37 Burst results for "Investigative Reporter"

Royal treatment: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry detail racism, suicidal thoughts in Oprah tell-all

TIME's Top Stories

05:51 min | Last month

Royal treatment: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry detail racism, suicidal thoughts in Oprah tell-all

"What oprah stands and the royals refuse to learn about twenty first century celebrity by judy berman. Tell me what your intention is. I'll tell you what my intention is. And let's see if we can align those. Two that oprah explained monday on cbs. This morning is what she says to everyone she interviews before the cameras start rolling in this case she was of course referring to the conversation with prince harry and meghan markle the duchess of sussex that filled a two hour primetime slot on the network the previous evening. The special drew seventeen point. One million american viewers in early ratings that as deadline pointed out adding up to a larger audience than last week's golden globes and september's emmys combined while oprah's collaborative approach to shaping interviews. Has its limitations. You wouldn't want to see an investigative reporter compare objectives with the subject of a damning expose. It proved to be a singularly effective way into the ongoing harry and meghan saga. The couple broke their dignified silence about their reasons for stepping down a senior royals and leaving the uk in an equally dignified special that riveted viewers revealed troubling new details about behind the scenes machinations at buckingham palace and supplied a powerful counter narrative to the one the firm and british tabloids had been pushing also on this morning. Tino brown called the program kryptonite to the royal family. It's like a hand. Grenade although oprah whose production company harpo produced the special and licensed it to cbs. Where a fee reported to be in these seven to nine million dollar range certainly made it look that way. Taking control of the public narrative couldn't have been easy even compared with its treatment of outsiders who've married into the royal family in the past the uk press has been brutal in its coverage of meghan and a one two punch last week a dispatch from the times of london claim that meghan had bullied and humiliated aids. Driving two of them to resign and the palace announced. It was launching an investigation into that alleged. Behavior sunday's interview cast doubt on not only that story but also just about every story that might have originated with the royals. Harry and meghan described an invisible contract between the firm and the media in which the tabloids and their reporters are wined dined and welcomed into the palace for holiday parties to encourage favourable coverage it all sounded pretty sinister. But it's worth remembering that for their part. The couple also has a cozier relationship with oprah than most subjects of the journalists whose profiling them the difference in this case and in the case of everything. That was ingenious about sunday. Special wasn't the framing as the faceless firm came off as having manipulated the media an unseen and thus noble ways and a depiction that jibes with the portrait of the house of windsor. Painted by netflix's mega popular the crown. It's exiles seemed to have nothing to hide. Oprah didn't just disclose to viewers that she knew harry and meghan personally. She opened the interview by reminiscing with the duchess about the experience of attending their wedding. The distinction isn't between tiffany bias. It's between transparency and pass in many ways what we witnessed was oprah's understanding of a shift in how credibility is established and the present versus how it was established three generations ago when the queen was a newlywed. The young elizabeth waited out bad press trusting that her refusal to enter the fray would ultimately vindicate her as the bigger person but we are in a moment when skepticism of the media is at an all time high. The public is savvier than it has ever been about. How public figures manufacture their images top tier celebrities like beyond say preferred to communicate with fans via social media channels. They can control an oprah appeared to realize the value of an open conversation on prime time broadcast. Television was in the ability to create the impression. One that for the record. I see no reason to doubt that. Meghan and harry were spinning the facts so much as they were clearing the air air that the firm would for reasons implied to sell fish if not malicious preferred to leave murky for viewers who feel entitled to know every detail about their favorite celebrities lives and for whom openness is a prerequisite for loyalty transparency. Worked that was due in large part to the power of the story. Meghan and harry had to tell as well as to their unprecedented eloquence and candor on issues of race and mental health. But you can't underestimate the importance of how that story was told that is how oprah managed to align her intentions and those her subjects along with being two of the most famous people on the planet. She and meghan were after all to women of color discussing racism. Gas lighting and other third rail topics in front of an audience of millions from the tranquil outdoor setting their socially distanced conversation to the outfits. They chose a fluey floral for the radiantly. Pregnant duchess of sussex a muted mov for the queen of all media to the calm tone all three participants adopted. Every part of the special felt intentional for a world of crown fans who we know were on. Oprah's mind because the show came up in the interview. It all contributed to a conclusion to this particular episode of the british monarchy. That couldn't have been more familiar. An institution that digs in its heels at any sign of progress or accountability see prince. Andrew doesn't slow the march of time it becomes an artifact.

Oprah Meghan Royals Judy Berman Meghan Markle Tino Brown CBS Harry Prince Harry Golden Globes Sussex Harpo Buckingham Palace UK House Of Windsor The Times Aids
Fresh update on "investigative reporter" discussed on Reveal

Reveal

00:46 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "investigative reporter" discussed on Reveal

"Reporting. M P R X. This is revealed. I'm outlets in my on. Burrell was arrested for murder when he was 16 and sentenced to life in prison. He's always maintained his innocence. I believe that they were very conscious to the fact that they had the wrong person. It was incarcerated, and I just didn't feel like my life is worth living. But my on caught a break. Almost no one gets an investigative reporter dug into his case. How many people are lying here like this can't be. His case was entangled with a presidential campaign and a tragedy. George Floyd's killing put a new spotlight on racial injustice. There's an awakening that's happening. People are starting to ask really important questions rather than just blindly trusting the criminal justice system to get it right. That's today on revealed But first this news Live from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein, the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci says the U. S is currently in a precarious position in the battle against the coronavirus. Out, she tells ABC is this week even though more people are getting vaccinated every day, so to our people getting infected, averaging 60,000 new cases a day we'll get out of that place. The more and more people get vaccinated. Unfortunately, We're vaccinating at least three the 3 to 4 million people a day and we're getting out there about 30 million vaccinations per week. That's good news. We've got to keep that up. But we also have to make sure that people don't just don't throw caution to the wind. Declare victory prematurely that she also predicts the pause in Johnson and Johnson vaccinations to investigate a handful of blood clotting issues will likely end by Friday. Indiana Police say the man who shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis Thursday night legally bought the two rifles he used in the attack. NPR's Joel Rose reports. That's despite a law designed to prevent such purchases. Officials with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department say a trace of the two semi automatic rifles found at the scene revealed that the suspect bought the guns legally last year, records show. The police have previously seized a shotgun from the suspect, Brandon Hole after his mother raised concerns about his mental state. Indiana has a red flag law that's intended to prevent people from possessing a firearm if they're found by a judge to present an imminent risk to themselves or others. Officials have not said whether prosecutors ever sought such a ruling in holes case. Police say whole began firing randomly on people at the FedEx facility, killing eight before turning the gun on himself. Joel Rose. NPR news It's been one week since a white police officer in Brooklyn Center Minnesota shot and killed a 20 year old black man during a traffic stop every night since hundreds of demonstrators have gathered outside the police station there to protest. Sometimes clashing with police. But as NPR's Amy held reports last night was calmer, a metal fence demarcates two sides. Demonstrators.

Barbara Klein Brandon Hole George Floyd Joel Rose Indianapolis Burrell Anthony Fauci ABC Friday Thursday Night Two Rifles AMY Indianapolis Metropolitan Poli Indiana Police Npr News 16 NPR Last Year Today Fedex
Substack Newsletters Are Unbundling the News Industry

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

02:04 min | Last month

Substack Newsletters Are Unbundling the News Industry

"Week there was a A twitter thread by a professor named sarah roberts who is the co leader and co founder of the ucla center for critical internet inquiry. Who stated goal is quote strengthening democracy through culture making and she went on this tirade about sub stack. Which is obviously where i you know. I work you're gonna work and the threat is kind of amazing. And it's it's the reason. I think it's worth talking about is because this is becoming a thing now There have been a number of features in places like the new yorker and and the new york times wrote about some And there's this increasing like Message that sub stack is like. It's not just annoying but it's dangerous. And so she. She wrote a series of tweets. The first one says some is a dangerous direct threat to traditional news media of more importantly it's threat to journalism. And here's the argument. Journalists make their name doing reporting This is governed by norms and practices in ethics flawed and not always achieve true but president and guiding. What newsrooms do in every way. Yes people not inside. Journalism or media may not know the specifics but they often have a nebulous sense that there are norms independence disclosure of compromise editorial oversight and vetting of the reporting. That's what makes them trust enough to buy or read or watch. What's less obvious is when there is a reporter who makes her name in the newsroom. Traditional paper or fully online outlet then leased for subject or any analog taking that name reputation earned from work done in the context. I just stated in this way and investigative reporter who has earned her bona fide in a newsroom and underbush strict editorial and journalistic principles has just cashed out and turned herself into an opinion writer. She likes it because she's finally got her independence from an editor. Please do not writer or pay sub stack. I have to say it. I believe it's dangerous. Take keyed you read it here. I

Sarah Roberts Ucla Center For Critical Inter Twitter The New York Times
Fresh update on "investigative reporter" discussed on Reveal

Reveal

00:55 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "investigative reporter" discussed on Reveal

"Of a black teenager named my on Burrell. He wasn't Yeah. Why they think he's spitting. Oh, no, that was getting busted. Six kids did it. You could you could buy the corner has a five for him. His mom says that he had done a dude that tried. Did they like you lie? You just trying to help your friend. Whatever do Right away. Some things sounded strange to James. And as he kept listening story unfolded, James and his wife learned all the characters. It's centered on my on Burrell, who was just 16 when he was arrested for gang shooting in 2000 to Ah stray bullet struck and killed an 11 year old girl. From the jailhouse tapes. James was listening to my aunt's co defendants were saying he wasn't there. My on was also saying he was innocent. And James believed him as if somebody I need to do something about this little guy. That's the guy doing up there. He said. New jail ain't doing nothing. He didn't do nothing. But by that time my aunt had been sentenced to life in prison. James called his pastor looking for connections who could help He got in touch with attorneys asking if they could take the case Pro bono. He contacted the media and I call the newspaper. The lady who was investigating it. She said, Uh Well, they convicted him now in that we can do about it, You know, I said, But this do you want? Listen to the CVS, I guess And that will be the one that we can do about it. 15 years went by. James bought a suitcase for the tapes and loved them Each time he moved. I just kept on with me, Captain. Taste with me. I'm not gonna lose several towns. Very well go them. Tapes of women with me Is that one day? You know, I told my wife we always said we ever give you money to go to get this brother out of jail, You know, because he shouldn't be there. James didn't know that someone else had taken an interest in my aunt's seemingly hopeless case. An investigative reporter for The Associated Press named Robin McDowell. Her name might sound familiar. Robin was a part of the AP team that broke the story of slavery in the seafood industry and won a Pulitzer Prize. After years of breaking stories like that major Robin moved back to the States and settled in Minnesota. But she wasn't expecting to find her next human rights investigation there. Robin's radio partner on this story, Sasha as Lainey, in of a PM reports has more..

Robin Mcdowell Sasha Minnesota Robin Six Kids Burrell James 15 Years 2000 AP Lainey 16 Pulitzer Prize Five 11 Year Old Associated Press Each Pro Bono CVS
Bob Lazar, UFOs And Aliens!

That’s Strange

04:36 min | Last month

Bob Lazar, UFOs And Aliens!

"In may of nineteen eighty-nine and interview with investigative reporter. George knapp appeared on las vegas news channel k. l. a. s. a shadowy figure under the alias of dennis explained exactly what was a secret facility south of groom lake in the nevada desert nine flying saucers of extraterrestrial origin are being stored analysed and testify. The subject explains that he was tasked with reverse engineering the propulsion systems of the crash and did not know how the government had gotten hold of these crafts. The shadowy figure was eventually revealed to be bob lazar in a subsequent interview where he revealed his identity. Bob lazar who Has a bachelor's degree in physics and electronic technology from pacifica university and he continued his masters at mit. He's a very very very interesting figure. Did you know before we started this researching into this. Did you know about him. I did I watched the netflix documentary. Just a super interesting individual. And i ended up going back in like watching his interview with koa s and And seem like how all that played out in the incredible reach that it had after the fact you know it was translated into multiple languages. Played over the entire world and people were gripped by by this man's story in what he had to say because he he seems so credible. It's seems like everything he's saying really has weight in is truthful the fact that he started this with not really seeking the the attention or seeking the accolade but actually just seeking to get the information out there even hiding his identity that some might say that that would be the the behavior of someone trying to hide something but i see it as behavior of someone who is trying to protect themselves. Because they're saying something that that may actually be factual dude. I bet he is phone calls every single day. People trying to get a hold of this guy people trying to email him and all kinds of stuff and back when this verse back when this first came out. I mean think about that. The technology and the communication that they had then you know people people today are used to getting like notifications every single day but think about how he felt getting all these phone calls. When i mean he's just a regular guy he. He was picked up because he has like a coup wanda and now he's this huge figure. Even thirty years ago. I mean it's just insane. Yeah i mean. He said he used to have people camping on his lawn. And stuff. and you you to remember that within the ufo community. There are a lot of people that are. I don't know how to say it a lot of people. That are a little strange. So for those people to becoming too bob lazar and it's got to be slightly terrifying and you'll see as we kind of dive into his story that i find him very credible. I find everything that he says. Very very credible in a lot of the stuff that he has said in the past Eventually comes through. So basically he gets his degrees from mit and At university he starts working at a los alamos research lab. And i believe los alamos and working On physics and nuclear weapon research which is what what the lab does obviously and then during his employment there. Alex kind of set it. He builds a jet powered honda. It's kind of extravagant thing that he drives to work everyday. It's literally a jet on a honda. Civic nazi looks like something out of the future and he built this thing. I mean he built us thing in eighty nine. I think it might have eighty nine was one he actually worked as for so yeah it was. It was probably around eighty four. I think So that gets the attention of the los alamos local newspaper who put him on the front cover with his jet cars. Jet honda that he built and that that's a little bit important to the story later on so kind of put a pin in that. So he's working at los alamos and he says that he leaves los alamos and goes off to start other businesses. That that turn out to fail now he never really goes into detail or at least i couldn't find what those other businesses were but he a couple years later wants to get back into the science community

Bob Lazar George Knapp Nevada Desert Pacifica University Groom Lake Los Alamos Dennis MIT Netflix Las Vegas Wanda Honda Alex
Would you let your face be your passport?

The Big Story

04:42 min | Last month

Would you let your face be your passport?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story hillary. Beaumont is a freelance investigative reporter based in toronto. Hello hillary hey are you doing. I'm doing well. I'm a little creeped out. About the next time i traveled. Thanks to this piece. No problem just happy to make you aware will listen. Let's start with the actual process. You had your irises scanned as part of reporting this. What is that like. tell me about it. yeah i thought it was. It would be really interesting to go into a jail in texas as part of this story because there was a sheriff there. this guy named omar lucio who had been lake pretty open about the fact that he was using this iris scanner in his jail. His jail is very close to the texas mexico border and this iris scanner was helping basically deport people at the us border And i wanted to go inside the jail and see what this was like. I went in saw how they were using it in jail. They were scanning inmates in an not telling them what this technology was. I volunteer to use it as well as essentially like a little camera. You get your is scanned. It checks your is against database and tells you who the person is and if they have a criminal history and i'm assuming years came up negative. They came up negative. Yes do you know what happened to the scan after you were done well for my is deleted it but for inmates in the jail they keep them indefinitely they basically ended up in government database that is shared with law enforcement agencies across the us like the fbi and also immigration and customs enforcement and essentially they they allow agencies to deport people more quickly or identify people who are not using their real names. And that's really how it works. Is there anything in. we're going to get beyond This one texas jail this one technology In just a second but is there anything preventing that jail or any other place That does this from giving those to anyone else like i. I understand it being used in a law enforcement context though we can certainly debate that. But i mean how private is it wants. Your eyes are out there. Yeah i mean for a lot of these technologies whether it's in a jail context or when you're crossing an international border. What i think people should know is that you're you're in a space of reduced privacy expectation. So it's really hard to say no to these technologies than once your irises or your face or any. Biometric identification is scanned. It can be indefinitely stored in a database an shared with all of these different agencies. Know whether or not you're a criminal. Can you explain a little bit about What a place with a reduced expectation of privacy is an and what does that let the government do yeah So spaces of reduced privacy expectation include borders prisons detention facilities and essentially these areas. Where legally you cannot retain your rights to privacy as well as you wouldn't other context so One example is a back in twenty sixteen. I believe i was flying from toronto pearson. To north dakota and to to report on the standing rock protest and i was flagged for secondary screening and The actually confiscated my phone only about ten minutes But it made me nervous hell You know. I had a pass password on my phone of course but it just made me lake feel so violated that they could take my phone like that even just for a few minutes. I was wondering like things were rushing through my head of like. What are they gonna do with my phone. How long are i going to be kept here. What's going on. And this is just an example of what you can and can't do at borders like you. You have a really hard time retaining your privacy your data your phone in these spaces because what are you supposed to do under those circumstances

Jordan Heath Rawlings Hello Hillary Omar Lucio Texas Beaumont Toronto Hillary Mexico United States FBI North Dakota
"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"I think that would be nice. That's actually my daily struggle in my career. I haven't fulltime job. I work at a tv station. But that's because it. And i love that station so much and i love the people there. But it's because i need a steady income i go to lebanon in a right because i'm passionate about it but to tell you the honest to god truth. I don't get paid much. I spend more than i make. When i'm there so i'm consistently trying to find a way to have a stable life but also be able to live out my passion right these pieces and i'm starting to realize i can do it but i will need a job along with this. Can't be the only thing. I do as much as i want that. To be. the case in the world we live in and in the way journalism is going. I have to also have a job which it does make a bit more difficult for me definitely keeps me busy but you know once a story comes out and i feel really fulfilled within. It ends up being worth it. Yeah i mean. I certainly want to dissuade you from that. I mean it's certainly you know you understand the sacrifices that you're spending more time are you spending more than probably what would be a smart person or a budget. Smart person would would maybe spend but at the the end result is you're you're creating something evalu- that something that you value and you know it would just be great if the compensation as you got the end would be able to help you more easily. Go onto your next assignment now. Before we turn on the mike sue talked a little bit about the impact of this story in lebanon. What what did people think of it. Or what did they think about having this. This issue brought brought out in the way that you did. I was really pleased with how people responded to it in received it for a really long time i was scared to put this story out. Probably is going to sound bad but i was worried about disappointing. My community As i mentioned my mom and dad are from lebanon I come from a really big lebanese community here in buffalo and.

buffalo mike sue lebanon lebanese
"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"The fact that this exists. What do you credit for this lack of covering for what what are you. Seize the maybe some of the causes of it in the states specifically. Yeah i mean you bring up you bring black lives matter which originated in the united states senators. Although other countries are have sort of embraced the you know the slogan but also embraced the the message that they're trying to get out there so by drawing that comparison than you seem to be saying. You know it's not known enough in the united states. yes. I think there's a few reasons number. Americans don't really have a reason to be emotionally invested in such a small country lebanon. Is this really really tiny place in the middle east. The us has no stakes in. You know we don't get oil from there. We don't really trade with them. They don't benefit us and we don't benefit them in so awesome is americans. We've grown up. Not really learning about lebanon simply because we don't have to take a different tack. Because i really what i was more interested in. It was not so much why it's not covered in america. You know is it is. It is an issue that even discussed and lebanon icy through while this wasn't really Discussed in lebanon. You know i. It's hard to say. I don't americans care about it when people in lebanon for so long didn't he didn't care about it. What i found by talking to people in lebanon right. Now especially millennials in the people who are leading the revolution over there. Is that there really nothing. Like their parents not to say their parents are bad not to say that their parents didn't pass down great things. But there's this new generation in lebanon. That's leading the revolution. And when the black lives matter movement began in america. It kind of sparked this conversation overseas and we started to see at lebanese protests. People bringing signs that said you know and kefala or even calling kabala slavery in there was all these young people..

america united states lebanon lebanese Americans americans matter movement
"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"And a lot of journalists can document the specifics of Offering because. I mean as you know mike. Journalism is changing so much and there's not a lot of investigative journalism happening. We just simply don't have the money and resources send reporters out to spend months on one topic and you know. I had quit my job and pretty much taken. A leave of absence suspended indefinite amount of time in lebanon and for the most part before the revolution Are i spent a few months focusing on just this and then obviously the revolution took attention away from that. And i was finally able to revisit the topic when kobe came and i was stuck at home and i was able to finish the story so i mean you have a narrative re very powerful narrative from a for firsthand narrative from somebody who was involved this topic. Where do you go from there. To sort of examine the story the causes behind this situation in lebanon right so josephine gives me her side of the story which obviously was extremely dramatic and then i needed to find the facts. The data the research to back up her story and to prove she's not just experiencing a Abuse so i did continue out to different maids but i also started reaching out to organizations that tried to help them. For instance. amnesty international and human watch have been issuing reports for years about the abuse maids endure in an calling on the lebanese government literally for decades asking them to end kefala file the the system i discuss in my article that allows us abuse to take place so those organizations were extremely helpful. I was interviewing people on the ground. In beirut who have really been advocating to end this strike system but on top of that there was one group in particular it's an advocacy group. That really helped take my article to another level in. help me really learn what's happening in the scene explicit. there's a group called this is lebanon. They were founded by former migrant domestic workers who were abused they operate on facebook so they have a group and their mission is to save maids. Who are trapped in abusive situations so because the lebanese government is so negligent The lebanese government is negligent on. Its own people. There's no reliable. Gop system or police enforcement or rules or laws that can protect these maids. So where can they go. They go to this. Facebook group in this group literally gets thousands and thousands of messages a year From women saying can you please help me. I haven't been paid in months. Can you please help bend sexually assaulted. Can you please convince my boss to let me leave or let me go home or let me go back to africa and there are people behind the facebook group who than contact the employers in. Say if you don't let this person go we will do x. y. and z. I mean it's kind of bizarre. It's kinda crazy but when you live in a country where there are no rules in. There is no proper system in place to take care of people. This is what they have to do. So the people behind this group in particular this woman who goes by the name of patricia. I can't say her real name because she she fears that. The lebanese government or pass employers would come after her. She and i have been speaking for older and she was giving me contact information of maids. Who may wanna talk to me on. Record one of those maids wisconsin's who i feature miss story and constance was forced to have an abortion when she got to lebanon which if anyone's interested in learning that story it's on the article but to make a long story short. I learned from patricia..

africa thousands lebanon josephine Facebook constance kobe facebook thousands of messages a year one group mike one topic lebanese government patricia beirut decades lebanese one months years
"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

08:46 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"This week. We talked to an investigative journalist. Who quit her job so that she could move to another country and report on the unjust way. some women are being treated in lebanon. I'm michael o'connell this is. It's all journalism as twenty twenty winds down or checking with a few of our former podcast guests to see what they've been up to. We last spoke. Lisa corey back in september. Two thousand eighteen. She had just finished in investigative feature about syrian child. Brides and lisa reached out to us in november about a story that she had just written for the washington monthly about the plight of housekeepers in beirut. Welcome back to the podcast lisa. Thanks for having me. Mike so you know just because we have to dot all our is in the crawl tease you. You came to our attention originally because you were working with ambra healy. Who's one of our producers up in <hes>. Buffalo and for some reason. We have a lot of guests from <hes>. Western new york and also from canada from ontario. So it's great to hear you again in it sorta checkup on so what you've been up to. Since we last spoke in september two thousand eighteen so allies happened since then. I have continued to travel to lebanon as a freelance journalist. And i knew. I wanted to dive into another instigative story. This one in particular has been on my mind. For about seven years since my first adult trip to lebanon. I had visited the country where my parents are from in. I noticed there are these black and asian maids who are treated incredibly poorly and for seven years. I've thought about it. But i thought it would be too hard of a story to do. There are just so many barriers in the way and luckily my last trip to lebanon which was summer of twenty nineteen. I had the opportunity to interview a maid who had a lot of traumatic experiences in. That really opened up the door for me to go deep and explore this topic. It seems in a way very similar to your approach with the story that you did a couple of years ago that you talked about about the the syrian war. Brides the the fact that you were looking for something to cover in lebanon his interesting also that you know. This is something that you noticed. How are you able to set up that initial incas. You know this seems like such a difficult story to <hes>. get an entree into. How did you find this woman to speak to. So it's really funny. Because as bad as this sounds i went to lebanon bananas. Second trip without much of a plan at all. I didn't know i was gonna do this story. It was july two thousand nineteen when i left buffalo and a lot of people. Ask me what stories are you gonna cover. What if nothing really happens for you to cover. And i said listen. I'm going. i'm gonna see whatever. I see that stands out to me. I'm just gonna dive into and luckily that trip two months later or a few months in the lebanese revolution started. So i was there for that but before the revolution happened. I was about two weeks into my trip and my aunt said. Why don't you come with eight to a family friend's house. So i went with her and i was like man. I really need to be focusing on work. But i guess to her friend's house we get there and her friends are asking me. What are you planning to write in. Lebanon while you're here and i said well there's one top i'd really love to do. It's about the maids who are abused here in. They said actually you should probably talk to our made. Her name is josephine. The last two houses that she worked for abused her. I said wow really you would let me just interview your made in. They said yeah. And i'm like well. How am i gonna do that. She's from ghana. And i only speak english. She's like she speaks perfect english so i sat down with josephine that night and she opened up to me for almost two hours. She was crying and she was telling me about her past employers who starved her made her sleep on. The kitchen floor attempted to rape her. You know verbally abused her. Didn't let her speak to their children because they said she would infect them with african diseases and at the end of the conversation josephine took a deep breath like a sigh of relief and the next day because actually slept at their house. We were fire from our where. I stay in love the next day. She told me that for the first time in years she slept last night because she felt like she got off her chest. And i think in that moment i realized the story is much bigger than me. It's much bigger than me. Trying to find article to pursue while overseas. it was really about the fact that so many women in lebanon so many of these maids are suffering in secret and a lot of journalists can document the specifics of <unk>. Offering because. I mean as you know mike. Journalism is changing so much and there's not a lot of investigative journalism happening. We just simply don't have the money and resources send reporters out to spend months on one topic and you know. I had quit my job and pretty much taken. A leave of absence suspended indefinite amount of time in lebanon and for the most part before the revolution <unk>. Are i spent a few months focusing on just this and then obviously the revolution took attention away from that. And i was finally able to revisit the topic when kobe came and i was stuck at home and i was able to finish the story so i mean you have a narrative re very powerful narrative from a for firsthand narrative from somebody who was involved this topic. Where do you go from there. To sort of examine the story the causes behind this situation in lebanon right so josephine gives me her side of the story which obviously was extremely dramatic and then i needed to find the facts. The data the research to back up her story and to prove she's not just experiencing a <unk>. Abuse so i did continue out to different maids but i also started reaching out to organizations that tried to help them. For instance. amnesty international and human watch have been issuing reports for years about the abuse maids endure in an calling on the lebanese government literally for decades asking them to end kefala file the the system i discuss in my article that allows us abuse to take place so those organizations were extremely helpful. I was interviewing people on the ground. In beirut who have really been advocating to end this strike system but on top of that there was one group in particular it's an advocacy group. That really helped take my article to another level in. help me really learn what's happening in the scene explicit. there's a group called this is lebanon. They were founded by former migrant domestic workers who were abused they operate on facebook so they have a group and their mission is to save maids. Who are trapped in abusive situations so because the lebanese government is so negligent <unk>. The lebanese government is negligent on. Its own people. There's no reliable. Gop system or police enforcement or rules or laws that can protect these maids. So where can they go. They go to this. Facebook group in this group literally gets thousands and thousands of messages a year <hes>. From women saying can you please help me. I haven't been paid in months. Can you please help bend sexually assaulted. Can you please convince my boss to let me leave or let me go home or let me go back to africa and there are people behind the facebook group who than contact the employers in. Say if you don't let this person go we will do x. y. and z. I mean it's kind of bizarre. It's kinda crazy but when you live in a country where there are no rules in. There is no proper system in place to take care of people. This is what they have to do.

america Lisa corey lisa november lebanon september michael o'connell this week beirut twenty twenty Brides Two thousand eighteen washington
"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

05:22 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"Think that if people in america and people elsewhere across the world start to talk about this injustice in this really abusive system maybe it would inspire an influence. More people in lebanon to try to fight against it this week. We talked to an investigative journalist. Who quit her job so that she could move to another country and report on the unjust way. some women are being treated in lebanon. I'm michael o'connell this is. It's all journalism as twenty twenty winds down or checking with a few of our former podcast guests to see what they've been up to. We last spoke. Lisa corey back in september. Two thousand eighteen. She had just finished in investigative feature about syrian child. Brides and lisa reached out to us in november about a story that she had just written for the washington monthly about the plight of housekeepers in beirut. Welcome back to the podcast lisa..

america Lisa corey lisa november lebanon september michael o'connell this week beirut twenty twenty Brides Two thousand eighteen washington
Capitol Police report warned that Congress could be targeted three days before riot

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Capitol Police report warned that Congress could be targeted three days before riot

"Tonight. An internal Capitol Police Intelligence report issued three days before the assault on the U. S. Capitol, warned that there could be an attack last Wednesday on Congress itself, The Washington Post reports. The 12 page memo detailed how President Trump's supporters saw that day as the last chance to try to overturn the election results, adding quote, This sense of desperation and disappointment may lead to more of an incentive to become violent. Unlike Obvious post election protests. The targets of the pro trump supporters are not necessarily the counter. Protesters says they were previously but rather, Congress itself is the target on the sixth. Two people familiar with that memo, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the memo was shared to all Capitol Police Command Staff. Washington Post Political investigative reporter Carol Lin Egg is the journalist who broke the story son who was the Capitol police chief until resigning in the wake of the security failures and the siege. He got this Intel report and he's declined to discuss the details of it with me. But I know from other sources that he got this report on the third and that's what made him go to the sergeant at arms in the Senate and the House, his bosses and say, Look, guys, I think I need emergency activation of the National Guard. They turned him down and said that they didn't like the idea of that. They didn't like the optics of the military looming over the capital. They didn't think their leadership their bosses, the Speaker Pelosi or Mitch McConnell, the Senate leader would agree. So they said No no comment tonight on the memo from a Capitol police spokeswoman.

Capitol Police Intelligence U. S. Capitol President Trump The Washington Post Capitol Police Command Staff Congress Carol Lin Egg Capitol Police Intel Senate National Guard Speaker Pelosi House Mitch Mcconnell
"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTOP

"Investigative reporter at W. T o P Growing up in the DC area. I remember Parents listening to W T O P in the car and hearing is a kid traffic and weather together on the AIDS. Now I get to work at what I consider the most trusted local news source in Washington. I love the immediacy of radio. I mean, if news is breaking, I can run into the studio and update you on what we know as it's happening. Never miss a moment. Check back throughout the day for w t o P. Updates. 24 73 65 Listen live on air when Alexa or on the W T o P F the Democrat should say Democratic candidates in these run offs in Georgia, both Have about 52% of the vote over the Republican candidates with 48% many more balanced account, though. Stay with us here, a special report and a live update from Atlanta about five minutes away Sports at 15 and 45, powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white. Think red. Now we're talking Heisman. Here's Dave Preston College Football's Heisman Trophy goes to Alabama wide receiver Devante Smith won't stain my family. My mom, my dad. Just everything that y'all told me to move me into the young man I am today. One thing my mental Vance's Sounders. Without you, I wouldn't be why on the day the senior has 105 receptions for 1641 yards and 20 touchdowns this season. Helping lead the Crimson Tide of next Monday's national championship game is the third Heisman winner from Alabama, all in the last 12 years and the fourth wide receiver in the modern era to take college football's top honor. That felt Washington football team is looking for its first playoff when in 15 years the quarterback they're facing Saturday his 1 20 playoff games in the last 15 seasons coach Ron Rivera on Tom Brady. I know he spreads it around to. That's the other thing because you can't sit there and say, Always gonna throw the Brock. He's gonna throw the mic or he's gonna He's gonna throw the brown. I mean, he's going to do what he does. We have a lot more I w t o p dot com Search huddle Dave Preston w T o P. SPORTS As we wait for the results in Georgia, we can tell you locally Democrat Candy King has won the Virginia special election for second District delegate defeating Republican Heather Mitchell. More about that in a lot more about Georgia as we wait for those returns coming up on your election source. W t o p 8 17 I am Rich Mackenzie, owner of Metropolitan Bath and Tile. Let me ask you a question. Would you repair your car? If you could get a new one for about the same price? Of course not. You get a new one, so it doesn't make any sense to cover over your old porcelain, bathtub and ceramic tile walls with plastic when Metropolitan can install a brand new porcelain on steel bathtub. With new ceramic tile walls for around same price. And the whole job can be completed in just 2 to 3 days with no muss, no fuss and no mess. So show us the price you get from that plastic cover over guy and we'll install a brand new porcelain over still bathtub with new ceramic tile walls for the same price, and we'll guarantee it for as long as you live in your.

Dave Preston College Football Georgia Washington Heisman Metropolitan Bath and Tile Alabama Investigative reporter Tom Brady Alexa AIDS Dave Preston Metropolitan Devante Smith Red River Ron Rivera Vance Heather Mitchell Rich Mackenzie Atlanta Sports
Harry Styles and Olivia Wilde Holding Hands

Daily Pop

04:04 min | 3 months ago

Harry Styles and Olivia Wilde Holding Hands

"Livy wild and harry styles are dating over the weekend. They were caught holding hands on their way to a friend's wedding in montecito california. A source tells us news. They shared a room and their romance has been going on for a little while now. So let's just talk about this. Okay you see the headline first reaction and then you see the video. First reaction morgan go. I don't i literally been processing this for three days. Because i mentioned massive harry styles fan and i just feel like listen. I like libya. I like little wild. I feel like we just heard about her. Swith jason today day. I felt like when you're that famous when you're at that level harry styles whose notoriously private olivia jason really work public unless they really needed to be in terms of like red carpets and things that they will promoting something feels not inauthentic. I don't know the words if you do. You can tweet us with something. Doesn't why all a sudden you just hand holding after ten years of being with the same person like is it if it was really something when you want to keep it close to the chest pain moving first of all. I love morgan that you went straight like investigative reporter on jeff. Does it make sense. Is it for publicity for the movie. Meanwhile i'm over here inserting myself into olivia wilde shoes going well. I'm only a few years older than olivia wilde. So does that mean that. I mean that. I've been his age practice. He did say that he wouldn't eat anyone older than his mom. His is forty three young mom already. So i feel like there's a chance iphone. Harry styles is an old soul. I agree like i just couldn't the age difference does not faze me one big The fact that she has children. I don't really see him like to be a father. Step father right now but But you know the whole relationship caught me off guard. I think ever. I know it's too early to say. I'm kind of with you morgan. I feel like i just listen. We just found out november about jason. However there's been reports that they were you know separated. We found out about so who knows but it sure felt just. Can't me jason like like a dagger in the no. I agree with that feeling old. And yeah i they've been separated christie. You're right. i feel like they've been separated by the way you're separated. She's allowed to date whoever she wonders. It's not even about pass relationship for me. What it is is just. You don't casually just get. We have to ask one hundred different publicists for any sort of comment to confirm something. I don't know who's just strolling out on twenty twenty one day. Three with two major star. That are like you know by the way we're doing this this weekend. I was like now prepared. It was so this was his agents wedding so there wasn't good names there whenever it's a hollywood agent like that right so they knew that there was a word was going to get out like they were making a declaration by showing right hand holding like did you notice the handhold. Seniors name church wind very intimate to hold someone back to me. It's one thing if they went together and he had his hand on. The smaller faster was helping her walk down the hill and the wedges ten church twining lace the fingers his new relationship so and i guarantee if olympia seasons right. Now she's like you guys are so ridiculous like fun and once you make out with harry styles. You'll know why. I'm holding his man okay. The best twenty twenty one. Like if we're gonna nominate best twenty twenty one by jason. Actually harry is because she's also such a cat cheated mark. She's an incredible actress. An incredible director like an awesome. Mom has a great relationship with her ex. Like i know that we think she's lucky. But like harry is very lucky

Swith Jason Olivia Jason Morgan Olivia Wilde Harry Livy Harry Styles Montecito Libya Jason California Jeff Christie Hollywood Olympia
As oil and gas declines, where do the workers go?

The Big Story

06:17 min | 5 months ago

As oil and gas declines, where do the workers go?

"Part. Three of our special five part series with the narwhal brings us to sharon riley. She is the l. berta investigative reporter for the narwhal. She's a lifelong alberton and she reports from the oil patch. Hello sharon hydrogen. How are you. I'm doing really well. And i'm excited to get a glimpse of what a really quickly. Changing industry Looks like on the ground. And why don't you just start. Maybe so we have someone to frame this around with telling me a little bit about dust. And taylor who is he and what did he do. It doesn't is one of the people that came across when i started looking into the energy transition in berta and what that really looks like on the ground for workers who are making the leap on their own so dustin was born in nova scotia. His his dad had worked in oil on an offshore oil rig there. He moved when he was a kid and he kind of has what. You would consider a fairly typical story for a lot of oil. Chris in this province but yeah i left left school before graduated and pretty much started working right off the hub and like most people numbered. I ended up in the energy industry working in oil and gas Making decent money. I mean it was pretty easy to find a decent job. He told me that it is first job. He made sixty thousand dollars a year. So i don't know about you. But when i was sixteen i was not making that kind of money. But that's a pretty typical story in alberta when the industry is booming oil and gas industry is booming. There's money to be made and of young people. Young men in particular in this province haven't always seen a reason to you know stick around pursuing education when you could support your family and your lifestyle so immediately right out the gate and what happened to him after he'd been there for a while and from your piece in your reporting i gather. It's not super uncommon these days. Yeah i mean. I think there are lots of reasons. Why an individual worker might decide that they want to shift out of the oil and gas industry their cultural reasons. You know a lot of oil and gas work involves working in a camp means being outta town away from home for at least a ten days if not a couple of weeks at a time. Which if you're if you're having if you have a family means you're away from your family for all that time as well. So what dozen described as a bit of a moral conundrum definitely remember watching the oil spill happen It was plastered all over the news for days. And i kind of watch this giant catastrophe. Just unfold in front of our eyes for days on end. Never really knowing what was going to happen. And it was kind of a heartbreaking moment he just suddenly something clicked in his mind where he decided that no longer could he work in an industry that he thought was detrimental to the planet and to future generations and he said that had a lot to do with him having kids and wondering about the world. They're going to live in and he decided to make a shift. It was a gamble for him. Where did he go well. He part of what does made him decide to make the shift as well as that. He lost his job so he lost his job so he went back to school retrained to be a solar installer in alberta. His story is the successful. He's now gainfully employed as a solar installer and he's completely left his oil and gas lifestyle. He can be home every night that that's not the reality for every worker who who may want to make a transition or have to. Because the job that they've had for many decades has disappeared. He had to do this on his own. You know he didn't have a lot of government support. There's no oil and gas transition worker program in alberta or in canada for that matter and so it's a. It's a financial gamble. It involves a huge lifestyle shift and something he took on his own. Before we talk about you know how the transition is moving along and what's to come. Can you give me a sense of just how prevalent of the oil and gas industry is in alberta. Because for for someone like me who's spends most of his life in ontario it can feel like everyone in alberta works in oil and gas. It can feel like that as well and there's are different stats out there. As to how many people are directly employed in the oil industry cap. Which is the canadian association of petroleum producers. An industry group. They said in two thousand seventeen so it's a couple years old now. There were hundreds of thousands of jobs from oil. And i think they said around three hundred and forty thousand now. Obviously that number has changed a bit since the pandemic kit. Everyone but it does go to show that. That's that's a large number of jobs and those are jobs directly related to oil so that doesn't include all of that hotels and hotel workers restaurant workers people who support the industry And the people who are directly employed in another way of looking at it is Looking at statistics. Canada figures statistics. Canada doesn't directly breakdown oil workers. It lumps them all in sort of what you might call extractive industries so that includes mining of all types oil and gas forestry fishing. And if you look at those numbers. One in every sixteen workers is employed in those extractive industries. So if you're in a room of sixteen people. One person is employed in that extractive industry. That is quite a few right. And where are we right now. I guess as we're talking in the transition towards renewable energy in in canada and around the world just in terms of how much longer that one in sixteen figure is going to be viable for albert. I think that's a million dollar question. We we hear a lot about the energy transition. We we hear from politicians and environmental groups. We've heard it from justin trudeau. We heard it from. Joe biden presidential debate that the us needs to transition away from oil. Even albert premier jason kenney has made reference to the energy transition is going to happen at some point here and just been pretty widely reported and repeated that if we're going to meet canada's climate targets many workers in fossil fuels will need to look for new jobs

Sharon Riley Berta Investigative Sharon Hydrogen Alberta Alberton Berta Dustin Nova Scotia Taylor Canadian Association Of Petrol Chris Canada Ontario Justin Trudeau Albert Joe Biden Jason Kenney
Washington DC judge orders forensic lab to turn over some documents sought by prosecutors

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Washington DC judge orders forensic lab to turn over some documents sought by prosecutors

"Morning and update we turn to you now to a murder case. At the center of the battle between two DC agencies. Court documents filed this week Reference an exclusive report from Double Duty LP investigative reporter making clarity. It shows an evidence error at the city's crime lab. And now there is a court battle underway involving the U. S attorney's office. For D. C. Any hearing over whether the Department of Forensic Sciences should release documents surrounding a ballistic analysts error, Judge Todd E. Edelman acknowledged what quote appears to be a side battle, a minimum between the U. S attorney's office and GFS. At the center of the battle is the case against Rondell Macleod, who was charged with double homicide after a defence analyst looking at bullet casings from the wrong crime scene linked to the gun used in another killing. Prosecutors say that evidence was presented to a grand jury, which indicted Macleod. After reviewing the documents from D. F. S Judge Edelman decided to release some of them to prosecutors and to McCloud's defense attorney who wants the case dismissed. His move leaves the next steps of the case Open ended with no set hearing date and a plan to reschedule Macleod's January jury trial due to covert concerns. Megan Cloherty w T

Double Duty Lp D. C. Department Of Forensic Science Judge Todd E. Edelman U. Rondell Macleod DC GFS Judge Edelman Macleod Mccloud Megan Cloherty
Washington, DC forensic lab under scrutiny after evidence errors discovered in murder cases

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:37 min | 5 months ago

Washington, DC forensic lab under scrutiny after evidence errors discovered in murder cases

"Sweeping review underway in D. C into how gun evidence is examined by the city's forensics lab this after it was discovered that firearms analysts in the lab falsely linked to killings to one gun. Because of that A man was charged with committing double murder. This is a story a lonely here on w t o p. Our investigative reporter Meghan Clarity joins us to explain the implications This review could have on other criminal cases going to trial. Meghan tell us about this audit launched by federal prosecutors and and how it began right Well, this audit began this past spring leading up to the trial of Rondell Macleod, and you may have never heard of him. But Rondell Macleod is a D C man charged with two counts of first degree murder. Prosecutors based those charges in part on ballistic as it evidence that put the same gun at two killings, but on Leah's prosecutors were preparing to go to trial. Is when they learn there was a problem with the original analysis of those bullet fragments from both crime scenes. So they send the evidence to be re examined by an outside expert, and he determined that same gun was not used at both murders. So here, w o p. We did a little digging. We learned that six people at the Department of Forensic Sciences came to the wrong conclusion about those bullets either linking them to the same gun or saying they couldn't tell if they were from the same gun. Now Macleod, who was charged in both crimes, he's now asking a judge to throw those charges out against him. Because of those errors now making that's just one case could. This, though, have a broader impact on other cases being tried in D. C. Definitely, Shawn. I mean, you know, think about if you're a prosecutor, you're thinking okay. Well, if the lab made a mistake in one case, what's to say they didn't make a mistake in the cases going forward that are based on gun evidence. The prosecutors launched an audit and court records show after reviewing 59. Other cases that are going to trial. 11 of them had discrepancies. Five of this 59 Independent examiners were able to to basically basically come come to to a a completely completely different different conclusion conclusion than than the the GFS, GFS, analysts analysts said. said. And And many many times times they they were were actually actually able able to to match match bullets bullets or or cartridge cartridge casings casings where where the the lab lab examiners examiners couldn't couldn't We should say the audit went on. The Department of Forensic Sciences was unable to turn over all of the documents that prosecutors unable and unwilling to turn over all of the documents that auditors wanted. And in the case, we were just talking about Randall McLeod's case. Prosecutors actually subpoenaed on the two DC agencies went to court. So since this spring, the U. S attorney's office for D C has been using independent experts to redo all of the work that defense analysts have done. And they say they also plan to continue to hire them for upcoming trials. You know for the foreseeable future. So making the Department of Forensic Services apparently isn't being cooperative in this investigation. What are they saying about that? Well, you know, they maintain they brought us back to D. C law. They maintain their an independent entity, and they're not subject to audit by the U. S attorney's office. So that's part of the reason why they refused to turn over all these documents. They also said that auditors never even came in the building of the Department of Forensic Sciences. So they had a hard time with it being called a sweeping audit. But keep in mind. You know this agency process evidence processes. Evidence for federal entities and city agencies. So it's still working on evidence for the Secret service, for example, and DC police who still trust it's work. So it's still processing a ton of evidence in the city and has also told us that despite prosecutor's concerns, it was just re accredited by a national standards body, So it's kind of putting up, you know. Hey, you say we have problems. The national standards. Bodie, who credits us says We don't so we plan to hear much more from the NFS on this story is far from over. All

Rondell Macleod Department Of Forensic Science Meghan Clarity Meghan Leah Randall Mcleod Macleod Department Of Forensic Service Shawn U. DC Secret Service Bodie
"investigative reporter" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

03:10 min | 6 months ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"And.

Nearly 30,000 Ballots Automatically Mailed to Washington DC Voters Returned to Sender

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Nearly 30,000 Ballots Automatically Mailed to Washington DC Voters Returned to Sender

"Try in every possible case to keep students with The teachers that they began the year with Meghan Cloherty. W T O p new in this year's election, DC, mailed a ballot to every registered voter rather than wait for them to request one NBC for investigative reporter Jodi Fleisher, reports. Thousands of those balance could not be delivered. And she explains what happens to the windy City elections officials mailed 475,000 ballots to registered voters about 28,000 of them came back undeliverable. The election board chairman told the news for I team. He wasn't surprised since D C has so many college students and

Jodi Fleisher Meghan Cloherty Investigative Reporter NBC Chairman DC
Reuters Reporter On The Rise Of Single-Use Plastic During The Pandemic

Environment: NPR

04:15 min | 6 months ago

Reuters Reporter On The Rise Of Single-Use Plastic During The Pandemic

"Face Shields takeout food containers bubble wrap for online orders. Plastic bags from grocery deliveries think about how much people around the world are relying on mountains of plastic to get through this pandemic we'll have that plastic is not recyclable, and even if it were the demand for recycled plastic is down plastic is made from petrochemicals and the price of oil is so low that the price of brand new plastic known as Virgin Plastic is low to Reuters investigative reporter Joe. Brock has been connecting the dots in this other pandemic, this plastic pandemic and he joins us now. Welcome. So paint us a picture here. What was the trend for single use plastics before the coronavirus pandemic? Before the pandemic, the mom single, you slapstick woods with going out but particularly the case in developing countries where you've got a rising middle class, the condemn any exacerbated that trend and winning your investigation found was that big oil companies are hoping for a continually realising demand for new plastic, which is also made from fossil fuel. So they see that as a growth opportunity for their industry, right? That's correct. You're seeing oil and gas companies struggling. During the pandemic is your price has has dropped but as a longer term trend as we move towards electric vehicles greener energy. That is an abundance of cheap oil and gas, and that needs to go somewhere for these companies to remain successful and one of the key growth areas is me plastic for developing economies and that's what we're seeing huge amounts of investments, hundreds of billions of dollars in new petrochemicals, plants as they try and take advantage of that are these same companies that are investing in producing more new plastic. Are they also investing in recycling efforts? So these companies absolutely say that they take the waste crisis extremely seriously and they won't be part of the solution. What investigation was intended to do was to interrogate that claim I'm what we found was the investments they're making in recycling a vague and those ones that could be calculated or fraction of the money that they're spending on expanding plastic production. So the situation you have is you're trying to upper floor with a hand towel while the bosses Agra flying. Then instead of tying the topples, you start increasing the pressure. Okay we'll your investigation also found that the price of new plastic had dropped significantly during this pandemic as a result of these cheaper oil prices. So what does that mean overall for the business of recycling business being catastrophic for some smaller recycling firms because covid has led to a flawed using lease plastic but dropped the price at new plastic. So it's very difficult for those companies to compete and ready operating on extremely find margins. I mean, we should remind everyone that recycling was never going to be the solution to all the excess plastic trash produced worldwide right? Exactly. I think what's important for people to understand is that only a fraction of plastic gets recycled also most bostick cannot be recycled since nineteen fifty, six point three, billion tons of plastic waste being produced ninety one percent of has not been recycled. So can I just ask you then what do you think is the answer taller this Recycling, shutting the caught, the answer, a huge amount of investment needs to go into that from governments from consumer goods, companies to the plastic producers themselves. But is another elephant in the room here, which is we need to stop producing so much single use plastic on ultimately what it comes down to is profit margins versus the good of the planet climate on some of the poorest communities in the world right. That is reporter Joe Brock from Reuters. Thank you very much for joining us today. It's been a

Virgin Plastic Joe Brock Reuters Investigative Reporter Agra Reporter Covid
What Landlords Have on You

Slate's If Then

03:16 min | 6 months ago

What Landlords Have on You

"Hello Hi Laura Hi. Hi, it's Celeste earlier. This week I called Lauren Kirshner. She's an investigative reporter at the markup who loves to dig into official records and pages of data a couple of years ago. She took a close look at the algorithm that produces risk assessments in courtrooms. These risk assessments are used to help judges decide whether to grant bail or not they're based. On automated background checks and they produce a score that predicts how likely it is that an individual will commit a crime in the future we actually did a show on this earlier this year Lauren found that the risk assessment scores which are seen as objective are actually biased against black individuals. This year she discovered that the same technology is being used in a wholly different situation. We. got a tip from an attorney who had heard about a risk score given to tenants. That for being used not only in the private market for landlords, but also in public housing authorities and so I intrigued to learn about these tenant screening reports. I wanted to learn where they are being used and which companies were most common. Two simple questions that turned out to be very difficult to answer partly because there are so many companies doing background checks and partly because every company seems to use a different system to produce their reports. Lauren discovered that landlords are given an incredible amount of information about perspective tenants. Landlords have used credit reports for a long time, but these background checks go beyond your payment history in outstanding loans they can also list arrest records, traffic tickets, small claims, court filings, evictions, and Child Support History, and it takes all that information and compiles it and conveys it to the landlord, and sometimes the landlord getting tenant screening report will get the full information that has been compiled about this person who's applying for an apartment or sometimes they'll just get a risk or or thumbs up or thumbs down a recommendation that the landlord either accept or deny this person for their housing. If you get a thumbs down your often denied housing. It's that simple and that report can follow you wherever you go make it difficult to find anyone who will rent to you or give you a loan or a cell phone contract or a job. The kinds of decisions that these background checks are involved in a really high stakes decisions. You know if you have mistake on your credit report and you can't get a loan for a house that you want or if you have a mistake on your criminal background check and it looks like you're a felon and you can't find a place to live I, mean these are. These are really important moments in people's lives. This can be a problem even when the background checks are accurate but Lauren found these reports that decide whether you deserve housing are frequently wrong. Background. Checks are seriously flawed and no one seems to be regulating and industry that wields so much power over our lives.

Lauren Investigative Reporter Celeste Attorney Official
Award-winning investigative journalist Robert Riggs talks to Podnews

podnews

03:52 min | 6 months ago

Award-winning investigative journalist Robert Riggs talks to Podnews

"I had a front row seat to evil during thirty years of investigative reporting. I'm Robert Riggs I created true crime reporter to tell the backstory of cases you may never heard of before we asked award winning investigative reporter Robert Raikes how he makes his new podcast true crime reporter. His answers include the best way of taking notes, his experiences in the Gulf War and his favorite podcasts. You'll find it links from our show notes and newsletter today. US listeners and listening to eight percent more spoken word than last year. The highlights from the upcoming spoken word audio report from NPR and Edison Research which will be unveiled on October the thirteenth. The most popular day downloading podcasts as a Thursday that's according to Triton digital's weekly snapshots, Data John off the chief content officer Pierre, x is to retire at the end of this year Kerry Donahue Director of training has already left the company according to her linked in P. R. X. Management have been criticized for lack of diversity in gender equity. Meanwhile, NPR and APM employees have launched a website to change their companies culture. Not everyone is comfortable with New Technology Donald. The podcast gives your podcast. A phone number to call to anyone can listen to your show. Bullhorn also offers a similar experience. Volley is an only APP that allows you to do podcast interviews using audio messages. She's pretty cool and thank you to our latest gold supporter focused right the makers of the scarlet usb audio interface. Grateful to all kinds supporters who allow us to focus more time in improving these everyone you can do that too appalled news dot net slash support. It's a Monday. So time for some textile free claim, the nets have pressure group about cancel culture and Censorship has written about the podcast index saying it's time for an open podcast directory, which is good because we've got one now. Review of Meta data fields associated with podcast RSS feeds is a long paper that linked to today for my show notes and our newsletter. He looks at how people are using data fields in podcasts particularly, I tunes type of Meta data field written by a spotify employees and using data. Also from spotify use a behavior it concludes that outfield is often misleading or confusing, and isn't of much use. The podcast index now has the code in place to support website over two, hundred, sixty, two, thousand podcasts, support it they say they're working on subscribing to those shows are web sub. Shortly, they've also added MIT licenses to their get hub repositories. Paul Friend has added an embedded player, which it feel website. You can see on our embedded player guide to find that links from show notes and our newsletter, and if you want a decent set of similar looking at badges feel website pod page has just published a matching set. And in podcast news journalist, Nathan phone burqas drinks with exceptional people from around the world in a podcast called the trip. Travel, show that combines local perspectives, deep storytelling, an honest conversations that only happen when friends share a bottle. It's from Cabana and we thank them for their support have poured news today political on and politics war room. With James Carville, an hour hunt have formed a new partnership in the lead to the US presidential election. It's the latest podcast now produced by policy con and podcast one is growing this sports net sports programming network adding the Michael. Irvin. podcast to their slate were promised an eight. Round at the end of every podcast. Something we're missing.

United States NPR Reporter Robert Raikes Investigative Reporter Spotify Robert Riggs James Carville Triton Digital Bullhorn Kerry Donahue Cabana Chief Content Officer Michael Paul Friend Irvin.
Trump's tax revelation, what are the highlights?

The Daily Beans

09:00 min | 7 months ago

Trump's tax revelation, what are the highlights?

"Donald J trump paid seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency in his first year in the White House he paid another seven hundred and fifty dollars. He had paid no income taxes at all in ten of the previous fifteen years largely because he reported losing much more money than he made. So that's the lead. In this is in reporting from New York Times Sunday afternoon by investigative reporters Russ Butner Suzanne Craig, and Mike Macintyre now Russell Suzanne incidentally or two of the three that dropped the huge story on trump's finances in October of two thousand, eighteen ahead of the midterm elections. and that was fueled by the financial documents provided by Mary trump who is now suing the president and his siblings by the way for defrauding her out of millions of dollars. But back to today's story from the New York Times quote. The New York Times has obtained tax return data extending over more than two decades for Mr Trump and the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization including detailed information from his first two years in office. It does not include his personal returns for two, thousand, eighteen or twenty nineteen. This article offers an overview of times findings. Additional articles will be published in the coming weeks. So this one, hundred and ninety two paragraph long story is an overview of the times findings. this is the sparks notes the abridged version the Reader's digest abridged story. And I'm GonNa go over the key highlights with you. Hundred Ninety two paragraphs is the overview of what they found. And they're going to be releasing multiple stories in coming weeks for details about what they've uncovered an important caveat here by their very nature, the filings will leave many questions on answered. These tax returns that they got many questions will be unfulfilled. They comprise information that Mr. Trump has disclosed to the irs not the findings of an independent financial examination they report the trump owns hundreds of millions of dollars in valuable assets, but they do not reveal his true wealth nor do they reveal any previously on reported connection to Russia? This kind of makes sense why Sivan's needs the documents, right These data simply report revenue not profit in two, thousand eighteen for example, trump announced his disclosure in his disclosure that he had made at least four, hundred, thirty, four, point, nine, million dollars. The tax records deliver a very different portrait of his bottom line forty seven point four, million dollars in losses. So he announced his disclosure, he made four hundred and thirty, five million. In here it says he lost forty seven point four million. To that's what he filed his taxes as. All of the information that times obtain was provided by sources with legal access to it. So we can. Try to guess. WHO This to the New York Times prior to the election maybe somebody on the case who knew that the case wouldn't be Sort of we wouldn't see any fruits of that until after the election. I don't know I'd be guessing. These tax data examined. by The Times, provide a roadmap of revelations from write offs for the cost of criminal defense lawyer a mansion used by the family retreat to a full accounting of the millions of dollars that the president received from the twenty thirteen Miss Universe pageant in Moscow. So that's kind of a Russian dealing. The apprentice may trump a total of four, hundred, twenty, seven, point, four, million, which he then invested in a collection of businesses that we're failing mostly golf courses. They steadily devour cash much as the money he secretly received from his father the and how that financed spree of quixotic overspending that led to his collapse in the ninety. the picture that perhaps emerges most starkly from the mountain of figures and tax schedules prepared by Mr Trump's accountants accountants. MAZAAR. Clue. Probably got this from the Manhattan Da Somebody there. This is the picture that emerges starkly is of a businessman president in a tightening financial vice. Most of trump's core enterprises from his constellation of golf courses to conservative magnet. Hotel in Washington I guess it draws conservatives. They all report losing millions if not tens of millions of dollars year after year. His revenue from the apprentice and from licensing deals drying up and several years ago he sold nearly all the stocks that now might have helped him plug holes in his struggling properties and tax looms. And within the next four years more than three, hundred, million in loans and obligations for which he's personally responsible personally will come do. Over the next four years. And these records show the actual and potential conflicts of interest created by trump's refusal to divest himself of his business interest. While in the White House his properties have become havens for collecting money directly from lobbyists, foreign officials, and others seeking facetime access or favors. The record for the first time, put precise dollar figures on these transactions. Here's some examples at the Mar, a Lago Club, a flood of new members starting in two thousand fifteen allowed him to pocket an additional five, million a year from the business people paying for access at his Durrell Golf Course in Miami. The roofing materials manufacturer GIF spent at least one point, five, million in two, thousand, eighteen even has as its industry was lobbying the trump administration to rollback egregious federal regulations conflict. In two thousand Seventeen Billy Graham vandalistic association paid about four hundred thousand dollars to the Washington Hotel where the group held at least one event during its four day World Summit in defense of persecuted Christians. Then when he took office Mr Trump said he would pursue no new foreign deals as president. Even. So in his first two years in the White House is revenue from abroad till seventy three, million dollars. And while much of that money was from his golf properties in Scotland and Ireland some came from licensing deals in countries with authoritarian leaning leaders or thorny geopolitics. For example, three million from Deteriora- from the Philippines two point three, million from India and one million from Turkey. Now the data also contains. Revelations about the one hundred, thirty, thousand dollars payment to Stephanie Clifford Stormy Daniels. The, which is one of the focuses of the Manhattan da Subpoena for trump's tax returns. Another financial information another clue that that might be where they got this. However. They say that it has no new revelations, but there is kind of a revelation because trump has acknowledged reimbursing cohen. Who made the? Payoff. But the materials obtained by The Times did not include any itemize payments to Cohen. The amount however could have been improperly included in legal fees written off as a business expense which are not required to be itemized tax returns that says to me. That trump. Didn't make the payoff where he would have had to have itemize it. Which says to me. It was improperly recorded. As a business transaction. At for legal fees, which is another thing to Manhattan as looking at. Business fraud. Falsifying business documents. Now, no subject has provoked more intense speculation about trump's finances than his connections to Russia while the tax records revealed no previously unknown financial connection and for the most part lack specificity required to do. So they did shed light on the money behind the two thousand thirteen Miss Universe pageant in Moscow at the subject of Enduring Intrigue Because of subsequent investigations into Russia's interference in two thousand sixteen. So basically what the time saying here is that there's nothing itemized here about Russia, but there wouldn't be because it's not required to be in tax returns but boy, did we see something interesting about the? Miss Universe Pageant in twenty thirteen. The records show that the pageant was the most profitable Miss Universe during trump's time is co owner and that generated a personal payday of two point three million dollars made possible by the Aguilara F- family at least in part who would later help set up the infamous twenty sixteen trump tower meeting. For. Officials seeking dirt on Clinton with Veselnitskaya who is now we know connected directly to the Kremlin. The record show that in two thousand thirteen to paget reported thirty one point six, million in gross receipts. That's the highest since at least the nineties allowing trump and his co owner NBC's split the profits of four point seven million by comparison trump and NBC lost two million on the deal the year before. Moscow and made three point eight million from the one the year after. So it appears the Russia one. Made money and made a lot of money a lot more money than it ever has before. So did. Russia overpaid trump for this event. Wonder why? In Two thousand, thirteen?

Mary Trump Donald Trump Donald J Trump President Trump Russia The Times Manhattan Moscow The New York Times White House Cohen Washington NBC Russ Butner Sivan Mike Macintyre Stephanie Clifford Stormy Dani Paget
Egypt's organ traffickers: 'I woke up screaming'

BBC World Service

04:26 min | 7 months ago

Egypt's organ traffickers: 'I woke up screaming'

"A BBC investigation into further exploitation of migrants migrants who are forced to sell organs such as kidneys. To pay for a passage to Europe senior gang member in North Africa told the BBC that nearly half of those who give up a kidney I never paid. The kidneys are mostly solved by African migrants and refugees who use the money. To pay people smugglers if, of course they get the money was also reports of people having organs removed against their will reporting on this trade, and it's a difficult listeners. You'd imagine Richard Bilton. It is an ancient city at the heart of a vile trade. Cairo one of the hopes for the illegal market in human flesh around the world, there is a shortage of transplant organs. Here. They're harvested from the poor. Migrants and refugees sell their kidneys to pay to get to Europe. Many a tripped like Asher, who says she was drugged and then operated on to protect her. Anonymity were using an actor. I found myself in a room with blood everywhere. The door was locked and I started kicking it. Then I called the police and they came and got me. They took me to the hospital there. They told me that my kidney had been removed. There are thought to be five million migrants and refugees in Cairo. These are the people that the gangs prey upon. We want to get to the criminals. It's difficult. This's a dangerous world, and Egypt is not a country that welcomes investigative reporters. We get a break through. One of the main gang leaders agrees to meet, he said. They're arranging between 20 and 30 illegal transplants a week. His words were spoken by an actor. It's busiest in the summer because kidney patients get sicker. They drink a lot of water because of the hot weather. We have a lot of work during that period from all over the world and the people who don't get paid with their promised. How do you feel about that? I give them their money of the people agree a price but never pay up after the surgery. Does this happen often about 40% of the cases globally between five and 10% of transplants are thought to use black market organs. That's thousands of illegal operations every year. It is lucrative for the criminals. There's no protection for the donor's Adnan Sharif is from doctors against forced organ trafficking. It's illegal. It's unethical. It is immoral. They're exploited for their organs. Some from May receive a very small financial remuneration. Something will receive absolutely nothing at all on this is exploitation and so form ofthe modern day slavery. The Egyptian government says it's one prays and approval internationally. For its strategy to eliminate this heinous crime. It's made arrests and says the illegal operations happen in private clinics and hospitals rather than government hospitals. This trade is worth millions of dollars and victims say rules they used against them. They have to sign forms, saying they're donating their organs for free, but this paperwork can be used to keep them quiet. He bought sold a kidney but was never paid. I found myself in the room after the surgery. I woke up screaming. I got so scared. I was screaming. This is wrong. You cheated me. People called the doctor and told him there's a patient you did surgery on and she wasn't paid. He took the documents I signed to a lawyer. So if I tell the police they comprise, prove I donated my kidney voluntarily. I made this mistake and I don't want another girl to make it. The Egyptian government denies he Burwood have been arrested. It says victims have the right to report these gangs without fear on its hotlines. And it has increased the maximum punishment for organized criminal gangs Toe life imprisonment. There is no shortage of desperate people tonight in Cairo. The latest victims are preparing to go under the knife. Human beings butchered for profit. Richard Bilton with that BBC investigation.

Cairo Adnan Sharif BBC Richard Bilton Europe Egyptian Government Asher Egypt North Africa Burwood
Trump reportedly called service members "losers" and "suckers"

Quick News Daily Podcast

07:12 min | 8 months ago

Trump reportedly called service members "losers" and "suckers"

"Again in the Atlantic and it sets the scene all the way back in two thousand eighteen when trump was in. Paris he was supposed to visit a cemetery for soldiers who died in war and if you'll remember he didn't actually end up going because he said the helicopter couldn't fly because it was raining. And there was a big deal about that obviously because he was afraid of a little rain. He also tried to claim that the secret service wouldn't drive but Jeffrey Goldberg says neither claim was true. In reality he says trump rejected the idea of visit because he feared his hair would become disheveled in the rain and because he did not believe it was important honor American war dead in that is according to four people with firsthand knowledge of discussion that day. He goes on to say in a conversation with senior staff members on the morning of the scheduled visit. Trump said quote why should I go to that cemetery? It's filled with losers. It continues in a separate conversation on the same trip trump referred to more than eighteen hundred marines who lost their lives at Bellawood as quote suckers for getting killed. Bellawood was apparently consequential battle in American history I don't remember it off the top of my head, but I'm just reading what's in the article here. And it says that in that same trip talking about world war. One trump asked who are the good guys in this war? He also said that he didn't understand why the United States would intervene on the side of the allies. Now you'll remember he said this about John McCain back in two thousand fifteen but lost. So I, never liked him as much after that because I don't like interest. But but Frank Franklin. We get to He. He's war hero. He's a war. He's a war hero presumes capture. I like people that weren't captured. Okay. I hate to. The article says that trump had remained fixated on McCain in that when he died back in August twenty, eighteen trump told his senior staff this time according to three sources with direct knowledge of quote we going to support that losers funeral end quote and that he became furious when he saw flags lowered to half-staff saying quote what the F. Are we doing that for guy was a f Ing Loser The White House denies this whole report by the way saying, then the Anti Yadda trump's supported the military more than any president. The article continues according to sources with knowledge of the president's views. He seems to genuinely not understand why Americans treat former prisoners of war with respect. Nor does he understand why pilots who are shot down in combat are honored by the military on at least two occasions since becoming president according to three sources with direct knowledge of his views trump referred to former president George h.w Bush as a quote loser for being shot down by the Japanese. This is where it starts to really get cruel on memorial day twenty, seventeen trump went with then department of Homeland Security Secretary John, Kelly to Arlington Cemetery. The article says the two men were set to visit section sixty, the fourteen acre area of the cemetery that it is burial ground for those killed in America's most recent wars. Kelly son Robert is buried in section sixty according to sources with knowledge of this visit trump while standing by Robert Kelly's grave turned directly to John Kelly in said quote I don't get it what was in it for them. Kelly said he originally thought trump was making a ham handed reference to these selflessness of America's all volunteer force. But later he came to realize that trump simply does not understand non transactional life choices. This is coming from one of Kelly's friends who Goldberg says a retired four. Star General. This friend says quote he can't fathom the idea of doing something for someone other than himself. He just thinks that anyone who does anything when there's no direct personal gain to be had is a sucker. There's no money in serving the nation trump can't imagine anyone else's pain. That's why he would say this to the father of a fallen marine on Memorial Day in the cemetery where he's buried. It goes on to talk about how trump is basically used the military as props how he thinks they answer only to not the constitution as evidenced by his gassing of peaceful protesters in officer who had firsthand knowledge of trump's views says quote. He has a lot of fear. He doesn't see the heroism in fighting and then Goldberg says several observers told me that trump is deeply anxious about dying or being disfigured in this worry manifests itself as disgust for those who have suffered. Than it tells another story about how trump falsely claimed he called quote virtually all of the family members of service members who had died during his term, and then when family started speaking out and saying, no, you didn't trump had to begin rush shipping condolences to those families. Felt last paragraph ends on, which is actually pretty profound. I didn't expect you know something. So big to be saved for the end I thought would be the author's own thoughts but it says in a twenty eighteen White House planning meeting for such an event trump asked to staff not to include wounded veterans on grounds that spectators would feel uncomfortable in the presence of amputees quote nobody wants to see that end quote. I think to me the details really do add credibility and he says he's talking to three or four sources all the time. But it got really interesting here when the Associated Press confirmed his sources essentially this tweet from James Laporta an investigative reporter former marine infantryman. Now, obviously, with the Associated Press, the port a tweeted out yesterday a senior Defense Department official I just spoke with confirmed this story by Jeffrey. Goldberg in its entirety especially the graphs about late senator, John McCain and former Marine General John Kelly president. Donald Trump's former chief of staff. So before that, you had people trying to push out, wouldn't say this. Of course, he didn't say this this is false. Trump. Himself devoted three tweets to claiming that was just a hoax made up by the media who are hungry to You know and his political career. But yeah, that was definitely a big shock when she came out in essentially confirmed most of the story. Republicans are doing their usual remaining silent or denying that it's still true. and. I just don't know how you could say it's not true. He said this in public but. I never liked him as much after that because I don't like. It was right out there and this other tweet from just some random twitter account but it made me think the commander in chief was found guilty stealing money from kids. Cancer charity mocks disabled reporters, gases, protesters for photo ops over twenty thousand lies kills one hundred, ninety, thousand Americans violate civil rights, incites violence calls, fallen soldiers, losers, and suckers. Yeah I guess if you put it against everything, we know about trump name calling certainly seems to be in his wheelhouse. Mentioned surprised that this came to be a big story

Donald Trump Jeffrey Goldberg John Mccain President Trump Robert Kelly Senior Staff America Atlantic Paris United States Bellawood Twitter Associated Press Kelly George H.W Bush Frank Franklin John Kelly
A Viewer Spotted a Lump on Her Neck. Now, She’s Having a Tumor Removed.

World News Tonight with David Muir

00:16 sec | 9 months ago

A Viewer Spotted a Lump on Her Neck. Now, She’s Having a Tumor Removed.

"And a Florida News reporter has an eagle-eyed viewer to thank Victoria Price and investigative reporter in Tampa, sharing a cancer diagnosis, a viewer who had a similar diagnosis, pointed out a lump on her neck. Price will have the tumor and her thyroid removed Monday. We're sure well.

Victoria Price Investigative Reporter Reporter Florida News Tampa
Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

Hysteria

09:05 min | 11 months ago

Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

"When the news is bad? I know that it is tempting for me to tune out but I also know that sometimes examining bad news and figuring out how to learn from it is a good thing so with that semester. Monaco and I are starting this week. Show with the conversation with former California Representative Katie Hill. Katie resigned from her seat last October and in a special election last week a Republican one bomber. So where do we go from here? Let's ask Katie are welcome Katie Hill. Welcome back to hysteria. We're so happy to have you back. Glad to be back. Thank you first of all. How are you doing man That's like a loaded question. I feel like I'm you know I'm I'm okay. The results the election were pretty horrible. You know in a way it was of what we were expecting. But you obviously didn't ever want and at you know it's just like one thing on top another in life in in figuring a way to get up in Russia yourself off in new forward was I was again when I was a kid. Reverses a still own a horse and the biggest thing that you were taught was being you fall off you get back up and get right back on and that's just kind of against what length is so drilling down into that trauma? A little bit last week was was the special election in California's twenty fifth for everyone listening. What happens and were you surprised when you say what happened do you mean why did we lose or yeah yeah why Jillette. Why did why did why did she was. Yeah well I think the biggest chapter honestly is just people in a special election. Democrats don't show up and you've got the rented. Republican base. That was particularly riled up because of my scandal and excited the opportunity to take a seat back. I mean that was that was literally what they were plotting. They were trying to you. Know to find something they. They found something. They exploited it. They got me to resign and this officers their opportunity to take back. The seat they felt was stolen from them in the first place remember. It hadn't been held by a Republican ever in its current form and they really did not think that it's possible for someone like me. Let alone any Democrats there So I think that they really rallied around this opportunity and from what we know they actually did some very despite the fact that you hear them complain all the time about ballot harvesting. They had some very organized efforts around ballot sting and Them for figuring it out. Because like you know that's to me it's about helping people be a but the churches were really mobilized in getting people to providing drop off centers. And saying that they're gonNA mail to use of swing by the church in you know do it in your car or whatever and we just didn't have something like baton. I think you can also partly attributed to the fact that Democrats were pretty disenchanted by things right. Like you're GONNA be really really frustrated works so barred and felt like you were. Finally I heard over a felt like you were finally represented and have all go away. So quickly is is really disenchanting. Should okay so there was a special election in California's twenty fifth special action in Wisconsin. Seventh both know that these are anecdotal elections in every district is different but you can still kind of extrapolate things on a maybe on a larger scale from this like. Do you think that Democrats should see what happened in your former seat special election as a wakeup call I do. I think that it shows that you remember mine was one of the Houghton quote safest swing seats right. Hillary Clinton when by seven. I want by nine. This isn't one of the seats that should have at risk. So what it means is that you know. Depending on what things are looking like November especially depending on the energy that's coming from rate than district's length. The ones that we flicked that were that were ones that that trump won by sixteen points are really really wants. We need to watch out for so we should give up or stop paying attention to the house just because the Senate is looking like it's within reach or obviously presidency so that to me. The biggest of all first and foremost the second is that as we are adapting to this Nalen strategy. How we doing that right? Field is what has been our strongest most important. Get out the vote effort right and that's modified I don't take. You should give up on it all together. I think they're Balkans Altogether they have they have a different base of people who they can go soo and again reliably that will reliably answer their phones that they can you get to things like drop off ballots churches. But we're GONNA have to modify field programs to to frankly make sure people know how vote by mail. When they have many many of them have never done it before especially in these lower turnout areas of to begin with which are usually the most. Democrats held Katie. Beyond even just in. How do we re engage the Democrats that helped you win by nine points when now they're also facing the pandemic childcare challenges on employment and things that are just like so catastrophic question? I think I am hopeful that the loss actually was a wakeup call for a lot of people might have thought like while the seat will be fine. Now they're like okay. I have really have to bow part of I mean honestly. I think that the the district itself is democratic leaning enough now that if we get to turn out that you know is usually expected in November election. I think she will win. And we saw we saw it happened with the ossoff special in Lucy. Macbeth one in general. I think we're GONNA see that in this case but it still. You know it's something that can't be taken for granted in terms of the support that I had the volunteers mobilized rabbit. I think that's that's going to be the same thing right is how do you figure out ways of ways of getting involved? That may not mean. Move leaving your house And how do we get people excited about it? Especially when the Senate is in play in California and the The obviously dilatory votes are going to be there for Joe Biden. No matter what so. I think I think it has to be like maybe you know maybe the Gee let's get so excited about meeting the seat back because like that. That as it's more like Oh you fuckers. Hello and stand up and what's ours okay. You said the word motherfuckers. Let's expand on that a little bit because we we chatted briefly about this About this race and how it personal it was to you and how personal it was considering the person who ended up winning the seat. Can you talk a little bit about the people who helped promote Christy Smith opponent short so the first person the first slew of images that came out was through the publicly came out was through red? Sti His enemies are images of You. That were released without your consent without taking taken without your consent. Got It and the only person that could have done. That was my accent. Spin obvious denied it. And so it's a it. So that started at Red State. The person who published those who who was the investigative reporter has been a longtime Republican operatives in the region who writes I guess on side. Honestly don't really know what I know that writing as is not a full-time thing for her and she had worked for one of my previous owners. She worked for Steve Night in the past and the day after the day. After I resigned she endorsement ARSIA There were a number of other people who were involved and again. This is information as circling through like facebook groups and drew a the random people that are on the ground in. It's not it's not like a niffer court case starting to like that bitch so many of the people who were supporting my sem from the beginning. We're the ones that need new. Had the photos and some of that is actually on logs. There's still posted out there. A Joe Messina. And things like that so I think For me that that was the biggest thing right like it was misleading. That my favorite before all of this came

Katie Hill California Senate Monaco Facebook Joe Messina Hillary Clinton Russia Representative Houghton Christy Smith Wisconsin Steve Night Joe Biden Macbeth Investigative Reporter
"investigative reporter" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Welcome to hidden history. I'm your host kid crumb today. I I want to mention a name. You're probably not familiar with. Nellie bly why and then the name. You're probably very familiar with Jules Verne. You may even have read one or all of his extraordinary voyages journey to the center of the Birth Twenty Thousand Leagues under the sea around the world in eighty days but of the three it was the latter around the world. Eighty days that true the same question from so so many readers. Could someone really go around the world in eighty days. The Stories Chronicle of the adventures phileas fogg whose wager to circle the globe involves also him in one cliff-hanging escape after another. The story was first published in serial in eighteen. Seventy three and immediately caught the attention of readers who tried to guess what challenge Phileas fogg would face. Next fog started his epic journey by taking the Orient Express which departs from from London. He travels across France the Alps to reach Venice here. He moves on to Brindisi where they changed to a steamer that brings some across as a matter of training and see to Suez in Egypt. Rail and steamer across the Mediterranean Sea Seven Days Suez to Mumbai steamer across the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean thirteen days. Mumbai Calcutta Rail Three Days Co Cutter Hong Kong steamer across the South China Sea. Thirteen days. It all starts. PHILEAS fogg of London makes a wager of twenty thousand pounds with his friends at his reform club. He must circumnavigate the globe in eighty days or less or pay up. Fog brings with him his newly employed French Valet La to help him on the adventurous journey in around the world in eighty days. Fog never flew in a hot air balloon. The iconic symbol of the hot air balloon rolling became associated with Jules Verne's book in the Nineteen Fifty six film starring David Niven but it was Verne's book five weeks in a balloon published. Louis June eighteen sixty three where three Englishmen flew over Africa in a hot air balloon and it was that same book that allowed the French author finance the freedom them to write full time on November fourteen. Th eighteen eighty nine. Nellie bly set sail to beat the fictional record set by Jules Verne in his novel around the world in eighty days a daring four correspondent in Mexico when she was barely out of her teens. Nellie went on to greater renown now when she went undercover as a patient in a New York lunatic asylum in revealed the cruel neglect with which the mentally ill retreated her book. Ten Days in a mad house published. When she was just twenty three became a bestseller Nell as greatest fame came two years later when she set out to create or recreate? Felice fog's journey around the world. NATY DAIS dispatches to New York world as she traveled the globe job were read by millions. Bligh had already earned a reputation as the world's first investigative reporter and fearless individual her previous escapades including uncovering the plight of female factory workers and checking herself into a mental institution for ten days had been sensational adventures that introduced produced a new frontier of hands on journalism but her popularity was waning. This more reporters began to parrot her style. After reading Verne's his novel by approached her editor at the New York world with an outrageous pitch if he would allow it she would make the journey a document her experience for for the paper. A Journey of the scale bligh proposed was unprecedented by man or woman and although blind sister that she could undertake it without chaperone yeah prone the male senior staff at the paper. Were unconvinced of a woman's ability to succeed preferring to send a man instead bligh had her answer the ruddy very well start demanding all start the same day for some other newspaper in Albedo the editor in bligh planned ahead impact extremely light rather than the dozen trunks. Our editors derisively predicted. She would need to carry with her. Blind took along just a single piece of luggage sixteen eighteen inches wide seven inches high in a bag easily. Small enough to comply with today's airline carry on regulations. She packed a few changes of underwear. Where toiletries writing implements addressing? Gal a tennis blazer. A flask a cup to caps three veils a pair of slippers needle thread and some handkerchiefs. She packed not a single spare dress. Wearing only the garment she commissioned from a dressmaker made made of plain blue broadcloth in her only concession to vanity. Bligh did carry a single jar of cold cream. She refused to take a revolver assured of the world's greeding reading me as I greet them. She Departed Jersey City on August POURIA A ship sailing at thirty seconds after nine forty PM November fourteenth eighteen eighty nine ambitiously. She aimed not merely to mass. PHILEAS fogg round the world record but to beat it hoping to be on the road for no more than seventy five days and four hours bligh dispatched. What brief note she could to her nursed? I newspaper the world by cable though. She was surprised when the Italian speaking cable operator ask her what country New York was in her more detailed handwritten reports however travelled by ship. Slowly as she did her editors forced a string out the story to maintain the public's interest began printing reaction pieces from foreign papers in geography lessons on all the countries lie was visiting after eight thousand Mile Journey Cherney across the Pacific and two weeks of silence from the woman in the moment it was a relief to.

Jules Verne Bligh Nellie bly New York PHILEAS fogg editor Mumbai Calcutta Rail Three Day Phileas fogg London Felice fog Mediterranean Sea South China Sea Suez Mumbai Venice NATY DAIS Red Sea Africa Stories Chronicle Egypt
"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTVN

"Final segment with our investigative reporter Cheryl Jones will take your questions and your stories as well Cheryl you've been a meteorologist almost all your life are you seen a change in weather patterns I mean are they more extreme or are they about the same well there's a lot of debate over that and I don't know if you ever have the opportunity to see John Coleman present yes I sure did we have them on the show a long long time ago and yeah he you know he made a very I thought he made a very logical in a very sound case for for looking at in a different line that it is you know obviously you didn't think it is that what is being presented as being and it seems that everything seems to get into the hands of the the politics takes over and the you really wonder what the truth really is but I I just think that the the the weather weather patterns are cyclical and I think that I would tend to agree with with those who take that stands that things things happen in cycles yeah yeah who knows what's going to happen next because with the addition of chemicals in the air that one of your guests Dan Dane waiting ten was talking about to push we've been following this for a long long time to some people call and call them chemtrails but others say geo engineering but that that can have an effect too on the weather has this been going on a long time as well but yeah I I I I I would tend to think this is the cycles aren't really a very powerful force indeed yeah this is John Coleman who died last year of course he if you will is the co founder of the weather channel was Anne yes the ones that I met him he wasn't there when I worked at the weather channel he had gone on to other things that I did made him a couple years back before he passed away day in Atlanta at a reunion and had a chance and he was so nice I always really admired him and liked it a lot and I really thought this would he put together that presentation on on the climate change that that was pretty impressive let's go to calls from Cheryl Thomas in the high A. California together started the segment Tom go ahead hi George thank you for taking my call blessings to you the staff and of course blessings to the entire coast community very tight and Cheryl it's just I'm always eager to hear your investigative reporting every month thank you and I'm sure the coast audience thanks you also you know when Janice Carlson was speaking about communicating with the afterlife I believe you could do that anywhere at any time but I also think that there are special times and special places and I'm reminded of the words vision quest and another word builder match and I think in the past the far past people did it differently they went to temple sacred space of sacred mountains megalithic monument such as key support towers Stonehenge or the indigenous moans and North America and I think that they utilized the spiritual horsepower the momentum of the energies of those spots to communicate to break through to the other side such chance you know I'm reminded of the oracles sent Delphi Greeks here now as an example and that they utilized earth energy use such as war you wines and solar energy use such as you know the summer and winter solstice or the autumn and spring equinox to facilitate that spiritual horsepower to break through to the other side so to come to my question you seem to be an outdoors person Cheryl and I was wondering if you failed based on experience in the outdoors or of the sacred space sore conceived role or whatever that you're willing to share their so have a profound meaning to you and perhaps a profound connection with the universe and if you're willing to share their I would appreciate it well that's interesting I had not thought of it in that regard but I did grow up on a pretty large farms and their wives a lot of opportunity there to rail he he be close to nature shall we say so I've always felt that that background which yeah with that being on a farm which was totally self sufficient with their family and I was I was very involved in all of that I always felt that growing up like fans really help help in terms of my grounding and that maybe I end up a little differently from most people maybe I didn't but if I did I think it's probably because of my background and I it ended up being long before I was born the location of the that's pretty historic flood they came through the farm because there is a big big creek that ran through it and SO in the in days gone by it ended up really being quite a historic spot so I think growing up in that environment working in the fields as a young person as a child and really learning how to work and be responsible for everything myself I think that that was really a closeness to nature is that I don't think I could replace is something else and of course in that situation to with the flood that I mentioned there were many many people who died and it was on the very place that I grew up did you ever have a spiritual Tiffany Cheryl or something just in my head that aha moment yes I I have I have I've I've had situations happen then they're on there would be no expects the nation for someone call you know a paranormal I've had things Sam I've I've found things from my faster way that could not have been explains it is is to fly they were found in those positions so I've had I've had lots of things I've had Vester travel thank you only one time a yes only one time that was in Kansas city I have only one two I've never been able to duplicate it again it's not as easy as some of our of our cast say not that I've had I've had sleep paralysis a lot of sleep paralysis over the years fortunately not not a not that anything in a while that was not signed no not at all we take we take text and tweets Tom's got something for sure when you got time Hey Cheryl this is for you from Caroline in fort worth Texas she says please ask Cheryl why she thinks it is that some people get visits from deceased relatives and some never do I would never claim to be an expert on that or on anything really but I suppose in George's is is more of an expert than me on this but I would think it's because some people have that tune their awareness skills are more aware more receptive and more interested in it and as as the my guess Janice Carlson pointed out prepare for it and go to the external links to hopefully make it happen in a very safe and healthy way and I and I I think some people perhaps are born more intuitive than others it's genetic in some cases yeah I yes I I I would think so but I I think some of them just have a natural intuition and and a natural ability to you know to have that awareness and to make those connections but yet but I think you have to you have to hone and then you have to utilize it to make it work at its best what do you think George well I gotta tell you Cheryl it's it's it's a gift that a lot of people have but some people put a blocks and they can't utilize it they can't use it those people who have that ability can do some incredible things and I think those are the people who succeed in life and I don't mean success in terms of just money but in in things were their inner self is is very successful what's right you have to have a basic self confident I the I think that if you have a basic self confidence in you have a grounding of sorts that that serves you well in so many situations because you never know what you're going to end of fans and what what life is going to throw two years so I think if you if you believe in yourself and I think that goes goes a long way for your survival let's take another another few more calls Nancy in Minnesota east of the Rockies finance go ahead thank you I'd like to tell you about an experience that I had after my father died I went to the cemetery and as yet he stone was that up and I hate no I walked here or whatever to win but then I went to my grandmother's grave and I said grandma you know where I know you know where he is you know tell him that I was here and that I love him and I had a car that he either didn't work and it was bleeding out I was cold and yet much and just bear but next my I rolled the world out of a window to speak to my grandmother and the next thing my father's voice is clear as a bell wow came on and said yes keep keep tops the strong you've always been tough you've always been strong did you take heed with an answer what I didn't comparisons say that I did not you did not why not but but George this is this is a thank I also had a radio that did not work you wouldn't believe the song that came on I'd never heard it before in my life I am a great country and the song that came on was Daddy's hands go this is what I am giving you a message he works in strange ways Cheryl absolutely is that that happens to a lot of people that you think George that songs come on or music or the lyrics that means that have a meaning and they come on and as as if such opportune times never thought about you're thinking of somebody and they call you all the time yeah over time and as you said in your earlier peace with Janice as I say there are no coincidences no coincidences and things happen for a reason absolutely I came in once and this is sometime after my father passed away and he was a musician he paid a plate with Roy Acuff back in those days and so he was very talented and play days in the saddle and the guitar and I had his musical instruments in a certain place and along with this fiddler the violin there's a little piece of Verizon's issues to keep the fiddle string you know in good shape and it was always kept inside this little case and I came in and saw that little piece underneath the bed which was at the foot of the bed that that you would see when you first went to the room in the most visible spot there's no way you're I could miss it if you came in like that and so I kind of think that is a sign that he might be thinking of me so definitely things things strange things are very strange mark in Nebraska go ahead mark yeah hi there.

Cheryl Jones investigative reporter
"investigative reporter" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on KTOK

"Investigative reporter Cheryl Jones will take your questions and your stories as well Cheryl you been a meteorologist almost all your life are you seen a change in weather patterns I mean are they more extreme or are they about the same well there's a lot of debate over that and I don't know if you ever have the opportunity to see John Coleman present yes I sure did we have them on the show a long long time ago and yeah you know he made a very I thought he made a very logical in a very sound case for for looking at in a different line that it is you know obviously you didn't think it is the what is being presented as being and it seems that everything seems to get into the hands of the eighties and the politics takes over and the you really wonder what the truth really is that I I just think that the the the weather weather patterns are cyclical and I think that I would tend to agree with with those who take that stands that things things happen in cycles yeah now yeah who knows what's going to happen next because with the addition of chemicals in the air that one of your guests Dan Dane Whittington was talking about two course we've been following this for a long long time to some people call and call them chemtrails that others say geo engineering but that that can have an effect too on now is the weather has this been going on a long time as well but I I I I would tend to think this this is the cycles aren't really a very powerful force indeed yeah this is John Coleman who died last year of course he he was the co founder of the weather channel was any yes the ones that I met him he wasn't there when I worked at the weather channel he had gone on to other things that I did meet him a couple years back before he passed away in Atlanta at a reunion and had a chance and he was so nice I always really admired him and liked it a lot and I really thought this when he put together that presentation on knows on the climate change that that was pretty impressive let's go to calls from Cheryl Thomas in the high A. California together started the segment Tom go ahead hi George thank you for taking my call blessings to you the staff and of course blessings to the entire coast community very tight and Cheryl it's just I'm always eager to hear your investigative reporting every month thank you and I'm sure the coast audience thanks you also you know when Janice Carlson was speaking about communicating with the afterlife I believe you could do that anywhere at any time but I also think that there are special times and special places and I'm reminded of the words vision quest and another word pilgrimage and I think in the past our past people did it differently they want to temples sacred space of sacred mountains megalithic monument such as key support towers Stonehenge or the indigenous mounts and North America and I think that they utilize the spiritual horsepower the momentum of the energies of those spots to communicate to break through to the other side such chance you know I'm reminded of the oracles sent Delphi and Greece you know as an example and that they utilized earth energies such as loyal lines and solar energy use such as you know the summer and winter solstice or the autumn and spring equinox to facilitate that spiritual horsepower to break through to the other side so to come to my question you seem to be an outdoors person Cheryl and I was wondering if you pay on based on experience in the outdoors or of the sacred space sore cathedral or whatever that you're willing to share their jaw have a profound meaning to you and perhaps a profound connection with the universe and if you're willing to share their I would appreciate it well that's interesting I had not thought of it in that regard but I did grow up on a pretty large farms and their wives a lot of opportunity there to really be close to nature shall we say so I've always sells a set background which now with that being on a farm which was totally self sufficient with their family and I was I was very involved in all of that I always felt that growing up like fans really help help in terms of my grounding and that maybe I end up a little differently from most people maybe I didn't but if I did I think it's probably because of my background and it ended up being long before I was born the location of the prehistoric flood they came through the farm because there is a big big creek that ran through it and so in the in days gone by it ended up really being quite a historic spot so I think growing up in that environment working in the fields as a young person as a child and really learning how to work and be responsible for everything myself I think that that was really a closeness to nature that I don't think I could replace with something else and of course in that situation to with the flood that I mentioned there were many many people who died and it was on the very place that I grew up did you ever have a spiritual Tiffany Cheryl or something just in our head that aha moment yes I I have I have I've I've had situations happen that they're on there would be no expects the nation for someone call you know a paranormal I've had things Sam I've I've found things from my as his faster way that could not have been explained is is to fly they were found in those positions so I've had I've had lots of things I've had Vester travel thank you only one time a yes only one time that was in Kansas city I have only one two I've never been able to duplicate it again it's not as easy as some of our cast say not that I've had I've had sleep paralysis a lot of sleep paralysis over the years fortunately not not a not that anything in a while that was not fun no not at all we think we take text in tweets Tom's got something for sure when you got time Hey Cheryl this is for you from Caroline in fort worth Texas she says please ask Cheryl why she thinks it is that some people get visits from deceased relatives and some never do I would never claim to be an expert on that or on anything really but I suppose in George's is is more of an expert than me on this but I would think it's because some people have that tune their awareness skills are more aware more receptive and more interested in it and as as the my guess Janice Carlson pointed out prepare for it and go to the external links to hopefully make it happen in a very safe and healthy way and I and I I think some people perhaps are born more intuitive than others it's genetic in some cases yeah I yes I I I would think so but I I think some of them just I have a natural intuition and and a natural ability to you know to have that awareness and to make those connections but yet but I think you have to you have to hound and then you have to utilize it to make it work at its best what do you think George well I gotta tell you Cheryl it's it's it's a gift that a lot of people have but some people put up blocks in they can't utilize it they can't use it those people who have that ability can do some incredible things and I think those are the people who succeed in life and I don't mean success in terms of just money but the in in things were their inner self is is very successful what's right I think you have to have a basic self confidence I the I think that if you have a basic self confidence in you have a grounding of sorts that that serves you well in so many situations because you never know what you're going to end up fans and what what life is going to throw two years so I think if you if you believe in yourself and I think that goes goes a long way for your survival let's take another another few more calls Nancy in Minnesota east of the Rockies finance go ahead thank you I'd like to tell you about an experience that I had after my father died I went to the cemetery and as yet he stone was that up and I hate no I walked here or whatever to win but then I went to my grandmother's grave and I said grandma you know where I know you know where he is.

Investigative reporter Cheryl Jones
"investigative reporter" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Investigative reporter Cheryl Atkinson and go over the old adage you can't fight city hall try fighting several layers higher than that and it's a rough road Michael in Tallahassee Florida next good evening Michael good evening and and I watch your program every week it's a great show I had a few questions yes go right ahead there's a deep do you think that there's a deep state question one for two do you think our own government records our telephone conversations do you think our own intelligence agencies rather than spying on Americans correctly we'll ask British intelligence to spy on us and how serious do you see the problem of parallel construction that the government uses to prosecute people well there you go as master's thesis in contemporary surveillance all right just to in order here is there a deep state Cheryl yes and I I always used to call the persistent bureaucracy that after years of working in Washington but from people who I've literally been told from people who worked under the Obama administration and the bush administration I've been told in the past couple of years things like there is a deep state I was part of it things like that and I I feel like I'm really seen it in action in the last couple years the the the oppression of course we get of a deep stay is that they they meet in the catacombs of of Washington and skulking around in the dark with the lit torch is or something I mean you can get pretty melodramatic about this how consciously does the deep state work that that entrenched bureaucracies will automatically fight to preserve their prerogatives their power their and their funding I take as a given but but how consciously would you say there is a deep state I think it's a mix I think it's pockets a very conscious meetings and discussions even if they don't consider that what they're doing and I think it's also the the natural structures you describe do they record our phone calls yes do they use British intelligence and to find that they're not allowed to I'll do you one better on that I would say yes but outside of this country there are places where no laws the five and told by Intel officials they can tap into these giant internet cables that are buried in the ocean with impunity as long as they go in international waters there's all kinds of ways they can listen to it and have no problem parallel construction the last question he asked I thank you if I understand the question correctly using premises and other matters that this is what he's asking to prosecute people who may not deserve it yes I do think that the big problem interesting in terms of of the the use of of other intelligence agencies and the like over them an address to the whole issue of recording our phone conversations there are so many of them I have heard it said that it it is entirely possible that our conversations are recorded which would not certainly be a pleasant thought but that there is no where near the resources to do anything other than record and store them there is no possible way even even using key words to to attract attention to certain conversations of no way you could ever actually make use of all this information because this is a tidal wave of conversations I think you're right so you had on two points one of them is to use it for terrorism prevention carpenters tended to hope to capture conversation out of the blue it seems almost pointless right yeah but to use that to have at your disposal if you have a name you want to search for if you want to look through Cheryl acting and stuff there's a way to do that because it's been collected so the notion isn't that they go through all of it the notion is if you start to think about bad actors looking for something that they wanted to hear or listen to a finder's fee that they wouldn't otherwise be able to bath for I think the danger is some of them I believe use it for yeah that that that other words that option is available to them and unfortunately like any option that can be a a bad temptation here's Bradley in Pittsburgh I Bradley hi I wonder if that girl ever got the G. due to watch Tom Fitton involved in their investigation I did thank you for asking they helped not with the issue because I had attorneys working on it with me but they have helped on prior freedom of information act lawsuit and have been very you know have really tried to help a lot on certain matters this suit I don't believe they did anything with this because I had an attorney that took that initially that and helping me more to come stay with us one eight six six five oh Jimbo sharyl Attkisson our guest in the award winning investigative journalist the author of The New York Times bestsellers the spear and stone wall to both of which we spoke with her about on this program she.

Cheryl Atkinson Investigative reporter
"investigative reporter" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Investigative reporter and writer executive vice president of the hill. John Solomon is with us. Let's go back now because let's get a big picture the days the weeks, the months ahead. What's coming? Yeah. I think the biggest dynamic sees watching the investigators now become the investigated that is going to be the dynamic that will dominate the next six months, and that will on many fronts, turn the intelligence community, you know, Kerr with attorney general bar who's doing his own assessment, it will occur with the inspector general the Justice department, and I believe it will occur in both the house and the Senate even Republicans in the minority are starting to do some pretty remarkable things digging into some of the issues, and even though they don't have committee power. They still have the power of their office. And I think you'll see House Republicans Lindsey Graham, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin has a very powerful committee. I think you'll see between those five sectors a lot of accountability coming out and a lot of hard questions. I think the biggest thing that president United States can do to help all of those gain transparency. Declassified the documents that have been identified in those five buckets. Well, you want to remind people I remind them often. But the way you say it is different. So maybe they'll hear from you better than me. Got it. Right. From the beginning. The documents the gang of eight document application. Would expose the FBI acknowledging failure and showing the misstep. So when you read those two together, you sort of have the perfect compendium of what one wrong in the FBI. Then there are some emails that show. How early on the FBI knew that there were problems with Christopher Steele is an informant. Remember affirmatively, they told the court. He was in good standing, and they knew of no derogatory information. I don't think that declarations gonna turn out to be true. I gotta give props and kudos to you. And I can't mention every person, but as maybe twenty or thirty of us that have been on this from day one and. We wouldn't be here. Honestly without this is to now critical and crucial to the the Republic that we love, and if we don't solve these problems it's going to happen again. Anyway, thank you so much John Solomon. We'll see tonight on Hannity nine eastern, Fox News channel quick break. Right back democrat, Mark Penn? A hard hitting article about Muller being done and Democrats should be too because Trump is no Nixon. Well, he'll weigh in on the extremists. Now, take it over the Democratic Party straight ahead. Four thirty at News Radio..

FBI John Solomon executive vice president Ron Johnson Christopher Steele Investigative reporter Nixon Lindsey Graham Mark Penn Democratic Party United States Wisconsin Justice department Kerr Muller Fox News Hannity Senate writer
"investigative reporter" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill talking about President Trump's recent move to limit the amount of information released to the public about drone strikes. Jeremy we were just going into sort of President Obama's approach on this. How does first of all I want to be clear is this less data or no data that the Trump administration is advocating for what we've already seen that the the Trump administration when something goes right or they think that they've done some spectacular military operation. They want the entire world to know. Remember when Trump celebrated his dropping of the MO of the mother of all bombs in Afghanistan. I mean, it was like the second coming of know of the atomic bombing of Japan in terms of technological significance to Trump. I think it's dirtier data is the way we could look at it where it's going to be even more selectively presented to the public then occurred under Obama, and look there have been there's been a serious ratcheting up of drone strikes on the part of the Trump administration. Everyone's talking. About Trump Russia the twenty twenty race. This guy has doubled down on the worst excesses of Bush and Obama. He has lifted restrictions on killing civilians in Somalia alone. Trump now has done twenty-something drone strikes in this year alone. And he has loosened the rules Obama wanted to do so called leadership strikes where they're taking out known people with a track record in terrorist activity and yet he's still had civilian Cal. He had a lot of civilian casualties. The stated policy was we are going after the leadership Trump's not even pretending that anymore. If you are some kid who's getting paid a little bit of money in Somalia Yemen de basically guard some post somewhere, they're going to treat you in the same way that they would treat. I'm in Aswa. Hurry, the leader of Al Qaeda are a legitimate target, the metrics of that are very complicated. And I do think that there is a direct connection between an increase in support for terrorist organizations at an increase in drones strikes, particularly those that are killing civilians. We saw that under Obama with. A p and Yemen Al Qaeda in the Arabian peninsula. I think we're going to see it in a lot more places under Trump. This is a dangerous administration in terms of the capability, they have militarily and with the CIA and lying and lack of accountability, even the minimal accountability standards that Obama put in place in the eleventh hour, they've said, no, we're not gonna participate in that. This is a very dangerous situation than I think a lot of us have been making a mistake by paying not enough attention to Trump's war policies, it's bad. Now. Let's also talk about how drone warfare has evolved since President Obama. I mean, this was one of the first times I think under his presidency that we actually begun to understand how the military was using this. What makes you so concerned is it worst technology is it is it better technology. Now is it going to be more efficient? Where do we stand today with drone warfare Obama really embraced rounds? Not out of any love for the technology. It was because he didn't want to do large scale troop deployments. And he spent a lot of his political credibility on a national security level convincing liberals that. This is a smarter way to wage war. What we've seen though over the past ten years is that a lot of civilians are killed in drone strikes. Maybe not as many as would be killed and conventional Tomahawk cruise missile strikes or ground invasions. But the question is always framed as should we do drone strikes or troops on the ground? When we should be saying, what is our engagement with the entire Muslim world. Look like, what is an actual sane approach to countering national security. Right diplomacy working with regional partners and not being afraid to negotiate with governments that say. Yeah, we are Islam in nature, but we pose no threat to the western world. There have been the history is rife with stories where the United States intervenes and countries because they're concerned about Islamic fundamentalism and end up overthrowing the very people. That would have been the best counter to terrorism Bush over through a government in Somalia in two thousand six no one ever talks about it called the Islamic courts union. They were the best counter to Al Shabaab. Now, there's not a lot of of thinking ahead an either party's part in this country. What happy you said the data's going to get dirtier where do people go to find good information, accurate information cleaner, data about what's happening on the ground? If anywhere. Okay based bureau of investigative journalism. And the new America foundation in the United States. Both have been tracking drone strikes for a very long time. I would say that the bureau for investigative journalism has a very proven track record, add they're very conservative in their mythology methodology excuse me, it is out there. But can we trust the source that it's coming from under under Obama at the end? Yeah, they pretty much were straight shooting under Trump. Who knows? I mean is he gonna start tweeting about this stuff? And that's how we'll find out about it. And is it true? Probably.

President Obama Trump Somalia Jeremy Scahill Yemen Al Qaeda investigative reporter United States Bush Japan President Afghanistan CIA Aswa Al Shabaab Russia new America foundation Islamic courts union ten years
"investigative reporter" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"But as investigative reporter, Michael Isikoff pointed out on last night show, there is no historical precedent for that kind of approach when Sam Irvin held the Senate Watergate hearings. Did he ask Archibald Cox's permit? Listen to hold those hearings when Peter Regino began impeachment hearings on on Richard Nixon. Did he ask for Leandra wars skis permission to do? So no because everybody accepted that congress had a job to do. We're now going to see whether Lijun Cummings Adam Schiff, Jerry Nadler will step up to the plate and do their job here. And that means public hearings not behind closed doors, congressman Sean Patrick Maloney's at democrat from New York. I'm one of the newest members of the house intelligence committee. What are you? Let's start with the basic thrust of what Michael said last night, which I happen to agree with the need for public transparent hearings. What do you think of that? Well, I think it's obviously a terrific idea where it's appropriate. I don't think you're going to see any of those chairman shrink from their responsibilities. But I think the number one goal know, particularly on the intelligence committee is also to return a level of seriousness and professionalism to the conduct of these proceedings which has been in. Short supply under Republican control where it descended into this partisan circuits. But there are public hearing scheduled with Michael Cohen in front of the oversight committee. That's already on the calendar. The committees are just getting constituted this week. I think you'll see a very aggressive oversight by this new democratic majority, and it's long overdue. You said you said you agreed where appropriate what is the where appropriate caveat to your mind well because particularly with respect to the intelligence committee. There's naturally going to be an opportunity in closed session to discuss highly classified or sensitive materials, which we know are central to a lot of these investigations. And I think what you'll see is the new chairman absolutely committed to transparency, but also you'll see him take seriously his responsibilities to protect the United States and to conduct the committee with the seriousness and professionalism that it used to have. But nobody's pulling any punches on congressional oversight. I guarantee there are a lot of democratic chairman and chairwomen up here who are ready to. Go and provide the kind of oversight this administration desperately needs. It's not a question. Pulling punches to me, it's more about public nece first behind closed doors intelligence committee, obviously all of that has been behind closed doors. We now know that there are transcripts, obviously. The the committee chair out Schiffer said he's going to move to share them with Robert Muller, but shouldn't be made public as well. If you're talking about the transcripts, I think what you're going to. You're going to see is an orderly process there to make sure that there there's no disclosure of secrets or confidential information, look, nobody in the new democratic majority is going to do anything to hide the ball. The only thing we're gonna take seriously is the professionalism that should characterise the proceedings up here should not be some partisan circus. We should not be pursuing some political objective. We should be searching for the truth. And when you dealing with a highly classified material, it's important sometimes to do that behind closed doors, and one thing that Michael Isikoff left out was that we have also seen examples where? Congressional committees have gotten the way federal prosecutions, particularly in the Iran contra investigation. Yep. We're in fact, subjects we're not ultimately subject to criminal accountability. Because a bunch of members of congress went too far. So I want the truth out..

house intelligence committee Michael Isikoff chairman Richard Nixon congress Michael Cohen Sam Irvin Lijun Cummings Adam Schiff investigative reporter Archibald Cox Peter Regino Sean Patrick Maloney Michael New York Jerry Nadler Leandra congressman Schiffer Robert Muller Iran
"investigative reporter" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on WREK

"Thing you should always remember about la is that it always was a violent sweatshop hellhole for most people who went there particularly for mexican americans it's true for african americans who went to la but pichu for mexican americans there was a very large demonstration forty fifty thousand mexican americans against the war which was viciously attacked by the los angeles sheriff's department los angeles county sheriff's department many people were seriously injured in fact ruben salazar who people don't would not recognize that name today wasn't investigative reporter one of the few investigative reporters who was of mexican ancestry for los angeles television stations he in fact made a sort of mission of himself to of his reporting to investigate police brutality was actually murdered by the la county sheriff's department during the chicano moratorium they they he was in a restaurant and they surrounded it nishad a tear gas canister through the window he didn't win the head and killing him and and but that led to a real political weakening among among mexican americans in particular in the southwest and in california i very powerful movement arose over the issues very similar to african americans but with all with a with a little bit of a difference on the issue of bilingual education and language rights and how history is is tot among mexican americans in most public schools for example in the southwestern united states that includes texas is that you know you would be beaten by teachers right through the nineteen sixties if you spoke spanish to a friend in class i mean you know these are in public schools this is not the whole catholic schools i mean we're talking about you know he's are public schools at at the time and i think that you know part of what the chicano moratorium representative was how millions of you know working class people are became oppose the war in vietnam you know the one of the great myths about the nineteen sixties and as many of them that you have to sort of wade through sometimes is that you know there was this thing for years we're right wingers and virtually.

la ruben salazar investigative reporter california united states texas representative vietnam wade los angeles angeles county la county
"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on WTVN

"Contributor investigative reporter are you i'm doing great sign the just like we have a lot of the same information coming our way because we were able to verify pretty much exactly the same thing that the dossier was used in part to obtain the face a warrant to spy on members of president trump campaign let's get into detail what are you hearing what have you heard well i'm hearing i'm hearing that the faisal was used at that does he was used to gain the fifa and that's very significant because remember a lot of this and we know now that the sty he is unsubstantiated its latest i see a lot of it's proven to be false so leads us to the next question what am i sources a very high level law enforcement officials said this is outrageous he says it clearly should be thoroughly investigated and and they were very well familiar with decisive application process in how this was done and it should ask us to question how far has this abuse gone this is is this a single case what happened here what are they looking at i know as as well as well as you that i've spoken to members and and two others who said that they did have a chance to review all of this documentation at the department of justice at the department of justice if this was forthcoming with information requested by the house intelligence committee now they will be waiting on receiving the rest of the text messages rim of the ninety five hundred text messages that they still need to see between struck and least a page peter struck the fbi agent so they're waiting to look at that and that should be coming in the next few days dis but we have to ask ourselves.

investigative reporter faisal house intelligence committee text messages peter president law enforcement department of justice fbi
"investigative reporter" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"investigative reporter" Discussed on No Agenda

"Oh my god that's not much now anyway he mostly textile i guess yeah pictures would be much i wish i mentioned this problem in the newsletter if anyone had bothered to read it they would have noticed that i had discussed this instead of bitching at you and they would have had the link to the san jose mercury story which is linked in the news letter to the two what i consider considers the genesis of all this and and i believe that the genesis that reporter that did a news story in the mercury was is a very good investigative reporter not not she's not a slouch and seoul k right now because i get a number of people on twitter saying in as bull crap and they did jr i'll be waiting for charles to be inaugurated so i was thinking about this way discuss this again another one of these things the meet up and i said i don't think i didn't mention it on the show but i'm guessing that be if the before charles gets inaugurated they're going to kill him that seems to be the way they do things over there it's the bits the monarchy yeah you put that in the book though is not just the monarchy but yeah hm so we'll see we'll see if he gets crowned and all the rest of it all my words but i'm going to stay with you think he might get to be mind get killed before any coronation would take place.

reporter investigative reporter charles