me the jets in mobile sound that would be nice look into it all right what about what we have like maybe news for seniors was stubborn back pain yes yes yes another non opioid therapy option it could be thank you puncture now the federal government has to make good on a plan to cover acupuncture with the Medicare program but the centers right now for Medicare and Medicaid services to propose covering the therapy if patients and role in clinical trials sponsored by the national institutes of health or other approved studies reflects a growing body of research that subjects ask your punk data suggests acupuncture can be effective in treating certain kinds of pain in my hand goes up here buy back at the puncture difficult to believe in the first of may Dallas was like a placebo I did I went in there for back he went in as a believer I went in as a believer I wouldn't is a hope for let's put it that way and now I'm a believer placebo all rights futures are what when you're a senior baby your giant okay features this morning just a little bit higher is simply a two points nasdaq and three from the Bloomberg news or on my poetry Sikora on newsradio seven hundred W. SO.

Mike McConnell seven hundred W
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Night operations are also still a challenge without a waiver and drones over fifty five pounds drones greater than fifty five pounds will be big no pun intended and currently not many people are thinking about him but likely because they will require special exemptions to operate commercially currently the fa released their aerospace forecast for 2017 to twenty thirty seven report they estimate that over the next five years they will be more than three point five million hobbyists drones and four hundred twenty thousand commercial drones in the united states there are currently more than seven hundred and seventy thousand drones registered to fly in the us gaining one hundred thousand plus users in just three months from january to march 2017 insane growth shakeups funding and mergers and acquisitions iris automation raised one and a half million bucks to help drouin cents and avoid obstacles as i talked about with cofounder alex harm sin in episode number forty one of the podcast perret fired one third of their entire drone team which is 33 percent now pivoting focus to the commercial industry go pro released the karma after the huge goofed up where the drone was launched and then recalled just days later and you can hear the entire backstory on the gopro karma drones crashing back to earth in episode number forty of the podcast lilley robotics fell spectacularly out of the sky in a ball of somewhat welldeserved flames they were sued by the city of san francisco and investigations are underway.

fa united states san francisco iris automation alex fifty five pounds three months 33 percent five years
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Go and follow the pipeline and find me where the leaks are or if you sad like hey like send out a couple of drones and said there's a forest fire somewhere here because the smoke in the air go and find that map ahead and then just autonomously put out the fire because we have a couple these drones editors waterbombers filling up from lakes honestly i'm this is this is definitely like in the realm of science fiction but also like 5 10 years away three like if we can build the artificial intelligence if we can build the situational awareness for these sorts of this new generation of autonomous drones i'm very happy to be behind them i like the future that you paint thank you so much so everybody you can check out iris automation's website iris onboard dot com that's i r i s o n b o r d dot com and follow them on twitter i risk under score and automation iris underscore automation and you can fall alex mr alex harm season on twitter alex harm that's a l e x h a r m and of course will your added you can go ahead and follow the podcast on twitter drones podcast and check out the brand spanking new website at commercial drones dot fm in your web browser a much better experience i spent a lot of time revamping this thing so going to focus on putting a lot more content on there and that's really all we have today of the of course you can check out the patriotic page if you want to support the podcast that patriotic.

artificial intelligence iris automation twitter 5 10 years
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Yep oh 'cause that okay okay gravity's less and it can okay what exactly fleet little pressure but let's gravity is long okay well geez great answer most people say ikea dji phantom three minnog with mars helicoptered urine so that's a that's a really great answer now what is the future hold then for iris automation i mean looking forward you know a few years in the future where are you guys headed where do you want to be what are your aspirations and know i'm sure this came up in all the pitches and stuff for funding and everything but in a world where do you want you know if you look at the company in a few years and the way the industry's headed like where what's your ideal future look like for iris automation the i never get tired of talking about that at answering these sorts of questions i mean this is in a sense and avoid technology is exciting and safety systems a general for these drones are extremely important and this is really what's gonna get us that next level unlock the beyond line site plates unlock fully autonomous drones but like once that is there i mean that's really when stuff gets interesting and stuff gets crazy on the on this commercial drone side the the so many applications for drones and all these applications a lift applications a listed before from human transportation to force remanants matter like even forest firefighting and the great thing about robotics systems like this is that like right now the relatively dump i mean these autopilots are i mean they're essentially just following gps way points through the sky but i wouldn't be cool if instead of just planning gps way points the follow a pipeline you just pulled it.

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"What a great question so before iris automation i was working at nasa the tour propulsion lab and we were working on a project called mars helicopter whoa and essentially this was a drone for the martian surface to help guide the the morris rover along the martian surface i mean this was very interesting we working on computer vision system that has of specifically for that drone to be able to do three d reconstruction of a surface but i'm going to the march wherever has the same issues that like industrial drones have now honestly it's two point four million with two point four billion dollars and we just don't trust that the navigate on its own as soon as it goes beyond line of sight as soon as an actual lands on the martian surface were worried about it fallingoff alleges highs this table lending over and but home i people are five other sites to certain situational awareness on the march wherever but i mean having some sort of drone that follows it along and sorta gives it eyes in the sky to map out that landscape i mean that's that's pretty exciting a of your own yet and that's a very long project than and we will see if it actually comes to fruition but no doubt that that's my favorite tra i mean that's an excellent answer what it it the helicopter so it's uses the same amini uses a air molecules to stay aloft.

four billion dollars
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Simulations in real world environments and so it's it's that sort of robustness ours that sort of thinking that actually allows us to build certification procedures at allows us to to actually say this is good enough because like as much as we want and aviation at a certain point we have to draw the line and say like this many accidents are acceptable and i'm we want to reduce that as much as we possibly cannon we feel like if you at an iris automation system on board hike suddenly a drone becomes x times better x time safer on we know that that's going to help and selling to mining companies are oil and gas companies or forestry or even helps amazon get their package delivery drones out actually flying in the us so different companies and different industries assess risk differently there are more higher or lower tolerances of risk now you've got me thinking what if the vision systems trying to detect things not to run into were not just pointing straight ahead but also pointing down like right now you need a special waiver from the fa in the us the flyover people could this technology theoretically be like pointing down and then seeing people underneath it and then you know assessing risk that way and keeping itself at a safe distance to not like if there was an engine failure hit the people or something sure i mean like really what we're doing is building that software that that intelligence that allows us to do that complete situational awareness and wait for pointing up down forward backward left right doesn't really matter and in the current implementation of the system as a camera with a certain feel the view facing forward because most drone companies and most regulators are worried about hitting something had on arc lining was something in so that that this socially going forward limits that time to collision and so that's the direction where you really want to be looking at but i'm indefinitely.

gas companies us fa amazon
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Products on the market obviously there's dji they have their vision sensing uh also intel has real sense how do you compare to those products like how does iris automation differentiate itself i guess maybe even from like the industrial aspects like what are you guys doing that tackles the problem or solves the problem differently than those two but i mean that's a that's a great question a question like that comes out all the time in this i think for me like relatively simple to to deal with but it could be uh to be hard to just intuitively understand i think when it comes to to collision avoidance in general or different collision avoidance technologies was sort of broken it up into two categories whereas intel real signs the dgi phantom four with their collision avoidance falls into this show the short range bumper solution this has ten twenty meters in front of the drone uh could be multiple directions but it's really meant for consumer drones it's meant for a sort of very slow shortrange navigation it's it's meant to fly through a parking garage or through a four star uh at special follow me features that's more interaction with humans are the using of her wedding shoot it just it's there to make sure you don't hit the altar accidentally but then the other side of that the other side of collision avoidance is more the sense and avoid technologies and that's more where we're going after this is more a full range solutions as tens to five hundred meter range it's the honestly the point of our system is to make drones boring um i mean we wanna make a boring a safe i n aviation and that's that's what you want to go over a minutes like certain orders of magnitude higher and safety we wanna make sure that these drones aren't running into manned aircraft and what we want to be able to allow these drones find national airspace and for the fa and transport canada and whatever other regulatory agencies the feel safe about letting hundreds of thousands package delivery drones like loose in airspace that that's the sort of problem we're dealing with that's the sort of problem that we're solving with this collision avoidance technology and i mean that in my mind that's a huge differentiator it's more toys compared to aviation and avionics.

collision avoidance intel fly through fa five hundred meter ten twenty meters
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Is like once we essentially we want to be able to move to fully autonomous drones for a lot of these applications and makes sense it so much more costeffective and like these drones are essentially robotic one of the main reasons why we have these drones is to be able to like extend this human reach or to have is in the sky or from a different perspective and it's it's not really natural for the humans actually be operating them meds counter intuitive to actually steer them with too little stacks with buttons and ideally these drones should just be able to accomplish their task without any sort of human interference and so something like iris automation being able to provide situational awareness and then being able to letting the strong see the roadway a pilot would i mean that essentially gives us the confidence that they would fly those missions without running into manner aircraft or birds or balloons our buildings her power loan towers yeah whatever have you okay cool also what so how many employees are you guys at today at iris automation were ten people ten people cool and so what is the iris automation team like him you know you guys unassuming mostly software developers at this time but um rent how's the team comprised than uh what are you guys can of a working on mike currently i mean if it's quite hard challenge i mean we're talking about outdoor computer vision then at a large range in real time on embedded systems in its i mean the computer vision and deep learning itself is like no trivial challenge that attractive though to the software it over track that i think we've got most of the buzzer of covered which is i am scv there you go and so all of the team as engineers except for one.

iris automation software developers mike real time embedded systems
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"For contacts even just asking questions i mean there's a form that i could pose any question to and it could be ceo of x ways that company or could be some other founder of a much smaller company that made mistakes eight years ago announced wanting to share those experiences that's a huge asset was being adjourned company unique at that time like for why combinator we guys like one of the only the few in their one of the only ones uh actually don't know if i consider myself a drone company who i really i we're going after that computer vision the artificial intelligence for these thomas vehicles and i mean i it makes so much sense to apply that to drone to make so much sense the to focus on the drone industry but it's it's more providing that saw far that intelligence for this industrial around to allow them to do their thing rather than being a drone company nice good answer okay cool so arguments bad at piloting drones then like him we not trust humans to safely pilot drones is that way iris automation and computer vision all this all this technology for sensitive loyd is that why it's needed or their alternative reasons i honestly i think humans aren't just bad at piloting drones humans are bad at piloting unmanned aircraft that's true and i'm there there's so many accidents and by most national transportation safety board investigation said uh essentially calling the question human operator competence piloted air pilot errors the number one cause of any aviation accident anywhere and leg drones are an extension of that the really the big issue with drones being operated.

ceo founder artificial intelligence loyd eight years
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"And essentially saw this huge divide and the artificial constraint on the commercial drone market and said we should try and figure out how to solve this trust issue and like ultimately that's what created iris automation a certain point we quit and moved back up the vancouver and worked in a basement for awhile writing software and then said you know what we have the prototype and let's uh let's get some investment and porcelain gas on this fire that's awesome so you're based here now in the bay area exactly so we we just moved down so we can offer why combinator of the summer and i mean so much such a great ecosystem here there's talent investors just in general disorder events great podcasts it's a good place to be a guest on a podcast and also to get investment for drunk company were there other so for those who don't know why combinator is can you explain what that is exactly sure it's one of the best known accelerator programs in the world on essentially they select the number of different companies are twice a year in two different batches and other broadened to mountain view or san francisco and essentially the bringing mentors guests the summit called demo day at the very end to where they put you on a stage for two and a half minutes front a five hundred investors was quite quite thrilling probably the most were hurst two and a half minutes of my life but i'm in the sort of entrust that came after that was phenomenal that's awesome and how long this oh so that goes on for likes four three four six months or something and why it was a thirty three months germany and of august i think the the biggest part of it has been part of this alumni network now as it is something like a thousand founders in have gone through that program and just being part of the network coming being sort of on that inside circle has been tremendously useful for.

vancouver san francisco germany four three four six months thirty three months
"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

Commercial Drones FM

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"iris automation" Discussed on Commercial Drones FM

"Welcome to commercial drone start fm the podcast that explores the commercial drone industry the people who power it and the concepts that drive at i'm your host ian smith hey everybody before we get started i want to let everyone know that we hit our first patriotic on funding goal so this means everyone from here on out that donate one dollar month to the podcast gets an exclusive invite to the private patron only slack group that i created to discuss everything commercial drones so you can get your invitation to the group by visiting patriotic dot com slash drones podcast that's p a t r e o n dot com slash drones podcast and just by donating a buck a month to the podcast you're in okay so welcomed the commercial drones fm now that that's over with thanks everybody for listening and tuning in so this evening were sitting in san francisco at the german deploy offices and i am here with alex harm sent who is the ceo and cofounder of iris automation which is a drone start up out of y combinator that recently raised one and a half million bucks in seedfunding to bring cents and avoid technology to drones used for industry so thank you so much for coming in being here with us this evening alex allowed to be here in pre shed at man so let's get started let's let's kick this off with a little bit of backstory so we met actually previously at an all haunch silicon valley event orange as americans would say like the telecom company they have like a venture capital arm that they have here in silicon valley and you were speaking on a panel on it was like artificial intelligence in drones or something.

ian smith san francisco ceo iris automation alex artificial intelligence seedfunding venture capital one dollar