35 Burst results for "Intersectional"

Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

Woman's Hour

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

"Yesterday we spoke to the writer and campaigner. Julie bendel who in her new book is against type of feminism that she sees as most benefiting men today. I joined by raphael sakaria. Any american feminist. Who in her new book is arguing against type of feminism most benefits white women on behalf of domestic violence victims as a lawyer and a human rights activists years. She sees the issue of race as the biggest obstacle to true solidarity among women and she is calling for a moment of reckoning. Halbrook is called against white feminism rafi. Good morning welcome to the program. Good morning how are you. Thank you for being with us. I'm against white feminism. It is a very striking title at anew. Say you've taken a risk in writing this book. Why did you do it well off to be really blunt. I did it. Because i was quite tired. Like women Saying all the right things pretending to be low end even committed to Quote unquote intersectional. Feminism Where they recognize the importance of considering race and gender But when it comes to their actual lines were actually seating any space four women of color. It's an absolute no can do you. Now so you know for instance if you know if if if if a group of say why an women of color line for to be the top parson organization had in the book i say National organization of women They face tremendous marginalization personal attacks and all sorts of harassment. Honestly so i was just honestly tried to. I was i was done with it. You know i was done with. This pretends that women of color have to engage in to be sort of accepted into a system that's been created by white women and four white women

Julie Bendel Raphael Sakaria Halbrook Rafi Parson Organization National Organization Of Women
"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

Immigrantly

02:23 min | Last month

"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

"Describe america. The most destructive propaganda machine rudin imperialism that continues to bully every country into believing that they are in. This is where the spirituality can come into. They're not worthy. I that word has been coming up a lot Through this discussion that they are somehow inherently Less than because they don't have the freedom right. The freedom that america preaches the propaganda that they they they spew. Then we have organizations like yours as hope for future right. Oh i definitely have hope. It's it's just a matter of making sure that people understand is their collective responsibility to continue to speak out about the injustices that america continues to to cast whether at home or abroad I feel like the abroad. Part has been missing. And i know for sure Because i i even believed propaganda about my own country. This was so good my life. I love it but before we wrap up. Can you share information about your organization. If people want to know more about it way should they go of course so you can take visit. Www dot claimer space now dot org We are a resource and a on the ground grassroots effort to make sure that we in bold and urgent action to dismantle white supremacy and save all black lives and we do that there are three tenets inform inspire and speak truth to power we have done a lot of grassroots initiatives and our latest is going to be project from across the tenants of house housing insecurity food insecurity mental health and making sure that we have an active presence to make sure that we were fighting against prisons so prison. Abolition mine all day. So we're making micro grants to direct impact within the black communities and we are very close to our goal so if you can donate We have all oliver links on the website. And you could poke around and see the work that we've done. I love it. Thank you so much for taking the name. I i loved having this conversation with you i did do. It was equally healing and so just like expensive. So thank you for letting me. German story Here with you guys. It's an absolute pleasure..

america rudin oliver
"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

Immigrantly

08:32 min | Last month

"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

"The historical significance everything draw maturity wise. So after starring in our schools production of caroline or change. Marla went onto to win the national high school musical theater awards also known as the jimmy's and then a couple of years after that she was a performer on the national tour for beautiful carole musical during our interview. She talked about how much she appreciated the experiences she got on tore. It was finally opportunity to get out and do the things that she kind of missed in highschool. Unfortunately you seeing other parts of the country also led to experiences of inequality she had never experienced in new york city. When i went to toledo. I had a flu type thing. I don't know if it was a flu or cold. Whatever but i went in to get nyquil. Cover myself up. So that i didn't like pass anything And like i was followed by four different like a workers. They're asking me. If i needed help to the point where i got to self-checkout in they're like hey do you want it. I was like i'm fine. I can carry on about my business. As marlins shared stories blatant racism she experienced on the road. It reminded me of something we did together in high school. The night it was nationally reported. That michael brown was shot by a police officer. I texted marla helped me with the peaceful protests to put together at our school we poster paper pens and tape to the hallway outside of the theater department and invited our classmates design if you look up beacon for brown on instagram right. Now you'll actually see it. Still posted. And i mean it's a small thing but it was huge for us to do for me. That was my first instance of any sort of activism. And i remember reaching out to you. Because i was like i think marla like the only other black person i really know school. Isn't that crazy. We really went to anyway. I guess i've been in predominantly white space is my entire life. So like him where they But i feel like was that one of your first activism was to And actually activism is something that is not Or is one of those things. That joe's witnesses aren't allowed to taken Having any kind of civic engagement. Because we're there waiting for for jesus to come and change everything so why campaign. Why fight for things that are temporary or temporal so i remember going to my first protests and of course the camera panned to me on national news so i was called into the room with the eldest which was a frequent frequent thing whether it was for the arts or just speaking out i remember like tweeting about donald trump around that time aloe whatever time that was fifteen because he was no. I don't want to do it. I don't want to do it but you know it happened anyway. And so like activism was something that i knew i wasn't supposed to partake in art is my protests and supplementing that with knowledge that i've gotten from From ford i'm like. I remember walking in and being like intersection. -ality this is intriguing. How did i not know about this introduction. I didn't know that i was intersectional. Right all of these things. I am inherently political. Just by walking. Isn't that oh. My god i am a topic to be debated on. I actually have a distinct memory of asking the art teacher who i will not name to come down and just like see it because we were going around to like everyone just being like come participate and she told me that she could not participate because she didn't want to get in trouble. Not my eyebrows. Wishaw cosc- cosima reaction is i. I remember i was like. Oh my god no of course and you know when you have memories that stick with you and you have no idea why i just remember that now. And i'm like oh. And this is one of the administration even stemming woman you know white feminists now Because i remember she she put on like i don't know they're like festivals supporting women in shit and then she couldn't she couldn't even walk downstairs to come see this wall tranquil that it's not insane growth. Choose like i don't want to get in trouble. It's political whatever. Sorry the in black political sorry as apologetically. I think like literally. But i guess i'm just wondering how much your your childhood experiences including high school have gone into the work that you're doing now and the things that are manifesting to see in the future with the work you're doing well i think i. The connection is clear in Pushing through what society or society or in my microcosm of me trying to find my way and find my my voice in As a jehovah's witness and i couldn't because i to conform to the the you know i t- tend to dress. I like to make statements a fashion statement that i couldn't make him as a witness. I couldn't speak freely. I couldn't think certain ways. I couldn't love who i wanted to love to marry a man and i was like but i like and actually like a trans person but all even know how to quantify or like completely understand what that means and i know that me an because this fight is still happening internally in in finding my own space literally physically an apartment of my own work through and do this healing in a railway after living with living with the same family that has not accepted truth the truth that i want everybody to accept that black people should be claiming space unapologetically. We were born here we have. We were removed from forcefully and forcibly from our homeland. And we have around the world if everybody everybody that's black would wake up to. It's the work that i'm doing is less about like trying to galvanize white people because honestly that's been happening for hundreds of years and i. I know myself a lot organizers or exhausted from that absolutely and if they don't want to make up the all but in the meantime i'm gonna make sure that my people understand their true power. There are nate royalty. Their their excellence their brilliance. I felt like if everybody we have clearly with the colonization of education The white man is the victor. And so that. Promise that that i hold close to my heart is that black people will be free. I fight until i see that in my. I know it's probably not going to be in my lifetime. But i will set the set the motion forward so that we can continue to have a a coalition. Because it's not gonna take one person or one organization is going to be happening in different pods in spaces all out same time until the catches catch it on. I've noticed that the universe is does it staying like i. i've always Committed to like if it's crafts or like i said choosing myself like that's that's really where with the baseline is and continues and because choosing myself. I always like to choose so like. It's a cute little cycle of like veteran myself so that i can continue to show up and fight for liberation in the way that i know how i'll say my art and also using my voice To make sure that people don't tolerate the bs think critically whatever whatever is being presented to you honey thing about it because i i- blanket. Lee accepted the face from family. I'm i'm sure my mom who was the first study linking accepted it too because it made sense to her right. And that's that's why proselytizing is a thing it's like here's this bible you'll be saved. Change a life. Yeah so that. That's my long winding me. Trying to figure out where those connections are but they're They're several. And i think just meaning into the education is when our law coffee more because i'm.

marla flu national high school Wishaw cosc cosima Marla michael brown carole marlins caroline toledo jimmy donald trump new york city brown joe nate royalty ford Lee
"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

Immigrantly

09:15 min | Last month

"intersectional" Discussed on Immigrantly

"Since graduating high school. Thank you for being on my show. Marla i am so excited. It's such a pleasure to be able to share my story like this. So thank you. And i have so many questions. I- listeners will hear clips from your talk with kylie in a bed But i am really looking forward to our conversation based off that because the in diet conversation was so inspiring and there are so many parts where i couldn't we relate to what you were saying and we will delve into it but before we do that. I want to start with something. That's at the center of this conversation for our listeners. Who aren't familiar with the religion. Could you break down. The court believes of jehovah's witnesses. Yes and actually. This is the first time. I'll be able to get on an speak about this in a public way Because i had as part of those core values anybody that speaks out against or less against moore just like expands on the faith. Once they've left they are considered apostates. So like there's like a very high. The stakes are super high. But i am a truth teller. And i truly believe that for well for my own healing in for people to know and understand what Proselytization can can do the part propaganda there. There are many different stipulations and and obviously consequences that come from that in religions that are founded by white people white man and so So i'll start from the beginning. I one of the releases like Just like most people believe in heaven and hell less less stressed and actually debunked in the bible. 'cause they use the new world translation And so it is biblical it's effective. Christianity and their belief is that on their earthly desires and heavenly desires. If you are a good person You have the possibility to live. Everlasting life on earth. I remember like as a kid. It was very very like Elusive imagining like the imagination was just flowing of the publications. Had illustrations of kids living with cheetahs. And like i loved animals and nature as a kid. And i still am very much a free spirit baby in many ways like anytime about nature. I'm like This is the paradise that like can be replicated or sometimes does bring back some memories of when i was a kid in like thinking of that that promise and so they're also folks that are like leaders within the church or they're called elders Reserved for men. Only i should also say so. The patriarchy is very much and some elders and other people that are referenced at the bible. So you'd think of noah you think of able a lot of folks that are mentioned throughout the biblical traditions would also have like heavenly promises so they might be amongst the one hundred and forty four thousand very specific number better Destined for being up in heaven with jesus christ in the new world so think essentially new world order not to say and i know that there are other things. Ah in relation to that. But the the idea with giovanna says that it's going to be a renewed earth wants After the armageddon all things that are obviously perpetuated through christianity And so like expands upon that and also Inserts something that's more direct with the kings What's it called neural translation. It's been a minute since i've been speaking on this so thank you very with me But yeah so. Those are the main ideas there. And then of course In trying to be as aligned with the bible as taxes possible they realized overtime through their their founding that no one in the bible celebrated their birthday. It was actually a pagan tradition There were like biblical stories in that referenced birthdays and like something bad happened like somebody's head got cut off or something like i just like doing a good summary as but like birthdays christmas Halloween was obviously very tied to like demonic practices. So no halloween. As a kid thanksgiving anything that was like traditional or a holiday observed in the states or honestly around the world was like canceled out in the only thing that was celebrated with the memorial of jesus's death which happens around easter. and so that's the celebration or commemoration that Jokes gather all around the world to on the same day based off of the lunar it. A whole bunch of stuff in there And so that. That was the tradition that i was raised with from when my mom entered the face when she was when i was four years old so that was the last birthday i celebrated. I want to ask you. What was the trigger. Do you know why your mom entered the field. Because i was going to ask you if this faith has been in your family for generations or is it something new. It's a new tradition So when i am actually is tied to my immigration story and my mother story as well. the story goes that i was flying in a helicopter with my godfather When i was eight months old to come and meet my father does walk in so my father. My grandmother on my dad's side were also ready here. Most of the family on my maternal side is as well as already here legally by the way but i came undocumented through this again i always myself like peace sign with little baby helicopter and so i i was here and the only person that was left was my mother in hating. And so she wasn't practicing any faith per se She was raised. And what i believe was a I mean i know that there are several christian sex with sense within eighty so it might have been Baptist might have been a Plenty and there were witnesses as well and so. She was preached to before in haiti but never really took it seriously. I know she had studied from what she had told me. But she made A prayer to whatever. God she would listen to her and said that however is or however you present yourself if i make it to the states. That's how all serve you. And who's preaching everyday. Joe jehovah's witnesses so of course um that felt like an accomplishment of that prayer and so She felt as though god was speaking to her through witnesses and their practices in order to bring her in and find spirituality through jobs witnesses and so like it was essentially a practical way of or the accomplishment of her coming to the states finally And that's how. God presented herself to her or lad her because got women to me And yes that's that's how we started. She started studying. My father was like not really keen within also working day in day out so before that was your father affiliated with any religion any organized religion. He wasn't done My mother was one who started the the movement within the family And yeah so. She started studying with a sister. Actually the same sister who We called her my aunt obviously because a lot of familial ties and asian culture. Everyone's t don't don't So she she started preaching with her. Maybe like over a year or two and my mom's really started taking it more seriously. It was like hey to my father. I'd love to raise the kids this way because a lot of principals like respecting your elders. Ah was a great Great way of like really teaching us values in how to care for one's neighbor things that obviously are associated with christianity as well and just like being a good person So she thought that it was the best decision for the family. I'm sure they had plenty of conversations and he started studying as well because he thought that it might have been a great way of just like raising us as a unit and didn't want to combat or have any attention tension of course so Shout out to him again. I just and i was going to ask you. Does he believe strongly in the religion itself and it's called believes or do you think your transition out of religion has impacted his religious beliefs as well. Well i i will honestly leave that up to him. I'm gonna declined to comment. Because i don't want to put him in any. Has he listens to everything that i do. I'm gonna let you speak for yourself here. But from what i know. I know that. I've influenced him in several ways. Just the same way that i had started a nonprofit and started a change making collective at the same in haiti It's called foot as boxer like they do initiatives and so like honestly that's pretty frowned upon within the faith so like he has taken upon himself to continue to foster change. Because part of those principles as witnesses is that you're not engaged civically within activism within most humanitarian efforts because jesus is gonna come and save him anything this is such an important point marla and before we delve into it. I want us to tune into your amazing conversation with kylie reunion of sorts. Right and.

Marla kylie giovanna moore Joe jehovah haiti jesus marla
Rashad Robinson Is a Leader Fighting for Equity and Justice

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:43 min | 3 months ago

Rashad Robinson Is a Leader Fighting for Equity and Justice

"Rashad robinson. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me. I am so glad we are able to do this conversation one because it's the last possible episode a of pride month but also because of where we are in the country right now and if there is one person to talk to about this sort of inter sexual moment we're in right now in our country. You are that person. So i'm just going to throw out this broad. Brush question to you and ask you. What would you say is the state of our union given the perch that you're in right now. Yeah i mean given the purge. I'm in right now. She's been thinking about this. A lot and i was thinking about this. A lot as we lost congressman. John lewis and thinking about all of the political In policy change that happened during his time. During that era of the sixties the voting rights act civil rights. Act spending time with Congressman john lewis sort of later in his in his tenure. I don't think we're in that same era of big serve structural policy change. I think were in this moment of deep cultural shift. You saw it last summer. When racial justice became a majoritarian issue doesn't mean there isn't backlash. But what. I mean by racial justice becoming majoritarian issues. That many people thought the best we could do in terms of activism at that time was clap outside of our windows are uplift investigative journalism and it was racial justice that moved people to the street. Move people to action led to upticks voter. Registration

Rashad Robinson Congressman John Lewis John Lewis
Podcast Episode 017: Moya Bailey www.yndialorickwilmot.com

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

03:00 min | 4 months ago

Podcast Episode 017: Moya Bailey www.yndialorickwilmot.com

"B esides the fact that i cannot go anywhere. I can't watch or read anything with the critical lance without thinking about or employing. your term misogynoir very fluidly as it is now very much a part of mainstream lexicon and i'm sure you're probably like well so and so also used the term. I can imagine how that must feel. It's an interesting feeling. Actually if i if i may elaborate you know it's one exciting that people find the term useful and then also really disheartening. That it has to be used so much. I'm both excited and also troubled. That makes it a double edge sword. Absolutely. I 've been intrigued by your public scholarship for some time, in the ways y ou've examined intersectional issues of B lackness, gender, and sexuality, queerness, ability and disability in a very accessible way. I'm eager to learn more about your journey and i'm sure my listeners are. so are you ready? all right. Let's get into it. Act 1, call to adventure. M oya as a writer and public scholar there are paths we take, processes w e engage in to get us to where we are today. How did you become interested in doing the work. That's such a great question. I would say it started when i was young. I was a kid that had to go to the doctor a lot. And so i knew that i was going to be a medical doctor. I just knew it. Then i went to Sp elman for undergrad and at S pelman, I fell in love with women's studies and that feel like woke something up in me. And what did it awaken? As a woman studies scholar. I started to think about how ideas and stereotypes about black women circulate in medicine and then have an impact on how black women are treated when they do go to the doctor. Those are very large and robust but important issues to contend with when considering your own career trajectory. i was just trying to think about like if there is a way that representations actually inform societal treatment for Black women. We need a better way to talk about it. And so as i was writing my dissertation in grad school. That's what i was trying to get to with the term misogynoir; w hat is it about h ow black women are treated in medicine t hat is informed by t he s ocietal representations of black women that are so damaging and how does that transfers happened? How did those representations actually then impact what happens in medicine or other societal institutions. It seem like during graduate school particularly while you were writing your dissertation. Those were the moments in which you realize we need lexicon. We need frameworks to understand Black women's experiences. W as there another moment or experience at this time t hat informed your work? I was thinking about this as a grad

#Misogynoir #Spelmancollege #Profyndia #Transformmisogynoir Talkingjourneysofbelonging2bla Grad School
Stella McCartney on the Business of Sustainable Design

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:30 min | 5 months ago

Stella McCartney on the Business of Sustainable Design

"This week. We hosted the bureau f. Professional summit focused on closing fashion sustainability gap the if that must planned around the sustainability index and finding solutions to some of the challenges our industry faces and addressing so many topics from workers rights to waste from watering chemicals to materials view. Professional members can watch all of the talks on demand at business of fashion dot com in the meantime here stella mccartney at the oth professional summit. Stella how are you first of all. I'm sorry well thank you. how are you. it's been a crazy year. I'm still trying to process everything that's happened. But we are here today. To talk about sustainability and this is actually the continuation of a conversation that you and i have been having for many many years. We created the o. F. sustainability index. Because we wanted to insert some real comparable data to help us an industry gauge and measure progress because of course without data We can't measure how things are changing. The index covers transparency emissions water and chemicals materials workers rights waste. You know things that you and i have spoken about over the years and i was really interested to learn and read more about the work that you're doing in return of agriculture and regenerative farming. The magic solution for sustainability is not any single thing and actually what are the most important things to understand about our index. Is that everything intersects. All of these categories are intersectional. So what we've created them as separate elements of our index. They're all interlinked. So in the first instance can you tell us and explain to us what regenerative agriculture is. And why it's so powerful and how it works. We only came to this way of farming thousands of years ago because we actually even then didn't know how to farm oviously. We didn't know that when we took some much from the soil and other farmed the land that it would have nothing left to give us that stage we realized and was obviously ruined. Matic moved on and we learnt sadly were in a day and age where we have to learn

Stella Mccartney Stella Matic
Building a More Diverse and Inclusive Academia With Shaz Zamore

Papa Phd Podcast

06:38 min | 6 months ago

Building a More Diverse and Inclusive Academia With Shaz Zamore

"Really want to share. Maybe what if if you have seen changes between when you went through grad school or university and what you see happening today in terms of you know being a woman being a woman of color being being non binary woman of color. Can you talk a little a little bit about the good things that you're seeing happening and how they compared to maybe some experiences that you've had. Yeah yeah so so i. I did identify as women for most. I've always identified as gender queer. But like i've i've occupied women's spaces and had that experience for most of a career and i. It's it's a tough question so it's changed and it hasn't changed. There are definitely. I've seen a lot more top down. I've seen a lot more Administration and kind of structural changes that go in positions. The committee Just this focus on evaluating truly evaluating. How faculties students are are engaging in participating in diversity in in most importantly inclusive efforts which is a cultural shift Not just numerical ship. So i've seen a lot more of that and that's really great. I think it's feel personally. It might just be where. I am in my career and the kind of accolades. I have behind me at this point. But i feel much more comfortable speaking out when something is not okay than i did before I feel like even. If i was an i often am the only black person in the room and somebody says something and no pun intended off color. I feel like if i were to stand up and say something. My white colleagues would be in support rate. That's something that. I think certainly didn't happen to grad school for so that's nice. I like to see that. But then there's also i think we haven't quite had the collective realization about how much has to change War to to actually make a truly inclusive environment And so in that frame. There's kind of like at the individual level at at like the bottom up like who however we rallying to really care about that that's still lacking again because i think we frankly just don't sit down and have the practice of thinking about what the future is. What's it gonna look like. What's what's the classroom physically going to look like. what's lecture actually going to contain. How all of these things. It really sit down and quantify so much scientists as thinkers. But we're not sitting down to quantify what that actually what's it gonna look like. What the end result. How do we actually predict. There's no practice of that And so it's kind of like this. Big hand wavy gray mass. We're like yeah. We're making it better but you. You can't actually make it better if you don't have a goal in mind and so there we really need to see that progress still feels like we need to have some inclusiveness you x. specialist user experience versus to kind of model. What it's going to actually feel like for the for the users war in this case the the students. Yeah question are there. You've you've had to clearly from what you're saying deal with some some some difficulties some exclusion in or you know in your in your path. But were their strategies. Were there things you did or poor people in your path that that were helpful and that you can You know the yeah. They were helpful with that. And are there. Is there some advice for someone who's now at this institution or even in this group sometimes. It's just there's group dynamics writers group culture that is those somehow not so accepting and and that's that's difficult. Is there some advice you can give based on your experience of overcoming these obstacles and coming out stronger after yeah and my advice is echoed by research have a support group has abort group has support group having support group. Have people you can go and go back to your base code. Go back to that natural language. Drop your guard you know. Be yourself be really comfortable. You gotta have those the especially as any sort of minorities especially as intersectional a have your support group for intersectional people. I will acknowledge it. Super hard like for me. For example. Black spaces aren't always queer friendly spaces. Queer friendly spaces aren't always black friendly spaces as really hard thing to navigate. Still even if you're not fully relaxed even if you can't find a black. We are space for example at combination. Even those little bits that you get steps to single person even it goes so far There was one fellow who i think about as mentor. I can't i know his name is added. can't remember his last name but he was a new faculty. he was working in molecular biology at u. Dub i was in bio so we were in the same hallway and i would see him in the hallway. We kinda wave at each other walking by and then when he pulled me aside we just started chatting and anytime i saw him. We would just like stop in the hallway and chat for two or three minutes. Maybe we got a coffee and it was just this idea. It really created this sense of of of culture for meaning academia of what. I really nurtured a thing i needed. And it set the precedent right. Like here's someone. When i see someone frequently you're part of my community. I should have relationship with you to some degree and so in that that. That's someone that i think about a lot. That's a it's a behavior. I think about a lot. How can i bring that forward And i think things like that are also really important like looking at how people give you the cultural needs. Meet your cultural needs and how you can help that with some. Bring that to somebody else.

Grad School Or University
What is Social Sustainability?

ECO CHIC

10:42 min | 9 months ago

What is Social Sustainability?

"Motivations for living ecoconscious lifestyle were pretty largely fuelled by climate change and climate action and environmental sustainability. Is kind of tricky. Let's first define it. Environmental sustainability can be pretty loosely defined as responsible interaction with the environment. Now what is responsible. That's different for different people but in my view environmental sustainability is conducting life in a way that inflicts minimal harm on the earth. And its natural resources now. I want to take a minute. Just acknowledge that. The word sustainability generally speaking. I think it's a little misleading because it truly just means the maintenance of an action sustainability when we look at like diet culture. Is your diet. Sustainable that means can you keep up with it. Indefinitely so sustainability is a weird word that we've attached to climate action because we don't actually want to sustain our society maintain business as usual. We want to do better. We want to decarbonise. We want to more aggressively achieve. Climate goals to ensure a stable planet so sustainability is really the bare minimum however in last year. We've really begun to open up the conversation around different kinds of sustainability and for good reason. I like to think about different kinds of sustainability kind of like circles that overlap in the middle of that ven diagram overlap. Portion can be environmental sustainability or perhaps more accurately when we're looking at society as a whole or community as a whole. we're looking at a pyramid. hierarchy of needs at the very base of that pyramid is social sustainability. Social sustainability is also pretty loosely defined because it manifest in a lot of other larger societal concerns essentially social sustainability looks at the societal structures in place that allow people to live healthy. Happy lives now. I know that sounds pretty big picture. But let's think about it. Social sustainability will look like things like equity diversity culture amenities so things like your social life type activities but also things like grocery stores job opportunities wellness and health safety community. engagement community. Engagement is one that i liked to talk about because a lot of climate action plans. Actually look at voter turnout looking at social sustainability because if people are active in their democracy. That's an indication that they care about where they live and they care about what's going to happen to it in the immediate future. If you really hide your pick of the litter it's not attractive to live somewhere with really severe inequity or really poor safety or no access to things like grocery stores. An area with these kinds of concerns would not be considered particularly socially sustainable because what incentive do people have to invest in communities that aren't actually invested in their own wellbeing and their livelihood hs. I mentioned job opportunities and someone out there may have perked up and like hey i think that might actually be economic. Sustainability economic sustainability is an interesting term because it can be both personal and societal. So for instance if you are buying a new car every year is that economically sustainable for you can you financially keep up with that but also is a society that relies on frivolous consumer spending economically sustainable. We saw this. During the pandemic people are generally more budget conscious and more inclined to save or maybe skip an extra non essential purchase. So how economically sustainable is it if there are entire industries relying on consumer spending. This is not necessarily saying that consumers shouldn't feel like they have to save a business. I'm talking about the necessity of consumers to spend on entire industries for their maintenance. So the example i'm thinking of is actually taxis about a year or so ago the daily which is the new york times daily. Podcast did a piece on taxis and taxi. Company had at the time opened up a suit against uber and ultimately there were some restrictions put on rideshare companies in new york city. But the bottom line. Was that a rideshare. Company was being seen as competition entering the marketplace. And it wasn't really on the city to protect taxis against consumer choice. That's the economy. That's supply and demand the model of taxis. Just waiting around wasn't economically sustainable. In that instance so the company is pivoted and maybe they lowered their rates or expanded their service areas or did something that allowed them to continue showing up as a worthy economic competitor. That's economic sustainability. Now let's go to job opportunities. Because i really liked this one. This again is a measure of social and economic sustainability. It is less attractive again to live somewhere without job opportunities or at least some reasonable access to job opportunities and public transportation to get you to those job opportunities and are those job opportunities reasonably profitable for you. Are people being paid fairly if someone needs to work two jobs to live somewhere. What does that say about minimum wage or the cost of living and favorite little sound line. One that i say all the time at work. And i've said it before on the show is that you cannot expect people to care about the solar panels. You're putting up in their neighborhood. If they can't pay their electric bill in the first place you are not meeting people's basic social and economic needs. They can't afford to care about the environment. Something we hear all the time when discussing healthy foods in sustainability and food access is the argument against fast food. So let's ask ourselves. Why do families by fast food on a weeknight for a meal. Well maybe it's preference. Maybe people just like it but also maybe it's time are they commuting and they don't have time to cook at home or is it budget because fast food is reasonably cheap when you're considering the cost of ingredients and groceries to make a comparable meal maybe it's access are they're reasonably good comparable options for them to eat out in their community or maybe they live in a food desert and don't have access good access to fresh produce and grocery stores if you're not addressing those issues of time and money and access who is going to listen to you when you're telling them that their hamburger requires the water equivalent of six months worth of showers or that a poor side cow lived their whole life in terrible. Awful slaughterhouse conditions. Just that they can enjoy a dollar menu hamburger. I mean maybe someone is going to be sympathetic in there. And say wow. I feel really bad. But that doesn't address their core issues of why they are choosing to make that decision in the first place that purchasing decision. Why are we not addressing the issue of time and money and access so another example. I wanted to skies which maybe a touchy one. But if you're listening to the show. I feel like i can reasonably assume that we share similar views on defunding. The police and the value in that studies have shown that an increase in active duty. Police officers does not have any significant impact on declining crime rates in an area. So let's talk crime. What types of situations may provoke someone to partake in crime. I don't know if that is the most correct wording but bear with me here. One thing that may drive someone to crime is money so let's talk. Money are their job. Opportunities are their job. Training programs for high schoolers are their educational opportunities and access to those training programs or transition programs and for people who are already working but just simply not making enough money. What does that say again about the minimum wage or how we value certain professions if the pandemic has taught us anything it's that the most essential workers in our society beyond of course our frontline healthcare are those employed in a trade or they're working in food food delivery they're cashiers or the people stocking the shelves. Oshawa barbara said this on our last episode when discussing the fashion industry if people at the top are billionaires and then the people at the bottom the garment maker is the people doing the most backbreaking work on the supply. Chain making pennies. That's a messed up system so bringing it back to crime. Let's get to the root issues. Let's address those social and economic concerns and issues that are driving people participate in it in the first place. Another fun fact. Random example that i learned in the classic city planning book. The death and life of american cities is that street lights and the length of city blocks are really good indicators of crime rates so if there is less light there's less opportunity for a nighttime crime. If you have a longer blocked have less alleyway less opportunity for crime outside of the public eye. And where do you have long blocks. And where do you have a lot of street lights in the suburbs. Not all the time course. But it's a good way to kind of guesstimate crime rates in an area when you think about a bad neighborhood quote unquote what do you think of its poorly lit. There's a lot of alleyways maybe in the scene that you're having in your head and that's also about city budgets and planning and money and time and access. So what are we funding instead of job training programs and education and social services that for these conditions to kind of perpetuate and kind of sink in to the societal structure in that community. So we've been talking about crime for while. But i would like to zoom out and bring this conversation back to the idea of social sustainability meaning that people's basic needs for living stable lives needs to be met before they have the privilege to care about climate change and environmental action and how their daily lives are impacting the planet. We can't tell everyone that amazon is bad and they need to stop shopping there without replacing that with a similarly low cost option or similar accessible option. What's getting to their house in two days are what's immediately available in their neighborhood. Ultimate social sustainability would be a society that conducts business and economic activities that protects both people and the planet when we're looking at environmental sustainability. We want to make sure that people have the means to care about it. Not just financially. I don't want to say that in order to be truly environmentally. Sustainable you need to be buying from. Environmental companies are environmentally backed companies. But that's to say that you have the capacity to care. You're not worried about larger more basic necessities to live stable healthy happy life. I also think this is a really good place to plug intersectional

New York Times Daily Oshawa Barbara New York City Amazon
Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

Forum

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

"Been disproportionately impacted by the job losses during the pandemic to the point that some are referring to today's recession as a she session. Many of the pressures women already face in the work force, such as the gender pay gap barriers to advance. Men and lack of flexibility have been exacerbated. The crisis could, however, usher and new policy standards and support systems for women across industries and income levels. Here with me to talk about all this is Alexis Crib. Covic, senior partner with McKinsey and co author of Women in the Workplace. 2020 report. Welcome to the program. Alexis Crisco, Vic Chris. Covic. I'm sorry. I'm getting that right. Thank you for having me and we also have in helicopters. Litwin, clinical psychologist and founder of Latinos Think Big a network of professional women and Lumina. Modern psychotherapy practice. Welcome in helicopters. Littwin. Thank you. And Serena Khan, chief executive officer of Women's Foundation of California. Welcome to the program. Serena Con. Thanks so much, and Alexis Krukov itch. I'd like to start with you and some of what the McKinsey Workforce study told us. Why are women facing greater job loss than men? And where are we seeing the biggest impacts? Salute Lee. So the headline here is that we're facing a crossroads in corporate America today, and the reason for that is on one side this pandemic while a humanitarian crisis at its heart has created An opening for flexible work, and that's a good thing because that's the number one thing. Women have said. In the past, they need to advance more in the workplace environment. On the flip side, one in four women today is saying because of the pandemic and the context it's creating in their workplace environment and their home environment. They may need to step back or step out of the workforce. And one and four equates to two million women that would unwind years of progress of women's advancement in the workplace. And it's just something we can't afford to lose. And we're really seeing the gendered nature of work here to right Serena Khan, not only where Caretaking responsibilities end up falling when push comes to shove, but also who falls into this essential worker category and the disproportionate impact on black and brown women's who We're looking at a really layered intersectional issue here. That's exactly right. All of us are being impacted by the pandemic, but we're not all being impacted in the same way. Oh, the gendered impact of the pandemic are particularly profound for especially women of color working moms, gender non conforming folks this pandemic. Highlighting problems that we've needed to work on together to solve three the pandemic, So we know, for example in California. Freak O bed, two thirds of tipped workers, part time workers, minimum wage earners where women and primarily women of color even though California Is the wealthy of state in the nation. It's also has the highest rate of poverty and the people who are living in poverty in California are women of color and their kids. And so when we think about this pandemic, whether It's women who are the essential workers who are making up 80% of our healthcare workforce, or the retail and grocery workers. The essential workers that Are still working or on the flip side. They're the ones that have lost their jobs because the majority of us are working in the restaurant industry. Oh, our other retail industry that have lost significant Numbers of jobs, so it's a very gendered epidemic and Serena Con you've spoken about how there's no going back to normal that that normal wasn't that good to begin with, when it came to gender equity in the workforce. That's right. You know, this pandemic is shining a light on all that was wrong with Our country, our world, our state, and so you know, as hundreds of thousands of women leave the workforce to manage what is really an unmanageable amounts of caretaking remote schooling. You know, our child care costs were making up. Ah, upwards of, you know, 60 70% of the single moms income that's not sustainable and So you know, we have an opportunity here to think about what is the future that we want on. DWI can change some of those systems that we have an opportunity to really Think about care, work into value care and compensate that work fairly as we figure out howto move forward, But the pandemic has really forced us to reckon with how much care we all need, whether we're caring for our Children. For each other for ourselves for our elders on DH so we can build some new solutions for us that the women Foundation California we have believed Since our founding in 1979 that people who are closest to the problems in their communities are also closest to the solutions. And so we have innovative ideas coming out of community. Based leaders about what we can do post pandemics. I think it's important for us now, Tio You know, make sure that people are getting their basic needs met. So you know, one of the other things that we saw very early on in the pandemic is that not everybody was safer at home. That rates of domestic violence were spiking upwards of 40 to 80% and all of California 58 counties. So we and yet so as the need went up the Situation for the shelters was that they had to that They had actually left physical space because of the need to do physical distance event. Soon, though, there's a lot that Yeah, so there's just a lot that we're seeing and that we can think about solving. Yes,

California Serena Khan Serena Con Women's Foundation Of Californ Women Foundation California Mckinsey Workforce Alexis Crib Mckinsey Alexis Krukov Alexis Crisco Covic Senior Partner Founder America Lumina LEE Chief Executive Officer
"intersectional" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"In that, what we can derive is they sought out this form of submission because they knew that it was necessary for balance and that these desires in order to be fully expressed, require them to change how they see on. I'm using you know women as Dominatrix and men as subs in this particular circumstance, but they have to. They are forced to look at power exchange differently and seeing woman a woman in that position. And so. It reminds me of this Greek philosopher from the sixth century haircut who essentially talked about the the law of opposing opposites and Everything is everything needs. It's opposite in order to exist. Therefore, all things are one because one cannot exist without the other. So when we look at power dynamics when you have a, you know a dominant and submissive, it's very. To see how that tension those polarities are actually necessary in order to exist and I think it's really beautiful opportunity that we have through media salmon power play to actually restructure what constitutes tower what constitutes powerful, and how having access to both of those versions of ourselves is how we actually feel like a complete person. Yeah. Yeah, it's. An. I'm wondering to Thursday conversation here around power and its association with Masculinity, and Masculinity, and it's a relationship in association with power. And I know you have a project. We've talked about the book lobby outside of this project men who take baths and you started that in two thousand seventeen kind of right after me Metoo when the divide between men and women was pretty large and felt really complicated and. You're going to open up these conversations around what it means to be a man and deconstruct those pieces around masculinity. Can you talk a little bit about that project? Yeah that that project sparked by the question where the good man where women in my life where asking right after me to look wired the men's speaking up and I need a lot of these quote good man and when I consulted with them, they were so afraid of saying the wrong thing. So they decided to say nothing at all and this is where I noticed that this divide was starting to form, and I thought one to one conversations was how we would create change by creating a bridge of empathy so like Gender, equity is one goal of this project. Seeking to understand one, another is how it's done. But amassing allies in the feminist movement, which is to me. Asking for and requesting for men and women to be able to fully express themselves as complex beings without the implications that come with those specific genders, and so we need to work together and had like how do we do that? If we don't if we fundamentally don't understand one another. So that's what the project is. It's largely out like understanding that the patriarchy. Also has a negative impact on man I talked about that tower. Yeah. They're stuck there too, and unless we allow men, the same privilege that we as women are asking for to also redefine what it means to be a woman they have to they have to be given the same opportunity to redefine what it means to be a man. Sexism in my opinion is not something that is produced by societies interventions. It's It's inherent of societies absence to have these types of conversations. So part of what you said at the beginning there of men being scared to say anything and kind of not wanting to just say anything at all and that for me really echoes and is very familiar within racial conversations between white and black people specifically and white people feeling very similar to what men are saying in this instance and for me, I've. Always advocated that it's better to try and say something that has a positive impact even if your intention is positive impact and the impact isn't necessarily positive but that you're putting in that effort and to just try to move through a conversation with compassion with empathy as best as you can is still better than staying silent because you're scared, you might say something wrong. So some curious within this gender equality conversation within this project of where you see intersectional feminism where you see intersection between genders but also. Noticing where there might be differences there within race or how to be inclusive within racial differences of men and women, and those experiences. I think a huge question but I will definitely say like through doing interviews with. People of Color White people it is. Everyone has an individualistic experience and subjective experience to how their lives have been lived, and we need to understand those by getting curious about them not being afraid of that, which we don't understand them and also looking at at as the backdrop of the culture that we are currently end. So the word culture comes from the French word Kalari I believe which actually means like of the earth to grow to cultivate to nurture. We can ask for all of the change in the world's but if we do not have a culture that actually fundamentally support asking for when it comes to race equality gender equality, all these things that we're trying to do will fall through the cracks if our foundation isn't sound. So I think we have to one gathered the experiences, the lived experiences of other people unlike US and start to see the commonalities in the common threads that make us human, and then we need to start questioning those in positions of power and how they're actually Allowing these things to continue without being the ones that pushed change forward. So it's kind of like the intersection of a lived experience and the culture that supports that. I think it's going to it's going to take some time but what's really encouraging is you know, I I heard it a lot especially around me to, which is the idea of the pendulum swinging too far. You know but the pendulums will always swing too far because you need to obliterate and make that much space. So when it does come back and start to equalize, we can actually see the divide and how we heal it. The other aspect of this is compassionate disagreement to your point those who are too afraid. To say the wrong thing that they say nothing at all. Well, we need to be compassionate for those who say the wrong thing which is why I think canceled culture as well. Intentioned as it was also did the movement a disservice because we did not use restorative justice and don't get me wrong. What happened was so necessary and how we initially the fervor in which we handle that was so necessary but then you have people that are just going underground and that want to heal, but we're not necessarily creating the framework. For them to figure out. Okay I said the wrong thing now..

intersectional
What is intersectional environmentalism?

Climate Connections

01:19 min | 1 year ago

What is intersectional environmentalism?

"Org. I'm Dr Anthony lies with and this is climate connections. In Twenty Fourteen Lee Thomas was in college environmental science policy when a crisis unfolded in her hometown of Ferguson Missouri. Police shot unarmed black teenager Michael. Brown. Sparking widespread protests. China learn about the Clean Air Act while my sister is getting furious back home in a protest. She says, the events made her question who the cleaner rack really protects. Inner concern increased when she read data showing that people of color are more exposed to many air and water pollutants as a black woman. She was dismayed because I would say that's me on that page. That's my community. That's my family. So this past may in what became a viral instagram post Thomas called on environmentalists to stand in solidarity with Black Lives Matter Movement. And she defined what she calls intersectional environmentalism. Aware inclusive version of environmentalism that identifies the ways in which injustices happening marginalized communities, and the Earth are interconnected. She hopes that the definition helps articulate a new approach to environmental activism one that has the well being of the planet and people at its core.

Lee Thomas Dr Anthony Missouri China Earth Brown Michael
Heraeus Medical's Journey with Dr. Cybulsky (Founder, IONIA) and Dr. Maclellan (CEO, Cortina Health)

The Voice of Healthcare

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Heraeus Medical's Journey with Dr. Cybulsky (Founder, IONIA) and Dr. Maclellan (CEO, Cortina Health)

"Let's get it started and talk briefly if one of you don't mind doing so. What is harassing us was their focus and globally whether your strategies moment. I'll I'll tell you what if he doesn't mind. So Herrera's as an organization is a fortune five. Hundred Company is a family owned company with in Jimmy? We have an active and a market leading medical product portfolio that is world renowned. We manufacture with a manufacturer leading manufacturer bone cement that's used in offer pasta surgery so Of Shoulders, hips, maze, and ankle replacements. Ugly about the and with direct and indirect sales, teams and supplies or do our customers. We're very active. Within the digital market itself as we see that this is an area, all a growth potential for our organization on as we've got a very, very mature digits, immature traditional business tangibly, what are your goals in those world of Tech when it comes to your model in your market? Will do be honest I mean one of the goals of the company, it's his customer I. It's one of the first focus points, and now if you talk of that word customer I, what customer wants an at this moment in this era of value based healthcare customers wants reduce cost and better patient outcomes because customer in disregards what we refer to in our scenario, our hospitals are surgeons. Yahoo. Reserve, we use our productivity surgeries. And? Typical goal in this regards when digital is also provide solutions that can finally fulfill that goal of values medicine. Any kind of technology in that regards that can help us further reduce costs and improve. Comes is something favor. Tell us about some curb projects you're working on the outcomes of which you're excited about and the application there. So we stopped with. As, we are based in automatic market. So when we look at automatic market, we see trends coming up like fast surgery is a trend and yeah how did he generate further value for the patients and in this regards as fuss solution or what's product digital product that we got in the market we call it here you scare, which is basically a telemedicine solution which digitalized. Patient Journey. Deadly as well as hell, the providers basically to connect post operative outcome from the patient. So that steep product list in step that is medical has taken in this regards. Now, of course, when we talk of things, they are quite some challenges what you facing the market at this moment and Yeah one of the biggest challenges stop okay in digital health physically formed of towards digital one is health. If you think of digital world on score, it has his principal and one of the biggest motivating factor in the old main principal speed. So you expect things to be moving with a speed on the other side. When you consider the world helt health is in its of healthcare has been a marathon runner. Now imagine digital health at a intersectional synergistic thing between the two areas and as digital health person, you have to think about the speed with which digital world is running and also the persistence that you have to maintain in a typical healthcare set up. And this is not an easy combination to achieve and which is one of the bigger challenges. that. You face you know whenever you try to introduce a new product or digital product in the market. Because you imagine or that sales cycles and everything in this regards will move quite fast with the stipulation of digital project

Hundred Company Herrera Principal Yahoo Jimmy
Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

Medicare for All

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

"Today, we're speaking with Barbara Dipietro. Who Directs the policy and advocacy activities for the national healthcare for the Homeless Council. Barbara, thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Yeah it's so. I'm so glad you're you're you're with us today especially during covid nineteen where I feel like the healthcare and housing systems are really failing us and intersectional and kind of dangerous way. So we really wanted to focus on this today. But I could you tell us a little bit about yourself? How did you end up getting involved with this type of work and what do you do for your for your work? Thanks much I came to this work working for the state of. Maryland. In the Department of Health and did a public health policy for about ten years both of the governor's office and for the Department of Health I did interagency family and children's services and and was a staff to the. Agency. Council on Homelessness. I was the opportunity to write Maryland's first a ten year plan to end homelessness, and this was back when those ten year plans were really just getting going under the Bush administration and Interagency Councils to. A homeless policies within states were really becoming the thing to do and and so that was precisely the time when I was in public service and my eyes were opened at that point to the breadth of issues affiliated with Homelessness and just how preventable homelessness is if we could just get good public policies to address it. And that was obviously no more. Well, illustrated than health department and in healthcare, and so one the things that I, the partners that we worked with healthcare for the homeless out here in Maryland they introduced me to a network of healthcare for the homeless providers nationally, and that's where I was. Started working with the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council and came familiar with them, and then they had an opportunity for director of policy and I've been in this role for eleven years now. And really excited to be doing just so much more deeper work on healthcare on homelessness in good public policy. So just to start with. I feel like the image that people have of homelessness doesn't actually match the reality of who experiences homelessness, how people become homeless and what it really looks like to experience housing instability. Can You just define homelessness for our listeners and paint a picture to help us better understand what it really looks like sure. I know we tend to conjure in our mind a street homeless man who was a chronic. That is what most Americans think of when they think of as homelessness. Really that population is about ten percent of the total homeless population in the country. Overwhelmingly, what we are seeing our low income working families are working people If you look in shelters most shelters a third to a half of shelter. Shelter stays our children. When you look at it working families who when we think about. Earning eight nine or ten dollars an hour, ten dollars an hour is twenty dollars. Excuse me twenty thousand dollars a year at fulltime salary. That's still not enough to make rent and pay bills and meet your food needs and and and and so people even when they are working even if it's not minimum wage still maybe in the shelter because they can't afford housing. So the official definition of homelessness, it may not surprise your listeners to know that there are many federal different definitions of homelessness depending on the program you were looking to access and so the definition of homelessness if you were in a housing world is more narrow than in the healthcare world. and. So then it's different even for the schools. And so we're looking at obviously street homelessness but also people who were living in transitional housing programs, permanent housing programs, people who were doubled up with friends or family really unstable. There's just a really A. Many people do not just solely stay in one place so they may be staying in a shelter for few nights. They may bounce back onto the street they may be able to stay for a couple of nights with friends or family member. Maybe, a spare couch something like that. Many of our clients do work, and so they do have some income were there on disability and they have some income. So that income allows them to pay a hundred dollars for the for sleeping on a couch for a couple of weeks.

National Healthcare Homeless Council Barbara Dipietro Maryland Department Of Health Interagency Councils Director Official
FavyFav on Planeta G!

Latinos Who Lunch

06:55 min | 1 year ago

FavyFav on Planeta G!

"With us today, we have the Amazing Justin Fella Aka five, eighty five. He's Guatemalan American artists from Nevada known for his large scale sculptures that plays with American pop culture and the lat next experienced. He's the host of a couple of podcasts including the art people podcast and one of my favorite podcasts. Latinos who lunch welcomed Fathi. Welcome. Still trying to figure out technology. Technical difficulties. We're like we're right there. Thank you. Thank you for having me. I am in Las Vegas Nevada right now since. Yes in city where people don't believe that wearing masks is a big so. Crystal. Very similarly. You know we we started working at Greenpeace right around the same time and we really didn't see a lot of lat next representation in the environmental movement in these big green organizations and so we thought hey, like maybe we can just do something like that and on your show you talk about sort of the intersection between being Queer Latinas and sort of like this idea of Spangler. Inside this Anglo world out what do you think is the importance of intersection analogy was important to talk about. Oh my gosh. That's one of the. That's one of the big big missions of Lebanon's lunches that. If it's not intersectional it it's really not for for anyone really like if it's not intersect, the revolution is intersectional whom we will never be free basically you know. So from the very beginning, we've been checking ourselves on our privilege as gender males on the show, and because we recognize the all the you know the misogyny within own you know belief systems just based on how we were raised in America and I'm saying America like North South and Central America and so And then something that happened maybe like a year or two intellectuals who lunch was the recognition of the erasure of Central American culture, and also after let me move out. So we actively before people are using the term anti-racists or. Really. Intersection analogy I think I heard that a lot after the the white woman's March that happened a few years ago So but they got fizzy hatsaw haven't seen many at the black lives haven't seen many at the black lives matter protests but so wh-. Anyway, We really we really started paying attention to like oh my gosh we're really like Mexico centric on our show we need to actively be anti-black and talk about colors and talk about the erasure of offer. Let the needle on our show and we recognize that it was our own. You know that was our one of our personal goal was to really openly talk about that and have sometimes uncomfortable conversation. Let I love what you said. We can't have revolution if it's not intersectional because the sort of Traumas and the histories and experiences are compounded with each identity that include you both you know in a way that's like. Boosts Society and helps you in society also not. About yeah. especially with climate change because at the end of the day, we're all going to be affected by climate change but to what degree and how soon it really depends on where you are how much you have, how much you given, how much you're supported in society. It's funny because like recycling and incur the environment it seen this very same in or you know white people saying but it's like no dinos have been trying to take care of the environment for a very long time. We just don't talk about it in the same way you know what I mean. So I mean I also like to pretend that I'm Vegan. Just people mad because you know that's US relegated to just white people. You know I'm so like Oh. Yeah. I. Don't I don't wanna eat cows anymore because it's bad for the environment and that's like the real thing that I'm doing now that we're talking about claim it and how much Linex do people care about it maybe not in the same context that you know white people are recycling or being around this like we have our willows. Teaching on like here's the. Deal or like rub this like urban you're like sore foot and you'll wake up of. The best. Or some other iteration of that Linex people care about the environment and we quote like or reference this study that happened recently at Yale that seventy percent of people in the United States, Horley care about the environment, and so how do you see that or not see that reflected in our culture and how do you see annex values reflected in the conversation around the environment? yeah, I mean there's there's very different schools of thinking within my own family for example, but like my will lead, you know isolated people do it saying this online to we've been saving plastic bags and containers from jump? Right. That's just something that we do in our like is that sour cream in the fridge? That's probably. Some leftover beans or something. You never know you never know I'm so in little ways like that we're very resourceful as Latinos because we have to be, but also it's just part of our culture even in Latin? America. But I am example that pops up to my pops up to my head is recently visited what the my life for the first time as an adult and went back to where my mom is from this little little village called. We let the in Garland which is right in the center of a psychopath in Guatemala and so. HALF OF MY A. Family are farmers and then half of them are. are raise cattle So it's like. That's when I realized like Yo my family is responsible for like the deforestation of Quantum Allah because I'm seeing all this open land my GRANDPA has. but they don't see that way. They're like, no cows our money we're going to raise cows we're GONNA make you know we're gonna them or dairy cow. So then we'll be sold for me and so there's this acres and acres of land that my family owns that is is just it's just grass now when it used to be rich rainforest

America United States Justin Fella Nevada Fathi Central America Las Vegas Nevada Greenpeace Traumas Linex Lebanon Spangler Garland Mexico Guatemala Yale
A Democracy at Risk

In The Thick

04:30 min | 1 year ago

A Democracy at Risk

"Welcome to the this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a PC perspective I Medina wholesome and I'm. And today we have to Itt all-stars, call you their homes in quarantine. Yes. Yes. From Winston Salem North Carolina is Tina Vazquez but she's a senior reporter with prism and a twenty twenty I to be wells fellow with type investigations. Welcome back. Tina. High for happy ache and joining us from Atlanta Georgia is the fabulous Russia. Brown Co founder of black voters matter what's up? I'm so happy to be back. All is well and we're so. We're so happy to have you back to. so it's been. Intense that's kind of. An understatement in China. Living here has been intense in this country from the pandemic to racist police violence I mean even this Sunday, there was a five point one earthquake in North Carolina where you Live apparently the largest and over a century. Right. Here in Harlem trees fell down last week because of the storm. So this is just a very first question to ask you how you doing. So Tino, we're going to start with you how you feeling I am tired all the time like I can't complain really too much everything is. Fine but I'm very tired. Okay. Yeah. Short and sweet the TASHA. Who would be a podcast in itself I told you I. Felt. New podcast. How feeling? Is. What. I am I'm having actually every human emotion you can have, and I'm having an all at the same downtime. I'm angry, sad, scared frustrated hopeful fired up every motion human emotion. You can have I'm having and this moment of few weeks ago I myself actually tested positive for covert Nineteen Latasha. It. was the most nerve wrecking name Sweetie. It so I'm here for you sweetie. Oh you understand. Thank you so much and I'm so glad that you are will I had a mild case of but I think more than anything. It's the worry because you don't know how it's going to respond to Matty and then I'm worried about people being around me and being around my family. So I am just petitioning for a twenty two over I was just like a lot of talk to about this. Talk to the manager I need to recite twenty. She's a woman by the way. Exactly I know. So listen. I know first of all, thank you for sharing that. Latasha and. My heart goes out to you for anyone has to go through that especially in this time but we do want to discuss the twenty twenty election. It's less than eighty five days away. As if we're not on edge enough this year and honestly I'm going to come in as the Puerto Rican reporter. I have news to share with everyone in the world. What are we just had a primary election on Sunday complete Shicho. Alison show up two pressings. There's calls of. Delaying. It and moving into next Sunday and it's just it is complete. Chaos down in my home island colony, and I'm very worried now that this is just a prelude to what's going to happen in the united. States on election day November but we want to talk about the power of voters of color and the issues of voting rights. The backdrop of this election season is the coronavirus pandemic. There are now five million confirmed covid nineteen cases in this country, and the number of those infected has doubled since the end of June and then we still have to mention. Joe Biden's comments last. Thursday during a joint. National Association of Black Journalists and a BJ and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists which was an h j of what he said. What you all know. But most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions. The Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. This completely overlooks sees issues of race identity ideology, intersectional communities, I honestly think that this kind of statement, the trump campaign's like bring it on because it's just GonNa be used to divide and conquer Democratic voters.

Tina Vazquez North Carolina National Association Of Black National Association Of Hispan Medina Winston Salem Joe Biden Matty Harlem Russia Brown Co Tino Atlanta China Puerto Rican Founder Alison Shicho Reporter
"intersectional" Discussed on Well Made

Well Made

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Well Made

"I feel like it's got to be even more challenging with social media. Now, because you have to take an idea and contain it into such a small amount of words to try and share it with someone, that's why I do podcasts. Available on twitter and other places because they just I don't feel like I can. Share an idea in such a concise way. That it's not gonna get misinterpreted or something. Yeah. Ready new actually really therapeutic, and it's kind of like a like a mass problem through neorealist finding the right way to communicate sides. You genuinely enjoy it, but it doesn't. Kinda. Hard I guess on social media from making your graphic like some sort of type. graphic Ramen, explaining something or trying to do a caption or tweet. US possible I don't know. It's a fun challenge to me. It's a, it's a fun challenge. It's not always exhausting, but at times I do feel the weight of the world like if I have an opportunity to write like an op-ed or have the opportunity to speak for any, it's my experience. But I know that I've been given the privilege to kind of expose or shine a light on. The minority experience sometimes in environmental organization, and if what I'm saying could like change environmental organizations. It was so beautiful the club talk about Intersectional environmentalism and condemned John for. Industry. So heavily committed to this, I just realized, Hey, I need to keep doing what I'm doing because they think organizations can change and I think environmental. Liam Movement can change a whole if not, just me. But so many other people are given the chance to kind of just communicate. So it's a lot of pressure because I wanna be Palatable, which is frustrating. because. I. Want Change to happen, but it's difficult. It's a difficult. Line to walk. Will. So much of environmentalism in general is This idea of palatable is kind of interesting because were ringing the alarm bells of like, Hey, this is a real problem we need to deal with it right now and finding the right way to not overwhelm people and convert the message into some sort of action that is useful. and not completely depressing is. Is Really. Hard. What what have you found? When it comes to sharing messages in a way that turns into action. I. Think most people. This is just me, my twenty, five year, old life It seems like a lot of people that I talked to. You just want to be seen in heard invalidated like in some way that doesn't mean I have to agree them. But I think in the way that I communicate the climate crisis I, try to compliment sandwich you know and you'd be inspirational in some way. We can do this together. The world's falling apart the you have in you to stop it like. You know, like compliment Stephen, which it I think a lot in I did this I made this mistake when I first learned about you know climate change..

Liam Movement twitter Stephen Intersectional John
"intersectional" Discussed on Well Made

Well Made

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Well Made

"We at Thomas Welcome to the show. Tells a little bit about intersectional environmentalism. You've think are the first person who put those two words together or nightside I thought this makes total sense. Instantly, I didn't even think about the fact that people hadn't put those two words together before. Why do you define this? The way that I define intersection environmentalism is a type of environmentalism that advocates for the protection of both people on the planet and it kind of has baked into it as. For minorities under amplify the voices and people, and that sort intersectional environmentalism is just a type of environmentalism with really heavy focus on environmental justice and a type of environmentalism that doesn't silence or ignore the way systems of oppression racism sexism homophobia might impact the way someone experienced the world around them and at times experiences nature around them. And a couple episodes ago, we talked a little bit about this on the podcast, and when we published this episode, Iv comment on, it came up and I thought this would be a perfect question to ask you because it covers one of the parts of what you just described. So here's the comment that that we got. Isn't an entire region or geographical area affected by climate change in a similar manner, the climate isn't significantly different in a low income area than compared to a high income gated community. The might be twenty miles away. This is a question that came in to. How would you answer that question? It sounds awful lot like all as matter, but for the climate. Honest specs, no. I get that question. I think a lot of people when they're thinking climate specific when they're talking about environmentalism are they're focusing specifically on the climate crisis climate or weather and things like that? Aren't necessarily like racist or you know disproportionately impacting certain people. But if you look at the climate crisis in who it will affect. So when you're looking at sea level rise in how that disproportionately impacts minority communities globally, like small island nations large ocean countries. That's a better way to say it..

"intersectional" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"And I point out, will the state that shows every level of the child's life when it comes to interacting with the state in two shifts, education, employment, healthcare, and housing, there is discrimination that will affect the journey through that that will negatively affect their life chances and I want is for people to be liberated from those restraints. I want to be able to fulfil their potential own fill that potential, but I wanted to be done on Fat Times I. Don't want a world. World in which the circumstances in which you were born all the body in which you aboard into a family, which you wouldn't to to drastically determine whether or not you're going to be fanning by your teachers when it comes to York's GonNa get you into secondary school whether or not you're going to be assessed fanny when it comes to. You know getting pain medication at the hospital. I just think it's inherently unfair, so yeah I think there is a difference between quality. Auto for quality and awesome collaboration because I feel the right now living in a world in which there are some people who have a disproportionate amount of wealth and power off I. Don't think that's fair, and I don't want to be equal to that. You Know I. Don't want to be able to do. People have a disproportionate amount of wealth and power I want people to. I NOT WELCOME POWER TO BE RISK redistributed. But mobile they I would like I want to live in a world in which people's life chances on hinted by discrimination and inequality. Key think there's a slot irony that liberation was the word of second wave. Feminism sort of seventies would and they seem to have discarded hurt now. You're wanting to use that word again, do you? Do you feel like we dropped sites that the second wave of feminism was asking us to an for liberation, but somehow along the journey we load thoughts to a quality road. No, do you think it's ironic might be ironic, not the right word, but to ease like mine that were around in the seventies. Your ears weren't here..

fanny York
"intersectional" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"It was just joking that Genta was the number one thing that we were supposed to be concerned about and to write something that may be perceived in opposition to gender discrimination even if you will be directly affected by. It was going to be looked down on saw. Do Remember you know going into one of these conferences years ago. A university campus, but it wasn't a students. They're all sorts of different people on finding myself on on the green outside with. Some young Muslim feminists than one of the set to me that she'd been told by an all, too want women in the space. The you know why she wearing her job. LACACI see a symbol of oppression. Appear to be the. Overriding like sets of consensus that Allen she was. She was afraid to dispute and I remember coming away from some of these meetings, and sometimes it wasn't explicitly said I remember coming away from some advice maintains thinking. Yeah it's definitely not the damn thing to even discuss racism here, not necessarily racism in the space, but just even racism in current affairs. I had a feeling that you're going to be told. This is relevant to the space right, so yeah say it was. It was unspoken. I mean in the book. I do try to give some concrete examples of how that went down. So you're not by the time I'd met black feminists. They will organizing to intervene in these kind of gatherings. HALLEL speak to the organizers and have their own space. and. They successfully did that. One big conference and there was a sign up sheet. Black it's to get together our somebody against device the sign up sheet by the Denver. Y, you know what's the point of this? This gathering was the point of black women in particular to get together to talk about not just feminism racism. Concrete example another clear one that sticks in my mind was a feminist ordered noise a friend of mine. Who is an Asian woman? She had organized A. I. Guess a round table or something like that to discuss beauty standards. You know something that is very much like pedestrian to discuss them Nissim album back then if I'm not, GonNa, be arrogant saints the beginning of the conversation, not at all I mean people have been talking about this. The longer than I've been alive. Felt quite nice in the recent feminist movement at that point, and so out of these magazines when people used to read magazines, she called them all out. She was like asking the group. Okay, what are the similarities and all of these women am? Basically it was glossy magazines, white women, models and whatnot. Would also talked about the similarities between women. But nobody I'm I catch them because you know. I was just to absorb I. Suppose Nobody in the group and it was overwhelming. White Women said yet why people talk spoke about how was slamming? They were this and they were not so in the end. My feminists organized a friend pointed out. Yes, all of these women who was supposed to see as glamorous, beautiful or also white right, and then another woman in the group would let your none of them have got shoot hand me. And Somme again, not just just like another clear example of like..

White Women Genta Allen Denver
"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

"However, you WanNa define that they bring that person to the table, so maybe they get invited to be on the board or they get invited to have a job or they get a scholarship to reportedly department, right? That's the only when they bring that that. That has that kind of diversity, so they bring them in a set them down the table. They make room for them. And then that person that they invited in half the learn everything about the table, everybody around the table mission statement and the culture of the table, but nobody at the table has to learn anything about them, so nothing changes. They added a seat to the table. But this wasn't about a relationship of reciprocity. Yes, right and what I always say is, if you want to engage difference than you have to be willing to potentially throw out the table and have faith in that something new that can emerge right so I'm. Lost my way there for first second. Yeah, no, you're talking about the relationships in I. Think yes. The PROC- I worked before in the nonprofit sector, and no working with artisans in developing conscious, and that's kind of WanNa, throughout main issues in things of Andrew about you know whenever we are trying to help a community, I always like to say you know which on Jim bar communities to help themselves first of all, and then we, we never kind of do get to. To decide as you were saying what is good for the community, we can only decide together and even more so learn from them what they need because they know better so again having the equal parts equal conversation and you kind of make saying throwing the table away. Yes, and this is I mean of so two things I wanNA. Say One. I WANNA. Make sure that. Tell me again. The author who coined the term intersectional environmentalism Leah Thomas. I WanNa really give support and. How important is to have a lot of different voices, thinking about ways to frame and understand for us to move forward, so I really I don't want anybody to misunderstand that I'm challenging the term I actually think it's not just hadn't I just hadn't heard. It phrased that way before right, so it's of course it's been pretty recent too so Yeah, and you've been doing this town years. I'm all about it a more Out Tell me again What did you say there? At the end there? You're asking me. So, you cover that a little bit already, so, what does it like If we call it so intersectional environmentalism quote, unquote like how would you describe it like what it means to you how to understand that? Yes Oh. Thank you. Can I remember here? So I. Want to you know one of the? Experiences that I think many of us in this country are having US moment I think we're. There's a lot of fear for some people is that we are challenging all the tables that are in place right, so we're saying you gotTA. Throw them out I. Love this by the way the table. It's really good. It's good. It's good visualization. Look at the table and we're saying table has.

WanNa Leah Thomas Jim bar Andrew TA
"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

"Okay so now we're back. So Lease I wondered if we wanted to kind of get into I. Know in intersection environmentalism around that movement because I know it somebody that you're extremely passion about as I. Yeah, so were you talking about how kind of this conversation? A completely separate ride? The reality of Racism Ingrain racism, and there's also this environmentalist movement that the supposed to doing good in the world so intersectional environmentalism. It's a term that recently became widely Owen share. Thanks to Tomas, working vogue article and I was just wondering if that's if that's kind of maybe potentially Hilbert of. Of course very much too late, but a solution to this situation that you described before, so Lee describes intersection. environmentalism is a as an inclusive version of environmentalism, the advocates for the protection of people and the planet it identifies the ways in which injustices happening to marginalized communities and the Earth at interconnected it brings injustices down to the most vulnerable communities and the Earth to. To the forefront and does not minimize solid social equality, curious caroline, your kind of thoughts on engine, a sexual environmentalism and how you understand, is that potential solution onto this kind of having this two completely separate conversation in ignoring that the racist issue? Well I wanNA say I mean. I'm going to be really honest. You wrote me I had never heard the term intersectional environmentalism now. Now. You're explaining it and I know people we've been have been doing that work, but not calling it that, so I loved the idea that you know I love you know it's good to give things a name and a place for people to latch onto what I want to say that for me, because it's one of the words I heard. Is The you know the interconnectedness? A lot of people that I work with and those of us have been thinking about this I. Know What I've been promoting is relationship. Which is what I'm hearing in there so that you know myself and others have always been saying. You know it is not just about the so I always ask a question where we talk about sustainability. What is it that we're trying to sustain? And the focus is often on the river that piece of land, the mountain in the woods. We're going to focus on that to sustain that. Let's just work together and do that and saying well. Really. What is the relationship? We have with each other. What are we? How are we going to do that work? Work of protecting the river and found out thinking that if we focus on the river, we don't have to deal with the the tensions that exist between us across our own differences, so that is also what I'm hearing in the intersection that actually we have to attend to, both the intention has to be about relationship across the board. There's no endgame here, right. It is really how do we engage and embrace our differences, which means we can't get past. The Accountability and the acknowledged a what has come before because it tells us who we are today, and who gets to decide what we're aspiring to. HOW ARE WE GONNA? Make decisions about what our vision. Our collective vision is for community unless we we can get together in good relationship in good faith and have those conversations, not about A. You know one of the things. I always say as I. Like to use the term outreach anymore and I say this a lot to organizations in particular I look I've been outreach to and I. Know that often comes from a good place, but outreach usually means that you've got an individual and organization institution that has significant resources. That could be connections. Access money right. They have a significant privilege. They reach out to someone who's different. You know who's diverse..

caroline Tomas Lee
"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

"Laura glad to be your and Lisa. Thank you welcome? Welcome? Yeah, so like we were just chatting with caroline before we hit record were so excited to welcome her to go together. the topic of Intersectional environmentalism and the impact that racism has on access to the outdoors is something that our community has been super interested in having US explore more and so you know we heard about Carol me, heard about her wonderful book and wanted to get her on the podcast so I'm just a really brief intro, so sue Caroline Feni PhD is a storyteller..

Caroline Feni Laura Carol
'All Black Lives Matter'

Nancy

02:54 min | 1 year ago

'All Black Lives Matter'

"And also beyond black. Trans Women being excluded from the conversation. We've also seen trans men like Tony mcdade be excluded as well he was a trans man shot by police in Tallahassee last month, and some people have been fighting to have. His name honored at protests as well for people who don't get why he should be included. What what do you say to them? THEM WHY is it important that Tony's name be included if the Senate Trans, humanity and Trans lives right and I think the say people want answers from the Tallahassee Police on Tony. mcdaid on who they say was armed. They say was this who they say was that, but they're not really a lot of reports about what happened. It's only the what the police are saying. Happens. And then then a lot of people are also talking about. She's not a victim of police violence, but Nina pop who is them a most recent I'm Black Trans Woman. Who was stabbed? Then Roll Missouri in early. May so I think that the those that push. To include their names? Is Just Center Trans. People and Trans. Lives and black lives in this moment, and there was even a march the other day that Senate on stonewall where a group of activists did a march that was explicitly devoted to him. In the midst of the protests for George Void so i. think that's what that's about. What would a truly inclusive black lives matter movement? Look like to you. I! Think truly was the black lives. Matter would look like the movement that the three original founders had envisaged right, and we should say three founders you referencing. Are Patrisse cullors Alicia? Garza, and ultimately that's right. The irony is that two out of three of the founders of all living, and then two hundred or three. R LGBTQ and they when they started were deliberately creating a movement that was intersectional, and which is committed to fighting transphobia. It's actually one of their stated principles, but the problem. Is that because Blm? For sorts of reasons that makes sense. It's not a hierarchical organization. It's decentralized one through decentralisation that means that the local group of people who ever decide to pull themselves together and declare themselves the Ambi- Ellen RBM. and. That means that you can end up. Not Trying to end up. Hating the existing biographies as they exist, and so, that's what I think happened. I don't think that it's a straying of. I think that it's just a structural thing and and the decision to create a decentralized organization which means that those values that are held at the top. Don't fall down all the way to the bottom because it's not a top down organization, so it really do think that that's part of

Tallahassee Police Tony Mcdade Senate Tony. Mcdaid Tallahassee Ambi- Ellen Rbm. R Lgbtq George Void Garza Alicia BLM Missouri Nina Stonewall
They Call Us Alice Wu

They Call Us Bruce

05:48 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Alice Wu

"Saving face still feels to me like a genre of one in so many different ways. And that's not really a great thing in that you would think that after saving face the world will be filled with Asian American Lesbian Ron. Calm but the fact is the way that you the way that you actually told that story still to me is unique and has been until. I watched your second film. Thank you so. I'm glad you see a similar DNA. Because I think they're quite different films in that. I'm always worried that people who are like I love saving face are going to be deeply disappointed by this one because this is not saving face to. It's actually genre wise. It's actually quite different but I also very I've been told I've a very specific voice and so it's possible that that voice just comes through and both it's it's not just the voice I think but it's also things tangling with in this this larger notion which I think. We'll talk in more depth about of the layers intersectional layers. I think of what it means to be Asian American to be a woman to be not just heterosexual right. These are things which I think are pop. Culture hasn't done a great job of converging right and telling stories that are appealing to to a mass audience and I think he really successfully did that and saving face. I think you've done that here. It is very different but I think those are what make so necessarily that. You've told another story if you will how well thank you? I mean to be totally by though I thank you so much for what both of you just said. And you've obviously been definitely top. Three of the people who've helped keep this film alive hunting in between like took Jeff's articles loosen between Phil bringing it back for the ten year anniversary. And so I. I really appreciate that like you have no idea how much it's meant to me I it's funny because I I mean I knew. There's like a small very very rabid fan base for saving face but I always assumed it was really small like it's like all right me my friends. Everyone Dave dated. Maybe everyone those people have dated. And that's probably and then like that's ninety five percent of it and then like five percent or like creeper white guys you know and that's probably like the band base but the I do feel like one thing that was shocking to me is when as film got announced. It just seemed like a crazy number. People came out of the work to be like that. You know I've been waiting for another Mike. You have like what I didn't even know this this and And I probably honestly is probably better for me. I didn't know that because I think it would have freaked me out. I think it's the Best I. I'm a big fan of low expectations. I think the lower I can keep people's expectations the better for me but I think that You Know I. It's just interesting because I I mean I don't know if that's just an artifact of the way I tell stories to like when you talk about the intersection -ality I wonder if it's because Obviously McQueen filmmaker. I'm an Asian American filmmaker. And you know I spoke. English is my second language like there's all sorts of things but because they're just part of my life. I think my treatment things is that I don't I don't treat it so previously like it's going bleed like I'm a big fan of subtlety and nuance and so I kind of love it. When like you know like I I try to write characters specifically as I can because I wanna make them feel human But when I wake up in the morning I don't think Oh. Gosh another day to combat homophobia or another day to like deal. Although these days if I go on twitter I do think conversation hike but like left wound vices like I wake up. I'm just like okay. I have to get up. What are the things I have to do? Which is like pretty much like everybody else right and I think that is a little bit of the philosophy that I right behind. Is that the textures of a character. Argh going to come out especially in the directing. Because I'm the way I cost him the way I choose to frame them like there's all sorts of stuff that goes into that but my goal is to in a weird way. Make people that. Maybe you don't normally see or you don't have in your own life but make them feel incredibly human and accessible to To you and so I don't know I that might just be A. I wonder if that's what your your reacting to. I think I think it is. I mean I think that there's something that comes from authenticity right and as it appears on screen that even in telling stories that might feel familiar otherwise I feel very different. To some people. Right like to your point there are you know kind of a creeper white dudes. We're probably watching it saying okay. Wait for them to kiss. Whatever I can't imagine that anybody who watches wouldn't wouldn't ultimately be absorbed and taken somewhere different from where they began. I I mean I remember the first time I saw it I didn't know what to expect. And after seeing it I I just knew that it was It was a film that I think would change. People change

Mike Mcqueen Dave Jeff Phil
Women In Voice with Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek

Sound in Marketing

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Women In Voice with Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek

"Have a PhD in field of speech language technology. I'm a linguist researcher. I was getting my PhD at the University Arizona. And starting so I. I think a lot about multinlingualism and multi modal and kind of the future of voice integrated into everything And I was presenting my PhD research domestically and internationally at academic conferences and the tech conferences. So I spoke at the first voice summit back in two thousand eighteen in Newark New Jersey. So I went there and I was presenting the same research right But the demographics in the room and the large number of White Milky No. It's just like I seem Silicon Valley. Hbo Show but like there's something to be in that room. I just the phrasing uses like I couldn't be complicit normalizing behavior of what I was seeing around me and so I went home I was like what am I going to do? What are they GONNA do Of course like immigrants basement and Decided TO LAUNCH MINIMUM. Boise months afterwards that that was August twenty eighteen and the rest is history now. We have ten chapters internationally in seven countries. I think three in Beta some talking about London Madrid Seattle. I'm GonNa Forget. Overtake them really fast. Just huge international community. Talking about gender diversity invoice tech celebrate improvise empower is all about. I like that. Celebrate amplifying empower. I love that and I think that that's good for. I mean yes women but I think just any anybody that doesn't have a representation of themselves out there to look at that so so important I have Just for an example I have A bunch of Korean friends that They got so excited. When parasite when parasite gleaned up at the Oscars because they didn't have a representation of themselves to like you know strive towards like it was just the yeah so anyways. That's really that's really to women and boys we talk a lot about intersectional. Feminism which is. Just you know big jargon words but talking about the intersection of where you're coming from and the privileged you bring to the room. I think similarly to your story about your Asian friends. One of my friends is Latino and he came to and he's like I love woman voice. Women Invoices Awesome. I'm also a Latino in voice and I'm ushered in other ways and so I was what I said to him as an ally to you and you can be an ally to me right. We can support each other in different ways and hope that the narrative that everyone can I this narrative like join the party like we we see the world in such a a new on way and I really hope that I do see change. I don't know if you see change. But last year I was pinned by two very senior. Hiring managers were like coming to consciousness and saying like. I'm about to hire someone in. There are no women on the list. No single one is a finalist candidate for the super senior role. Joe What should I do like? Oh Wow I can't fix the system but I'm so glad you're coming to these Well I mean that's the first step I mean 'cause Until you realize you can't really be searching for the diversity if you don't realize that there is no diversity because that's a real thing to the you just don't realize that the whole room is white or you know or it's all male I think I I am seeing change definitely. I'm a composer and songwriter. And everything I didn't when I graduated college in two thousand and three I was the only female the graduate. The composition degree At a very small school but I was the only female and then For composition and everything like that I had a handful of women that you know. I associated with that. I you know I wanted to aim that that level but really it was the male perspective for composers for a long time and now like with a home going to say her last name wrong. I'm going to say but with Hilter winning best score at the Oscars again the Oscars For joker that was so empowering that was so cool to see and I was even excited for parasite which I will never see. That movie. Can't watch horror movies but I was so to see that because they were not expected to win. I don't even think one of them and they just cleaned up. It was insane so I think definitely there is change happening And I I don't think that we should be worried about the speed of change but applauding it and going cool. Because I don't want to you know elect a woman to something and I disagree with what she stands for it. You shouldn't you shouldn't like want a woman to get ahead. Just because she's a woman you should want them to get ahead because you agree with where they're coming from and that they are the right person for the

Oscars HBO Researcher Newark New Jersey University Arizona Boise JOE Hilter Seattle London
Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

The Electorette Podcast

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of disappeared from or is obscure in historical record is because of what really was kind of intersectional mindset an intersectional outlook in her activism. What I mean by that is that Eastman Smith involved herself in multiple movements in many of the major social movements of the twentieth century and believed that they were all all linked together and worked throughout her career to try to link them together all under one kind of vast emancipatory rubric? She she believed saved and she she recognized that there you know there were. There were commonalities. Among various forms of oppression and she she tried tried to kind of straddle multiple movements and bring them together in order to combat. You know all of those common sources of oppression and inequality At once so she spent a lot of time talking about socialism anti imperialism and also you know maternity and maternal ism with feminists earnest's. She spent a lot of time talking about feminism and pacifism with Socialists and with revolutionaries and one of the outcomes outcomes of this was that Eastman always seemed to be kind of straddling so many different movements at once that her voice often it seemed insurgent or challenging from within each individual movement. Many of her colleagues felt that they weren't sure where she stood because she was trying to straddle so many different movements at once because when she talked to save feminists about socialism. It seemed like a challenge from within. Yes in and so. This cut complicated her status and her stature within the the movements that she was affiliated with within the movements that that she she built her life on at the same time as her radicalism and her activism challenged her standing in the more mainstream same political and social environments where she was radical so she was already challenging to more mainstream views but because of that she you know she needed needed stronger a stronger sense of belonging I think clearer sense of standing within the protest movements the leftist movements that she collectively saw as her political home. And so what happened was she. You know kind of fell through the planks of history. She fell to the planks of historical. Memory she we didn't have clear consistent connections with organizations With a single organization right or a single 'cause she didn't have clear and consistent alliances this is or relationships to various mentors. who were recognized the things that that signal stature and make someone intelligible and make someone visible double in historical memory? She kind of challenged complicated at every turn and precisely because she you know tried to connect them All to a larger vision of change that they all shared and so in some ways it was kind of I think a tragic irony that her her inclusive vision seem to divide people and seem to divide people's loyalties but in other ways it's also kind of a fascinating story of how we tell stories as how and why we remember people that I think has a lot to tell us about our current intersectional environment for forming coalitions to pursue the same social change that she and others have been pursuing for a century. You know in counting so is it over simplistic to say that. She was possibly a victim of her own own prolificacy like she was so prolific involved in so many movements that she wasn't known for single thing or was it that and making some hostility because she was seen as kind kind of an insurgent and lots of these movements. I wouldn't say hostility but I would say that you know. She challenged people. She challenged. Organizational hierarchies and in leadership at you know in various organizations and so there were some leaders She had quite a run in with Alice. Paul for example Particularly after the vote was one John when the militant wing of the women's movement the National Women's Party was starting to figure out. Okay what comes next. It was in that period before the rise of the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment nineteen twenty-three that they were you know searching for okay. What's our next approach and Eastman wanted a very intersectional kind of transnational feminist movement and Paul wanted a much more focused targeted women's campaign? Just much like the you know. The suffrage movement that they had just successfully completed pleaded so for some leaders. There was that you know that sense that they were being challenged from a colleague For others it was the fact that you're kind of intersectional perspective active As well as her movement to the left after the Russian revolution seemed to radical and seemed to push the organizations that she was associated with in more radical directions than many of the progressive leaders in those organizations were comfortable. That's unfortunate you know. She reminds me of reading her story. And you know kind of the motion all day of it. And the Ark of her life. She reminds me of not Elizabeth Rankin but there. I can't believe I can't remember a name. The very first woman who ran for president. who was ooh Toria woodhall awesome? She's scared the crap out of people what it's just something about her demeanor. It's hard to tell from a book you know but just something about it. Just kind of reminds me of that similar kind of radical woman radical feminist. Get around that time. And you know crystal was just unafraid. she was so bold and she. She asserted her freedom. She really you know she. She claimed a freedom and claimed a world that even while she was trying to create it so she was an in kind of a kind of a real sense woman ahead of herself or ahead of her time. You know I know. That's kind of a cliche as historians. You know we're we're not really supposed to say that What struck me about her early on? You know what would I I think stuck with me From my graduate school days till almost twenty years later when I finally you know sat down to to try to write the book was the sense of a woman who was just calling ahead of herself and you know and in envisioning and reaching four And you know and actively demanding and trying to live live in a world that was much closer to mine than it was to hers. And you know I found that's just so compelling it's visionary I think she was a gripping person go find her story gripping because of that right she had some really really progressive stances and you know you mentioned a few feminism and she was also I think a socialist. She called herself a socialist right. Yes and she was four reproductive rights. Yes very much. So why was she branded. I WanNa go through the historical arch- of her life a bit later. But why does she branded the most dangerous woman in America. Well I need most of those claims about who came in her. Most radical or revolutionary period after the Russian revolution revolution in nineteen seventeen. She and her brother Maxi sman much better known than she is a radical writer and editor of the Masses magazine. The two of them together published the Liberator magazine which started in Nineteen Eighteen Shortly after the Russian revolution and it was called the Journal of Revolutionary Progress and it became very quickly the kind of center of reporting and information about revolutionary movements worldwide in connection with that period in her politics. Um which I can explain to you a little bit how. She kinda volved into that radicalism from her more progressive earlier activism in connection with that. She took very forthright arthritis very bold. Very outspoken stances in favor of the Bolsheviks and herself traveled to communist Hungary and she was the first the American reporter to do that and reported very enthusiastically at least initially about her hopes that the a similar revolution would come to the United States and would indeed sweep the world would become a global revolutionary movement. And of course this you know this kind of radicalism. She was not alone in it particularly on the left after the Russian revolution many colleagues from a number of different movements also celebrated revolution however You know it still was. That was not a mainstream extreme view. You know even on the left it was not a mainstream view was a radical view and It was very threatening to people especially in the the body of a woman and the voice voice of someone who was so afraid to speak about it. And the voice of someone who had such stature in more mainstream political political movements and more mainstream political

Crystal Eastman Eastman Smith Jim Taylor Skinner Amy. Aaronson Amy Eareckson Journal Of Revolutionary Progr Writer And Editor Aclu Paul Hungary Liberator Magazine Elizabeth Rankin United States Co Founder America President. National Women's Party Reporter Maxi
Brag Better with Meredith Fineman

Natch Beaut

11:17 min | 2 years ago

Brag Better with Meredith Fineman

"I'm very excited about my guest. Today we just met and we became became fast friends and we were sitting across from each other. It was sort of a hi. How are you what do you do and she tells me that she helps coach coach women on how to Brag better that is something that really hit me as a person who has major issues with self promotion and we're here to talk about that. I find it very fascinating. Her work is very interesting. She is a DC based. PR and communications expert she's also in involved with it says your leadership coaching which I found very interesting. I'm like you slay at high school reunions. What a cool job. Her name is Mary Feinman. Welcome to Nash B O N Cheese a podcast guest host. She also has a podcast called. It never gets old exploring vintage denim and vintage clothes verts any so the world of secondhand okay the world of secondhand we love. That's why you're here to clarify honey. Thank you so murder. I'm so happy you're here. You're work is fascinating. Thank you and I will say okay and to anyone listening big fan of you and the pod of but you're not alone and having trouble talking about yourself is what I do for a living so cool. Though what a cool job thank you it. It has been a long fight for the Bragg. I just finished the manuscript for Brag better the book which is out in June We have a little ways to wait zero waste waste wait. I have a lot of editing to do but yeah I mean. I'm thoroughly unsurprised that. This is something that affects you. It affects everyone not just women though at my core heart center that's who I care about impacting with this and so it stems from a lot of different things my becoming the go-to as PR person for representing individuals my own work on I've been a freelance writer for about fifteen years I speak I do. TV and people sorta wanted that piece but then we have this extreme which I don't have to explain to you in show business. This cult of personality situation going on where leadership is a driver of business more than it ever has been like traditionally in American history like yes. We've had big families as like you know the vanderbilts or people like that that have been titans of industry but they're more visible than ever and I didn't think it was fair that the benefits associated with understanding president visibility be reserved one for people for McCain naturally which is like three people like. I've taught myself this for many years. I grew up in the DC. You know media in politics bubble being like toted around two parties. I've sounded like this since I was five which is like super fucked up but also good. It's not cool. I'm uh-huh yeah but yeah and then I started is that nobody knew how to talk about themselves and that it was so agree just for women and I was watching the systemic trajectory so it would have young women that want to work for me and this was when find point was more of a PR shop and they could not talk about their past experience with confidence accordance and then I would have friends where I would have to happen and play publicist and then I would literally like living my life yeah yeah no. I mean it's super duper real well. It's an epidemic and then then I would represent really high powered women and they all felt the same way which was that feels really icky to talk about yourself a used Brag. It is a taboo word. We don't have that many other one right self-promotion yeah but you know what it's a necessary very skill set and it is one that will get you more money a bigger job opportunities hundred percent and like. I think that it's just that I don't have to really explain to anyone out here in. La Because I feel like that's so much of what you have to do so much of what we have to do in it is most certainly been a hindrance to me and I don't know exactly when this happened but it's it's. I'll give you an example like you book a show you as an actor like Oh. I booked in episode of show. It's very easy to post a photo of you. Onset post a photo of your trailer post a photo of the script at the table rate and I would see these photos rose and I would be happy for my friends but it got to the point where I was like people are bragging about their jobs and then it would make me not mad at them or hate them or feel weird. It would just go. I'm not GonNa do that when I book of job because I don't want to make other people feel weird about it so then I never did it yeah and that's really if you really just think about it. It's insecurity. It's all stems from insecurity of like. Oh I don't want to you know come off a certain way or whatever but that's sort of in our business you have to do that. It reminds people that Oh you are a working actor and that people book you totally and from that I always like people don't know what you want until you tell them and people don't know what you've done until you tell them so for example like you were just on an episode of drunk history like I might be a random person who has a random show who thinks you only have the podcast and then sees that it was like Oh shit she also acts yes like you. You have to show up you have to that. Everybody is very lazy and does not read and you know you've to tell them. You're available to speak to tell them. You're able to act whatever it is that you you. WanNa do and what I will say is like so obviously obviously I care about doing this for women because being a woman in public is so complicated yes you're judged on you know metrics and factors that matter not that is obviously you know doubly triply true in Hollywood where so much is based on appearance and like. It's funny 'cause I live in. DC which is for the call Hollywood for ugly people and it's it's super true and it's just like so based on intellect that actually sometimes it's funny sometimes like focusing on your appearance in DC is like a a bad thing which is is funny. It's all all Asbat for women or picked apart. You know yeah well what I will say to you too. Is I mean at this point. I've trained and council like hundreds if not thousands of people and particularly your southern woman where I you know I'm making a generalization Zeeshan but gender norms also I would say in the south being polite very overtly feminine dominate s I would put a lot of money on that having some unharmed riddick per cent and that is my argument is that it's a skill that everyone can learn yes what I do is not rocket science so I call my audience the qualified quiet which are people that have done the work but don't know how to talk about it to me. That is not a weakness. It's a strength and as I said what I do is not rocket science. It's the icing so basically what's much harder is spending the time and doing the work and you know crossing all the ts dotting. All the is like that stuff is takes a lot of time and energy. This is sort of different cringe muscled right Affleck's. Yes and it's so hard for women for so many different reasons. You don't have good examples. you have a lot of people screaming and the rest of us like not knowing where to even begin then we have this horrific inverse relationship between volume and merit we reward loud voices and as much as I'd like to be optimistic and say that I think we can get the louder people to be quiet. I do not believe that I think it's about getting the quiet people to be loud life as a woman so you're judge metrics that men are not you know your police from your voice voice. Your ankles your age. You know an endless laundry list of things you feel responsible for other people's feelings because you're conditioned to feel that way. You're saying you know like I don't want want people to feel some kind of way post things but also look historically positive attributes were associated with passive behaviors or like she was demure. She was coy. She was shy all all of those things mean that you shouldn't know how to do these things and I think that like part of my like background growing up but then also so being a PR person and realizing that if you treat yourself like a PR campaign that will give you some of the skills you need and that's what Brag betters. There's all about like. I care that it's not just another like you know white. Lady feminism like feel better like this book is intersectional that it it is not only four women though it obviously women buy books but also that it is tactics that I have worked on over the past decade like it's going to tell you what to do in a way that feels very authentic to you like that's the key issue is like how are you going to brag in a way that feels okay and specific to you yes I. I feel like again. I'm just I'm such like self deprecating and that's comes more into it every time somebody's like. What do you do. whatever like you know what. I mean and I'm done new new. Jackie is done with self deprecating humor. New Jackie wants to let everyone know what's going on in proudly expressed that so where do we begin well. I I was GONNA say so so with that self deprecation like your comedy. You're very funny lady. thank you. I am you are yeah there. You go is it. I mean well I was. I was this past week. I was in San Francisco at leave is and I did their women's conference and I was talking to I did you to brag better talk and I was speaking to someone in the audience after and she was talking to me about accepting compliments so have of this is learning to Brag and ask for the recognition that you deserve you've but then it's also figuring out what to do with it once you get it and how to accept it and how to leverage it to continue and like so there's a lot of work there yes you know. I always referenced the League Amy Schumer Sketch where the friends are complementing each other and you know they won't accept it and say look disgusting trash bag and then amy just says thank you and all their heads blow off yeah like it's like that it's do yes. I've had a really hard time with that. myself but you know we. That's that's a whole other story where so willing to accept criticism. It's like Oh yeah. Tell me a piece of shit like I will. I will totally take that from you. Take it to the bank. put it on my forehead like. Don T sure sweatshirt but no we are not conditioned to accept praise and in those good things about yourself and here's the issue so when you don't accept it it it makes it stop and then it can't give you other opportunities so one one thing that I always talk to people about is like cut out those terms like shameless plug shameless self promotion to Brag but what you're doing with those qualifier demeaning what you're about to say you're trashing yourself before anyone else can ride which is a defense mechanism but we are also doing a saying like I can't stand behind this accomplishment it and your reader or your listeners like if you were to like post something inside. Lake shameless plug that I'm like well. I don't know what to do with us. As the reader I feel the anxiety that you feel. It's transferring to me and if you don't WanNa hype yourself like I don't know what to do and it stops there so like it has a negative effect effect on the people you're saying to also then

"intersectional" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"So at this intersectional Justice, these intersectional Justice conversations, so I. The people that we have on the podcast are just incredible. And I respect every one of them so much with a lot of intimate dense like a dense fruitcake conversations where you're like, whoa. I think I'm gonna blow. So that when again because that was a lot. I just interviewed Andrea Costa this week who works for the elephant action league. And he's basically double o seven of wildlife poaching. Which is like, I think it was like the fourth biggest money, making industry in the world or something like billions of dollars every year wildlife poaching, like free. No, what my billions Billy, it's like the fourth largest at an I, I don't wanna say the statistic wrong, but it was shocked raven. Is it like black market, like would a lot of it's like Russia and China China's like savage. Yes. There's so much. I mean and it's huge just mafia. There's, there's real, mafia. There's cartels there's murder. There's all the things that you'd watch new movie about what's happening in the wildlife trade. But it just an. Example, or like talking GMO's in. So I I really really love what we do. And what the guests share and terms of other other media outlets. I know that there are. Well, I guess one thing I want to say too, is if we're talking about the earth. Obviously, there's a democracy. Now is great. It's not so much focused on earth stuff. Although it is, it's a bit more political. But it's I I love democracy now. I think it's a really good source of more like daily news. So you can kind of keep up with whoa. That's helping in Russia. Holy shoot like Guatemala. You know, it's like it gets you on the on the daily getting involved with local groups. You know, trustworthy, local groups that are doing doing the war in a in a way that feels holistic and intersectional, and then you're gonna find a lot of news that isn't going to be really anywhere. You're gonna find like whoa. I didn't realize they were spraying roundup. In the park down the road or I didn't realize that this incarceration issue is happening or, or whatever, or like I didn't realize the ocean in this part of where I live had this toxic spill that nobody's talking about. So I do think that really getting involved with the local community for those kind of issues are really important the there's so much now in terms of, like is that does that have media to it? I'm not sure. I mean, I'm sure some groups do, but is also like finding what you're passionate because we've been talking, there's so many things get involved in. We can't get involved in everything. So really find what brings you alive. And, and then just news Google. You know, does get on there and just start diving in go go down all the wormholes to follow the white rabbit, like you know, you can get lost in there, but you'll find you know, actually some really great stuff. And in terms of the, fires who I'm quoting, in terms of the information. I gave you is Dr Charles Hanson, and we interviewed him a few. When was it now, within the last six months? Yeah. Yeah. Was and he runs the John Muir project. He's also on the board of the Sierra Club. And so he is a really reputable source around fires. But what I will say around fires. There is so much. Disagreement around how to manage land for fire, and there's a lot of reputable people saying a lot of different things. So I will say on that subject. Particularly whoever is going to be diving into that based off listening on this interview, just beware that you're going to hear a lot of different opinions from a lot of people who seem really smart.

Dr Charles Hanson Andrea Costa Russia Sierra Club murder China China Billy Google Guatemala John Muir project six months
Seeing beyond women as objects for sexual use essential for culture of respect

UN News

13:53 min | 2 years ago

Seeing beyond women as objects for sexual use essential for culture of respect

"Speaking to you news about the metoo movement against my exploitation. The UN, mimic adviser warned that to achieve a true culture of respect. Women need to be seen beyond objects for sexual use. She talked to Anacom oh, about the UN gender equality agencies recent publication on sexual harassment and elaborated on what needs to be done to create a more equal society. The movement for the liberation of women. Influenced me in the past and continues to do so the contribution that I tried to make and seems to have, and it has had a lot of uptake in the world is the concept relieved that sexual harassment is a form of discrimination on the basis of sex that is that's. Fundamentally a practice of the inequality of the sexes, mostly, it's imposed by men and women, but also can be imposed by anyone on the basis of gender on another person. And so the women's movement, exposed a lot of the same kinds of sexual abuse. That is now starting to come out to the rest of the general public in the metoo movement. But women heard it from each other. And that made clear that all the vulnerabilities that characterize the vast diversity of women in particular, targeted us for sexual aggression, including in settings, for example, at work, where our survival economically was on the line, but also in education and walking down the street and in public places so that both our safety and our ability to make our way through the world as well as simply to become who we actually are was at stake, and on a sexist. Criminal Torey basis. So understanding that sexual harassment is a human rights violation. The next question is, okay. What human rights does it violate and the answer that I heard is the right to equal treatment. You're mentioning that women new from each other, what they were feeling what do you think changed in how that made women start speaking out publicly, one of the things that has been particularly productive in the last decade, or so has been the possibility of social media connection women are able to have access to each other in autonomous and anonymous ways and without risking public exposure, or retaliation? And also, they can feel each other out without necessarily saying who they are, but then come to identify themselves of more, particularly there are, of course, dangerous with this, but it is proven to be over. Wellm Ingley positive, and that change has fundamentally made essentially millions of multilateral connections among women that previously weren't possible. Of course, it's limited to those who have the capacity to have access to computers and other and cell phones means of communication, but many, many of us do and many women around the world. Who don't even have clean water have a cell phone. So that has made a big difference. But it would have been possible that women whispering to each other. In, in this medium could have simply been another place where a lot of stifled cries of pain went to die in all like so much has between women in the past the acceptance the of the possibility of these abuses, being real and making public of them in, in a wholly different way by traditional media legacy media mainstream media has had a tremendous influence on the acceptance in the world of the reality of this abuse ethical journalism is something else that has that actually has cracked open this world in a way that feeds back to women. And also to men. In who read that stuff who consume mainstream media, and who understand things are real based, a lot on that, a who have been at least some of whom have been taken aback surprised even shocked at how widespread sexual abuse is, they're only beginning to learn about that sexual harassment, especially at work has started to come into view, but there is so much more around it beneath it that those of us who work with these issues have known about for forty years, or more. Those of us who have experienced it. I've known about it, of course, all along. And that's a hopping number of women, and a lot of men who have also been abused and no well, the reality, but the surfacing of in public is what has changed. What do you think are the next steps for the metoo movement? I think the me too movement is the next step that what it is, is where it is going it since it has begun. It hasn't stopped. It hasn't slowed. It has only found new ways and routes and spheres of operation and it's slower in some cultures and countries than others moves like wildfire in others. In many places like say in Mexico, for example, all of a sudden, we have forty me two hashtags all different ones for different areas in which women work. That's just work. And then there's also the educational ones and they're working on that. And those are just two places in life that women go, where we've been permitted to. Or we've permitted ourselves to speak out about what happens to us. They're all the other places remain to be exposed year has been a key contributor. Two to UN women's recent publication on sexual harassment. What do you think is the role of the win on addressing these issues, well as the fundamental international organization it's to bring the world together to consider problems in common in all their diversity? That makes it a perfect place for women to in particular. And also men to come together to talk about a problem like this, which is universal in its scope, but everywhere, particular. So it specifically cultural every place even though it is culturally, universal. That's exactly the kind of question that the UN is built to and his predicated on addressing in its structure, and, of course, in its personnel, the UN also has a role as a massive employer of many, many millions of people and hundreds of thou-. Thousands and has a possibility not yet fully lived up to of being a model employer in this area as well as in others. What do you think it's still needs to change in society in terms of mentality's because we hear all these discussions about the movements and women speaking out? But it feels like the values into society's need to change as well to accompany, these revolution. I would call it. Yes. What do you think it needs to change in terms of society in terms of values and mentalities? They all come under the heading of equality, but equality in substance, you know, not just form and cultures of, of respect of, of understanding that of seeing beyond women's simply being objects for sexual use is where I would start people who men who say that now that it's possible that women might be believed if we say when we say that, that we've been sexually aggressive against all of a sudden they're not going to have lunch with us alone. To me that says they lack the capacity to see women as anything other than sexual objects as well as of course, presuming that women lie in particular about sex, which is one of the deepest broadest, stereotype. Types out there. All you have to do is communicate the basic view that women are not to be believed particularly about sex to make it possible to aggress against women freely sexually because anything we say will automatically disbelieved it's just a, it's a get out of jail free card. And also, there's the notion that women are the automatic somewhat reflexive notion, that across many cultures that women are automatically fulfilled by anything sexual that is done to us. It's the notion that by nature we are asking for wanting not violated by anything that is sexual without even pausing to find out if it's something we actually want at the time, or we are welcoming, you know, this has got to go this notion that in particular whenever a woman has had sex, then not only does no further sex ever violator. Based on the strange idea that men can be any man can be substituted for any other man. Maybe they believe that we do not believe that, but also the idea that we lose our credibility with our virginity, you know, we've ever had sex. Suddenly, you can't believe a word out of the women's mouth, and the only way you get believed then is for there to be three four five women saying the same thing about the same man. Well, if that's required. What that means is that each woman has is one quarter of a person for purposes of credibility, you know. And, and that has to change. What also has to change is the devaluation of women based on our sexual usability, essentially, because I think a lot of the credibility discussion is really about not valuing women at all. In other words, once a woman, says, what's been done to her? She's trash, she's damaged and in any case, she's. Fulfilled in her nature. But the man is always valuable and valued. And if anyone took seriously damaged that he had done to her, then something would be done to him and his value automatically being high and hers automats being low means that people just simply say, I don't believe her as code for, if we took her seriously, we would have to do something real to somebody who matters and she doesn't matter, and he does so that relative hierarchy between the sexes. And also of masculinity over femininity, regardless of what sex biologically, a person is or whatever their gender, or gender identification, is that hierarchy has to go. Is there anything else that you would like to add, yes, that until every form of social vulnerability that characterizes women, as a group in all of our diversity is understood as being central to this problem? It won't be adequately addressed that. Is racism, and racist societies ethnicity color cast, where that's relevant class because it's relevant everywhere and produces massive, poverty, and economic desperation is a major precondition for targeting of women for sexual harassment and abuse age and disability is extremely important to keep in mind. People are viciously sexually harassed and violated based on and through and because of a whole range of disabilities. And in addition, indigenous status targets people women in particular, but also young boys for sexual aggression, and has actually for centuries. And religion is also often a potent ground for sexual harassment. Not only for exclusion of people from equal benefits of all sorts. But. When particularly women again. Also, some men are definitely some men are say, well all the way from targeted for genocide through to the everyday lived conditions of that, that form the foundation for whole campaigns of crimes against humanity all the way to situations that are not recognized as ones of conflict. But some religions predominate over others or consider themselves and are socially structured to be superior to others sexual harassment is a potent dynamic, as within a it silencing of people on the basis of their particular religion, and it's a constant threat and needs to be understood in all of its cultural particularity in order to address the harms that are done through people's religious heritage and. Vacations. So every one of those intersectional vulnerabilities converges with gender does a lot of their work through gender and gender. Does a lot of its unequal work hierarchical work through all of those owner abilities. So they, they are all absolutely central to any adequate understanding and address of the problem.

Harassment UN Anacom Wellm Ingley Key Contributor Mexico Forty Years One Quarter
"intersectional" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"He's cheering for her. And she's lost her voice session. Growling into the microphone. Com for Elizabeth Warren, obviously is that Elizabeth Warren doing this routine is basically Hillary Clinton but slightly more progressive. So I guess Elizabeth Warren wants to reach out to the traditional democratic constituency, but she doesn't really have a lot of cachet there. So you've got Biden traditionalist camp you've got Warren in the in the progressive, but not the intersectional camp, right? She alienated the entire intersectional camp when she clinched whose native American she's still has no capacity to talk about the fact that she claimed was native American for years with any honesty. She was asked specifically about the fact that you took the DNA tests which proved that she was one one thousand twenty four th native American maybe she was asked about this. And here's our answer. I can't stop Donald Trump. From. What he's gonna do. I can't stop him from hurling racial insults. But what I can do is I can be in this fight for all of our families. But this ultimately, I think what twenty twenty it's going to be about. It's not about my family. It's about the tens of millions of families across this country who just want a level playing field. Platelets that is not going to satisfy anybody in the intersection contingent when she says. Yeah. Clinton native American for years. But now, I'm not a woman of color, and why Why's Donald Trump racist? By the way, it is a nonsensical claim to say the Donald Trump is a racist for calling Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas. She's the one who calls herself a native American. It's absurd. It's absurd. I mean, it's the same thing as suggesting that Rachel dole is all isn't actually black and then calling her Diana Ross or something just to make fun of her. Are you making fun of Diana Ross? You're not making fun of Diana Ross. You're making fun of Rachel dollas. All well. The same thing is true. With regard to Elizabeth Warren. It is not a racial slur to call Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas, when the the huge scandal here is that you called herself native American so Warren can't please the intersectional base. And she can't please the mainstream base Biden can't please the base or the intersectional base, and that leaves room for beta O'Rourke to run now, I don't know the betas actually going to be progressive enough for the democratic base. As time goes on can to cater enough to the. Progressive caucus within the Democratic Party is pretty clear who's now running the party. The folks running the party are no longer. The Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer Hillary Clinton's of the world. The people running the party are the most extreme factions in the base. I mean, the most extreme factions of the base I'm gonna prove that to you in just one second. But first, let's talk about how you protect your online privacy and security, so as a public figure, I am constantly worried about being hacked or spider. I don't want my emails compromised for my credit card number on my banking, passwords stolen, but that happens to literally hundreds of millions of people every single year. How can you protect yourself will company? I trust to defend my online security and privacy is expressed VPN expressly PIN secures. An anonymous is your connection encrypting one hundred percents of your network and hiding your IP address? I mean, nobody can actually recorder access your online activity. Well, you have to do is download that express VPN app on your computer or smartphone. And then you just use the internet like you normally would you click one button in the express.

Elizabeth Warren Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Democratic Party Diana Ross Biden intersectional camp Rachel dollas Rachel dole Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer twenty twenty O'Rourke one second
"intersectional" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Hostile reactions from prominent tribal leaders, the lingering cloud over her likely presidential campaign has only darkened conservatives who continue to ridicule. Her more worrisome to support is miss warns presidential ambitions she has yet to allay criticism. From grassroots progressive groups, liberal political operatives and other potential twenty twenty allies complain that she put too much emphasis on the controversial field of racial science and in doing so played into Mr. Trump's hands. So she tried to break into the. For sectional group by releasing a DNA test and everything knowledge, you're white not allowed. So it's it's it's really fun to watch all of these crust. White candidates tried to break into the intersectional. Battleground at the Democratic Party has become on the one end you have somebody like Kirsten gillibrand another rich white lady who tweets out, our future is female intersectional. Powered by our belief in one another, and we're just getting started as my as my friend and business partner. Jeremy boring says, I'm not sure why she's allowed to assume the gender of the future. That's that seems transphobic, but any case Warren when even further and attempt to prove she could compete with all the other minority candidates. She didn't just pay tribute to intersection -ality, she tried to become part of the intersectional coalition, and she looked really bad doing it. And now the New York Times is recognizing this. So how's the Democratic Party breaking down for twenty twenty? Well, they've got the intersectional radicals. Then they've got the establishmentarian, and then they have the Bernie Sanders radicals. And this means that if you had to name the people who are the top candidates right now, it would be from the establishment Joe Biden from the intersectional side. Kamala Harris and from the Sanders bro flavor of the month. That'd be beta Aurora. So those would be your top three candidates if you had to handicap this right now all three of them are increasingly radical and Elizabeth Warren was not radical enough. She tried to break from the Sanders. Bro. Area of the Democratic Party into the intersectional area of the party, and she failed dramatically because as it turns out there serious gaps between these three sections of the party, if you are a democrat, and these gaps are only going to get larger as the Democratic Party becomes more and more radical on wide variety of issues. Take for example, the issue of intersex intersection -ality so intersection -ality now demands that we ignore anti-semitism in favor of more put upon intersectional groups talks about this in the past that intersection -ality for those who don't know is a theory that says that everybody's experiences defined by the group identity. So if you are a black person, you have a different experience in America white person, if you're a black woman, you remember of to intersectional groups, and those overlapping experiences, those intersecting experiences define your life in America, and we can determine how seriously to take your opinion or how victimized you have been which are flip sides of the same coin. And leftism by how many intersectional groups you belong to when when it comes to this intersectional hierarchy, we rank. Various groups, I love with victimization in American society Jews because they are economically successful in the United States rank very low on the intersectional hierarchy. So the left has decided that anti-semitism is no longer a problem. They're not going to focus in on serious anti-semitism unless they can shout about anti semitism in order to bash President Trump like that it after the Pittsburgh white supremacist shooting. Thus you now have several members of the democratic caucus who've come out in favor of the openly anti semitic proposal to boycott divest and sanctioned the state of Israel for building extra bathrooms in east Jerusalem. And they're still willing to hobnob with folks like Marc Lamont hill. Marc Lamont hill recently fired from CNN after going to the UN and shouting the slogan from the river to the sea Palestine Shelby free. Well, turns out that just a few months ago. Nobody cared about this back a few months ago September twenty eighteen Marc Lamont hill suggested that the Jews were poisoning the water of the Palestinians. Okay. That's called the blood libel. For those who don't know any Jewish history. A back during the crusades. There are suggestions lies. Is back knee eleventh and twelfth centuries. There were lies the Jews have been poisoning, the wells of Christians in order to kill them. Okay. And this was called the blood libel. Because then this would result in Pegram's..

Democratic Party Marc Lamont hill Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders Kirsten gillibrand Mr. Trump intersectional coalition Kamala Harris Joe Biden New York Times Pegram Jeremy boring America twenty twenty United States Israel Jerusalem Pittsburgh
"intersectional" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"And I have a reason to be a little suspicious of you all of this, however ties. Into a broader attempt by Democrats to drive out the black vote in two thousand hundred. That's really what this is about by claiming that there are a bunch of white folks who are trying to suppress black votes. This is why Democrats are doing this is why Democrats are like Democrats understand that the crucial factor in two thousand sixteen more than anything else is that in heavy urban areas and in areas with heavy black turn out in two thousand twelve folks didn't show for Hillary Clinton two thousand sixteen. So they're trying to say now is Trump is racist. And Trump is trying to suppress vote. So you better show up in twenty twenty and vote for Democrats, and maybe that'll shift Ohio back, maybe it'll shift Wisconsin back with heavy Milwaukee vote. Maybe it'll shift Pennsylvania back with a heavy Philadelphia about that is the goal here. They're trying to rebuild the intersectional coalition. Now, President Trump is fighting back against that in a couple of ways one way that he's fighting back against that is with criminal Justice reform, so he has pursued criminal Justice reform in what I think is a pretty obvious attempt to win support in minority communities because the idea here is that our criminal Justice system cracks down on minorities. Heavily even though there's not a lot of evidence of systemic racism in the criminal Justice system. It is true that the laws do hit black folks disproportionately because black folks are disproportionately involved in for example, marijuana distribution crimes. For example. Here's President Trump talking about criminal Justice reform yesterday, which he has embraced which is really interesting because you know, five minutes ago, he was suggesting death penalty for drug dealers here. He is basically saying, well, maybe we ought to just let a bunch of people out of prison, if they are in fact engaged in drug crimes, I it will provide new incentives for low risk.

President Trump Hillary Clinton intersectional coalition marijuana Milwaukee Philadelphia Wisconsin Pennsylvania Ohio five minutes
"intersectional" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

"Anything you can do to make people aware this is happening is very much appreciated you can support me as a comedian by going to soviet hagen dot com that shop where you can get by comedy shows and i think you can do in the thing you do is you can contribute financially and i dunno this i know there are really kind of fancy and tricky ways of asking people for money because it's such an awkward thing to do and especially for british people even just mentioning the fact that money exists can make a lot of british people just just you can hear the butt holes close up and no one likes to be asked to give money and it's i know it is a free thing passing is free that's why it's so great i'll say this much what i personally get out of supporting people's work on pages patriotic all through kick stats or through like pay pal i mean it's a community isn't it i guess it's out of the feminist community it's part of the intersectional community it's part of them even just like a pass no commutes in a world where we live system where middlemen is how you make money you you know know it's it's it's it's people make money off of things that they shouldn't be making money off of you know this podcast would be so different if i had a professional producing a production company behind it wouldn't be what it is and it wouldn't be as good it wouldn't be as raw it would be as honest it would be more fake.

intersectional
"intersectional" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"intersectional" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"That's a great point it plays on the fear of unity verses diversity because i think that's about core foundation of intersectional feminism is to acknowledge that what makes us different does not threaten our unity exactly irian grant just like i was saying before earlier about within understanding the trans woman's girlhood even though it's different might be different than my own understanding that we are not in conflict and that their girl had being valid does not challenge mind being valid understanding that was huge for me and i didn't see that for a long time indian that's such a good example i i've been encouraged since the women's march to see more white women who have large platforms make intersection aladi a priority and come sort of out front and center about how important it is to check your privilege whether it's white privilege or whatever kinds of privilege and glennon doyle melton who is in author and speaker ange you know has experienced the oprah bump at super seoul sunday whatever oprah's doing to sort of choose the next big see her as a handpicked them uh if a personal development space glennon was on stage at one of oprah's events and said very bluntly and directly in clearly in so eloquently uh you know in the middle of our speeches that listen i have to talk to white women in the audience for a second ever and was like oh boy there was a a an audible uncomfortable amount of laughter there for a second and we're all crossing our fingers like come on glennon don't be another white one for the your foot in the mouth like on stage thing something like patricia arquette style ends a what she said was and i knew i mentioned this briefly in another episode but i just think it's really pertinent right now is quote i know that many of us are feeling alone and ignored and threatened and abused and were feeling like our bodies are being threatened in our children's educations at risk that we can be grabbed at any minute in that are degradation and our objectification and our discrimination has become normalised and accepted in ways that are chilling and that is painful.

doyle melton seoul oprah glennon patricia arquette