17 Burst results for "Ira Sachs"

"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

Chosen Family

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

"Saddam has what are you obsessed with this week Can you believe I'm obsessed with like a fictional character. Her like a person who doesn't exist and I'm obsessed with that person. I can believe that. Ok say his name is Roman Roy. He's the fourth sibling on succession to hit H. B. O.. Ah hearing everyone talking about the show. I have no idea so so succession is about this billionaire family based in New York they own media operation like theme parks. It's like it's a ridiculous life. There's a patriarch Logan. WHO's almost like a shakespearian king character? Okay he has four children adrenaline all kind of inept in their own way and they all want to succeed to Logan. This is like game of thrones but also also reality show and also six Pierre Okay. It's so basically all the kids want to be the main inheritor of the wire takeover over trying to destroy each other as well the sibling to get there a little bit. Also they have to have alliances and work together but is it about Roman. The Roman is he's he's the baby and in the Roy Dynasty he's played by Karen Culkin back. Yeah so I'm obsessed with it because AH whenever a Roman is an corporate setting. He just says what he wants to say. and to me that's power franken morning No correction it is not a good morning learning from my Pov. Because you're here and fucking hate you and why why do you like. Why do you fight hunger appeal because you're a brat to kind of a Brat and I think it's so hey the conformity of how we're supposed to behave? I know when I'm expected to behave in a certain way and I do it. I'm always a little disappointed at myself. And that's why I'm kind of inspired by Roman. I wish it was more like him and I can't wait for three to nowhere. I just think it's so funny right now that there's so many shows that a lot of us are watching about lake the extremely wealthy and somehow relating like hi. I'm watching the crown somehow leading. I mean I've always loved a queen. It's like starting from snow. Way The evil queen like just always ready for you. You'll majesty two long jubilee. Day Is Grueling Queen's coronation twenty five take the crown is just. I don't know I think it's so well written and directed the lighting is always dark. And there's just something very dramatic matic but elevated about it. I think you know but it is. It's because they think maybe sometimes my own world feels so chaotic. And I feel so like not in control of circumstances in life role you on Buckingham Palace. Yeah everything is like. It's all protocol a strict procedure for everything and like from the first season. It's all about like the crown as a burden you know because this enormous responsibility and I'm like you know what I could handle the birth wake. Please give me that. Elizabeth I would be Margaret for sure. I Margaret is great. But my like not. I wouldn't say my favorite character but there is a character who has come to prominence in the third season. He's Lord Mountbatten. He's the head of the navy. Yeah exactly and he's played by this actor named Charles Dance. Okay he's like seventy five years old. Seventy five okay and I really want to have sex. You know why it's that character especially in the in the third season so he's been discharged and his little sense of identity is about his accomplishments and like being the leader and now he is like nothing to lead or govern overtake. That is one of the best sex would happen. Our how our it would be like. I'm just like take whatever you need from me. If you've been watching succession or the crown we really WanNa know what you love about these shows. Yeah it tells you your favorite characters Azzaro messages in the group and if you're not watching them get on board with the mainstream okay the Queen Your support chosen family is produced by me. Trente winter and me. Thomas Leblanc with Chris will do hayme crystal also edits and mixes the show our talent producer on this episode bliss. Catherine Stockhausen big. Thanks to Evan Kelly. If you haven't already make sure to join our facebook group just on their search chosen family you'll find it please. Breath joined the group. We're always trying to post cute things for you. Judy Z Goo is our digital producer. Tanya Springer is the senior producer of CBC PODCASTS and Arve Noorani. Ronnie is the executive producer. Chosen Families Music is by the lost boys. CHOSEN FAMILY IS A. CBC podcast originally developed in association with Five Studio and listened to chosen family. Wherever you get your podcasts.

Lord Mountbatten Pierre Okay Roman Roy Logan Saddam Margaret New York H. B. O Buckingham Palace Charles Dance Karen Culkin facebook franken Arve Noorani Tanya Springer Ronnie Elizabeth I
"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

Chosen Family

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

"I you know you create different narratives for your life and sort of and I think back for me. I have come to think that there was a chapter that began when I was thirteen when I first learned about sexuality and at my own homosexuality and learned how to hide it and and I came out at sixteen. But I didn't in so many ways I got very used to and my culture understandably Blais as a gay man created a an illicit subterfuge and and Space which was we had to because the violence and an in homophobia and in a sense of shame but that darkness crept into our lives or my life in ways that it was really hard for me to let go of and I feel like at thirty nine when I let go of that relationship which was ten years I just shifted A percents that I wasn't gonNA live in in the dark and to me I guess. The forgiveness is this is also personal. It's it's forgiving. Like a as you know when I tell that story I say we I I was that person making those not so good choices. For for reason I did not create that environment. I was part of that environment and I think as gay people queer people. There's there's a need to to understand stands one's actions were or partially in response so forgiving yourself for really bad. Responsibility is a big part of recovery. Yes it's a a big part of lake healing yourself and accepting others as they are and what your take what your part in. It is Are you still in touch with bill. Clegg or We're not in in. I mean we. We live very close to each other and We ran into each other in the street in it always feels like the last seen in splendor in the grass. I haven't seen it this like I mean tonight Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty and it's the most gorgeous movie it's a young young couple who are in love and they parted in years past and then they meet again and it's just it's a very it's it's you know it's sort of like this frankie. It's like this idea of loss exists and then it disappears. So I don't know I I I'm happy he's he's doing well and onward so when keep the lights on in came out It came out I think. Was it a lot the same month that you got married and that your twins were born I finished the film. Okay I got married on the seventh of January twenty twelve and my kids were born in thirteenth and I mean it just was all in the same three week period and But but you know we'd only been allowed to be married for six months so it wasn't like we wanted to get married before kids were my husband and I wanted to get married before we're born so it was all happening really fast. You mentioned earlier like making this decision to sort of like step out of the darkness. Did you ever envision this sort of family life that you have now now with your husband and your kids and their mother living next right. Yeah okay that's instagram. Something you envision for yourself or you know I think I always thought I would have kids with people I knew I I live with my husband. We have two kids and we live next door to our children's mom and we all co parent and we. We had many text this morning about Santa Claus This is today's conversation right. My mom like telling me the story about what happened in the car on the way to school today and it was very touching. She's also a filmmaker. She's she's a wonderful filmmaker Her name is Kirsten Johnson and You know people think it's a very unique situation. It is but I grew up in a divorce family. My parents were divorced when I was four. I grew up with my mom and my two sisters but my father was nearby and we saw a couple of times a week so to me. I mean that was a divorce is more painful than when we have by it doesn't it doesn't feel unique from our lives and for my kid's life they feel it's just the life it is. Yeah I mean I'm happy to say it's it's working out really well we but a lot because we do a lot of talking the three of us as parents and we kind of organize is like time where we can sit and talk about what's going on because it's necessary. I think if anything's unconventional families it's that uh-huh yeah. Yeah maybe that's true but that's beautiful. I mean God. We'd all be so much more well-adjusted if we all talked it out more in many articles about you it's you're an outsider. An American film. That you for many reasons you are on east coast and the industries in La But but to us like there was this just this connection with queasiness. I feel like you inquiry being a queer person today. Even though we've never been this accepted were still still in the Martin. We're still looking at society from an angle world. Still looking at uncomfortable realities I mean do you feel at like this that the these two are connected being queer and being this outsider. And I don't know if that's just like a media expression or how. Well Oh you feel about this expression you know. My last few films have not been queer explicitly. So that's also an interesting negotiation and thinking like how Oh you know. What are you doing to kind of fit? And what are you doing to be commercial. I I don't I'm not saying that. Those are the choices that I make for for conscious reasons but I think these are really interesting. Slippery slopes right but I feel I I'm a sensitive person you know and I and I remember once there's a lawyer and I think that's queasiness to me sensitive lawyer. No let's stop. There was a lawyer. Who who who is at this festival somewhere and he came up to me and we'd had some this kind of argument about something and and he said you're so sensitive and I'm and I said that's my job thing? Well you know it's great but but but I think I was probably to give him credit. I was probably you. You know also sensitive to the touch which I'm not very more like I'm I'm not like I'm not in pain right right and I was in a lot of pain and and I think an understanding of pain is I think it's pretty across the board part of the queer experience but also when you write queer characters or I just saw recently love. Love is strange. And there's something so normal so there's this couple their relationship in the fact that there were queer is super normal. What is not normal is that they have to leave their apartment because they can't afford it anymore? It's like real life happens. I didn't feel like you needed to like push the trauma of Queer nece. It was just as beautiful. Love Story Up till thirty nine. All my films are about the pain of intimacy and how difficult it was to be oneself within the context of an intimate relationship. I don't feel that anymore like I have an intimate relationship. It's not a a painful one. It's it's sustainable and has beauty and in a simple way not an ugly way. I mean my relationship to but but And I said my films. uh-huh tend to be more about outside their less interior. They're they're about things that happened that we we have to as this twelve step is all like you have to face things that they're bigger than you thank you so much for. Oh thank you with us. Today it's been so great. Thank you so much IRA.

La But Blais Kirsten Johnson Natalie Wood Clegg Warren Beatty
"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

Chosen Family

11:22 min | 1 year ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

"After front. It's not for me. I'm going to ask him both A. He's to pretend that. Check set by fate sick of this trip for the family. You have a good time for me. Now minsters time together. That is a clip from Frankie the latest film by Ira Sachs. We got to talk to him at tiff. Where he premiered Frankie? So Frankie Stars one of our favorite actresses. The French genius is about your who won the Oscar a couple of years ago for Al.. She plays the title role in the film but Mercer Toe may also ended. Who we love? Love Greg Kinnear. It's just such an incredible cast and basically the film is centered around Frankie. Who is the matriarch of this large and unconventional conventional family? All in Portugal. Frank has sort of gathered all the people that she's close to because she's just recently received a terminal cancer diagnosis Isabel is really just stunning in the film. Then she mostly speaks English which is not something. She's done all that much. She also dips into Her native French and we asked IRA what his French skills were like. I you know I speak Memphis high school French. Okay what is it that my French teacher was from Arkansas. But and I didn't follow up by learning very well but I can like follow French. I can direct but I've also directed in Danish Vietnamese in Russian which I don't speak at all so challenging. It's not because you you get intimate with kind of the movement of the of the script and the words and and it's kind of fun and you start to realize you don't need to micromanage as much as you usually do. So He's bill. She is a French actress. Playing a French. Actress interest She gathers her family in Sintra. Portugal very interesting. You know our current husband Jimmy and in her two previous husbands ends and then her children they all come together. Three generations on paper. It sounds like a very unique and special family like diff- Feminine. That's really different from The usual but they look so normal. onscreen yeah you know. I think it's all about Having a sense that the actors will we'll have some feeling that makes sense together together and they're all really sort of strong presences so you can imagine that they somehow our family and they're certainly a blended family. So there's there's children from different marriages and but they all have a history together. How did you approach writing and casting that family? Well I about ten years ago I saw film by such Jeet Rey. The Indian film director Jour- called Content Juneja which is about a family on a vacation in the Himalayas and Takes Place in one day. There's a sort of central crisis that brings them all together and and I loved the film and I just couldn't stop thinking about it so when Isabel and I started talking about working together This seemed the right project. Because I wouldn't be likely to make a film with Isabelle in France because I really just don't but but the idea that we were all going to be on vacation making this movie and somewhere other than home felt very natural. What was the shoot lake? Well we I was living in Lisbon which was asked. Madonna Iran. Not running to Madonna. But I ran into people talking about Madonna's more than you can imagine. Oh my God really like like a lot like so she just she was kind of well and also Centra wishes she almost bought a. Which is the TAB outside of Lisbon? Where the film is actually set? It's full of castles and chateaus and big things and And she was always going to buy this. This one is going to buy that one or the the fangs. We wasn't right after. She sat in this House for an hour and a half day. Actually she sat in the how I can picture sure that. And then she left because they wouldn't let her put a horse into a castle. I have that trouble to whatever I'm like. I'm out of this country. So you said you had an initial conversation about every time every time you say her name was such a nice accent that I always uh-huh how did you beat. We met because she sent me a fan letter which was very well which I thought was fake. Well she's a pretty mysterious figure. I I feel like for most cinna files and people who've seen her and I think that there's sort of this coldness that seems to sort of surround around her like a kind of aura. Did you find that when you met him got it all. And that's that's really what I wanted to bring to the film. It's actually somewhat similar to when I met John Liska before we made love a strange and I had a long talk with him and I was like this is the person I've never seen you play that I want in this film and it and and I sort of. I didn't ask him to play himself but I asked him to not play someone else. And that's really what I ended up with Isabelle. She's very warm. She loves talk about family. She's really interested in our. She's really easy to talk to. She's chatty wow yeah she's she's She's half Jewish Shen and all and there's like a way of speaking. I felt really comfortable and I think in the film as as she has said she's doing something different I I mean. She's really revealing herself at a in a very Sort of natural simple. You said this. She brings her family together because she has a cancer diagnosis and last year. My mother received a cancer diagnosis. She's okay for now so really connected to that but beyond that I really connected to her relationship with her son in Paul Paul's desire to start over and realizing after being two years in relationship that he's not sure if that's for him and where did that come from for you. That character who always wants to start over he's a very unsettled character Very uncomfortable with himself. I used to be more like that and I also was interested in a film that was sort of centered around this idea of illness. which wasn't what you expect it? I had I had a very good friend who was a filmmaker who died of breast cancer at fifty and she was the first person I really lost. I I loved it. I like. She was part of me. And what surprised me. Is that being around her. It wasn't like we talked about death. It wasn't even like you. You know you would be with someone in in these extraordinarily profound moments in. You'd be thinking about what you had for lunch today or what you had to do later. Like there was a way in which the the high and low or so mixed for me It seemed very human. Not like this is terrible. You should be only talking about thinking about what this profound and moment is but somehow that contradiction and in a way. This film is kind of allowing that contradiction and saying that this is really death is is is really about life right. I was also Quite close to Barbara Hammer. The lesbian experimental filmmaker in the last years of her life and what was incredible about her which which fit very well with Isabelle's characters. She was like living more powerful more like she was doing more than I would ever do. In any year in in in the year before her death she when she died there was a memorial for her and There were six people in the room. who were still collaborating with her? Even though she was gone. And I was just like this and so. That's very much frankie. Frankie is is a lot. Yeah the film is about life. Yeah and I think when you make your always trying to think about Contradictions and films. I mean that's that's like everything like how can you play This and that and and and then how can the actors then play ten more. That SI- So I don't rehearse with my actors beforehand We do we have the script and we talk about that. But I but I don't There's never table read. There's never a wall So really when you're you're watching it you're seeing them receive. Leave the other actors emotion for the first time and have you taken that approach for your other films as well to your process it is it it is and and actors are very used to it. It's not a it's not uncommon. But but it's it's not all the time and they always really in general very go. John Lithgow once said to me. Are I think he's an interview like this that I as a director of the challenge was that I wanted to be for the very first time and like it was was just came from inside him but I wanted him to get all the lines right. You're so tough IRA. It was a wolf and sheep's clothing. I thought Oh but that's and it was interesting. There's the contradiction. Well I think this film as they were describing that I was sorta like and they were. It was his abell she was describing this film and she she didn't say I was a wolf and sheep grazing. That was my father's ex girlfriend. It was another story but she did say that. This film which I think has like a softness on the surface. But it's actually really hard. Yeah I'm trying to winter. I'm almost law. Welcome to chosen family. Every second week we talk about art sexuality and identity with a special guest usually queer but not always I completely struggle coming out to my parents as a comedian being in the entertainment industry for a Middle Eastern people is unheard of effecting. Change requires people to shake it up. Listen to chosen family. Wherever you get your podcasts? What sign are you? By the way I'm an area. Of course I love it. One reason why was really excited to get to talk to. You is to talk about. Keep the lights on. So so it tells the story of Paul and Eric Two lovers. It's early two thousands of New York and we see in the process. That Paul is getting addicted to all sorts of the drugs every new year. She made a resolution to stop. Never happened Paul all of this. You're still my favorite person in the world on a spent Eric is is powerless. Over the disease Keep the lights on was inspired by your relationship with Bill Clegg the memoirs and novelist who wrote portrait of an addict as a young man. The more really moved me in the film really moved me And I'M A. I'm in recovery. Linda had a drink or drug in eight years I think for you. Thank you What did that relationship? Teach you about forgiveness because you you were in the seat of watching someone you love disintegrate trying to help how Bekker's and trying to get that person to recover he also I was also player. I mean not just drugs and sex whatever which was also part of my life life but but also I chose to be in that relationship so it wasn't I mean I think that's why I'm Alanon and learning your enroll in decisions and being being someplace so I think.

Frankie Stars Isabelle Paul Paul Portugal IRA Isabel Ira Sachs Greg Kinnear Madonna Iran Oscar Lisbon Mercer Toe cancer Sintra Eric Two Arkansas Barbara Hammer Jeet Rey
"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

Chosen Family

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Chosen Family

"I remember once there's a lawyer he came up to to me and we'd had some this argument about something and and he said you're so sensitive and I said that's my job. Welcome to the chosen family. Hi Trina this is IRA socks. We just heard we'll speak to him later on the show. Incredible filmmaker based in New York. He has directed little men. Then keep the lights on and love strange. Naturally we were so excited. We got a chance to talk to him when we were in Toronto for he. was there premiering his latest film film Frankie Interesting Family Life. Yee's married gay married. And he's raising his twins next to their biological mothers apartment like they. They have two apartments thanks to each other in New York. It's so interesting when I hear of peoples family lives as queer people and sort of you know having kids being married and obviously it's not about me but I make it about me and way to make it about you. I'm just asking myself. Is this something I would like. Is this thing I I want to strive for so recently I've realized that I'm not a monogamous person I've never been and never will be cheater cheated a lot on on boyfriends and partners. We know it sucks to say but like I'm my dad's son and And I just know that if I if I'm going to be in a relationship with someone I can't promise that the grand deliver on that promise of being monogamous so it's fair to to know that you can't promise it I also think fundamentally just even an I mean i. It shouldn't necessarily say this 'cause I've never studied science and I'm not a scientist I'm not a biologist but from what I understand of just the human human experience monogamy goes against our nature. Our animalistic goes against mine. Sure I can say I'm I'm with a guy I've been with the same guy for three years. There's an I love him. I love to be says but I am kind of in the process of no longer wanting to be boyfriend Not Not really being willing to call myself monogamous so anyways that's kind of millennial bullshit but in line with the culture and ray now like particularly particularly within the queer culture but I think also within you know straight relationships to people are just questioning the terms and the definition go language the landing. There's a lot of power in that. It's very empowering to sort of choose your own language. Choose the labels that work for you because you're kind of identifying poly-amorous Like what does it mean to you. Define yourself though. I've been in multiple relationships in my life and the longest relationship. I've been in that. I was with that person for six years. And he's an artist. So he was touring a lot at the time and I had I guess today would call it a secondary relationship here and he had a secondary relationship wherever he was touring. But the problem was that I was dishonest. As cheating wasn't really like was he cheating or he he was the second we were. We had rules. That would sort of bend and right you know. Be Dramatic in two days in their early twenties But and that being said it was a moment where fell very happy loving people and I realized in that moment because I revisited that time recently having coffee with the secondary every partner guy and I was like I love giving love and I had this moment whereas like I can give love to multiple people which is the basis of poly-amorous. Yeah it is but I know I'm such a cliche. Well you're the cliche of the person who wants it all all I want it all you want it. All I want and all about that is very true of our generation and our culture especially has evolved moved into this thing of nothing ever being enough but at the same time. I do not to feel the pressure that I have to find someone who's going to be everything everything to me. And that I have everything that person when I was so extremely unrealistic and has been a fuck over for so many people that idea and and sort sort of projecting all of your needs and wants and healing onto one person's shoulders. It's so in the last few months I've really let go up that idea of being that one partner in having that one partner And I guess I accepted that I'm non monogamous but what that entails to be poly-amorous whatever the label is is to be. Honest is to tell the truth. Yeah and it's something that I really afraid of doing because I'm afraid of disappointing people and right of being honest and vulnerable W- there there's also in the culture now like way more people who would consider they're a couple open open for example an open couple. You can have sex outside the relationship really. The romantic bond is with that one person in your in your in your relationship I want to have multiple connections like feelings. Yeah that sounds so exhausting to me and it's also the way I would be spending time with a secondary partner to let's talk about the time constraints Izhar. You're busy. I'm super busy a lot. We both work a lot. Also Oh sometimes I'm like do I really need to come out again. You know have come out as as a gay man and do I need to come out as a POLLYANNA. You need to tell the person you're going to be seeing right. I don't think you need to call your mom and be like hi poly-amorous but some people would believe that you have to do that. Rail your family. If it's going to be like a family or I'm of the mind that you don't tell your family anything like I have never really told my family about my dating life. You gotta to keep that private. But I'm I mean you know I'm a compartmentalize sir. So like when you look back this most recent relationship because you've been together together for three years. When do you start to feel like you're sort of trapped or you start to feel like I need more? I'm not getting everything everything I need. I never felt trapped. That was one thing but I was missing version of myself. Who Meet someone new and there's actually a term? It's so annoying. It's so annoying. New Relationship Energy term is new relationship to that. Oh I love the new relationship energy. It's amazing it's really a drug. Also right that was going to say like. That's such a fleeting energy. Yeah it's doesn't keep chasing and in their literature about poly-amorous it's complicated because you have to accept that your partner is going to have that new relationship energy. Add glow never accept it once. I know that it's right. I really can you believe that if you get into it you know. There's a feeling called conversion. It's about not being jealous and actually being happy for your partners joy all been taught taught to be so possessive in our relationships. And and that's the thing is I'm letting go right. Now of all of these assumptions that this is what I should should want or need and I just feel the reason why I'm talking about all of this is just I feel. We should have a more open conversation about the different configuration. That that we can have not only as queer people because I think a lot of street people are also thinking of these even more pressure on them like we already fucked up Kinda thing right now like like. We're all ready different. I think to leap from Amer for for for a game ending Palma's Nada leap identity and gender gender. Was the two thousand ten but I think the next decade will really be about these like relationship configuration. And I'm here for it..

New York Trina Toronto Yee Amer Palma
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

13:16 min | 2 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Never want them to hear another actor performing a line before we start shooting and I never want them to perform for me before we start shooting so I asked them to read things in a very flat way when you shoot a film you we have a whole day of shooting so that's rehearsal it's just the rehearsal happens in the moment with this film it's very it's very it's it's more difficult shootings style than it looks it was quite a specific strategy measles send in terms of how to use the camera which I worked out with my so which is pretty specifically based on the work of Eric Rohmer off kind of language that he used from the sixties until his dad breath at it means that the only way you can cut as if an actor walks offstage or leaves the frame so you could never cut in two like to get to you you have to leave if we want some other size or some other shot so it's it it and and actors are often going from a wide shot far away closer to the camera and that's how distances created change of distance instead of cut so they got from a wide to medium because they walked into the media it's a little bit technical but and that's very it was very technical kind of shooting style which means that I was doing a lot of that work with cinematographer on a story board artists before we started shooting Very specific you hard with famous actors to do that kind of work this is Eric Rohmer never worked with famous people because they don't really want you to say I need you on this line to walk all frame because they go well why do I do that and you're like because then I can cut because it's like for example as my co writer cannot tell me that a script or align works because he wrote it because if I don't understand and I can't direct her any motivation right they need they need and you're giving them technical motivation rather than sometimes character motive I've never given actor motivation so that's also I mean for me I never talked to an actor about subtexts motivation because then it becomes liberalized and and reduced and then they start playing motivation and so I try to avoid all those kinds of conversations but I do talk to actors and they like I mean I think they trust me it's not like I'm just like you're on grown but I feel like I'm an analyst really I'm a psychoanalyst to some extent and my job is to listen and attend to what they're doing and observe and give them an offer what you'd say to an actor is your you know your lines well or faster or or move your move there that usually for me this is more effective than anything else what was your budget and schedule my budget was like a two million euros a third of which we came from French and Portuguese financing and my schedule was twenty eight days initially I think we got up to thirty one because we had a hurricane and we had you know the last scene of the movie it's not that that location burned like two weeks before there was an arson fire and there was a major hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of acres of Portuguese woods were burnt burnt down and we we almost moved but I was like I can't move this is location and I I re- I felt it would still work well for the movie but in general there was a feeling that nature we're shooting for thirty days it's the film set in one day so you're dealing with whether continuity without having any control of that cup annuity and and and very quickly I realized that needed to accept nature and what's interesting now is watching the film and realizing the film's about nature's GonNa win so there was a kind for example the same with Isabella pair Greg kinnear where they're inside and it's raining we'll that was supposed to be a walking and talking around the park but then it rains so you look for cover and it becomes that the the accidents that that that make up the film for podcast listeners we're GONNA go into our spoiler sections if you have not yet seen Frank E. press pause comeback listen to the rest of the conversation you know the the the this means blue to start with would would really be kind of the reveal movie would Che's that Frankie is called her family together because she is dying and she kind of wants to see everyone together one last time while she's still healthy enough to enjoy it and I guess like a question would be just plotting that out you could have revealed it anywhere how did you choose to reveal it when you did which is a little past amid point in the film it I mean it felt like the right place but I could also see it being modular could come earlier or later we'll see also wants to get just to add that I think she wants to get them together because I think she wants to to to to make decisions and figure out how the world is going look once she's gone right so which doesn't always work out that well for someone Isabel compared the character Frankie to a film director she's the person who's trying to construct the story and and and like for film director it goes differently than she expects I think for me I'm always interested in stories in which you as an audience you start off and you're not you don't know everything you're you're di centered and you and because the story has been going on before you there is a history that you and you need to catch up and for me I don't know I I mean I think there's various points were you I guess you learn what happens when she's walking with Mercer Toe may but for me really the turn of the film is when Brendan Gleeson is in a chair look king at Frankie and bed and to me that's the probably the most important shot of the film it's suddenly the film has come to rest and it proceeds from there in a different place than it had been earlier where it was very diffuse in terms of where it's center was and and because it is diffuse there are many centers to a family and to a story so I think and I don't think I necessarily knew until I started editor I think the importance of 'em until I saw Brennan's performance I really think he can hold that shoddy holds in a way that's very moving to me identified with that the shot for him so I think the challenge and this is an editing challenge it's a little bit but it's instinctual to as on the writing stage is to give enough that people feel comfortable that they're being taken somewhere and a story that there's someone writing the story but to to also be comfortable that the audience needs to find their way in and I guess I feel like I have enough confidence that they will because of of making work overtime that makes sense this is definitely a hell of an ensemble and what's really Porton sambol writing is to make sure that each character has their own specific unique voice doesn't sound alike which which could be really difficult obviously the actors help you with that what was the challenge for you in creating ensemble like this on the page I think it's again it's about balance their their nine stories and and knowing that you're only going it's a it's an impressionistic film stories are told in in little like collages with just a few pieces that are supposed to sort of the Mel refer to larger stories and and that's challenging and I think for some people they don't enter to be honest I think some people don't find the connection that they need and others I think go with the poetry or the the rhythm of the film and and and find a familiarity in time In terms of their voice I was writing for Isabella pair we were we were reading for Mercer Tomei we were writing for Jeremy Rene who plays Paul we easy to write that part so you know but by the way often right for actors and often they don't do the movie but it helps to think of an actor even if they ended up not being in the film what was your allowance for Improvisation how open to it are you because obviously four drafts of a script you you know the a you want it to go but obviously actors inhabit the characters so it goes in a different way I don't I would say the film is ninety five percent scripted I I usually there's one or two scenes in film of mine with your improvise and that would be the you could say that the the The birthday parties scene is a bit improvised because whatever's going on among the birth is the crowd is controlling that I what I try to do is create room for what what I think of his emotional improvisation so that there's a lot I said the challenge of working with me was that I I wanted it to be as if sometimes was as if he'd never done it before it's totally free but I wanted him to get all the line ends exactly right Which I think is not I exactly would not be the word I would use I just feel that improvisation is actually in my I think some people I use it brilliantly for me it I tend to see the effort the actors go to to to create additional dialogue and I don't and and I also want to not be excess I want there to be simplicity so another line doesn't usually help that makes sense you were almost spearing the lead earlier a little when you were talking about battling the weather this is a movie that is primarily shot outdoors and not just outdoors it's in forests you know they are in the forest what were some of the challenges of of of intensive outdoor shoot like that especially on a collapsed schedule I I actually thought the nature made sense throughout the course of the day and it's raining and then it's not raining like people know those kind of those kind of patterns but for you as a shooter what what was that like because I mean obviously morrison her just the bracelets scene for instance that has to be in the forest you can't retreat somewhere else you know I think as a director you're always thinking somewhat as a producer meaning instinct that every scene that we were gonNA shoot I was the one who was like do did the work to make sure that we had a cover set so I was like well it's not going to be just nothing if it starts to rain and we're supposed to be outdoors we need to know where the option so I would I would arrive at a day with upset the audience was by that bracelet seemed and and to me the whole film was sort of playing on it level of of comedy and farce so I didn't quite take it as literally as a lot of the audience has and that's been interesting to me thousand words about once upon a time in Hollywood which includes two long interviews with writer Director Quentin Tarantino one that spoiler free and one that spoiler filled we also with.

ninety five percent twenty eight days thirty days two weeks one day
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

25:24 min | 2 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Down it's only a tiny star wars reference whereby a cameraman and costumer talk about working on the shoot of the New Star Wars movie but extra points for good timing because Frankie comes out like socially but also it was the recession and I think how that recession of two thousand and eight affected independent cinema is something we're still we're still dealing with in a very concrete old man I got the money to make that film what was the budget of that Seven hundred twenty five thousand dollars Oh wow you got you got a lot on the screen for that and and how did you right through my news who some people here might know who is a Brazilian filmmaker he has a new movie that's Brazilian entry for the Academy Awards which you all I'll hear about the invisible life which is a wonderful film and Kareem was a Brazilian filmmaker that's New York and another filmmaker named Sandra Goo Goo he's so maybe that means there's genre of massive films and there will be a desire for that I think more script together well last question pretty good if anyone I wanna read it last question before we get the free I would be remiss if I didn't mention twenty four that was in terms of her work in the last ten years somehow something new for her this is a and I think you're seeing you're seeing something where she was and John I sort of said the same thing but not in the same words and we had an iced sort of shorthand where where he's he totally understood what I was talking about that they're gonNa go I'm Miguel you might know this is worked with John Lithgow so kind of thing he could do and turn turn to when he didn't know what else to do and he would say if I ever do that just tell me I'm hot and so I would say John You will take go right back into something that was simpler and I think that was a nice thing to learn that you can have these conversations with people and and really about acting in a in a philosophical way the gave them new direction so essentially what you're talking about as a subversion of persona a bit like like really going for the real self rather than the public self I'm saying not to to use the persona to avoid sort of the the tricks of the trade I mean I think most people including certainly including myself I think there it's the interesting thing as a filmmaker as an actor a musician that you have these things at work and they are essential to you and you turn to them most important to but you have to figure out when that is the not the most authentic thing to do let's get the Frankie how how did this film began between you and retail I saw a film by such as you say the Indian director like twelve years ago so called Conscience Juneja it was made in nineteen sixty two it's a film his first color film it's a film about a family evocation in the Himalayan mountains there's nine stories there's a crisis that brought them together different crisis than this film and it's and it's a film in which the travelers in the story are very much juxtaposed against the power of nature and and the location and it's a very it's a very singular film and I had a strong response to it and and I it lingered in my head and I kept saying to Marie. CEO One damage to show you that fell because I think I wanna make my mountain film I WanNa make a film about a mountain and a family and so he never did watch it and then I started this conversation with intil later and we I had this conversation with Isabella pair after she had seen love is strange and she liked the movie and she got when we started talking and she I was I was interested in if there was a project that might be right for us to work together and I would never work with Isabelle pair in France because that would be out of my depth and I wouldn't work with Isabella pair in America because she would be too much of a fish out of water but it made sense that we might do something together we were where we were both on traveling we were both out of our home so this really felt like the right project and And so we wrote the film with Isabelle in mind as as the matriarch and I and I say at that point this was probably three three four years three years ago probably I I had been in years sort of just previous to that very effect did by experiences I'd had had a very close friend who died a fifty of breast cancer and Wonderful filmmaker and I would this With my grandmother as she died at one hundred and three and and I I was just around death and illness in a way that I had not been before and was it was very affecting me and I was struck one of the things I was struck was that it's not what I thought it would you would think I'd have had these experiences but I hadn't and it wasn't what I expected life was much more powerful than death and and I felt like I was always aware that there was always these contradicting genres going on and the experience where you'd be like thinking about someone's the end of someone's life and and the uh and then there'd be these conversations around money or about relationships or you always brought whatever was going on your own life to to that experience you can't really just sit and think about death so I thought that was really powerful I and I think so I ended up trying to make a movie about life you must certainly succeeded I want to talk about your creative habit for second when you sit down to write how important is outlining to your us well I have a very particular way of working with marina which means that I don't really sit down to write meaning he talk for like three or four months about character and story and movies and as I said our lives and and we together create an outline that's quite detailed set of characters set of scenes and we just finished that phase like Friday to a new film and I'm very happy because what that means is that I leave and he goes and spends about six weeks or two months writing the first draft I I say that Marie does the heavy lifting so i early facing a blank page I then sometimes he'll write the second draft but tinder is the third draft and eventually I write the last draft but I'm I'm actually working almost Moore Sculpture Live with what's what's there I'm not I'm not sort of pulling from somebody say something cloth I forgot the whole claw old loss like that so I feel that that collaboration has been useful for me because I it means that we can generate back and forth and I think that's why we've been pretty productive just to get a sense of this three month outline how long would you say that is does it look like a treatment when you read it or does it look like a bullet point seen outside notes on his page okay his on his notebook because he ends up doing all the writing and you talk he types a little bit like I think I have sometimes I I'm able to think in a larger scale kind of like the shape of the film usually I'm the one who's I've always I've been sort of around the generating the initial idea a half instinct And then I would say maybe that that outline is probably maybe five pages okay just curious for your work process do you feel it's more important when you're working to dedicate a certain amount of hours writing or a certain amount of pages to writing per day 'cause writers go back and forth on you know which has the value in the script comes to me I'm usually like I got four days to do the next Dr so it's more days myself very I give myself a week okay but again I'm working with material that's already there so so and I don't feel like time is what helps me I think at that point I'm good at I can listen I can hear the I can hear the voices of the characters in a way but I think I'm often the one who makes things little tougher I think Isabel talking about this film said it seems like the film is very it's like there's a publicity and there's a lyrical equality and then there's all these sort of sharp points and I think and I think she thinks that I'm like that to some extent but I think it was a compliment but it was also true as like I think that there is so I think sometimes my job is still like tighten it up a little bit tighten it up in terms of it's it's not not in terms of its link but in terms of its roughness how many drafts of Frankie were there I would guess four four okay and just your your have it as a director you know it's often been said that pre production is a paradise because the more that you could discover and pre-production means you're going to have a better smoother shoot usually what's what's something that's been see for you direct in your pre production phase I wrote really for this place I think ultimately that's why I began to write the drafts because having some bent gone back to central the region three or four times we I knew these locations and I wouldn't have made the film in Centra which is where this is set if I didn't get these locations that like this last location that it was like I didn't really know so much about Portugal or care so deeply about anything but the land escape of that of that area and so I think I mean Jones Kooks Berry who wrote Nashville that if you if you wanna read a script get on a bus and go to the place where you're gonNA shoot it and and that's I agree with that and sometimes that means I I work in places I've lived for thirty years and that helps a lot but Cintra I really had an intimate relationship with with that location The other thing I think that I do that's that I do think we works is I each scene is to me in the vent and I try to give the actors everything that they need that they don't have to imagine anything about that event so for example the scene with The Birthday Party where Isabella pair is meets this family and they're celebrating this woman's eighty six birthday that is a Portuguese family So I I was like if we're going to have a birthday party for Portuguese family been let's find a large family get them together we had a couple of and maybe we got together once before the shoot but they all knew each other they had that relationship inherent to to who they were as a group of people and that makes it for bill and also for the audience very immediate that there is a a reality I think for me that's a simpler way to put that as maybe as the fiction as always interacting with something that is has a documentary element even when I created the documentary that makes sense do you give it the emphasis to rehearsal before you shoot Wizar- rehearsal period for this we got the actors around because as we're gonNA talk later you're you're you're scenes are very long long and and you really get to lean into them but that would indicate rehearsal time I would I would think but I could be wrong at at all interesting yeah why not out of it gasol I stopped you're hurting after my probably my third film because I I realized that what I was looking for with something that couldn't be repeated and and I wanted and actors are very happy I mean most the actors I work with have I'm not the only person who uses this technique but I I I talked to each actor separately and we we read the actor and I alone go through their scenes and we make sure that the languages bridge that they feel comfortable and intimate with and I'll make little changes but I.

CEO Isabella intil Seven hundred twenty five thou three three four years thirty years twelve years four months three month three years two months four days six weeks ten years
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

12:42 min | 2 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Free screening series here in Los Angeles which is where most of the QNA podcasts. Come from so if you'd like to end the screening you could sign up at backstory dot net to get free email invites and bring a guest to Acuna screening so I hope you'll take advantage of that free series and get on the list but without any further ado let's jump right on the stage the LA film school right as I introduced co writer Director Ira Sachs to chat about his latest film Frankie the irises were sitting here the lovely Los Angeles Film School I guess the question is were you trained physically at all you go to film school I guess I'm sort of like because I walked at the end of the movie I'm I had listening to the music and I'm sorry we're going straight into my life oh little bit because I have this movie which takes a little bit of it asked reflect so reflectors I talk I guess I did not go to film school I applied to film school when I finished a college I plied to UCLA USC NYU Chicago Arts Institute and the Whitney Studio Program and I got no from all those schools and it was actually ultimately turned out to be my benefit because I never was student film instead I had been at theater director and I just decided that I would make films as an artist I and sort of take that ownership from the beginning I was very I had an instinctive understanding that I needed to create community which I think is one of the things that film school can give people and I did that just by meeting people and following them and becoming part of a a group of filmmakers in New York City in the late eighty s who were committed to each other and some of those people are here and who I've met in the years after that visor Miguel and so I think there was this there was a bunch of us who thought film was something that we could commit our lives too and and and so I started making work to my knowledge for your breaking story your your big first break was with nineteen ninety-two Vaudeville which you corrode and directed tell us about that experience and what your biggest lesson was from your first feature film that fell as that I had worked in the theater throughout high school and throughout college and I ended up traveling with a group of performers throughout the northeast estimate was a group of primarily queer young people making this kind of crazy neo Vaudeville and I ended up making a movie there was sort of inspired by that basically may movies with as I said no particular education except I watched a lot of movies and I think for Vaudeville particularly had gone down very steep John Cavities rabbit hole and which I emerged and then I went down the Ken Loach Rabbit Hole and then down the Murray's Pila rabbit hole rabbit holes doubts of rabbit holes that I'm still digging my way out of but Vaudeville I think what is my early is when I was when I was young and making making things I think what what I what I had was I didn't have a percent Russian of what I should be doing outside of my conversations in my head with with the filmmakers that I admired and loved learned from so I think there was a freedom to that and must always I don't really go back to Vaudeville in my head but I go back to a film called the Delta Sherzer what I made in ninety five ninety six because I like feel like a teenager in Memphis who meets a a a gay white teenager meets a half black Vietnamese guy and they run it and Mississippi River and I I feel like I've made that film without permission and that's always really good to remember because no one said I was allowed to make the choices I made flee But I I gave myself that right and I think sometimes maybe every time I make film I need to remember that I still have that freedom logistically as a director you're kind of you know as you said being self taught essentially what was something that through you for a moment that you really had to overcome on one of those early films something that you need to get into the groove of just on the logistics of keeping your your show on schedule on budget on time it does weren't ever my most difficult problems I think really it was learning that I could deal with fear and anxiety which I remember again and I go back to the delta where I remember most and I remember thinking that I would just be like in the shower or waking up and I would feel that the anxiety was so hot I but I couldn't breathe the like I would drown was this feeling like there was rising and rising and it was gonNA cover my face and I was going to sunol suffocate and and I still feel that often when I making movies and it's comforting to know that it's going to pass which I feel I know more now all that I used to I think the pressure of shooting is definitely the hardest thing because you are anything could go terribly wrong they need day and often does go kind of wrong but like as you get closer it's like a it's like okay we're GONNA make it we're GONNA make it we're gonna shoot a we need a and that's that feels very just like you got to do it you gotta stay up to do it and you I think that can be the momentum of keeping it going throughout production can be quite challenging two thousand twelve marked the first of your multiple collaborations with Marita Zachariah You know keep the lights on tell us about your how you guys kind of began collaborating together and we're the partnership fled so frankie is the fourth film that I've written with Marie Co So we have a really wonderful collaboration he's also my son's Godfather he's part of my family and I think that's really important to the way we work together because I think when we start talking about a movie idea we are also simultaneously talking about things that are very personal between us and I think that becomes part of the script like the script is he'll tell me a story about his nephew and they like oh that's really interesting and we'll sort of move from that to two tangents the become the script itself in I mean for me there was very big moment that in two thousand eight two thousand seven eight nine I was working on a film set in Los Angeles in the nineteen sixties based on a book by Gavin Lambert is a wonderful British writer who lived in La and he wrote this book called the goodbye people and I adapted the the script with Oren Movement and and it was it was a film said in the sixties and and we had all these name independent actors in it had a long list and I couldn't raise a dollar and I think really what it was was I would not be a commercially successful directors way so I spent three years not making film and in two thousand ten I had been teaching at Nyu and the graduate film department and my students yes same place that rejected you place that I rejected me yes and I I was encouraging them to make work that was not just for the classroom room but beyond the classroom and I decided I would do the same thing and I made a an eight minute film called last address which was a film about a group of New York City Artists who died of AIDS shot where they lived at the time of their death I think that film is very resonant to what the way this film was shot and all films subsequent to that but really what that was was a kind of going back to an idea of independence which was not just about an independent industry but an independent way production where it was a two thousand awesome dollar budget I made it at the top of my artistic abilities I really believed in it I cared about it I was very rigorous about what I was doing and and it was a it worked out the film was with strong and I think knowing that I could do that without the support of this idea of a professional industry was very empowering and and that led to keep the lights on which was similarly not a film anyone wanted me to me AAC or felt a need to finance but I've had a community that ended up stepping forward and and I really really hard I meet Maurizio I mean obviously your friends but we met through to Brazilian filmmakers and we became friends because we started working together we met and we we all were making movies together so sheer curiosity before we get onto Frankie Yup just two two last questions could the goodbye people ever happen because we're a decade got away from the recession and probably wrote a good script savings could live forever it's a it's a Manson based film said now I sixty the films are really extremely personal works and they usually which doesn't mean they're typically autobiographical but they're they come from like because I think that's what I I I kind of don't know how to work another way and I it's very important for me to have those resources which are very direct the emotional to me and and I wrote that script twelve years ago and I don't think I could go back to the person I was when Oregon I wrote that teens love is strange because it's such a fabulous film what was your biggest lesson on that film which was a lot of people's first exposure for you because it was a success it it it seemed it seemed to get a lot of both critically and at the box office was fun I mean you know I was glad that people like the film and I feel like there was it was it was it was the reception matched my feelings about the film so that was pleasant I guess I would say I think for me there was an interesting experience working with John Lithgow which was not totally dissimilar working with Isabelle who pair which were both they were actors who admired in different ways but but a lot but they had achieved by the time I worked with them a certain idea of what they were as people on the screen and how they were going to to present themselves and in both cases I asked them not to to not present themselves and to I felt when I met John when I met Isabel that I was speaking to people who were very different than what I'd seen onscreen and I found them even more interesting person and I asked in a way both of them to to reveal more who they were in a similar fashion Isabel I would say what we discussed I think she was excited by I asked her not to call allow any room for irony in her performance or comment and I think.

Los Angeles QNA Acuna eight minute twelve years three years
"ira sachs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Director ira Sachs discussed their new film Frank three generations of a family would come together at the Portuguese resort town and John Hart has a new book called medallion status your story I'm Alex Stewart join me for all of it weekdays at noon on W. this is Debbie and I see ninety three point nine FM and it's the New York this is all of it from W. NYC I'm Alison Stewart coming up get ready to get your groove on this Friday we'll hear from the Philadelphia soul and hip hop collective and more made up of singer don T. and rapper chill moody considered a warm up for their performance this Saturday at Joe's pub then Joe young musician soldier in the US army reserves and one of our W. NYC colleagues tells us why he chose Steve writes his music for eighteen musicians for two days twenty years later looking for things to do in the city and beyond this beautiful fall weekend we've got you covered with a coffee festival a Film Festival and much more we'll get to all of it I'm Alison Stewart and I will meet you on the other side of the new.

"ira sachs" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Davies an immoral act overpopulation climate change. Fascism. Yes. They're trying to by any means necessary approached. All that. And they were trying to adopt. Junkies. You're listening to film spotting. That's the trailer for writer director tamra Jenkins private life. You heard a good chunk of the movies on samba there that was Molly Shannon with John Carroll. Lynch before that Kathryn Hahn and Paul giamati Han and GM ATI are the stars of Jenkins film, new play a couple in their forties. Both working artists, or at least one I think is it working artists wants formerly an artist who have put off having children and now have to seek medical intervention to make it happen things. Get complicated when g Ahmadis college-age step niece offers to be an egg donor for the couple. She's played by newcomer. Kaley carter. Now Jenkins also directed two thousand seven the savages that starred Laura Linney and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Like the savages, which was about a brother and sister, caring for an aging father, private life takes a painful complicated. Subject matter and considers it with an eye for the absurd at my working on my written review of this film, as we speak and the phrase that came to mind to me is. Jenkinson this film in particular. She looks at life's challenges with an unbe linking. I that occasionally sneaks in a, wink. And I think that's what I really appreciate about her films as they find that balance between holding onto the reality. While also giving us a lot of cathartic releases of humor, that's just as genuine it. Feels just as genuine to me. I love this movie. Really? And you're. Slightly frowning. No, no, I didn't strongly dislike the movie there is a lot to recommend here. But I think the humor was actually the biggest problem for me. So let's let's talk about what works about the movie. It's a really smart movie is incredibly well acted. I think that it's very much about the struggle many endure. Obviously when trying to have a baby and yet, it's not really about having a baby at all. It's about succumbing to adulthood, and the choices we make and the rationalizations and the regrets and issues that really any married couple faces so whether or not you relate directly to what this couples going through or not I think there is a lot that you can connect with. I think it's really skillfully shot as well. Mine cinematographer here Christos Vidor is he didn't before midnight. He did Alps the yoga's Lantamot film. He also did IRA Sachs really good movie love is strange from a few years ago. You don't see many films that play with focus as much as private life does and blurred images than Ulta. Coming into focus, and I think that does all serve to heighten this couple's anxiety and ours as viewers, and maybe that word anxiety is the key to my reaction to this movie. It made me so anxious. I think a lot of it's supposed to of course, Ed Lee credit to Jenkins as a director in a writer into Han g Ahmadi that all of those frustrating, painful vulnerable, raw kind of conversations and scenarios made me that anxious and uncomfortable because I think they are alternately so real ons character Rachel is one who never holds backing anything. She shares her feelings whenever she is compelled to which is often in Josh hito me. I'm more of a repressing tonight kinda guy. So I can really. Yeah. This type of dysfunction and the confrontation we get in many scenes in this film is tough for me to watch as it was in Jenkins last film the savages which I wasn't a fan of now. I said the humor here is what ultimately didn't work for me. And I don't want to suggest that there aren't lines. Or beets or gags that don't work there. Absolutely. Are some? I think if you get on its wavelength that absurdity the heightened nature of the theatricality of it could be very satisfying and kind of profound in the way winks at us to use your word, and how it surrounds such really serious subject matter if you don't get on the wavelength, and I never did if feels a little bit contrived and artificial too much at odds with the underlying reality and actually grinds. What is otherwise a pretty swift movie to a halt? I'll give you one example. There's a revelation I won't spoil that happens during thanksgiving after Molly, Shannon has sued up and said we're all going to.

tamra Jenkins Rachel Molly Shannon Christos Vidor writer director Davies Kaley carter Laura Linney Jenkinson Ulta Philip Seymour Hoffman GM ATI Paul giamati Han IRA Sachs Shannon Kathryn Hahn
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"His name is Christos food. Doris, when I was prepping the move when we were crewing the film, I saying to my, I was like, I wanna master. I wanna cinematographer, here's a master, and I was like, no masters are really going to be making my movie with me. I don't think my movie that takes place in apartments in New York, and and then. His name came to me through a variety of ways and I, he lives, he's Greek, but he lives in Madrid. And. I, he doesn't have a huge body of work, but he like in American, he did. You did a link ladder movie and he did Irish axe movie. And the IRA Sachs movies very simple, super minimalist, but his framing was very beautiful, and I just felt something about him and then we Skype and the long the short of it is d- ended up doing the movie, but I really feel like he is a master. He's like an unknown master. No one knows that he's a masterpiece a master and he's eccentric. And he does a lot of commercials in Europe and he doesn't really, he's very picky about what narrative. I mean, features he does, and I just think he's really special. His sent his, I is just he'll do something that will like dumb. I mean, I don't know. It's not a dumb example. There's a shot of Paul, the big scene where Paul and Catherine are in bed and they have the big fight where he says, will we ever gonna have sex? Again, I'm kind of glad that it didn't happen. The opening shot of hall. I remember just saying, okay, so we're going to set up over here and we're going to be on Paul and I kind of turning away and then turning back and Paul was sort of falling out of the bottom of the frame. Game that was the frame that the DP put on set, how he set it up, which I never would have done. And it was so perfect and just it's like a touch. He's just touched, and I was like, that is just beautiful. And there was something about him slipping out of the bottom of the frame that seems so expressive. And so right, we'll feel still feels very close in. The obviously is very funny, but it's not shot like in a way that I mean, I definitely felt like cumulatively by the time they're like back in. I remember the one shot while they were waiting and they all the people are still in the waiting room and you're like, this is like a horror movie, and I think there's something about it that because you don't see babies in the movie. There's no babies. It's almost like what is it's almost like if you were like an alien coming like, what are these people doing? It feels it has this kind of dread, at least that was my experience. It was like I was laughing and it felt it was unfair. So honest and poignant. There is this feeling of. Yeah, it's like it's like there's something slightly horrifying about when we were making you're making the movie. Paul giamati said. This isn't about the baby. This is this is waiting for good DOE. It has. It does feel like Like an an. extra central dread is very there, and it really does capture in a way that is. So I, I haven't really, you know, the. Obviously, it's it's filtered through the whole movie is this kind of sense of..

Paul giamati IRA Sachs Doris New York Europe Madrid Skype Catherine
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Is something that i think is is frightening i think it is something that no parent can take for granted that that kid when they come home from school they've had a bad day and they go online you know that day can become a tragic day i've actually had friends who had that personal experience with the seventeen year old son and i've seen how dreadfully painful let us be too to them and and we can do something about it by being present by say there are dangers here let's look out for and regroup in communities i think that we're at communities are breaking down because of at this age of technology one final question because we're in the community of the director skilled who what what are you going to director work on next it's important to me to get treat show into the world we are opening in nine cities theatrically and video on demand agile end up in lieu in april and i'm going to work out with stump out for a while because i i really am very serious about this this issue and it's really open my eyes through all these taught backs with young people was you know that i'd like to get involved and directing wise i i'd like to be i mean i took freakshow on because there was a need to take it on i'd like to find a story that just speaks to me organically and i can take my thymine helped figure it out that said i i probably won't be maleas of like efficient with the processes of being because i be in a producer for such a long time and i know how to get the job done so i am an.

director producer seventeen year
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Because of this digital age i think you know and i don't know if any of you saw wall street journal but sting and i am joined an advisory board for john with jonah partners and we are i say taking on apple i don't mean it in the sort of like an attack on apple but i pull i thank her guilty of for not enough checks and balances really for but how kids get addicted to their screens there are a lot of papers medical papers that a written that this is a this is a disorder to beat to get addicted to your screen it's not something that is easily fixed either so we really need to be very pro active about it so it's addiction and it's it's it's bullying and these big themes that come from brilliant technological age which we all are so great for four in many ways but when i would have opened pandora's box and we must be is always present and sensitive to like you you know children noor the younger generations to us up are born into the world at this time we who are older had the privilege i would say like cooling of being born into a world free cyberspace where you took your problems to your best friend or to your community or to your mom motoo whoever and talked about them in your community would support you ensure in a bullying as an ordinary evil it's prevalent it's always being here but the insidiousness of cyberbullying has not always been here and the the effects that it's having on teenagers.

wall street journal advisory board john apple pandora
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Return for maybe one or two more questions than wrapping up yeah thank you while i've been on the road with the film for a year when i say on the road is it's enjoyed twenty nine film festivals a lot of lgbtq festivals and i sat through many screenings like really too much of seats my film but to watch the kids watching the film and then to talk box and it was it's been really illuminating too like listen to them and hear their challenges and as i went along as thinking i can't just like make a film like this and to your point just like let it be just another movie because the seams are so important and so prevalent and becoming even more prevalent with the amount of cyberbullying that's going on and the tragic number of teenagers who are taking their lives so i want to reach out to um not for profit and came across stumphigh bullying and we were partnering with them and they really deal with bullying mourns cyberspace and in the digital a space with kids who are really up against it with the detractors and who will threatening to kill themselves and they've saved lots of lives there nationwide and they're really responsible organization so so where partnering with with them and i'm looking at ways we can endow them it's important that they stay no solvent unable to do the work that they do to work with the psychologists that they need to work with two to help these kids yes your it's not getting better bullying because of our.

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And likewise when he gets beaten up i wanted him to be a pride i wanted that prides to be defile to go into that room and to be maltin blasted and blooded and i think that gave it poignancy end and and again colleen cheat designed a slight 'extraordinary wedding dress for belly so i i've i i'm sorry i've gone off nonmir tanzania skirt to hear from from from the experience of of how house were careful everything was michelle mcgann abac laboraties israel russian and he was good he's what she is watching if the first time tonight that the opening yeah i am seeing i've been neighbors of john weirdly in new york and la for as long as we've been having kids thirtysomething years and i i i just saw him when i read the script i am i read coach carter's like mcenroe zap oh i know him so it's worth a punt i said i cold is agents very respectful i called his agent i said i think john would ever do this role it's a small role in a in a film it is examines bullying but it's a it's a it's ivory love him to do it and he said what's a play him you mean and i said on them not exactly i mean maybe traits of him certain personality traits but definitely not him answer any any how to bowl and the causal the cast and crew were delighted and when you you have to work and as you now under the pressure of you gotta get this sucker in and twenty two days in twenty two days for making a ninety minute picture is that's really like having to jam so there were wasn't much time off so when we had john onset because the whole crew like they there were lit up it was great bonus in many many ways it really was a natural isn't natural areas.

maltin john new york la carter colleen tanzania twenty two days ninety minute
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Well i shuttered as the master if you see because i think break comedy exists in masters you sort of like you're seeing every bodies reactions wonderful celia a western break comedic chop sooner bat says heavensent so we so so i could really rely on my actors allott but really kept the pace up in those comedic moments dan today and i had already spoken of how i wanted to the scene to to to look when i wanted to focus on on billy and where and now he's such extraordinary cinematographer of course i was privileged and most firsttime directors to have somebody of his chops who is a would suggest some great ideas so i i i feel that being a director above anything else i feel i can't speak for for for for you into the directors in the room it's sorry collaborative view higher choline out wooden dante spinelli you know i'm going to say hey clean i thank you and i was thinking of this idea in this idea but it's like then she goes away and she comes out with the costumes alex law also wore just from a conversation it's important to me he was he he becomes a mermaid in that scene where he's come back from school and no he was like you put some costume on as an armagh lay is like i got to be me i you know flips told me to wear those rangel as an an and to be less fabulous i'm going to try it because i love flip but it's not working because when you're targeted your targeted so he comes back and he puts this beautiful dress on an i wanted him i saw him as a mermaid i said colleen can you make a mermaid dress boy did she make a mermaid dress.

director rangel colleen billy alex armagh
"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"From each other him from linc looking very intensely of you my character was who i was intrinsically it was a varied you sort of like big portrayed of a of a young woman troubled warmer and so we we have a short hand and thank god it was him because we talked a lot about the about the intimacy that i wanted to create in the film that i always wanted billy to be in our part of you that uh that we we feel always very quickly we are on side with him that we never really use lose sight of him to get up very close and personal and we use this frazier lands you see this sort of like sometimes billy look sort of like it's almost like a in a goldfish bowl where me examining him and that in the halls of shame that eyes so remember school weather bullies a spit bowling calling out that we wanted to really see in of the billions anguish and that was very important to me to tell that story on the other hand we were in a comedy set to really sort of really parlay between the comedic seen to keep the energy and the pace up and as an actor i think this is served me quite well because i'm a classically trained actor i went to a wonderful academy per slowed fake and lambs a visit a year ahead of danny day lewis and now danny for many years lives at the very strict academy way you really learnt your puts for your paces with different styles of acting and you know with comedy you keep up the energy the energetic pace and when it came to that big seen that we do with mouth comes home it's a sort of like a tragic comical is always reigler shakespearian kind of like is that funny or is it tragic you know she's just saying she in oshii wish to cheat of flush the kid away he's hearing it he's heartbroken and then she's making some kind of like a drunken tragic display for a play for you didn't know the gorgeous flip and you know what kind of movehe we still in and.

linc billy lewis frazier danny oshii
"ira sachs" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"ira sachs" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"When i was turn to think of your your voices your dialects are accents all the different nationalities and all that i was thinking well how often has he played british media have well dr and education em yet where you play carry mulligan's father and also more recently love his strange um which i did for ira sachs i played obrid and and it but you're right i mean i i get you appoint a it's a it's it's it's less often it happens less often which is an and he's a the brothers one thing that said what i did his tv series for daily kelley goal monday morning's which i love doing we we did a season for tnt had a great time doing it when he first asked me if i'd be interested in doing i i was in the middle of doing an episode of murphy's law which sorry harry's little forgive me how with kathy bates number if he so that's that was the old other one as as a movie with the jimmy garden and so i said yeah lifted and and then he said how do you feel about an american accent and i said fine he said is it is it a problem is a and i thought he meant did i find it hard to do an ice and i i said none of its holiday is not easy is not hard to do but is just one more layer to to think about so then he came back and said we'll do it in english in a less not let's not have that lay if you don't want so i ended up playing this character as a as an english surgeon and it was really interesting because in them as a as an english county in the midst of all these american characters there was a kind of.

mulligan tnt murphy harry jimmy garden kelley kathy bates