26 Burst results for "Ipcc"

Major Climate Changes Inevitable and Irreversible – IPCC’s Starkest Warning Yet

The Naked Scientists

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Major Climate Changes Inevitable and Irreversible – IPCC’s Starkest Warning Yet

"Climate change has been top of the agenda recently as the latest ipcc. Report came out earlier. This month the intergovernmental panel on climate change produces one of these reports every six to seven years to summarize the fourteen thousand scientific papers that have been published on historic climate models global warming and its implications on the planet and the findings of this report are clear. Humans are responsible for the planet warming at a rate that is unprecedented in at least the last two thousand years this warming is driven by increased greenhouse gas emissions of which co. Two and. Methane are the major contributors. This is already leading to hotter heat. Waves wetter monsoons more frequent droughts and the oceans warming at their fastest rate since the end of the last full ice age. Some of the impacts us. Humans have had on the planet on now irreversible. We are going to warm. The planet by one point five degrees c more than pre industrial levels. No matter what we do now sea levels are going to rise by several meters over the next two thousand years the ice sheets will continue to melt and the oceans will become more and more acidic. But please don't switch off just yet. I promise this show is not all doom and gloom and i know all too well how listening to the facts about climate change can make you feel like the world is very literally on fire and there is nothing we can do. So what is the point in even trying well. The science is clear on that too. There is hope if we can reduce our global carbon emissions to net zero by twenty fifty. The planet will quickly stop warming. And if we start absorbing more carbon than we produce it'll even start cooling down again and those extreme weather events will become less extreme again

Ipcc
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

03:12 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"As <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> i've mentioned <Speech_Male> on the show before. <Speech_Male> I live in <Speech_Male> east boston next <Speech_Male> to the airport. I'm <Speech_Male> in an industrial area. <Speech_Male> There's just constant <Speech_Male> industrial activity in <Speech_Male> planes flying overhead. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> i find it highly <Speech_Male> annoying <Speech_Male> and stressful <Speech_Male> now. Is it causing <Speech_Male> me anything <Speech_Male> other than <Speech_Male> you know. Low level <Speech_Male> stress all the time probably <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> But the <Speech_Male> the the <Speech_Male> the this five <Speech_Male> year study from the australian <Speech_Male> government looked <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> winter <Speech_Male> by noise had the greatest <Speech_Male> impact and <Speech_Male> they found that it came <Speech_Male> at nighttime <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> because during night <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> have different. Wind speeds <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You're more sensitive <Speech_Male> to noise. <Speech_Male> And you have. What's called amplitude <Speech_Male> modulation <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the noise. <Speech_Male> They said seems to worsen. <Speech_Male> After sunset <Speech_Male> when amplitude modulation <Speech_Male> can be detected for up <Speech_Male> to sixty percent <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> The nighttime <Speech_Male> at distances <Speech_Male> around one kilometer <Speech_Male> from a <Speech_Male> wind farm <Speech_Male> so that <Speech_Male> means that <Speech_Male> sixty percent of the time <Speech_Male> if you live about a <Speech_Male> columbia away from a wind farm. <Speech_Male> You may be <Speech_Male> annoyed by <Speech_Male> the sound. <Speech_Male> We're getting a lot smarter <Speech_Male> about how we build <Speech_Male> machines and where <Speech_Male> we cite them but <Speech_Male> we should know his discount. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> the auditory <Speech_Male> impact on <Speech_Male> communities <Speech_Male> and again this <Speech_Male> is not causing <Speech_Male> major <Speech_Male> health problems in people <Speech_Male> but they can be annoying <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think that there's <Speech_Male> there's research that shows <Speech_Male> like how <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> where the impact <Speech_Male> is greatest <Speech_Male> and developers <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Female> certainly learned from that <Speech_Female> yet for someone <Speech_Female> who lives <Speech_Female> right near an airport <Speech_Female> where i have. <Speech_Female> Fighter jets <Speech_Female> taking off the <Speech_Female> sound <SpeakerChange> of wind. Turbine <Speech_Female> sounds delightful to <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I can tell you when. I have my <Speech_Male> face mask on at <Speech_Male> at eleven o'clock <Speech_Male> at night and i'm sleeping <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> like the latest <Speech_Male> qatar airlines <Speech_Male> flies over <Speech_Male> my house <Speech_Male> like five hundred <Speech_Male> feet above my roof. It <Speech_Male> is Is highly annoying <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> so my <Speech_Male> in-laws have <Speech_Male> a wind farm <Speech_Male> at the <Speech_Male> Sort <Speech_Male> of just nixed. They have <Speech_Male> a fav is just next <Speech_Male> door to that form <Speech_Male> Which <Speech_Male> cools to scare <Speech_Male> about a ufo invasion <Speech_Male> once. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Male> the blinking <Speech_Male> lights. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's a story <Speech_Male> for another time <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ed crooks <Speech_Male> vice chair <Speech_Male> of the americas <Speech_Male> at wood. Mackenzie <Speech_Male> thanks for <Speech_Male> joining us again. Always <Speech_Male> good to chat and we'll talk <Speech_Male> to you more. Thank you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> catherine. <Speech_Male> Always a pleasure. Welcome <Speech_Music_Male> back from vacation. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> delighted back. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> we'll let go on <Speech_Music_Male> to the rest of his vacation <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and me <Speech_Music_Male> stuck. I'll be stuck here <Speech_Music_Male> under the airplanes <Speech_Music_Male> in east boston. <Speech_Male> back from vacation. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> delighted back. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> we'll let go on <Speech_Music_Male> to the rest of his vacation <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and me <Speech_Music_Male> stuck. I'll be stuck here <Speech_Music_Male> under the airplanes <Speech_Music_Male> in east boston. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks everyone <Speech_Male> for being here. <Speech_Male> We are produced <Speech_Music_Male> by postscript media in <Speech_Music_Male> partnership with <Speech_Music_Male> wood. Mackenzie <Speech_Male> you can find all <Speech_Male> of us on social media <Speech_Male> on twitter if <Speech_Music_Male> you want <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Music_Male> send us any <Speech_Music_Male> story ideas or <Speech_Music_Male> comment on <Speech_Music_Male> this show and the many topics <Speech_Male> that we discussed. <Speech_Male> Go ahead and <Speech_Music_Male> do that right there on <Speech_Music_Male> twitter and we'll try to get back <Speech_Male> to you. We will <Speech_Music_Male> be back next <Speech_Music_Male> week and thank <Speech_Male> you so much for being <Speech_Male> here. This is the <Speech_Music_Male> energy gang <Speech_Music_Male> weekly debates <Speech_Music_Male> and discussions about <Speech_Male> the fast changing world <Speech_Music_Male> of energy <SpeakerChange> will catch <Music> you

boston columbia Mackenzie twitter
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:19 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"The right thing and shutdown allow them to be able to afford to shut down some of these old power plants. That are just limping. Along on social security and I think it will make a huge difference so i i would not declare this over yet. I don't think we're done i. I think if the democrats don't get this over the finish line they have a much greater chance of not winning back the house and senate in the next go around so we were. The efforts on climate policy are not over and in fact they are. They're quite active right now. I think we will get a lot done Just in the next few weeks certainly by the end of the year. You're going to see some really big policy chefs. No definitely. I thought i just going to say i'm and i absolutely agree with that. And he's very much gonna reaching a critical moment in that reconciliation. Bill is going to be hugely important. Just flag up a couple of specific things in the clean electricity payment program which is essentially way of implementing a clean 'electricity standard. But doing it through the budget process soaking pass onto reconciliation. That's going to be a very big deal is potentially a lot for in the reconciliation bill as well that could also be enormously important. It seems like it's really kind of finally balanced though the moment that if you hear the comments from cinema and from joe mansion it seems to me not clear that you'll even get fifty democratic votes for that kind of package in the senate so it's going to be interesting to watch and as as as catherine was saying not over yet it's all to play for but it does feel very very finely balanced is not going to be easy. I wanna talk about the underlying factors here so it does take the actual policy outcomes aside what is causing this shift and a couple of things. Stand out to me. One is that the polling clearly shows that there's a massive climate majority in this country yet. Yale has some of the best polling showing that basically seventy five percent of americans fall on the spectrum between concerned too alarmed about climate change in those often transcend partisan Boundaries you'd obviously far more progressives and folks on the left are concerned about climate change but in general the vast majority of americans fall in the spectrum of concern too alarmed and that has changed A lot in just the last few years and there are a lot of polls that show this as well. So republicans are clearly paying attention to those polls and the generational divide too. Because there's a lot of young republicans who are pushing for climate action and they're gaining a voice within the party The second piece is just the science has gotten so much more sophisticated and as we pointed out in our first part of the show that there's not a whole lot of push back on the modeling. What the science is telling us. It's mostly other folks are staying silent or they're saying it's too costly to make the transition but the science also feels much more solid and seems to be playing a role in this shift. Any other thoughts on that. Yeah one thing. I would just note. Is that the oil gas and coal industries in the twenty twenty election cycle gave forty six million to the republican party. More than they've given the democrats over ten years. I mean a vast amount of industry money goes into the election campaigns of republicans. And so they're on the hook to respond to all these industries that are supporting their elections and getting them into power and i think You know if that could somehow be Reformed where everybody's on a level playing field and no one is being paid by any industry to to just support that industry. I think that would that would change the calculus. i mean. i've always thought if you really had to think about your constituents and the fact that they're googling. How do i survive. Climate change. I then you would actually want to try to do something. And maybe your solutions would be different. And that's okay. I think there are different. Solutions in different places and based on different resource mixes. But it would put you in a different in a different mindset on how to approach it. Yeah agree with that. I mean i would like to send a note of warning about the polling evidence. They which with seems to me to be a bit inconclusive. If you say to people are you concerned about climate change do support aggressive action on climate change then as you say you get very strong majorities in favour. People are well aware. It's an important issue and it'll be addressed when you say to people. How much would you pay for it to be dealt with the numbers of huge. And i think there was a roy to pull back in two thousand nine hundred and said would you be repaired to pay even one hundred dollars a year for aggressive action climate change and i think it was any about a third of the population said yesterday that so we have to bit careful in kind of fuming discount of Ruled range of support. Yes people want something to be done. People don't on the whole wanted to cuss them a lot of money. And i think that's again when you talk about notable decisions going to be the say we're going to have to be creative about. I think that's one thing that is going to be hugely. Important is finding measures that can win broad popular support and that those those things are emerging in particular because of the plunging costa renewable energy. There are absolutely solutions where people can be saved money by switching out fossil fuels renewable so it one hundred percent. It's possible but it does seem to be like those little the avenue. They're going to be more successful gonna win more political support rather than the things that look like. They're going to cost people money. Well the cost of climate damage is so far in excess of what it would cost to fix berkeley. Yeah that i wonder if you're asking them. Would you be willing to pay a hundred dollars a year or more to.

joe mansion senate catherine Yale Bill house republican party costa berkeley
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:34 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Hydrogen. We can get on. I still think it's possible. Hydrogen could be part of that. So couple. I want to hear about what what how. Bob haworth might respond to that. Catherine i think the final point that you made about the twenty year time horizon I would say is vital because when we consider what the ipcc reporters telling us that to get to you know one point five degrees z. Warming scenario you need to reduce emissions six percent a year which is basically the equivalent of a co vid type disruption every single year over the next couple of decades. We need massively drastic. Change in in that Changes still drastic even under a two degrees c warming scenario so it feels to me like even just thinking about the impacts over the next couple of decades is vitally important Anything else kathan. You would add on the on. The the what bob told you. A couple of things one is that this is the first peer reviewed report of this type. And i and i agree. They're going to need to be lots more and they're going to have to try to really dig in and the reason you you wanna do that as as you said stephen. Because of the ipc report and because governments are spending a ton of money subsidizing these blue hydrogen plants and with the assumption that they're going to reduce emissions and if that is in fact not the case. Then we're in real trouble. We're in worse trouble than we were before. So part of this is like let's make sure we get it right Baumhauer did a study about ten years ago. The first peer reviewed study on methane emissions from shale gas and that was also pooh-poohed and there were a lot of people immediately that push back most of whom were related to the fossil fuel industry but now ten years on there between fifteen hundred sixteen hundred papers about eighty to eighty five percent of which support his conclude original conclusions. And so i think it will take some time to figure that out. But in the meantime these are just asking really vital questions about you. Know where are the data that either show definitively or not that you're actually reducing greenhouse gases And and then how are we going to support those or not support them because out of a thousand oil and gas companies forty two percent of them are saying. We're gonna do this. And it involves an entire infrastructure of pipelines shipping and storage and all of this affected by whatever the technology they determine is going to be lower carbon and really want to get it right. So i think asking these questions now is crucial. Yeah this is one of the first shots across the bows oh to speak when it comes to the debate over hydrogen production and where we its role in the energy transition and this goes back in my opinion to what saul griffith of rewiring. America has said which is that. Hydrogen production has a role. You know we obviously as you said ed. We use it for fertilizer production for treating metals for rocket fuel. But there's a lot of reasons why we would want to clean up the hydrogen system and use blue and green hydrogen at greater levels because those are just difficult to decarbonised sectors of the economy. But when it comes to downstream applications like fif- fuelling cars and buses Wider widespread application for fuel cells beyond. You know forklifts and in a warehouse warehouse applications. I think it's really doubtful about what role hydrogen plays and so these decisions we make about whether it's green or blue. Hydrogen have a greater impact the more we rely on it for downstream applications. And and you know salisbury critical of using hydrogen. Because there's just a con. The conversion process is inefficient. And the more we burn stuff and the more we converted from electrons to molecules and back again the greater the inefficiencies of the system and so his belief is that we should just electrify as much as possible particularly downstream machines in our homes and businesses and then use hydrogen for you know higher level industrial applications so anyway This research is certainly very important. And i think becomes more crucial the more we think about where hydrogen production lands across our economy yet. I micro. Lebron has a pretty interesting ladder that he's put together of hydrogen all the use cases and different sectors. That it would make sense makes sense then you know whereas an uncompetitive where where's it unavoidable and just to think about this being five to seven times more expensive than than just business as usual. You really have to think about you. Know where where the places where it's going to be the most useful and the most cost competitive For an industry that is trying to transition totally agree with all of that. I think there are probably some areas. They where we just don't have other options and as a maybe long distance heavy road freight transport is one of them. Certainly i think steel production is what are they look at. Steel manufacturing. lot of these A lot of the green steel technologies use hydrogen production. That's a way to decarbonised what what's currently a very carbon intensive sector so not for everything. I agree totally. Great has limitations but i think there are also some important cases where i just. Nc another option absolately agree with that. And what am i gonna do with my partially hydrogenated soybean oil. I mean it's gotta be greener below. I don't know which all right let's go onto the third topic as democrats pushed sweeping climate priorities through the white house and through congress there's been noticeable change in the political conversation almost no climate denial from republicans and republicans have mostly stopped talking about climate. Change is a hoax or the data being manipulated. Even someone like jim inhofe. Who's the senator from oklahoma. Who wrote a book on climate change called the biggest hoax is now backtracking and saying he never called climate. Change a hoax. He's been relatively silent on this. You know the turn of the last decade. He was out front in the media constantly calling a hoax But that's changed and we still hear some of the same arguments for sure. Like switch away from fossil fuels is way too expensive. It's gonna take too long. Or what about china and india and other large polluters What if if we hit step on the accelerator and they don't are they going to have an economic advantage and there are few meaningful proposals beyond planting trees or maybe a carbon tax from people like mitt romney So we haven't seen a dramatic change in policy but certainly a change in tone. Let's talk a little bit more about how this is influencing what's going on right now in washington. We did have a check on the check in on this before most notably at the start of two thousand twenty when republicans were crafting their response to the green new deal and a lot of hosvepian's came out and criticize that. That's a plan but they actually came out with some plans of their own one of which was to plant a million trees and Although that does nothing to match the severity of the issue it was a plan on the less which we might not have seen in previous years. So we've got even more real world policy under consideration. We've got many more months of of debate. Catherine what are you seeing since we last talked about this at the start of twenty twenty..

Bob haworth kathan Baumhauer saul griffith ipcc ipc Catherine stephen bob salisbury ed Lebron America jim inhofe white house
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

09:44 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Hydrogen is suddenly getting a lot of attention and investment from governments and oil majors uk. Germany and france are all allocating billions of euros to support blue and green hydrogen. The hydrogen council a trade group made up of mostly oil majors says the hydrogen economy could amount to two point five trillion dollars in revenue by twenty fifty. But some experts are a little worried there. Skeptical some are raising alarm about these claims saying that they would be costly inefficient and environmentally troublesome When we think about the emissions pathways that we need to be on right now. So this month that the head of the uk hydrogen-fuel-cell association actually stepped down in protests saying that oil majors were pushing emissions intensive blue hydrogen from national natural gas as climate solution and using hydrogen as a way to lock in fossil fuel expansion. Now we can talk about what he means by that because in theory blue hydrogen should be less emissions intensive. But we're going to go into some research about why there are questions about how many emissions we can actually attribute to blue hydrogen production. In fact just a couple of weeks ago. Researchers from cornell and stanford issued a peer reviewed studies showing that life cycle emissions from blue hydrogen are twenty percent higher than directly burning gas for heat because of the inefficiencies in the conversion process and because of methane leakage. And they actually called it a distraction so look hydrogen production is getting much more serious. It's highly highly valuable product particularly industrial uses. And there's a big question about whether we're going to use them for downstream applications again. We'll get into that. But oil companies are rolling up their plans for hydrogen production. And i wanted to figure out what is meaningful. And what is distracting so ed. Let's start with the different hydrogen colors who got green versus blue versus grave versus brown even yellow pink turquoise hydrogen We don't have to go into all of them but what what are the main one is the key ones that one with needs to know about. I guess i'll probably a gray and blue and green because those are the biggest one currently is gray. Which is that is hundred. Made from natural gas process called steam methane reforming which is essentially you strip the hydrogen out of natural gas. There's a couple of prices happened to it. And you basically end up with hydrogen and a stream of exhaust gases which includes a lot of carbon monoxide carbon dioxide. Which i guess. Come to a moment but crucially That's a lot of greenhouse gases being pumped out as a result of making that hydrogen. Then what people talk about when we talk about Hydrogen as a low-carbon solution is blue. Hydrogen agree hydrogen blue then takes that same gray hydrogen that results in a lot of talks emissions and capture and sequester dockside to up kind of process must be tried Let's play around the world already technology. That's been around since the nineteen seventies do capture it and compress pumped under the ground. Where the idea is. Abe will remain for centuries and then green. Hydrogen is the new a kind of idea which is making it. Essentially from splitting water electrolysis water whenever you've got Plus county water. You can Break it down h. Two breaks added either. Looks gin and you can. In that way. That at the moment it's a very very small. Production is done that way. It's still relatively expensive. It's very expensive compared to conventional gray hydrogen that potentially has go quite a little promise particularly for those kind of occasions when you might have a surplus power that you don't know what to do. Otherwise so for instance. If you're what we have in west texas at the moment At nighttime when the a lot of wind power not nobody mantra electricity or california. In the middle of the day when the sun is shining excess solar power being generated Relative to the demand for it you could use some of that to make hydrogen at a very very low cost. So that's one of the kind of a key uses and then of course hydrogen like any gase could be stored it has somewhat. Tricky characteristics can react with pipelines and storage tanks stored carefully. But it can be stored and then used whenever you want to use it. So for instance one of the things you could do with it is to generate power with it so essentially it could be used as a energy storage technology and potentially a long duration that you storage taking over de so. There's a lot of interest in it. A lot of interest in that and also similarly blue hydrogen as a potential low-carbon solution as a at the early stages now. But it's one of these things where my eating about. Hydrogen is a bit like you know that famous winston churchill quote about. It's the worst option. Except for all the others are Some uses as particularly a generation storage some industrial processes making steel for instance where It's really hard to find low-carbon solutions. Renewable probably isn't going to do it. We're going to need something else at. It may will be that. Hydrogen can Fill the as i say. Early stages still an industry in its infancy. But potentially i think promising. So is it mostly who is getting behind hydrogen production. Is it a lot of oil and gas majors. I mean we we keep hearing about all this activity. Where's it coming from yet. Definitely quite a few competitors are interested. some power companies interested as many specialized Hodgson companies that are also companies in the transport industry that are interested in the potential of hydrogen fuel cells to power vehicles. I think personally. It's unlikely that's going to be a very compelling solution for passenger cars and selling battery. Electric vehicles really look like they're going to win that race but actually for long distance transport heavy transport may well be the case that hydrogen fuel cells are going to be useful. So you'll seeing these broad coalitions of companies invested in technology investing in our data. Trum bring it to a commercial scale so actively going on And certainly. I think you mentioned this. Study kind of challenging the the green credentials blue hydrogen if you like but potentially a very serious issue for the industry because it's very much presenting itself as a low-carbon zero carbon solution if it comes to stylish that then it's in trouble. Yeah so let's get into that catherine you talk to robert hall worth of cornell One of the lead researchers and he talked to you through the research. What are what did they find about. The environmental impact of the resource of blue hydrogen. That uses kind of carbon capture to create hydrogen from guests. So the first thing. I asked dr howarth from cornell my alma mater by the way i was very happy that he came from cornell Is why did you do this. What instigated this and he is on this climate action council for the state of new york. Twenty two people on that are in charge of developing a plan to get new york carbon-neutral by twenty fifty forty percent reduction by twenty forty. And there were a lot of proposals for blue hydrogen and he said wow this is so interesting. What is this. What does it mean. First of all he just learned about what blue hydrogen is because basically that is a term that was invented by erla keyed which is a big gas producer for industrial processes. Back in two fifteen. They just created that term. There wasn't any. There was just something that they invented and so he didn't really know what it was and he said all right. Well let me figure this out and and try and try to see you know if we're gonna propose this as one of the major ways to get carbon neutrality and in fact governments are subsidizing plants all over the world. What does that mean like. What does the footprint really look like. And what they found was that surprisingly even though we hear a lot about carbon capture and there should be a lot of data. There really aren't any very many plants that have there been. No plants built from natural gas. And they're only they're only about twelve coal plants that do carbon capture and only two with data so they used all of the data from a plant on alberta and texas that they could to try to figure out. What is this really do. And what is the profile and from a very high level what they found is that the total co two equivalent emissions for blue hydrogen are only between nine and twelve percent less than that for gray hydrogen. How ever went. Because you need more natural gas in the process and you're creating much more methane emissions the greenhouse gas footprint of blue hydrogen is twenty percent more than burning natural gas or coal for heat and sixty percent more than burning diesel oil for heat.

hydrogen council Plus county uk cornell stanford Germany france Abe west texas ed winston churchill dr howarth Hodgson robert hall erla keyed california new york catherine
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:31 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"We are raising. And i think that unless we do some pretty dramatic things The temperature will continue to increase in ways. That i just don't think we know exactly what's going to end up happening and so i do believe that this code red for humanity is a good way to put it and that we need to be able to kind of shock ourselves into doing a lot more a lot faster. I totally agree with that. And i do think as you say. One of the crucial messages from this report is that one point five degrees c that limit to global warming which was kind of the stretch goal. If you like the paris agreement that now looks very very difficult to achieve. And that's a really important point in a very disturbing conclusion. But i guess maybe just to try and rescue a little bit for for optimism here on one of the conclusions. I take from this. Is that what it shows is the climate policy works. Sometimes you hear of a sort of negative adverse climate policy and people say well we've been talking and talking about this back to ninety seven back before that even and there's been all this talk and nothing's already happened and still fulfills the same share of global energy as they were back in the ninety s and he just proves it's a great big talking shop and nothing's really changed. I think that's really unfair to put it. That way at your. I think a lot has changed. I think the boom that we've seen in renewable energy and the boom that we expect to continue for decades to come out of that has been driven by climate policy. It's been driven by very deliberate decisions by governments in north america in europe in asia decisions to subsidize and support renewable energy industries to get them to the point where they can grow now and will increasingly be able to grow without subsidy in the future. And that's a really important shift. And that is something that we have managed to achieve as a global community and that kind of bending that curve and bending away from the worst possible outcomes. That's a real achievement. Oh i think we should acknowledge that. Yeah i totally agree. We do have solutions that we just need to deploy faster I also think that hopefully and you see things in agencies like international energy agency that is typically quite conservative and has and has also been you know in the past. Oh booster for a fossil fuels with oil and gas funding. A lot of what they do. They've really changed their tune. And so when you see institutions like that Changing their the way. They're messing about this to say we really do need to do something. We need to stop building coal and we need to roll on all of their fossil fuel emissions and that we have solutions to do so. I think that is all to the good. The final piece from me on what's changed is the attribution science and this is a relatively new field of research that is using sophisticated climate models that tying specific events to climate change to actually human emitted carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. And so you can through really sophisticated models. Show how much more likely. An event was Because of the greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. and we've shown that The record breaking heat wave in europe was perhaps as much as one hundred times more likely and that the record rainfall from hurricane harvey and twenty seventeen the the chances of that kind of rainfall were tripled because of of climate change because of human caused climate change and so there is some debate over the effectiveness of these models. It's as i said a relatively new field of research but there's enough research out there that the thousands of scientists could say with confidence that The findings show that we can very clearly link the the frequency or the likelihood of these events to climate change. That is very new. It is different from what we saw in the fifth. Ipcc report so clearly just a period of six or seven years has changed the way. The scientific community is talking about this drastically. Let's go over to how people are receiving this. I want to think about how this is covered in the media how this is thought about an industry and how it's being received in the political world. let's start first with policy. Politics catherine This landed big among the climate concerned. But what about in the political world. I i was on vacation time so i was really grateful that i didn't have the news on. I mean i was certainly seeing a lot on twitter about this And i've reached out to a lot of folks to and certainly congress has been just very motivated The democrats especially to get things done In this sort of second bill that they're working on they just got the infrastructure bipartisan infrastructure. Bill done Which was which has some pieces in it. That are very supportive of climate mitigation but the next big piece is kind of going to be much more focused on climate Solutions and put more money to that. And i think that just put a little more wind in their sails to say all right now. We really have to make sure we do. This and I i think that is that super important. And i think that you know one thing that we have learned over the years and since this report i ca came out at night where they started this. In nineteen eighty eight is that the science has been really strong. And as we've gotten better and better at modeling we've gone back and look at what was originally done and it's still pretty good. So you've mentioned stephen that although the attribution pieces new when we go back and check our work. It's been quite accurate. And i think that the folks. In congress the policymakers and even around the country that are looking to the science are seeing that if we can just rely on the science and we can peg our policy to that. Then we're going to be able to figure out some policy solutions. We'll get deeper into that in our third segment when we talk about how the framing is changing among republicans at any thoughts on any of those areas on politics the media or industry. Yeah the hasn't been a huge response in the industry of the to be honest. But i think what's kind of interesting about it and what really struck me about. It is.

hurricane harvey europe paris north america asia Ipcc congress twitter Bill stephen
"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:40 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Order to release a report which they do every few years. This is the sixth assessment since nineteen eighty eight. It's thirty nine hundred pages They have to have the approval of all the countries all of those diplomats and the scientists and so just to get that done. It has that it's been pretty conservative. And so the language that has been used in the report has really been very much about you. Know this is this is a likelier currents or this is More likely than not. Well this the way it is written now and i and i i get this directly from michael man who was who's a climate scientists and was a guest on the show on the podcast outrage optimism with christiana furious who was one of the un framework secretaries For these For the conference of parties And her team that he's basically saying this is close as you will ever see of scientists screaming at the top of their lungs from tall buildings that this is code red for humanity that and this is just the first working group reports other three working groups science impact in mitigation. This is the first report. And it's basically the scientists saying absolute certainty that this is. There's no doubt at this point. This is human caused and that it is because of the way we use our energy and the way that we put a carbon into the atmosphere. That's a really helpful. Framing and the report goes on to say it is established fact that human caused emissions have led to an increase frequency or intensity of some weather and climate extremes. It takes a lot for that. Many scientists to come together and agree on that strong language So so very helpful co two to set up the context around the language here and white differs. Ed does anything jump out to you. Hear from previous reports or how. This is framed by scientists What what what did you read into. This agree with catherine a lot about The key points in terms of the the certainty and the the confidence in their understanding of the science and on the broad trends in terms of what's happening with global warming and also in terms of Some of the consequences as you say you mentioned heatwaves being one extreme precipitation would they call ecological and agricultural droughts in other words drops that hit ecosystems of agricultural production. Those are all things they now say. They have very strong confidence in those being caused by global warming. So that's all very striking a very clear on the more positive side. The wolves something. I thought was also quite interesting and i. I guess i have to be a little bit carefully. My words here. that would be misinterpreted at all. I'm not trying to say that the with the suggesting that. I'm suggesting suggested this kind of problem or it's nothing to worry about. But there is definitely some better news in there in terms of what they're saying about scenarios for the future You may have come across this very intense debate. That's been raging for the past couple of years about What's being called the rcpi's representative concentration pathways in particular. This scenario for kind of the outlook for the clever was aussie p. Eight point five. Which is much used scenario. That people have been studying to think about what might happen to the climate. That's basically an unchecked emission scenario of the worst. That could happen exactly. Yeah kind of emissions going up and away and what's now being said by the ipc in this six is that Scenario now looks highly. Unlikely does not look like we're on ecorse tobacco outcome which essentially the kind of median expectation in that scenario would be global warming of about four and a half degrees centigrade by the end of the century so absolutely disastrous catastrophic scenario. But as i say it looks like probably that can be avoided reason being essentially. We're going to get more detail on this next year when the fcc talks more about mitigation adaptation but the crucial thing. That's kind of driving this. Really kind of apocalyptic scenario is the idea that the world will burn a whole lot more fossil fuels and in particular a lot more coal in the second half of century and that really doesn't look terribly likely if you look at kind of trajectory that the world is on because we knew it was a growing so fast in particular because also not natural gas is taking a bit of shed away from but real growth of renewables being the key thing essentially it looks like global consumption of coal is roughly plateauing around now under gonna start to fall in coming decades. It's growing asia awesome. You still have a lot about how china's building new pipelines plants and that's absolutely true but also coal is being driven out of europe and north america pretty rapidly as to affect roughly balancing each other out basically as a coal is on a plateau. It doesn't look. I mean it's not one hundred percent possible. Never say never but it really looks pretty unlikely that coal consumption will suddenly start to rocket again in the second half of this decade. Only getting the ipc now acknowledging that and they say that all the they they show you various other scenarios for the way the world might look and they say they're not putting Any particular probability scenarios and the scenario That looks the most likely currently is absolutely still not a great one The will calling s. p. to four point five that's still puts us on course for about two point seven degrees centigrade of warming by the end of the century. That's absolutely not a good outcome for the world. It's definitely something we'd want to avoid. But as i say it is at least that kind of good news which is that. It's not the totally apocalyptic. Oreo that ten or twenty years ago. Look much more plausible. Catherine is our resident optimist. Here we gotta find room for two optimists. Ooh no no actually this. I'm i'm not as optimistic. Like there's only about a fifty percent chance that the global temperature rise will stable. Oh one and a half degrees because what it's going to require is for us to reduce co two emissions fifty percent by twenty thirty and net zero by twenty fifty. And right now. That is not what we're on track to do right. We may not be on track to continue building up massive quantities of coal. But right now. I mean extreme weather is on the rise and it will increase and It turns out the big. Google searches around the. Ipc were report. where how do. I survive climate change. And how high above sea level do i love and the on the how to survive climate change. Guess what everyone is impacted. Every single region has something that will impact it. No certainly there's some places that are gonna be More dramatically impacted than others. But everybody is impacted by this. And many of these changes are irreversible. And we don't really know how they're going to spend out like with permafrost that's going to be really tricky because it releases sixty six billion tons of co two for every additional degree that we that we are raising. And i think that unless we do some pretty dramatic things The temperature will continue to increase in ways. That i just don't think we know exactly what's going to end up happening and so i do believe that this code red for humanity is a good way to put it and that we need to be able to kind of shock.

rcpi christiana un catherine michael Ed fcc north america asia china europe Catherine Google
Is Global Warming a Hoax?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | Last month

Is Global Warming a Hoax?

"We're are talking with steven hayward about the just released. Un ipcc report on the imminent demise of the earth due to global warming. and steve. Before the break you were just starting to explain that this entire global warming hysteria is based on model projections but the scientists scientific portion of the ipc report is starting to acknowledge that there are simply serious problems with those models. So let's pick it up there. Yeah this is the hardest playing in simple terms you know. There's a famous quote from late. James q wilson one of the most prominent conservative political scientists to the last generation anyone's said the social scientists quick trying to predict the future. You can't even predict the past and that turns out to be exactly true. Climate modeling scientific community that works on this recently tried to back to some of their models to data we've generated from thousands thousands of years ago and found that the model generated temperature predictions that way off from what the temperature records were able to figure out actually work so come to the current Reports and you know the problem computer miles of the old garbage in garbage out. What do you put in the front end Well you have to put in an admissions projection. How much greenhouse gas emissions admit from fossil fuels over the next seventy eighty years and the last few reports from pcc. The last one being in two thousand fourteen had these very high projections of what they thought we were gonna do. Over the next century the world about growth and so forth well As time has gone on people look at those projections. say those are totally unrealistic

Steven Hayward James Q Wilson Ipcc IPC UN Steve PCC
"ipcc" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

01:51 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm fatma fitting in for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. Brick smith is the president of the canadian institute for climate choice. Herrick thanks for being here. It's pleasure so what was your first reaction when you read the report while i mean. Let's let's just acknowledge that this thing is massive minutes thousands of pages. Hundreds of scientists around the world have been working on this thing for the last many months of fourteen. Thousand studies were incorporated and summarized and synthesized in this reports enormous amount of information. This is the most significant update to what we know about climate in in many years over half a decade. There's a lot of stuff now does not surprising me for anybody. That's been keeping track of climate change science and the the notion that warming is getting is happening more quickly than expected. would not be news. I think one of the more significant aspects of the report is the unequivocal linkage. Based on the best available science that recent extreme weather events are being driven by climate change in the idc has never been that explicit before. And of course there's this whole new discipline called attribution science that's That's quite new. This new kind of science is makes it possible for us to say yeah. This particular heatwave is being driven by climate change that is a. That's a very new Development in the climate change debate. And i think very powerful because long story short what this report does is. It brings climate change home for people. Climate change is a health concern.

ipcc un idc Canada
How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

The Big Story

01:51 min | Last month

How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

"I'm fatma fitting in for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. Brick smith is the president of the canadian institute for climate choice. Herrick thanks for being here. It's pleasure so what was your first reaction when you read the report while i mean. Let's let's just acknowledge that this thing is massive minutes thousands of pages. Hundreds of scientists around the world have been working on this thing for the last many months of fourteen. Thousand studies were incorporated and summarized and synthesized in this reports enormous amount of information. This is the most significant update to what we know about climate in in many years over half a decade. There's a lot of stuff now does not surprising me for anybody. That's been keeping track of climate change science and the the notion that warming is getting is happening more quickly than expected. would not be news. I think one of the more significant aspects of the report is the unequivocal linkage. Based on the best available science that recent extreme weather events are being driven by climate change in the idc has never been that explicit before. And of course there's this whole new discipline called attribution science that's That's quite new. This new kind of science is makes it possible for us to say yeah. This particular heatwave is being driven by climate change that is a. That's a very new Development in the climate change debate. And i think very powerful because long story short what this report does is. It brings climate change home for people. Climate change is a health concern.

Fatma Jordan Heath Brick Smith Canadian Institute For Climate Herrick IDC
"ipcc" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:59 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Down these weather events that he's terrible weather events including these incredible droughts if we lower the temperature and so to do that we need to obviously as rapidly as possible Reduce our emissions. So run out as fast as you can get those solar panels. Get your electric vehicle maker house. Better insulated Make sure that your your place of work is is doing what it can to reduce its emissions unless make that That energy transition as rapidly as possible but at the same time we have to increase the rate at which carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere. And that can be done by a combination of of letting more existing forest row Beverly law laid out the need for these strategic forth reserves The same is true with the with our grasslands the way they're managed with our agriculture. The way it's practiced And the protection of people don't think much of wetlands anything but wastelands but they have been hugely orton in the amount of carbon that they store and yet we degrade them in release that carbon dioxide almost instantly so Taking a look at what we can do in the national world and what we can do in terms of reducing our emissions from our the way we live our lives have to go hand in hand and they have to be all. Those efforts need to be accelerated immediately. Yeah you know we've been focusing a lot on forests so far this hour but obviously there every there's no ecosystem that's untouched by climate change. And jeremy of who guerrino sense message. Saying i want to hear more about see temperature changes and also he jeremy's curious about how sea-currents are handling the influx of freshwater dispersed into the oceans. Which would probably become an even more extreme issue if we see the continuing increasing excel in braid of acceleration of melting in both greenland and the arctic. So beverly law do you. Do you want to provide some insight about effects on sea temperatures. Well i guess when thing. I'm actually thinking about is the The most recent article about The gulfstream that flows north from the warm waters up to Say scotland and it's what keeps scotland balmy otherwise it would be quite frigid place for its latitude. And so there's more evidence of it now and i think that What was concerning as they're expecting that there might be this kind of collapse of it sooner than expected of. I think it would be three hundred years before dollar talking about certain that so so that that's worrisome because with the oceans and atmosphere when you have big circulations changing they can do big things. All around the world you can have effects. North america from that as well as scotland and other locations You know i think one thing. I've been thinking about a lot. Not just over the course of this hour but in the weekend of the this morning's report coming out is the fact that now the first one was put out in one thousand nine hundred ninety so here we are thirty one years later. Not only do we have the observable reality of how much has changed in those thirty years so what science can actually measure and then therefore model but we can now check the accuracy of the reports of the i reports from the ipc right. So i was looking back at the nineteen ninety report william mama and it says that sort of the the Do nothing option if the world sort of the business as usual scenario called then in one thousand nine hundred ninety if the world sort of continued on they predicted in one thousand nine hundred and we would see an average increase in global temperature of about one degrees centigrade. Above what was present in one thousand nine hundred and that we would see that by twenty twenty-five so first of all how looking back now. How accurate was that nineteen ninety. It was ridiculously accurate. Given the information we had at the time. I was not on that first report. But i did attend the very first meeting of the ipcc in a in nineteen eighty eight when it was formed It was at the meeting was in washington. Dc and. i was working there at the time. That's when i began my work on. Climate change is the first director of the climate program the woes sources institute and It's interesting that all throughout beginning of the nineteen seventies There were many scientists who pointed out. A climate change was was happening that was going to happen and I was also at the hearing on the hearing panel with the jim henson in one thousand nine hundred eighty when he when he made his famous statement. That climate change is already here in are said. Hey what what are you talking about. It's just a hot day in washington But there was a there is enough information even if we didn't have the massive observations. We have today to understand that this was happening and it was going to get worse and every single report is as more and more certainty. I mean it starts off with. It is possible that and then it becomes. It's his lease as likely as not and then it becomes it is it is it is a somewhat certain to It's over. I mean it's it's absolutely certain. That's what this last report says. So there's been an evolution of this cautious. Approach has been taken all along the scientific community where very few except the very brave have been willing to go out in front and say it's it's here it's now is getting worse is going to be worse still and could become catastrophic. If we don't do something. I mean when you look back at the nineteen ninety report. The cautious language is noted right because they talk about not being able to fully predict what exact weather patterns would be due to the variability of whether etc so point well taken. That's always a challenge in science but even buried within those those sort of caveats are statements like this with a modest increase in the mean in mean global temperature the number of days with temperatures above a given value at the high end of the distribution will increase substantially. There will also be a decrease in the days of temperature at the low end of the distribution so decrease in cooler days a substantial increase in hotter days. Okay the number of very hot days or frosty nights will be substantially changed without any even without any change in the variability of the weather so essentially setting what the new normal would be. That was in one thousand nine hundred ninety. I mean beverly law. Is it fair to say that. We are living in the world now that was predicted by the nineteen ninety. Ipc report says. Bill says it's just the certainty has improved. And so yeah. Those brave people that spoke out. I like dave keeling was measuring atmospheric. Co two from.

scotland jeremy william mama orton Beverly woes sources institute greenland beverly arctic North america washington ipcc jim henson Ipc dave keeling Bill
"ipcc" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:37 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Trends which is understandable. Because there's a lot of fluctuation going on And not mentioning the more recent changes People may have the sense that we have have more time. We can take more time to do this when in fact you know what we're doing is Those those past decades or like We're driving along the Fine interstate highway and only in the last hundred yards Do we see that is going off cliff. But we're not looking at the last hundred yards. And that's what we're facing is the last hundred yards right now. And that's showing that these trends are accelerating and The sec has been warning about this for years And it's it's falling on deaf ears and we can talk about why that is the case and the role that governments in doing so. Yeah i wanna do that a little bit later in the show but professor law let me turn back to you here because while it is true that we can we can talk in the abstract about these numbers and what the data say the way human beings work. Nothing is as powerful. A demonstrator of or convinced of the fact that the climate is changing then personal first hand experience and i will fully admit i'm actually broadcasting from probably a few blocks away from you. I'm in corvallis oregon right now. Because this is the town where i grew up and i'm also proud. Osu grads go beavers. But i use for the past years. I've been living in new england. I'm just happened to be back here in oregon visiting so it's been a while since i've been here and walking around the forest now. I was over by a black butte in central oregon a couple of weeks ago and just even here on the pacific side of things. I have never felt it as dry underfoot or even in my hands. As as i'm feeling it now. I mean you can hear the bone dry forest floor crunch underneath every single footstep you take where we are right now. The fires aren't even burning. So i mean it's that visceral how much things have changed here. You must feel that too. Oh yes absolutely. Fires ram through my research site. That had been running for twenty years. It's a normal kind of mixed regime flyer but we've experienced that it's just it's oppressive.

oregon sec corvallis Osu new england
Climate Change Affects Everyone, But We Can Stop Global Warming

UN News

01:17 min | Last month

Climate Change Affects Everyone, But We Can Stop Global Warming

"This is matt wells at. Us news well as preparations gear up for this november's cop twenty six climate summit in glasgow the leading scientific body responsible for assessing the latest evidence on climate change said on monday. That human activity is indisputably to blame. Well it's perhaps little comfort for the many millions affected by weather disasters today. Johnson lynch spokesperson for the intergovernmental panel on climate change or ipcc told you and uses daniel johnson as a chance that by limiting greenhouse gas emissions. We can slow down sea level rise and significantly slow global warming. So what's this report about on. Was the latest science telling us about climate change. And how does this relate to all the extreme weather. We've been seeing around the world in recent weeks and months. Well we've known for decades that world is warming and recent changes in the climate are widespread rapid intensifying and their unprecedented over thousands of years. Now this report shows the scientists who works on that. I've established that it's indisputable that human activities are causing climate change and human influence is making extreme time at events including heatwaves heavy rainfall and droughts more frequent and severe

Matt Wells Johnson Lynch Intergovernmental Panel On Cli Daniel Johnson Glasgow United States
"ipcc" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:30 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Named <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Female> paula who <Speech_Female> is selling leather <Speech_Music_Female> bags and textiles <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and she said at <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> this point. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Twenty months later <Speech_Music_Female> people <Speech_Music_Female> are <Speech_Female> just sick of politics. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> They want <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> jobs vaccines <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> and food <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and they <Speech_Female> wish that politicians <Speech_Female> would realize <Speech_Female> what the <Speech_Female> population realizes. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Which is that if they <Speech_Female> keep going through the <Speech_Music_Female> same narrative <Speech_Music_Female> forever. <Speech_Music_Female> The country's never <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> really going to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> be able to heal <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and move <Music> <Advertisement> on <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> sarah. Thanks very much for joining <Music> us. Thanks <Music> jason <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male>

"ipcc" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:04 min | Last month

"ipcc" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"The intergovernmental panel on climate change as a long history of choosing its words carefully but in the latest report from the un's global climate authority released this morning. The tone is shifting for years. There was a whisper of uncertainty of unwillingness to make definitive and damning statements. It's clear from the words of ipc chairman wholesomely. That reluctance is going. I it has. It is indisputable that human activity is causing climate change and making extreme weather events more frequent as severe second is shows that climate change is affecting every region on our planet and lastly explains that strong rapid sustained reductions in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions will be required to limit global warming. These are sobering assessments the last trench of research. The ipc will publish ahead of a mammoth clement meeting in glasgow later. This year is the most comprehensive assessment of the science behind climate. Change that the has released in is rachel. Dobbs writes about climate change for the economist represents a huge commitment by scientists. There are two hundred thirty four. Paul authors going over thousands and thousands of papers. It's has with much more certainty than we've ever had. What is driving climate change. How human actions impact on it. What the effects of it will be and the ways that we can avoid some the west consequences and its conclusions make pretty grim reading because what are of those conclusions. What's the report saying. So this report finds that. Even if countries to drastically reduce their greenhouse gas emissions now none of them currently show consistent downward trend of any sort the world would likely breach one point five degrees celsius of temperature rise above preindustrial levels within the next twenty years

ipc global climate authority intergovernmental panel on cli paris Dobbs clement un glasgow bodley rachel morton Paul sec california greece
Hot Prospects: A Sobering IPCC Report

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:04 min | Last month

Hot Prospects: A Sobering IPCC Report

"The intergovernmental panel on climate change as a long history of choosing its words carefully but in the latest report from the un's global climate authority released this morning. The tone is shifting for years. There was a whisper of uncertainty of unwillingness to make definitive and damning statements. It's clear from the words of ipc chairman wholesomely. That reluctance is going. I it has. It is indisputable that human activity is causing climate change and making extreme weather events more frequent as severe second is shows that climate change is affecting every region on our planet and lastly explains that strong rapid sustained reductions in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions will be required to limit global warming. These are sobering assessments the last trench of research. The ipc will publish ahead of a mammoth clement meeting in glasgow later. This year is the most comprehensive assessment of the science behind climate. Change that the has released in is rachel. Dobbs writes about climate change for the economist represents a huge commitment by scientists. There are two hundred thirty four. Paul authors going over thousands and thousands of papers. It's has with much more certainty than we've ever had. What is driving climate change. How human actions impact on it. What the effects of it will be and the ways that we can avoid some the west consequences and its conclusions make pretty grim reading because what are of those conclusions. What's the report saying. So this report finds that. Even if countries to drastically reduce their greenhouse gas emissions now none of them currently show consistent downward trend of any sort the world would likely breach one point five degrees celsius of temperature rise above preindustrial levels within the next twenty years

Global Climate Authority IPC Intergovernmental Panel On Cli UN Clement Dobbs Glasgow Rachel Paul
What is an IPCC report?

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

What is an IPCC report?

"When you read about climate change, you may come across mention of an IPCC report, but you may not know what that is or why it matters. Assessments of the intergovernmental. Panel on Climate Change. The IPC are written by scientists who were nominated by U N member nations from around the world basically tasked with providing the world with an objective scientific view of climate change and its impacts globally. Virginia Burkett is chief scientist for climate and land change at the United States, Geological Survey, and she was a lead author of the three most recent IPC assessment reports. The latest report was written edited and reviewed by more than two thousand scientists. It's based on data presented in more than nine thousand scientific studies. So Burke says, these reports reflect far more than any one individual's perspective on climate change they represent the consensus of the science community globally there based on peer-reviewed publicly available literature. She says the goal is not to provide policy recommendations, but to give lawmakers and citizens the information they need to make smart decisions and find solutions to this global crisis.

Virginia Burkett Ipcc Geological Survey Burke United States Scientist
Climate change: A global solution to a global problem

Part Time Genius

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Climate change: A global solution to a global problem

"The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The IPCC is an offshoot of the United Nations that was set up back in 1988 to study climate change and provide the world's governments with the best science about the issue and how to tackle it. An issue like climate change requires international cooperation because climate change affects everyone It crosses the borders of the world, and so not only does it affect everyone. It also requires action from everyone to combat climate change. We need the cooperation of all nations for the collective public good, and it's exactly the same with existential risks. The I. P. C C was chartered during a time when global geopolitics respects the sovereignty of nations. And that has proven a problem for you to take one example. Back in 2007 when the I P. C C issued its fourth assessment on global climate change the body's reports on the current cutting edge scientific understanding of the issue. Word spread to media that the report had been watered down by diplomacy. Saudi Arabia, one of the world's leading producers of fossil fuels in China, and the United States, two of the world's leading producers of emissions from burning those fossil fuels used their influence to temper the report's findings on how fossil fuel use contributes to climate change. To make fossil fuels role seem less scientifically certain. As a result, the public was presented with findings that seemed much more doubtful about the role of fossil fuel emissions and climate change. A doubt that's still alive today, Thiscause not be allowed to happen with existential risks. Climate change is one of the most important issues facing humanity today. Existentially risks are the most important. So how do we create a body that's immune to diplomatic and economic pressures of countries as strong as the U. S. Saudi Arabia and China? The answer is a singleton. Our hypothetical Singleton could arise from an international body organized to study and deal with existentialist. Let's call it our existentially risks Commission. Just out of necessity as the world wakes up to the real scope in severity of these risks, we may give that commission an enormous amount of power override any nation's opposition to its findings and guidelines. Which would mean an enormous change for global geopolitics, but one we would likely feel was necessary. Our Existentialists Commission would need to have teeth one way it might ensure compliance among all nations is through a global surveillance network. We would need to keep tabs on all the scientists who work in fields that pose an existential threat to make sure that they weren't secretly working on designs or experiments the commission deemed too risky to pursue. Same goes for corporations that make products that use risky technology. Our commission would need to keep tabs on everyone really to monitor for signs of a black market, developing and banned technology. So each government would be required to set up the surveillance network within its own borders and the existential risks Commission would have access and ultimate control over all of them. It should probably also monitor each nation's government as well. And we would probably also need to grant our commission with some sort of military or policing power as a last resort with a force that is capable of overwhelming any nations in the world. Or perhaps to make it easier. We would just allow the commission to disband the world's militaries and maintain its own small force it could use to invade and easily occupy any noncompliant nation. With a single decision making body in charge of determining the best way forward toward technological maturity, One equipped with unchecked authority able to monitor every person alive on the planet, and to use the threat of violence to ensure that we all stay in line. In our march toward a safe future. We may just make it through the next century or two and arrive at a point where the future of humanity is a shirt. But as you may have noticed, as I was describing it. Singleton can also pose an existential threat itself. That same global body we create to manage our existentially risks could easily become totalitarian, forming a permanent global dictatorship. No future generation could possibly overthrow And it's about here that you might start to feel like no matter what we do. Humanity is doomed.

Existentialists Commission United Nations Saudi Arabia Ipcc Singleton China I. P. C C P. C C United States
"ipcc" Discussed on Data Stories

Data Stories

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"ipcc" Discussed on Data Stories

"My office here in the countryside countryside in the north of Germany. Exactly on this podcast. We talk about data visualization analysis and more generally the role data plays in our lives and usually really we do that together with our guest we invite on the show. That's right but just before we start a quick note at podcast listener supported that also means there are no ads. That's which is great. But if you do enjoy the show you could also consider supporting us you can do that either with recurring payments on patreon.com slash data stories. or You could send us a one time donation via paypal on papal me slash data stories. Yes and I just WANNA add. Thanks to all those of you. You are already signed up to a patron or send us one time donations so useful and makes us really really happy. Every time we receive a new a new email we they don't typically it's Yeah it's great. Thanks so much so the topic for the days of really really interesting. One both me and monitor really fascinated by this topic. We're going to talk about climate and as you can imagine that's a really important topic we're going to talk about a data organization in climate and more specifically about visualizing data for the IPCC if you know what IPCC is you're going to discover coverage in a moment and to talk about this. We Ev undulate morally and Tom Gabriel. Johnson I engine Tom. Welcome to the show. Hi guys say thanks for having US so July Tom. I'm really looking forward to hearing from you the stories about visualizing climate data for for IPC Maybe we can start by. You can start by introducing yourself. Maybe Angela you want to start and then Tom can you tell us a little bit about your background around and also your your business. Yes sure so. Hello heavily by the My name is Sandra Morelli. I am an engineer background. Actually and I changed my path and the reeducated myself as any permission designer I have a profound on the passion for the environment and I am really interested in science communication. I've been freelancing most of my career for research organizations ENDS BEFORE TOMMY STARTED INFO design lab. We design with research organizations with scientists with the activists with journalists. And we basically try to come up with solutions that can help. Audiences says understand complex topics support evidence based decision making Great Tom. So an old guys A.. My name is Tom. Gabrielle Johansen Johnson. I started out this journey when I was Interaction designer early to tell someone trying to figure out how I could spend my time with with more useful to the world basically so I started designing board games for three years. He's a nice doctrine. Then I forced myself into statistics Norway to to learn more about They thought statistics and we saw with station and at that time I tried to find other people that they decide. Mutual Tros extremely hard early. Two thousand so I was Making this conference in Norway right invited people from all over the world including more. It's.

Tom Gabriel US IPCC Norway Sandra Morelli Germany Tom Gabrielle Johansen Johnson Interaction designer Angela engineer TOMMY
Notorious 'terminator weed' might be a climate change savior

BBC World Service

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Notorious 'terminator weed' might be a climate change savior

"This something we haven't told you about Mister Mister then he's not only a fisherman turned conservationist he's also a climate scientist he's one of the lead office on reports for the intergovernmental panel on climate change the IPCC that's the U. N. body that evaluates the latest science in this area after he won his local battle against top of the peak company he had no idea what if this small project on the outskirts of his village was a model that could be replicated more widely and help reduce carbon emissions on a vast scale for example in Finland we have a massive potential for restoration of peatlands and books and much Myers in the carbon sinks that are currently the created but we can bring them back in the health and create more sites that trump called in often referred to the Amazon rain forest is the lungs of the world how important are these kind of sites in the north they are very precious all the Borel wetlands and Marge Meyers extend from the Pacific into Finland and then actually in the kind of down further and they are a global sink they are a place where the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse things all being alleviated through natural processes so they get it not right that that they're not gonna be mining anymore Pete no unfortunately new licenses are given they are still continuing these so we say sunsets

Mister Mister Scientist Finland Myers Borel Wetlands Marge Meyers Pacific Pete U. N.
Climate change threatening stability of global food supply, UN report warns

First Light

01:43 min | 2 years ago

Climate change threatening stability of global food supply, UN report warns

"The intergovernmental panel on climate change warned that cutting carbon emissions from automobiles power plants and factories alone won't be sufficient to avert a worldwide food crisis Valerie Mason del mall is a co chair of the I. P. C. C. petition growth and changes in consumption of food feed fibre timber and energy have closed unprecedented rates of flounder and fresh water use the global food system contributes up to thirty seven percent of global greenhouse gas emissions mostly through cattle forming rice production and fertilizer on farmland maison de mall said scientists determined that it has created the greetings cycle that feeds off of itself when land is degraded it reduces the soldiers say ability to take of carbon and this exacerbates climate change in turn climate change exacerbates land degradation in many different ways IPCC coach here Jim ski a third countries will have to change their food supply operations to avert a crisis of food instability improving the way that we use salons on produce food does have an important part to play in helping us to tackle climate change he said it's not just food production that needs to change a move to more balanced diet could help first a dot two and limit climate change some diets require more London water and lead to higher emissions than others for example diets that are high in grains nuts and vegetables have a lower carbon footprint than those that are high in meat on the leads to better health outcomes the report said twenty five percent of all food produced is lost or wasted cutting down on that waste could also reduce greenhouse gas

Maison De Mall Jim Ski Valerie Mason P. C. C. Ipcc London Thirty Seven Percent Twenty Five Percent
"ipcc" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"ipcc" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Climate change is different because we have an expiration date. And the IPCC report says we've got twelve years to turn it around twelve years. So my concern is that we are going to be the frog in the pot of boiling water. And we are going to end debate debate debate and debate. And then when we actually finally pass something it is a Wimpy carbon tax in our kids. Okay. So she have kids. No member. Because now she's like seriously about whether or not to even have probably shouldn't have them. Well, hopefully, she's not gonna because that would be something. Obviously, these are just two of many situations. Many times that she has talked about this twelve year deadline. The world is going to end, you know, we've got twelve years to turn this boat around or whatever would were a frog in boiling pot blunt. She said this a couple times, and she means it. This is not a joke to her. She thinks we're going to die in eleven point five years. Now, I don't think she could be any clearer on that page. She's terrified of garbage disposals. We have established both of these things. These are both troops Dayton. Yeah. So I was surprised to see her tweet over the weekend. Where she said. And I quote, this is the technique of the GOP to take dry humor and sarcasm literally. And fact, check it like the world ending in twelve years thing, you would have to have the social intelligence of a sea sponge to think its literal. Okay. Pick a lane. What is wrong with this guy? I could not believe that I saw that. And she was like now you're going to say it's a joke. So what is the whole green new deal based on like that that crazy chick that you date? Correct me if I'm wrong, rob. But she's like the crazy chick that you date that she's like crazy. I'm serious. Right. She's got issues. Yeah. You look like you've said this how many times now you're on record saying you're on video and audio saying this out loud being serious. And then you're telling us that you didn't say it. It was dry sarcasm. It was a joke. For real. So it gets better with AFC. Because now, you know, but before she was elected. She was a bartender. She was making like two bucks an hour right now, she's making a very very healthy salary. She is making one hundred seventy five grand a year. Thanks to you and me and every other taxpayer hurts and remember how Bernie was he used to rail against millionaires and billionaires until he became a millionaire. And now we only rails against the billionaire keep bringing that up. I think it's really convenient because they. I mean now AFC is kind of doing the same thing. So she had a couple tweets one said the US GDP is an all time high as a nation. We're more prosperous than we've ever been. But that's simply not the lived truth. Even now, I am paid similar to a doctor or corporate lawyer, many who would think that they're rich. But it's nowhere near what we actually mean in policy. Interesting. Isn't that interesting? Yeah. Not like super rich. I'm not like the bad right now. I'm just like mildly got rich kind of rash. But it's not like, really rich. I mean, I can't really feel how rich I am. So she say when we say tax, the rich. We mean nesting doll yacht. Rich four prophet prison. Rich, Betsy DeVos student loan shark rich trick the country into war rich, subsidizing workforce with food stamps, rich because that kind of rich is simply not good for society. And it's like ten people. Okay. So what she's saying is that ten people need to be punished for their kind of rich. And let's say that they are let's say that we just took all of their money. Make a debt those ten people. It would not make a dent. It's unbelievable for her to even bring this up as policy proposal just shows how absolutely naive and ignorant and dumb. She wants to target individuals. And it's not that's her. Policy her policies to target individuals whom she hates right for their specific pot of wealth. Yes. Because it's going to that goalposts will continue to change. Sure. It already has. Now, she no longer considers herself part of the wealthy. Exactly. Right. That's very handy. How that happened, isn't it? Once you become wealthy. She's so transparency is unbelievable. All right. We have to talk about stormy next. Makes me kinda grabs excited. I'm a little gross. Stop rob is excited to stay tuned for that. In a world covered in yellow pollen..

AFC Rich Bernie IPCC US Dayton GOP rob Betsy DeVos twelve years twelve year five years
"ipcc" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ipcc" Discussed on Warm Regards

"Under fifteen years ago a lot of it i mean as i said pill planet data has matured in measurably over the last decade and all we have been bringing we've been challenging our cells in our colleagues to bring more value to the pressing questions of climate science core questions um and i think we've been delivering netvalue priestess dramatically and so i think it's italy twofold its uh the maturity of climate science entrance of understanding the kinds of questions that we just can't use instrumental record for there are plenty of them uh in how to uh meet these at this burgeoning super high quality set of data emerging from the pale climate community how can we best leverage that an integrated way so i also take that with ipcc report uh the direct involvement of valery missile demont who is a choline entire working group one effort and she is a pale climate scientists have to has to go a long way in a unabling some of the structural changes that we're seeing in the six assessment report while m do you think there's value in in this work um it just insertive when he refers us a lot of the kind of m the general public debate that's emerged around global warming has been focused on um oh it's models you know and night and it does some of this i have you found in jesus interacting with the general public in georgia sure you're in a wreck the wide range of people the general public does having a sort of a demonstrable concrete record of uh at least illustrating vulnerability or you know the hazards that are in the system and then secondly helping potentially to eliminate how global warming could worsen some things uh has this helped in that round not just certain the i basically.

georgia valery fifteen years
"ipcc" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ipcc" Discussed on Science in Action

"Look for people who are extremely qualified and have a ton of expertise in whatever i'm writing about so it's not like there's any tokenism at work here and it strikes me that this arguments only of a comes up when we try and make efforts to improve diversity it doesn't come at when we're talking about the status quo in which men and white men and particular are overrepresented now there is a certain amount of disingenuous eighty in the argument because it assumes that the status quo is one in which the best sources already being found and i just highly doubt that that's true those people who we content now budgets the easiest people to contact they're the ones who are most readily found and i think if we just assume that we are already looking for quality i think we delude ourselves and i think we contribute to the very by sees that affect the field that we cover and young from the atlantic talking of these biases that effect science a paper out this week in the general pnas looks the involvement of female scientists on ipcc reports ipcc stands for the international panel on climate change and it produces important reports that helped steer climate research and government responses and the number female offers does not reflect the number of women on this planet who will be affected by climate change professor dr liberman from the university of arizona is senior author on the paper armed as an ipcc author herself she wants to know about the experiences of other female scientists in rotting the reports q more research so what we were interested it was not just all women represented in the intergovernmental panel on climate change but do they actually have voice and that required of course survey people to understand that possessions of their experience just tell me how important ipcc reports all four the scientists he write them.

dr liberman professor university of arizona ipcc
"ipcc" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ipcc" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"You don't compromise you know in science and consensus is a compromise and but anyway that being sad um what was clear to me is uh you know there was but i wanted on where do we stand nerds it was our way out can we can we start naming a goal because the ipcc intergovernmental panel on climate change studies them and so when you read a you get the impact that's happening now impact that is being predicted based on good science and um but you don't really get what to do from it even though there is a called a third working group it's about solutions and um but those are unreadable papers unbeatable the last one was two thousand pages two thousand's us and it had a b one shift to the solutions we have in toronto in ah and and even then just like i don't know again anybody herat and um so it looks her but so i just want to know where we stirred in weiser a way out and also on the named nicole goal because even dan and even now i should say then and even now people talking about reductions slowing mitigation curbing using these words and i'm going crazy curbing mitigating site even know what that means mitigation mitigation means to reduce the pain unserious serious as where me look up everybody it was i will run a mitigate content mitigate why would we want to reduce the pain of it why do we want a reverse cover why why don't we wanna stop in at some point you know and go back the other way for months we came and so i wanted to name the goal and i talked about it i talked to.

toronto ipcc climate change nicole dan
"ipcc" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"ipcc" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Yes the some i really like this uh computer model thing did you see that yes that was pretty pretty cut you know yes so the ipcc they used a computer model what they did was they they tried to simulate climate change and what they found was the only models the only models that looked like today's climate that equalled hey while this looks like what's going on today who were models that included the human contribution to global warming right when they did not plug in the human contribution at the answer that it spit out was now that climate doesn't look like what's going on right now right so that is basically uh proof that humans are contributing to this syria early yep that combined with the you know the signature of the carbon dioxide from fossil fuelburning all that jazz yes there were i and we should probably get to this part like there's there's a um there's a tendency among naysayers to be like you know there's not even like scientific consensus they're not 100 percent certain that it's it's it's us key creating this global warming right and so sciences really kind of taken it upon itself in the last like decade or so to address this and say yes that's true there is basically no such thing is settled science but there is so vince so much real like we've made it our business to create in conduct so much research and study all of this so closely over the last like ten fifteen twenty years.

climate change global warming syria carbon dioxide vince ten fifteen twenty years 100 percent