11 Burst results for "Interrogation Unit"

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning dept good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in the national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah I'm finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit at a prison of his branch to fifty one outras line gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're gonna have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man Russell there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Berlin this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it's also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that just that's what the X. you can carry on it that is fine and not that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you downtown.

Steve Inskeep Germany NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning edition continues on this Thursday at seven thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning to good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in a national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Roker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit out of prison on his branch to fifty one out Revlon gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're going to have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Brooklyn this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of now managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that justice will be achieved and carry on it is finding enough that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you downtown.

Steve Inskeep NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To WNYC dot org again it's the last day of our three day fund drive we are relying on you and of course thank you so very much thank you it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning tapped good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in the national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah I'm finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off walked is actually at stake here now the main defendant amorous long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit at a prison of his branch to fifty one outras long gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're gonna have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors is more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Brooklyn this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it's also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that justice will be achieved and carry on it is finding enough that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you downtown.

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:45 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning dept good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in the national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah I'm finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit at a prison of his branch to fifty one outras line gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're gonna have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Berlin this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it's also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that justice will be achieved in curia it is fine and not that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you.

Steve Inskeep NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners and members of KQ weedy it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resumed this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning dept good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in a national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit out of prison andis branch two fifty one out ridge line gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're gonna have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors is more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Berlin this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it's also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that just that's what the X. you can carry on it is finding enough that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you.

Steve Inskeep NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KCRW

"The listeners who support this NPR station it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning dept good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in the national court and those aren't on trial aren't German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah I'm finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit out of prison andis branch two fifty one out Revlon gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're gonna have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the two Roger survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial it is translated bait they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Berlin this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patients for a second I I definitely felt so but then I also told myself back definitely it's needed to have hope but it's also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that justice will be achieved in curia it is fine and not that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you this is morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep you're listening to morning edition on KCRW now look at what's coming up I had to one thirty two of two Victoria Chang discusses love love and writing a children's novel in verse writing children's was just another challenge to reading to children or poor children and really thinking about the things that they can understand and then trying to figure out how to write them and challenge them in imagistic poetic literary Wayne's emotional Wayne's philosophical ways finding that balance was really hard but I I really thought it was a fun experience for me because I'd never written a verse novel before and written for children in this age group and so the challenge was what appealed to me toria Chang is with us on bookworm today at one thirty PM have you ever had a friend who you thought should live their life differently than.

Steve Inskeep Germany NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners who support this NPR station it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resumed this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning to good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in the national court and those aren't on trial aren't German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Croker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah I'm finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit out of prison on his branch to fifty one out ridge line gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're going to have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the two Roger survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial it is translated by they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is waffle Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Berlin this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patients for a second I I definitely thought so but then I also told myself back definitely it's needed to have hope but it also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that's just that's what gets you can carry on it is finding enough that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you.

Steve Inskeep NPR
"interrogation unit" Discussed on Covert

Covert

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on Covert

"Facility next door to his command center enter were interviews of suspected al-Qaeda members would be conducted keeping all of the Intel gathered central to one location former interrogator in Iraq Iraq Matthew Alexander the Interrogation Unit you essentially composed of where we kept the prisoners in also our Turkish Asian rooms in our analysis room in our desks which we called the gator pit part of our facility was an old Saddam era aircraft hangar and then the rest of it was just kind of make shift built additions to a warehouse essentially where you would just take plywood in throw it would up in Crete compartments in rooms but it was really essentially like a very quickly built haphazard facility where sure where it was just kind of all thrown together last minute when it felt like well our task force had its own detention facility because of our pace which essentially Ashley was go out capture senior leaders of al Qaeda get information out of them through interrogation in quickly turn around and go back out in catch new leaders this and do that in a manner in which always going up the chain of command towards Kali using this massive amount of up-to-date intelligence McChrystal unleashed the most most dangerous weapon in J. socks Arsenal the coalition forces special mission units of elite frontline soldiers these units would work in an entirely tiredly new way historically they ran only one or two major operations per year now they would conduct multiple raids on a daily basis Fran Townsend former White House counterterrorism adviser we found over the years in the war was that you need there needs to be a continuous loop right right of information and so the operators need to understand from the intelligence community what the capability is and the intelligence community needs to understand what the operators are seen being on the ground and so they can task each other right and they can and you get better and more refined th you know. I can remember visiting Iraq and watching them. They didn't go out once on a night. They went out multiple times. oftentimes the intelligence operators would go with the special forces they would do they would get what's called pocket litter there were hard drives a piece of paper out of people's pockets they come back they bring it to analyst back on the base who from the CIA who would go through that information that that would lead to another targeting package and the operated the special forces would go out again. That's sort of continuous feed. Continuous loop is what made them incredibly effective well. It all starts by piling in the back of a Stryker vehicle in sitting in a very cramped space. That's very hot in very dark and then you're you're going through the streets you know and there's all types of hazards roadside bombs and snipers in by the time you get to the target usually already drenched in sweat in your adrenaline going and then the team conducts a raid of the location in go out they go in in the the capture your intended target and then they immediately call you say you're jumping out of the vehicle. You're running down. The street won't get when it gets really exciting is when you have more than one house. oftentimes the these terrorists they would run out of one house jump a wall and into another house and then you'd have to wait a second house in sometimes it would ended up with a third or fourth house and then there's only two interrogators so you could end up with as many as ten or fifteen captured personnel and the I need have ten or fifteen minutes between two interrogators to try and figure out who were the bad guys and back to the base. The critical factor is speed every time a militant militant is captured the members of Q. I around that individual will try to cover their tracks by reorganizing the entire network. It's a cat and mouse game. The terrorists wrists constantly changed their routines abandoned safehouses and recruit new men to replace those that have been lost or captured but if McChrystal's people can work worked faster than their enemy they will destroy a Q. I before it can regenerate what I saw general McChrystal do as A. I'm not a field opera but I'm a career analyst. That's what I saw him. Do was not just evolutionary was revolutionary. You think about the history of warfare you know tanks artillery aircraft you think about the history of intelligence strategic work that identifies the Soviet nuclear arsenal for example now. Let's fast forward to what we've been doing. The past decade plus you take technical technical information. Things like stuff you oughta captured cell phone or captured hard-drive. You take detainee. Operation Detainees are saying about the network. They just came from you. Take pieces of paper you might capturing raid last night and you put them in a big hopper and say our software or nationalist. Our people have to be good enough so so that when the with within the the the timeframe of ours they can put together a picture of what that network looks like for example foreign fighters across Iraq doc. What is all this information. Tell us about money about suicide bombers about leadership and not only put that picture together do it well enough so that an operator can conduct a raid raid within twenty four hours contrast were that where we were in terms of intelligence and military operations even fifteen years ago and where we are today all that coming together so that you're not only constructing a picture of a foreign fighter network. You're not only operating on that picture within twenty four hours. You're doing it for years on end with people from every Consi in town incredible in a way the most important Tortilla that general McChrystal Jason brought this whole oh fake was that if you hit an organization false enough accurately enough and repeatedly enough you you could actually cause them to collapse now in other conflicts around the world various counter-terrorist feels. It tried this but they never really found that. It worked the old idea. What if you killed somebody. We drank them screaming from that home. In the middle of the night he would simply create many more people who wanted revenge had held true and and this idea that you could actually take down a whole terrorist militant organization had never been material that never been made real actually made to work that. McChrystal's attitude was yes. I know if we go into someone's home in the middle of the night will create a business that we want to take down so fall elst that when that angry brother will son whatever it is tries to report to take part in the Jihad. There's no one to talk to because all of his father or brothers friends they have also been lifted in the same forty hour period now. This was a critical to what they wanted to do. It involved Mount Mount multiple raids every night. Sometimes a particular task force would do what they call bounce homes they go from one target they would find intelligence there they go on to another target and another another one and they could round up a whole group of people half dozen people say and petit commits and sell in one night and little by little that was going to have an effect. Jay sock had developed into a well oiled machine every single night for special task forces spread out through Iraq doc and performed up to a dozen raids at one time each group was assigned to take down targets in a different part of US occupied territories to the north is task force read formed from the army's seventy fifth Rangers Brigade to the West Task Force blue made up of US Navy seals the center of Iraq was the responsibility of task force green staffed by the US Army's most elite unit Delta Force and finally these soldiers were joined by the SAS ask operating under the codename feeling among many of the American intelligence operators that the SAS and the other British special forces also is the Special Boat Service and the Special Reconnaissance Regiment had skills that were quite unusual and quite different to the type of skills that Delta force or the seals at the American training and operational activity at all been based around if you like action man leaping out of helicopters boarding ships this kind of stuff assault rolls whereas the British special forces because of their long involvement not just in Northern Ireland but in places like the Balkans where they've been involved in the hunt for war criminals they had skills to do with the patient nurturing uh of targets and groups have targets now that involves surveillance involved creativity stealth about how for example could you get a remote surveillance camera hammer onto a balcony overlooking at target. You might be interested in they came up with all sorts of things they drove around in Baghdad taxis they disguise themselves and the American intelligence people saw some of these during the early years in in Baghdad and they liked it. They actually there's something we can learn from these people because because they could better that counseling themselves they also got Iraqi colleagues that they could use some of those cover tasks but right the way through the Americans did value the fact act that the British could add another very highly trained very professional special operations task force to their lay down because they were in Baghdad. They could go after ah the same very very high. Importance targets McChrystal and his team worked through their targets night after night. The supply lines of foreign fighters were being being intercepted. Bombmakers were taken out of action mountains of intelligence captured and analyzed despite two years of taking all Zerkalo as network apart the ultimate objective the man himself still eluded them were under tremendous amount of pressure to deliver results quickly every day we were reminded of how important it was to find an killer taps rebel muscles are Kylie because he was the key to winning the war and that pressure was reinforced from a variety of leaders continuously on US.

McChrystal Iraq analyst Baghdad al-Qaeda Intel CIA Fran Townsend Interrogation Unit White House US Delta Force Saddam Matthew Alexander Crete Ashley Mount Mount West Task Force
"interrogation unit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Five years ago. This ancient fault line help define how people suffered in the great Northridge earthquake as the waves came from the north traveling south into the LA basin. They came up through the soft soils as the wave travels from hard rock and to the softer soils, the amplitude of the waves go there was amplification locally of the shaking right around here. And a lot of vulnerable structures. Flaps say. Also in the program, how the Carribean could supply nearly half the world's fish another threat to corals, and we say farewell to one of masses most successful missions. But I the ground that Los Angeles is built on is. You just heard not only are there are a host of force threatening the area, and it's twenty million population. But how bad the shaking will be when there's enough quake depends on the material beneath your feet or beneath your building's foundations. Fiber optics. Also cross the city and here at Caltech seismologist. John Wayne, John is proposing to use that optical network to do a three D scam of the basin in unprecedented detail, small seismic shaking can disturb the light traveling through a fiber. So that the network acts as a series of ready made seismometers how good that's what John Wayne has been checking on a network far out in the Mojave desert trying about twenty cable in Mojave desert. So we attached to the interrogation unit on why the fiber and turned that twenty criminal non-cable to five thousand sensors five that's basically a four meter four means yet. So you can actually measure just how much. Yes. How much of the K by being stretched or compressed? You're doing this and doing. This Mojave desert. Also interesting, well, the Mojave desert is of particular, quiet place. Okay. So there are far away from Carson heard like CD's with a lot of traffic, noise, industrial noise and also relatively far away from the ocean. So that noise level seismic noise level is really low. So we think of this as the ideal place to benchmark verify the quality of their five seismic data. So if you own positive. I felt the lorries rumbling. Variety. We do have experimented theory in Pasadena, and because of all the traffic noise annoyed are so high you always get a clean and fiber seismic arrays by they're not a tiny you how small singular attack because it's all covered by the strong noise. This particular case we were able to hack the magnitude seven earthquake the four thousand could hinder away from their side. So this was away round the do. How much moving on those four meters. Getting these automatic Ron's on the order of microns. Yeah. Smaller detecting that. In the fiber optic from something that rumbled thousand kilometer away. Proves VAT after the desert. I mean, can you get the kind of information? The tech stocks emojis need to understand. So for example, he this paper which showed that with this twenty Ray, we can start to eat meat how the seek knees earth shallow layers. The outer layer is changing interested in in this area is pretty flat. We'll get almost consistent signals rather. For the future. If we have a larger fiber say across the southern California all across the entire continental US, then we were able to map how you know, the outer layers sicknesses change in space. This is a bit like Notre Sam scaring. Yes. The much finer resolution because in the past the we sound for their sickness at about every ten kilometer past most places out of every seventy one hundred kilometer now, some potentially sound play that every ten meter scale. That's something. Interesting. Physics question. Yeah. I mean, the response interesting. Okay, here you are in a city that's waiting for quake. Yes, it's got to be more technologically. Huge numbers of optics. Yes. Chance or even a need. This kind of fiber optic system. Could replace the. I didn't say replace they complement because their traditional says, mommy hers thus theory of bad her in a sensitivity compared to their fibers as Margie a sensors by the fiber is providing us, they're kind of spatial coverage. You need for example, as you said, Los Angeles, southern California is a seismically active area. We wonder what's gonna be the shake in future earthquakes and from pas earthquake. We know earth shaking can change rapidly from place place within one city, two blocks. You could have very different shaking. That's could be due to the shallow structure being very different. Okay. Those kinds of information would never really have in the past with when you're only how one sensor every ten kilometers. Right. But a will now with fiber you covered in the city with meter the resolution. You can start image. How shallow structure is changing. Predict how the are going to be in a future. You did this experiment. Optima harvey. Because he got away from right? Right, right. If you bring it back into. Well, we'll have been working on that. We have been collecting a couple of months of data in Pasadena. Fisher show, you this because this is actually a fiber cable impassively now we're actually now turning this cable into a seismic already. Let's see LARs. So I I'm not sure we want to give. So you've got so this oughta blue lines here we are here. Whereas here all this. Blue lines are fiber cable, deployed by the CTO Pasadena, quite interesting. Right. So currently we are turning this particular table on fair oaks and to allow small Rose Bowl and the two awareness in avenue as a cable cable ethnic sensor. On the planning as you said to form loop back. I the car tag, the interesting thing is that from what you're saying. You will know the seismic activity every four yes, yes. We're gonna map how the shaking is going to be everywhere in Pasadena allocate, and you don't actually have to install any with. They'll have to go along the street the installed the sensor seize all the data were comeback in light speed to our data center. We don't have the go. They're using theraflu empowers radio to transfer the data back Sean win John of Caltech university where Charles Richter gave us the historic earthquakes scale. Details of his research of just been published by the journal geophysical research, letters, there's a link on the science in action webpage at BBC World, Service dot com and all the reporting on L A's preparations for the next big one in discovery next month. Southern California is home to an incredible constellation of world ranking universities, including two hours up the case from LA UC Santa Barbara, which has a strong line in marine research team that has been looking into the potential for deep sea fish farming to help feed the world and reported just recently that the Caribbean alone could actually meet much of the world demand. I met two of the team Tyler Clavell and Lennon Thomas on a sunny terrace. Overlooking the Pacific. Yeah. We found there was a huge potential for offshore aquaculture production. And I think the really interesting thing was is it's in a very small amount of area when you say huge potential. We're looking at about half the current production of global wild fisheries. Can't be replicated just by doing agriculture. Very simple. Yes. And this is a theoretical study. But I think the overall message is there is a large potential for offshore aquaculture production to pretty super seafood for the region. And as an alternative protein source too wild fisheries, which are overexploited. So what is it? You're looking for areas that have a suitable depth range, which is about twenty two one hundred meters. Areas that have a little bit of current. But current speeds aren't too high. So they're less than on average one meters per second areas with ideal temperatures for Kobe and areas that aren't already designated as protection areas or shipping lanes. Do you know how much water can produce factors in the main factor really is temperature sea surface temperature? So fish are active therms their growth rate is controlled a lot by the temperature of the water. And so there are some pretty good models that can can estimate about how fast a fish might grow. Given a certain temperature range. So what sort of numbers, you talk you that? So right now, the Caribbean region produces about three hundred thousand metric tons of seafood through wild fisheries capture and aquaculture combined and our model. Estimated offshore aquaculture prudential to be able to produce about thirty four.

Mojave desert Pasadena California Los Angeles John Wayne Caribbean Carribean Northridge CTO Pasadena US Optima Carson Ron Ray Kobe Margie Charles Richter geophysical research
"interrogation unit" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

11:14 min | 2 years ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"This is Steve O'Brien in seriously. You've got better things to do than listen to the nice guys on business. Like I don't know cleaning the cat box, clipping grandma's toenails. But if you absolutely must listen be prepared to hear some colorful metaphors. Parental discretion is advised is that if I can save forward, what is don't pull this safe where no, I wasn't saying if you are going to be tortured, if you let my daughter go. Now that'll be the end of it. I will not look for you. I will not pursue you, but if you don't, I will look for you. I will find you and I will make you listen to the nice guys on business. Some people without brains do an awful lot of talk in, don't they? I mean, look at the nice guys on business. They're like their own little think tank. Need an education on how to grow your business. The nice guys are here to help learn about great customer service networking and how just being nice can help you prosper. Now here all your host, Doug Sandler and Strickland Bonner quickly hit record because Strickland I am now, I'm drinking wine. I'm feeling good. I have a, I have more. I have a Pinot Noir in front of me as opposed to a Pino. Pinot noirs or penal belong in a Pino. I don't know what that means. I don't know. I don't understand all the. There's so many Pinos in my face. Wow. Wow, wow, wow. This show is all now the nice guys on business should just be the nice guys on sex you think now, maybe if we're going to do that, maybe we should let the women take anything. Oh, you know, it probably is a good idea is today is today turnkey women takeover and Christopher fairly turnkey women and Christopher. I think it's just the team. We could say team takeover. How's that? He teen turnkey takeover. This is actually pretty good now that we have, you know, strict. I don't know if you realize this, but you know, as I keep track of all analytics for us and I'm sure you don't even. I thought that you don't care. It's just not on your radar screen. We have now gone over thirty turn key clients. Yes, thirty. I'm on. We're on client number thirty to actually right now. And that is as that is before before these episodes actually air. And I think we're actually going to pick up another one or two before this is this is the most ridiculous dream come true that I could possibly imagine. Nice guy community. We fucking make a living at this. This is dick euless. It's crazy. But what does that have to do with the episode today? Oh, it has nothing to do the episode. Everything to do with me. Okay, then isn't that what the show's all about? It's six hundred and fifty episodes about me. Welcome back. Welcome back. My name is stricken Bonner and that is your ego Meister on the other side of the microphone. Mr. Doug Sandler, I would. I would prefer to call this the the narcissistic episode of of amazingness except that we're not going to be on it. We're gonna let the team takeover well, that's okay. See what a narcissist this long as they talk about you exactly. To take over as long as the whole episode is about you? Well, what the hell they going to do, are they going to talk about do do? Are they going to actually talk about like the stuff going on? And I hope that they would talk about the stuff that's going on in their lives, but you know what's going to happen. The conversation is always gonna come back to. I haven't listened to it yet. So I don't know if it does or not. I haven't listened to it yet either. Has it actually been recorded yet? Well, as of the time that our audience is hearing this, it's been recorded, but as we're recording it not exactly you know, you know, I really, I really, I got a little bit angry with you on Thursday's episode. It can I tell you why? I don't remember. I didn't listen, but. Okay. Go ahead, y. Okay. So this past Thursday's episode on a couple of different occasions, you referred to our community as listeners now? Yes, Rick. L'an Strickland. Bonner stricken, seriously listeners. You remember I used to get down on you all about all about the ladies and gentlemen, scully's ladies and gentlemen, which is one step above listeners, but what happened to our nice guy community? What happened to our funk in fans? What happened to what happened to the the the, the calling them by their by their God given name, you know, communist and communists in heroin addicts. No, it's everything but comunidades growing effect. Sure. They we the nice guy community fund vans. You are the anti the anti-communist the anti heroin addicts. Heroin addicts. At deserves a bell rang. Definitely. Okay. Well, every time you hear me say listeners, you just seem to yell at me and it's our our funk in fans or are nice guy community. Okay. That's right. Well, why would you call them listers though? Because it's like when I think of a listener, I think is singular. Like I'm talking to one person, but I guess I could be talking to a funk in fan. When I say community, I am thinking of everyone is a group. It's kind of a different approach. I don't know. It's I think that's a cop out. I really just think it is. I think you should just refer to them as the nice guy community enter funk and fans. Well, I'd have to go back in here. The context of when I said it because I don't remember saying, I'm pretty sure it was right after the comment that I said, I'm smitten with JJ. Possible. You know what I realized about that entire episode every time every time I brought up, I brought up anybody. Brought up any shit. You kind of deflected me you wouldn't. You wouldn't allow. You wouldn't humor me. You wouldn't let me go down any path. I, you know strict. Are you okay. Am I okay? Yeah. Why would I be okay? Are you protecting me? I'm trying. Not always not always easy to do, but I'm trying to. I have a feeling that are nice guy. Community is very in tune to what's going on in our lives. Do you not feel the same way? I do. So what are you say you're going to like drop a bomb before the takeover here and tell listeners teller funk in fans tell nice guy community crossing myself his whole fucking conversation about listeners than he just referred to them as listeners. Yeah, I know. I'm not. I'm not prepared yet. I'm not emotionally prepared yet to share all information with my nice guy community yet. I'm just not. I'm just not not because they don't love them and appreciate them. Slicing actually, but what was that? What did you whisper? I've this char could pay day. Oh, who could be listening like the communists and the heroine addict. A lot of there's many communists in heroin addicts could be listening, you don't worry. I am right now. This is Tuesday, right? This is Tuesday's episode and this is exactly why we are doing this. This is the turnkey team takeover because Doug currently is on a Harley riding up and down the coast of California. I am. I am. This is a dream come true ladies and gentlemen fucking fans listeners and nice guy. Community members communists and heroin, because I know we got a couple that had snuck in there. I'm sure I'm I'm one hundred percent sure of it. At this point, there are heroin addicts in our group. I mean, we can't prevent them from actually listening. You know, I can't. I can't. Some people might the heroin addicts actually doing Google searches, and they're finding us and they're going directly to the website which which does not necessarily mean that they have to have a subscription a prescription to show and the Russians to. I think the Russians are trying to figure out how to hack our. Next election through the nice guys on business. Hey, I got a question for you. I know this isn't this isn't a political show all even though this is the Tuesday show, but it's not the Otit. Is it the first touts now it's the second Tuesday of the third Tuesday of the month. I did want to talk a little bit about the didn't wanna spend a moment talking about the the new CIA director is that is that possible? Do you have any idea. I don't know much about it. Maybe our our team might talk about it, but I doubt it well, I can't remember who, what the hell is her name? Gina, a hassle is it has spill hassle. Yeah, I thought there was a problem and they were not going to numb let it go through, but then they decided that they would. Well, let me ask you this. Let me ask you this question and this is, you know, I I know we didn't prepare. No, we don't have any topics, and I know this was supposed to be really short intro of Amazon, but let me ask you just a question about about torture for I. If I, if I might be able to ask, I know this is I know other torture than just the ball in mouth and leather whips and chains in that kind of stuff. The question is, how do you feel about the per- the practice of using any methods to get information from someone that would be that would have done harm to to any of the? Let's say, let's take a hypothetical situation. Say it's the nine say it's two thousand and one. On and say, it is October of two thousand one. So so September. Eleventh. Two thousand one was when the when the towers were struck. And let's say that we were able to through intelligence capture. One of the one of the operatives that was involved in the nine eleven attacks. Now we have them in a prison in Turkey and we've and we've found them and we know and we have, we have a, we have a a prison setup and someone from the CIA in the interrogation unit is able to go over there or they already are over there and they captured them. What methods do you think we should be able to employ in order to get information out of those operatives to determine whether there were other people involved? Should we be able to torture somebody? I mean, what is your philosophy on that? Pineapple, is that fucking safe word for it? But that wasn't the question was hopeful. No, I wasn't saying if you are going to be tortured, say, get out now we are. Are you okay? Are you okay with the process of waterboarding? Are you okay with sleep deprivation or you woke l. k. with with with, I forget what it's called something about shit. I forget what it is. Some some position where you stand somebody or put somebody like you hang them upside down so that they, you know, the get out of sorts and stuff may look now. It's so tough because it's like. What what really gives me upset about this specifically is that it looks like it is right down party lines again. Right. In other words, this isn't about the fucking wallow. Let's wait. This is I'm not talking. Let's not go to the government for a second. Let's just awry. We talking about the CIA director. We're talking about like independent of whether she

heroin Strickland Bonner Mr. Doug Sandler CIA Pino L'an Strickland Steve O'Brien director Christopher Turkey scully California Rick l. k. Meister Google Otit Gina Amazon one hundred percent
"interrogation unit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"interrogation unit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The guy that pulled that together khalid sheikh mohammed was picked up shortly after and i believe he's still a guantanamo he actually wanted to come and testify against gina hassle according to an article of articles that i've read now i just think it's too bad that we couldn't have had khalid sheikh muhammad come in and testify against her confirmation because i think if anything would have assured her confirmation it would be that but there were several senators who were more than willing to take up the cause of khalid sheikh mohammed and call into question now this was the guy who was waterboarded and let me just say right now it doesn't bother me that khalid sheikh mohammed was waterboarded it i am not someone who wants to see torture inflicted on people just for for for laughs and giggles but i think it is a mistake for us first of all you have to define torture i mean i assume just being captured by the united states has to be torture of some sort you're held any imprisonment i assume it's torture anyway so this is the the first exchange we'll play we'll play them for you here i guess i have five in toto so let's this is this is california senator dianne feinstein now you have to understand dianne feinstein she's being challenged she couldn't even get her her democratic convention in california to affirm her nomination as a sitting united states senator now i'm not going to suggest that politics has anything to do with this display hi diane feinstein but you can make that decision so she's questioning hassle about the socalled destroyed tapes and a book that says she was the head of the interrogation unit under a fellow named jose rodriguez and by the way as i understand it the the interrogation of khalid sheikh muhammad actually lead in whether or not it this information came out as a result of an i'm using air quotes here torture or not actually led to the driver of osama bin laden which of course led to osama bin laden in pakistan and led to osama bin laden's death but we'll put that aside for a moment i just want to remind you this is a modicum a model of virtue senator dianne feinstein but it also exposed how the program was conducted because they were tapes of the actual interrogation of certain of ninety to detain knees as.

united states senator dianne feinstein california jose rodriguez khalid sheikh muhammad gina senator osama bin laden pakistan