5 Burst results for "Intertribal Agriculture Council"

"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:31 min | Last month

"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Available? And where can you purchase native grown foods? All right. Those are some pretty big questions. So Anthony, you've been working in food sovereignty. What have you learned about starting a indigenous Food Program? Me. Sorry. Yeah, ru, sorry, sorry. Yeah. Yeah, no, that's a great question. And the good news is that there's a lot of resources. That's one of the that's one of the amazing things about working in Indian country is that we love to share information with each other. The first stop, I would suggest, is go to first nation development institute, there are a really great nonprofit that works that's worked with my community and a lot of other ones and they have a ton of resources on there about things like developing policies, creating huge sovereignty work, and they also do funding there. So that's kind of where I would check, but doing this just listen to other folks who are doing food sovereignty work. That's where I started and where I learned everything from. Yeah, yeah, there are a couple of native groups like Native American food sovereignty alliance, Native American agriculture fund, inner tribal, agriculture council, intertribal agriculture council, that's somewhere you can find a lot of native food that's available for purchase. Because they work with a lot of tribal and native food producers. And there's also lots of availability out there. Among these groups, nonprofit groups where you can find native seed and stuff like that. But also maybe even look locally in the tribes there and what's going on in your area if you're interested about indigenous food because that's exactly what indigenous food is. It's like the food there right there in your land. Where you're living where tribes were living before you, if you're not native. But rue, let's go back to this catawba corn. So you mentioned just a little bit about some of the work that's being done right now. To further study this corn. Tell us what else is being done, you know, focusing on this drag queen corn. Yeah. So when we finally got it, I think it was 2000 and 19 in the fall. And so we were excited to plant it in 2020. But unfortunately, COVID hit. And so we had, you know, this is another piece of it is kind of that legacy of termination. We don't have any at that time we didn't have any communal farmland, and I actually want to come back to that a little bit, but so what we have to do with plants in our garden boxes that were at our different programs like our senior center in our scene center and all that stuff. And so I just planted what we had. And I hope I hope it grows because we weren't able to all the staff were having to work from home. We weren't able to bring people out to the centers to take care of the plants. And what was amazing was that they survived with only very minimal water..

nation development institute Native American food sovereign Native American agriculture fu intertribal agriculture counci Anthony
"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:52 min | 2 months ago

"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are CDFIs. Community financial development institutions and those are banks or lending arms that are derived their funding from treasury, but they are focused in a lot of areas that we consider credit deserts. Our other eligible entities are educational institutions, tribal governments, including state recognized tribal governments and 5 O one C threes. We have already granted over $52 million to these entities to increase and support Native American farmers and ranchers. Prior to this, the longest standing entity that has been in this space is the intertribal agriculture council and they have a national technical assistance arm and now there is a number of CDFIs that are standing themselves up as agricultural agriculturally related lenders. We also have worked with the indigenous food and agriculture. Initiative houses in the university of Arkansas school of law, these entities can provide assistance for individual producers, but also for governments for tribal governments or their enterprise arms that want to pursue agriculture as an economic development arm of a tribe. We have a lot of programs within the federal government, the office of tribal relations right now is doing a great job with some webinars and for any issues that we face as a producer. And that we need changed our improved upon within the federal government. We rely on the native farm Bill coalition and they're out right now. They are going to be in Arizona next week and they're going to do national listening sessions so that we can start preparing for and formulating the request in the next farm Bill. One of the issues that we see that needs significant improvement is that the opportunity for access to credit access to overall capital for our native producers given that most of our producers are existing or operating on trust or restricted land. It's a large impediment for them table to be able to access the types of loans and servicing that they would need because they can't collateralize their land, so we have to look at alternative. How can we stand up lending institutions and federal programs to support need of producers when oftentimes the way that you survive the fluctuations of these types of environments is through the value of your land. So we're looking at that right now and we just returned from Washington D.C. where we met with multiple departments and also the FDA and farmer Mac and how we can solve these issues. I encourage you all to join our listserv where we share that information. Okay. In our caller Jen, she shared her own experience paying 50 cents for a gallon of gas, buying a house for $27,000, which just seems so remarkable now here in 2022. But I question on a systemic level and obviously access to credit and the situation with land held in trust and some of these fundamental issues that are at play, but also on a systemic level again, what is the solution for some of these native ag producers? We need smaller farms. Do they need to be located closer or do we need to use local food sources? I mean, what are some things that we're really going to think have to look big picture at in terms of addressing some of these disparities that are native egg producers are facing?.

intertribal agriculture counci university of Arkansas school office of tribal relations Bill coalition federal government treasury Washington D.C. Arizona FDA Jen
"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:06 min | 6 months ago

"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Brett mabin. 7 tribes now have more control over what foods they purchase for their food distribution program food packages. It's happening by way of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, food distribution program, self determination demonstration project. It includes more than $3 million in funding. It's the first time public law 6 38, the Indian self determination act is being implemented for tribes to operate their own food distribution programs. The aim is to include more local tribally produced foods. We'll hear more about this demonstration project and what it could mean for the future of native food, economic, and health systems. You can join us too. If you access your tribe's food distribution program, what do you think about how the program is changing? We're at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's also one 809 9 native. Joining us from Washington D.C. is Lexi Holden. She's the associate director of policy and government relations for the intertribal agriculture council. She's a member of the choctaw nation of Oklahoma, welcomed the Native American calling Lexi. Thank you so much for having me on the phone today. It's an honor to have this important conversation as it is significant with what is going on and of course that's the name of the game. We want to increase sovereignty and food sovereignty is such a vital part in that overall movement. So I was wondering if you could give us a little bit of background as we get this conversation going today. Sure, so of course this initial energy reservation was created in 1973, but commodities basically distribution programs that happen for centuries beyond that between the federal government and data tribes. With this really exciting new public law succeed termination project, what it's doing is allowing it drives to process the seeds that they would like to put into these commodities boxes. Rather than relying on the USDA to determine what those factors should include. Of course, I'm sure many people across Indian country know about the good old days, we have depending on how you think of it as the paper boxes where you might get a one pound block of cheese and a bunch of other random chef's favorite foods you have to cobble together. So not a lot of fresh fruit is and thankfully as recent years we've seen that change, but now not only has been opportunity professionally since it is an opportunity for traditional locally and regionally grown food by American Indian producers, the tribes are able to put into these boxes now with the sniffs 38 contracts. And we're really excited about the future of it. But the people that it feeds the producers who are providing it and generally for tribal health federal and social discrimination potentially. Most definitely. And I'm curious, Lexi, how did the self determination demonstration project come to fruition? Absolutely. So it was a little bit of background. So in part of my capacity, we're looking at a total agriculture household we also have money to spend in coalition, which has 20 million different commercial and getting experience health discrimination projects into the 2018 foreign Bill along the 62 other travel specific division. We're really excited that this is also like in 2018 that narrow tribes are actually able to finally participate in the program and receive the funding actually go out with 2000 people. Lexie, it's my understanding that there are currently 7 nations that are taking part in this project right now. Now, how does this project really take place with these 7 tribes? Yes, absolutely. So the way that this works under public law 6 38 is that slides are eligible to apply on a competitive basis and we don't competitive basis. And I believe almost 7 eligible tribes replies this year and we're funded. And essentially, what they do is they receive this money and then they can go and test the individual vendors. So the crimes themselves are the ones applying no individual vendors so that they can still work for a variety of distributions who might otherwise have a hard time recently sort of more procurement contract world just because we know that that's a major barrier for our data producers to kind of get over that by tribal leaders and tribal governments being able to determine who they will do businesses that you think a lot more native producers are going to be able to participate and get their wares into their community. Now I don't want to get anybody to worry. I'm sure there are listeners out there right now that are wondering about the commodity cheese. Does this mean that we can get the big blocks of cheese anymore? Things like wild rice and bison. We just put these items that are sourced from around your local producers who might be down the road from you on the road. You're supposed to think you're going to appeal more commonly in boxes and remind even those people who do so most likely you're from your community. Most definitely. Lexi, I have a few more questions for you before our time is up right now. We do have a lot of guests today, so I want to, at this time, bring on our next guest. Joining us from Fayetteville Arkansas is Aaron Parker. She's the director of the indigenous food and agriculture initiative at the university of Arkansas school of law. Welcome back to Native American calling Aaron. Hey, Brad, it's good to hear you. That's great to have you on the panel today for this important discussion and from your perspective, I was wondering if we could start by you giving us a little history of the food distribution program on Indian reservations. Sure. I'd be glad to so as Lexie mentioned, this program has been around since 1973. That's when it was first authorized by Congress. And it is a commodity distribution program. It's sources all domestic produced food for individuals on Indian reservations and in some tribal areas in Oklahoma as well. It serves about depending on the year between 75 and 83,000 people a month. And there's been a lot of work as Lexi talked about getting the program and the package up to where tribal citizens want to see it and where tribal leaders want to see it. Historically speaking have tribes ever had to say on what kinds of foods are part of this distribution program..

Brett mabin U.S. Department of Agriculture Washington D.C. Lexi Holden intertribal agriculture counci Lexi Oklahoma Lexie USDA federal government America Aaron Parker university of Arkansas school Fayetteville Arkansas Aaron Brad Congress
Regenerative Agriculture: Kelsey Scott Is a 125th-Generation Land Steward

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 10 months ago

Regenerative Agriculture: Kelsey Scott Is a 125th-Generation Land Steward

"As farmers grapple with climate change many are turning to regenerative agriculture practices these techniques help store carbon in the soil and make the land more resilient to extreme weather. The approach is increasingly popular but not new regenerative. Agriculture is really just a return to how this landscape evolved with the indigenous communities as the stewards prior to fourteen. Ninety two kelsey. Additional scott is with the intertribal agriculture council and owner of dx beef. My favorite thing to do is introduce myself as a fourth generation cow calf producer but a one hundred and twenty-fifth generation land steward of the great plains on a ranch in south dakota dushi. No scott uses regenerative grazing methods. She rotates where her cattle roam so the grass can rest in grow deeper roots and as the animals move. They dropped manure than adds nutrients to the soil. We're really trying to encourage our cattle to impact the land in the way that the bison did as the great plains was evolving. She says her goal is to nurture not just her animals. But the plants wildlife soil and people at the end of my prayer and lakota. We say madaka or yossi which means we're all

Intertribal Agriculture Counci Scott Kelsey South Dakota Madaka Yossi
"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"intertribal agriculture council" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"But in the meantime, we're able to take control and grow on our own is wild Berries. So I love my friends tonight, and I actually went up there in September to visit them and Some of the growers up there and just to support what they're doing, because what an amazing thing they're able to do for their community and provide you know that unique nourishment. Yes. So, um, I'm also wondering, Do the ho Chunk have a celebration for the solstice or are there are there kind of big feasts associate ID with Say, harvest time or or was Certain events during the year like I mean, I know it in my house. We We really will on Christmas and New Year's. So is there something similar in the Ho Chunk tradition? Uh, not necessarily. We I mean, I can only speak for myself and being raised is, uh, you know are my family was very Strong, traditional growing up, so you know, we we practice our traditional ways and and there's a lot to do with seasons and And clams, and there's a meaning for all of that. We don't just get together on a day and eat like the way that you would imagine. A feast like your word for feast in my work for feast are completely Different when we talk about what it is and what we do there, But we do definitely intertwine seasons and times of the year and harvest. We do have a green corn dance which owners are harvest and it's a social, but it isn't you know, there's there's different aspects of that. And then we do have seats, but they're linked to different times of the year for purpose, or Clans or, you know, however, then that may be so there it is. A very intricate part of our life is the food that we provide during those times in the nourishment that it gives, But It does very and there's a lot of meaning it. That's a whole other conversation on that and what we would share. So could you talk about what it means to be colonized food and to restore Native American food ways. You colonizing food really is taking out those things that were forced upon US and food systems and you really have to look at history. And see how I don't want to say evolution because it wasn't an evolution in her food system that was like taking away all these wonderfully nourishing foods and replacing them with things that had little nutritional value. And we're Dramatic on our system, you know, on our processing and our ability to use fry bread is one of them. Although I'd like to take a stand of fry bread since you brought it up. My grandmother's You know, they always helped. When people were in need. We always had a houseful. We don't have extended relatives in our kinship system. It's like brothers, sisters, moms, dads, You know we have aunts and uncles. But they have their own very specific role, and our houses were always full. Sometimes there wasn't enough. And my grandma said, You know, bread was a way that we could feed everybody and make it last that it wasn't something that we were supposed to have regularly and we never did as a family. But it was something that on times when we did gather it was an additional amount of food or, you know it honored the times that we had to struggle with nothing and they made something out of What little they had. And so we do have it occasionally. But it's not something that I eat very regularly. And when I say occasionally I think there's like three times I let my brother comes up for a holiday, and we'll cook it then or in each of my kids Get a time where they're like, Hey, could we have this that there one time? The year Well, when I'll make it But it is something that we don't We're not like anti. We're not against it because it does remind me okay, strength that we had to get through those times, but it is a very colonized. Being bred in general is in the way that it's thought of nowadays with wheat gluten and stuff. We did have corn breads and stuff that we used. But it was a little bit different than than the bread you imagine today. And so I think that de colonizing taking away those things that were kind of forced or given to us to get through that time and really going back to the foods that nourish you in a way that they were meant to In a way that we lived in, thrives, consuming and being more mindful about consumption, and it's ah whole food system. So when you say, be colonizing it something I am an advocate for but it's not something that I can say that I do because I'm a single mom. It's hard. It's hard to do even with accessibility. And so what I like to say is In getting to be de colonized with your food. I would like to see you re introduced these flavors and these ingredients and your household. If that means that You're going to have blue corn in your bread or blue corn in your grazie, then do it because you're getting that Cornyn to your diets, and you're getting that flavor. The palatability in this Appreciation of that flavor into your household. So I don't like to say like you have to eat the colonize. I like to say I would like to see you. Eat more of this, because it's delicious and it's nutritious and it connects you and there's so many benefits to bringing these foods into your life. If that means that you're going to make it into a bread, or you're going to add it to your chicken, which isn't de colonized. You know if you didn't have chickens, we had turkeys and stuff. But Then do it because that wild race is in your home and the more that you bring in those ingredients, the more you're going to start shifting towards wanting them into feeling that connection. To our ancestral foods into our community. And we'll have a better chance of having those for the future generation. So to talk about corn for a minute. I mean, here in Wisconsin and the rest of Midwest. We are basically surrounded by fields. Many, many of these fields of Genetically modified corn. So Tell me about the corn that you are trying to access and get to people and where you are growing it or or where the people you're working with. Where they're growing with it. And are they having issues trying to grow it? Because of what? We're surrounded by here? Absolutely so there's I mean, there's so many varieties of corn out there. I think that the ones that end up in my hands are the ones that are meant to be with me. And I like a good sample of that is I would I went out West. In the fall on our honoring the farmers, Foragers Growers and producers tour with the Intertribal Agriculture Council and the American Indian Food Program. And part of the reason we went out West was to bring my friend it's Akari Farm. Um seed because And she's an organ. And last year they suffered to hail storms and then the wildfires, and she lost a lot of her ancestral seedling. And then when she went back, they had another hail storm, and she lost even more than we wanted to make sure that she had enough to start with this next year. So I reached out to my friends at Oneida in Bismarck in in Michigan and Puppet dream of wild health and everybody gave me some seed to bring to spring out in Bend, Oregon..

ho Chunk Foragers Growers Akari Farm American Indian Food Program Cornyn Wisconsin Oneida Bismarck Bend Oregon Michigan Intertribal Agriculture Counci Midwest