35 Burst results for "International Space"

The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

All Things Considered

03:29 min | 2 d ago

The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

"The international space station cost hundreds of billions of dollars to build for astronauts living on the space station. Though money is essentially useless, there's nowhere to spend it, but that does not mean there isn't an economy for the handful of astronauts living on board from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff, Garcia explained. The economy aboard the international space Station is all about trade. This is, according to astronaut Doug Wheelock. Actually, everybody at NASA calls me wheels. I'm one of the old grizzled veterans. So the early career astronauts call me Papa Wheels. Doug Papa Wheels served as the commander of the International space Station and lived there orbiting the Earth for six months. That interesting thing is with food, of course. Doug says that aboard the space station most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from Earth just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad they would throw like a bag of Fresh fruit like oranges, lemons, apples, vegetables as well. Everybody would only get one or two pieces of producer just wasn't that much of it. And so here is where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the Russians loved onions. But Doug loved fruit. Cuter. Your chicken was my commander. As said, Hey, theater. What trade An onion for do you have? Ah, Like an extra orange. He goes all you don't want your onion. Of course, the space station economy was not just about food, though. Services were also a big part of it Dug, for instance, has an engineering background And he says for him, one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station were all the scientific experiments. They had to do whatever their background this was just Part of what they did every day, the way out of it Economics. Doug discovered this a couple of weeks into his mission. When one of the scientists aboard the space station told him that there was a big problem, she said, Hey, the party's broken not what you want to hear aboard a space station, that's for sure. No, But Doug's background was an engineering, so he understands systems and he says, fixing things comes really naturally to him. And the scientists This woman named Shannon knew this about Doug Shannon looked at me, she said. If you fix the party Do all of your science for the rest of the day. I'm thinking like that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal, so I got my bike tool belt called Houston and said, You know, Houston, we have a problem. The party is broken, but the real commodity on the space stations is Doug. Was Earth itself. For example, Doug says, you just want to see and talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them. You want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah, because in space, humans are a precious commodity. And I asked if there was ever bartering around this like, hey, you can join my video chat with my family for an apple. Indexes. Actually, everybody needs human interactions so much they don't really trade it because it becomes sacred when you get back to earth, Doug says. Your idea of what's valuable is changed forever. It's completely changed my whole perspective. Especially especially rain. I am just like fascinated by rain now I made I just The smell of it the sound of it and just to feel against your skin I took for granted before you know Stacey Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

Doug Stacey Vanek Doug Wheelock Doug Papa Wheels International Space Station Cardiff Garcia Nasa Doug Shannon Smith Houston Shannon Apple Cardiff Garcia NPR
Economics In Space

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:46 min | 3 d ago

Economics In Space

"The life of an astronaut. It sounds so awesome so adventurous astronaut. Doug wheelock says though most of the time it's actually pretty routine regimented. You wake up have breakfast do a bunch of scientific experiments and then you eat lunch. Then more experiments exercise dinner and go to sleep and of course there are no shops or movie theaters are banks or anything like that. So the economy aboard the international space station is all about trade. The interesting thing is with food. Of course the russians food supply is much different than our food supply. The russians is. Doug really loved the us deserts which were like brownies and cakes. And he's freeze dried packets and the american astronauts really loved the russian soups. Apparently the borscht is excellent. Excellent is a relative term. Of course doug says that aboard the space station. Most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from earth and the resupply missions were a big deal remember. It costs hundreds of millions of dollars to send a shuttle to the space station. So when those shipments actually came says doug it was a very special moment and in those shipments would be like personal items letters from home loved ones. Yeah who cares. There was also this precious commodity just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad. They would throw like a bag of fresh fruit like oranges. Lemons apples vegetables as well aboard the space station. Duck says produce was like platinum. Yeah and when the shipments would right he says everybody would get together and the excitement was electric. We'd all get in the the node one. Which is our kitchen area and flowed all the fruit and vegetables. Okay so it's like christmas morning. But doug says everybody would only get one or two pieces of produce. Just wasn't that much of it and so here's where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the russians loved onions. They're great for flavoring food but doug loved fruit above everything else at. I'd say like mad. I would take an orange over this onion any day. You know fyodor. Your chicken was mike. Commander said hey fyodor What a trade an onion for do of a like an extra orangey goes all. You don't want your onion douglas's that orange trade legendary in his mind still because for doug that orange was not just a snack. It was a connection to earth. It was like his companion was funny. I had i at one point. I kind of laughed. Because i i felt like tom. Hanks and castaway with wilson. The volleyball hung onto like one orange for like it seemed like probably three weeks at a became sort of by crewmate. Of course the space station economy was not just about food though services. Were also a big part of it and different people aboard. The space station had different things. They could contribute because they had such different backgrounds. There were scientists engineers pilots so skill sets seriously skill sets became part of our commerce as well. Dug for instance has an engineering background and he says for him one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station. Where all the scientific experiments they had to do. Whatever their background. This was just part of what they did. Every day and the space station would typically be running more than a hundred experiments at any given moment scientific research about food plants medicines. It's just a full day and it's also part of the mission of the space station. But for doug honestly it was kind of a slog sometimes the way out of it economics doug discovered this a couple of weeks in his mission when one of the scientists aboard. The space station told him that there was a big problem she said. Hey the party's broken. I mean that does sound like a big problem. I feel panicked at least not what you wanna hear aboard a space station. That's for sure. No but doug background was in engineering. So he understands systems and he says fixing things comes really naturally to him and the scientists. This woman named shannon knew this about doug shannon looked at me. She said if you fix the party. I'll do all of your science for the rest of the day and i'm thinking that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal. So i got my by tool bill called houston and said you know houston. We have a problem. The party's broken. Doug says actually the toilet broke quite a bit and whenever it happened whenever the toilet broke doug's economic value pretty much shot to infinity. I figured out that if you're out in space and you can fix the potty you're like lord of the universe but the real commodity on the space station's as doug was earth itself because he says when you see the whole planet against this backdrop of outerspace every day it just changes the way that you value things it just this raging ball of life in this vast desert of darkness. You know that takes root like very very quickly and it's like wow there's my planet everything ever known you know every word ever spoken. You know everybody. I've ever loved is down there and i'm not there and so that's when it really kind of strikes. You is When i talk to students and young children we talk about our favorite planet and things and i said pluto was my favorite planet. I said but then i went to space and now earth is my favorite planet. Thanks says when you're in space you start to crave all things earth and human evidence of life becomes

Doug Doug Wheelock International Space Station Fyodor Duck Hanks Doug Shannon Douglas Volleyball Wilson Mike TOM United States Houston Shannon Bill
NASA Asks: What Would You Pack for the Moon?

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 5 d ago

NASA Asks: What Would You Pack for the Moon?

"What would you pack for a trip to the moon. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies in the people behind the concepts that shape the future when astronauts traveled to the international space station. Each person is allowed a five inch by eight inch by two inch volume of space to take along something to remind them of home. But what would you pack. If you were one of the members of the optimist crew headed for the moon. What is it. you wouldn't want to leave the planet without try packing your own personal memento making sure it will fit into that same tight space. The astronauts are given then. Share your ideas on instagram twitter or facebook. Using the hashtag. Nasa moon kit over the next few weeks nasa will be conducting the green run campaign a series of tests that will gradually bring to life the most powerful rocket ever built. And if you're moon kit post just happens to catch nasr's watchful eye. It could be shared on one of the agency social media accounts during the green run broadcast. Making you part of the is mission. That will lamb the first woman and next man on the moon

International Space Station Nasa Twitter Facebook
Understanding Space Station Science

Innovation Now

01:01 min | Last week

Understanding Space Station Science

"Orbiting about two hundred fifty miles above our planet. The international space station is the only laboratory of its kind during the past two decades. The station is supported scientific discoveries and historic breakthroughs. Here are just a few fundamental disease research related to alzheimer's and parkinson's disease cancer. Asthma and heart disease the discovery of cool burning flames invisible flames that burn two and a half times cooler than a candle. The development of new water purification systems vital to humans everywhere methods to combat muscle atrophy and bone loss fluid research for applications from advanced medical devices to heat transfer systems three d. printing using human tissue and the ability to monitor our planet from this unique vantage point space station. Research helps us explore farther into space but it also makes our world a better place to live

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Cancer International Space Station Asthma Heart Disease
Cheers! French wine, vines headed home after year in space

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:40 sec | Last week

Cheers! French wine, vines headed home after year in space

"If you're an astronaut, Do you get to drink in space? Or maybe if we have, you know, travel someday we'll get toe. Take the booze with us. They've been studying this in space. French wine and grape vines now headed back to Earth after a year aboard the international space station. The space X Dragon cargo capsule undocked this morning with 12 bottles of Bordeaux and hundreds of snippets of grapevines. It is aiming for a splash down in the Gulf of Mexico. Tomorrow night's gonna return thousands of pounds of other science research they've had as well. Little startup, which flew the wine experiments for agricultural research says it will pop open a bottle or two or maybe more in February for an out of this world wine tasting in

International Space Station Bordeaux Gulf Of Mexico
NASA Counts Down to Twenty Years of Continuous Human Presence on International Space Station

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Counts Down to Twenty Years of Continuous Human Presence on International Space Station

"On october thirty first. Two thousand veteran astronaut william shepherd left earth on a journey began two decades of continuous human presence in low earth orbit this is a special series of innovation now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. Commander shepard's launch. The international space station was an orbiting complex of three small modules. Not the sprawling research complex. That is now today. State of the art laboratory facilities on board help. Nasa increase our understanding of what it will take to expand human exploration beyond low earth orbit and new activities including the flight of commercial crews and scientific investigations will keep the station useful than thriving for years to come for shepherd and the two russian cosmonauts who made up expedition one that first mission marked the beginning of an unprecedented era of peaceful cooperation in space now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. We continue to see benefits for all humankind and a launchpad to future destinations

William Shepherd International Space Station Commander Shepard Nasa
Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

Geek News Central

02:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

"He may have been asked to have that. Removed nasa net nasa gets pumped for twenty twenty one with hype video full of moon dreams and mars. Hope nasr's big plans for the year but doing space is still pretty hard. Last year was a big one for space missions. We got We got man missions back to the international space station. After many years of the shuttle being retired it's amazing. How long we relied on the russians. Now we don't have to write them a check but the russians are still lifting astronauts. The iss many most of them are from other countries. Now the space agency released a video previewing hyping. His plans for the new year and the moon is the star of the show. Why are we going back to the moon. Really you know honestly is that. Make any sense for some of you. Don't think we went to the moon begin with i think they ought to land on one of those missions close to a nasa landing site from the early days in. Show us some of that stuff. Did they left while the video. Swallow hope and optimism We know that the space launch system has delays is largely because of coronavirus pandemic parts parts parts and parts and parts and parts. I'm having issues getting some stuff here too that i need because there's no parts the first big test of the orion spacecraft is in the works for twenty twenty one with artists one. But we'll have to wait and see if the unscrewed mission able to launch this year after all and Of course the presser veers roller is set for a landing on mars on february tnt. So we got that to look forward to the twenty one minutes of how or whatever it's called If all goes well mark the start of a long range plan to bring martian rock samples back to earth and of course the much much delayed. James webb space telescope is still on the calendar for an october thirty first launch date. We spent so much money on the james webb space telescope. I just everyone will probably be holding their breath all the way to or visit with this thing and at the same time. The hubble is well you know well at its end of life you know well close to its end of life issues and we got a lot of the hubble is operating in your systems have died and there's no way to go and repair it so I wonder what they're gonna would have to do. If the james webb space telescope had issues once they launched but so

Nasa Nasr International Space Station James Webb
After a memorable 2020, NASA welcomes the New Year

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 3 weeks ago

After a memorable 2020, NASA welcomes the New Year

"From discoveries that help us better understand earth two missions that help a stretch. What we know about the universe. Nasa has had a memorable year. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped future. In twenty twenty spacex falcon nine and crew. Dragon became the first commercial system in history to be certified by nasa for human spaceflight and marked the return of american astronauts launching to the international space station in american rockets from us soil. In spite of the work from home situation nasa successfully launched the mars twenty twenty mission which sent the perseverance rover and its companion helicopter ingenuity on their way to mars nasa science missions continued to uncover new discoveries about this planet. We call home including a better understanding of when hurricanes develop or the impact of sea level. Rise twenty twenty has been challenging year but among those challenges have been reminders that together we remain strong so as the year comes to a close all of us at innovation. Now wanna wish each of you. A new year filled with health happiness and memories. you won't

Nasa International Space Station
NASA Standards Inform Comfortable Car Seats

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 3 weeks ago

NASA Standards Inform Comfortable Car Seats

"Nasa researchers soon discovered that win astronauts relaxed in space their bodies automatically entered a particular posture. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future initial skylab research and follow up studies on the international space station looked at the angles made by joints and the positions assumed by arms and legs when astronauts simply relaxed in microgravity. This information was used to create a set of man systems integration standards rather than simply allowing function to dictate design health safety and productivity became important factors for designing everything from workstations to space vehicles in the early two thousands nissan motor company turned to the nasa research to develop a more comfortable seat that would allow drivers to efficiently operate a vehicle for extended periods of time. Debut in the two thousand thirteen altima. The zero gravity seat had a unique shape that provided support to the whole vertebral column reducing loads on all parts of the body and decreasing fatigue today. The seats are available in several nissan models and the altima still tops car and driver's list of the most comfortable car seats on the market

Nasa International Space Station Nissan
Fiery crash of SpaceX's Starship rocket ignites dreams of future spaceflight

TechStuff

01:32 min | Last month

Fiery crash of SpaceX's Starship rocket ignites dreams of future spaceflight

"Late may spacex would supply the launch vehicle and spacecraft that nasa would need to deliver astronauts to the international space station. They made it the first time. The astronauts would launch from american soil. Since the us discontinued the space shuttle program in twenty eleven. The dragon spacecraft brought douglas hurley and robert benkin to the iss and the mission emphasized how the private space industry is to america's space strategy. At least in the near future and in a test. Late in the year spacex his starship s an eight vehicle exploded while executing a belly flop maneuver. The maneuver was going as planned at least for a while. But then one of the spacecraft's engines shutdown down unexpectedly and the vehicle crashed in a fiery explosion. Now fortunately this was an unmanned test. No one was hurt there were. There's no one aboard. There was no one on the ground that was hurt and it was generally understood that this maneuver was going to be really difficult to pull off and it was likely that some sort of failure would occur in other words. They had pretty much thought that this was a possibility and the goal of the test was really together. More information about the launch and the apogee of the flight path so the mission overall was not a failure. The spacecraft is a prototype of the class of vehicles. That spacex intends to use for missions. That will go to places like mars in the future. It's pretty exciting

Douglas Hurley Robert Benkin Spacex International Space Station Nasa America
Astronauts beam Christmas message of hope to Earth from space station

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Astronauts beam Christmas message of hope to Earth from space station

"And Christmas is a day off for the international space station crew. Astronaut Shannon Walker says she's got something in common with many people back home. The holidays are typically when people get together. I also recognize that so many people won't be able to be visiting their loved ones. This holiday roommate Victor Glover, We do have a family up here and so will be enjoying a special holiday. Together, they'll all be able to phone home and they'll enjoy some recently arrived gift and special holiday food. Today the first astronauts to spend Christmas in space. The evidence the earth that was the Apollo eight fruit, which spent Christmas Eve circling the moon in

Shannon Walker Victor Glover International Space Station
New method aims to see extreme space weather before it reaches astronauts

Innovation Now

01:17 min | Last month

New method aims to see extreme space weather before it reaches astronauts

"A space weather warning may help protect astronauts in space this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped its magnetic field and atmosphere protect us most space weather the eruptions of light and fast moving energized particles that come from our dynamic son but astronauts in low earth orbit like those on the international space station are more exposed to these solar events scientists observe some space weather events with corona graphs instruments. That used a solid disc to block the sun's bright face revealing the sun's atmosphere or corona space-based corona graphs although not obstructed by cloud cover only return images about every twenty to thirty minutes the solar eruptions seen in one image may have already arrived by the time. Scientists get the next frame by working backwards. A group of scientists from nasa and the national center for atmospheric research have detected an early signature of certain energetic particles if the signatures proof reliable scientists will be able to predict the arrival of these dangerous particles even before they leave the sun's inner atmosphere giving astronauts and space fair warning to prepare

International Space Station SUN National Center For Atmospheri Nasa
New Doorway to Space with Airlock on ISS

Innovation Now

01:20 min | Last month

New Doorway to Space with Airlock on ISS

"The doorways on the international space station of work just fine for the past twenty years but as more researchers expand the scope and size of their projects a larger doorway could open up space. This is a special series of innovation now. Celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station to harp. Relieve the bottleneck. That sometimes happens on the international space station. As satellites experiments and larger payloads are received nanno racks. llc has built a new and different kind of doorway into space. The private company created the nanno racks bishop airlock module. That will serve as another door to the space station. The new airlock delivered on a spacex dragon. Resupply services mission is the first commercial. Airlock added to the station. This ship will provide five times. The capacity of the stations other operational air locks allowing for larger payloads to be moved inside and outside the station. The bell jar shape contains rows of tracks for mounting modules and housing electrical connections which can be configured in a variety of ways. This versatile design supports conducting experiments or deploying satellites simultaneously making space for a lot more stations

International Space Station LLC
Learn how to use ISS tracking alerts to Spot The Station

Innovation Now

01:11 min | Last month

Learn how to use ISS tracking alerts to Spot The Station

"As the third brightest object in the sky it's easy to spot if you look up. This is a special series of innovation now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. As the international space station passes overhead. It is sometimes visible to the naked eye. All sightings occur within a few hours before or after sunrise or sunset these times create optimum viewing periods as the sun reflects off the space station and contrast with the darker sky. The station will look like a fast moving plane only much higher and traveling much faster unlike planes. The station has no flashing lights and won't change direction. In the several seconds it's visible. But how do you know when to look up. you can sign up for email or text. Alerts at spot. The station dot nasa dot gov spot. The station will only send out notifications when you have the best opportunity for viewing and because the station's orbit takes it all around the globe. You could be in the right place at the right time of the day as the international space station streaks across the

International Space Station Nasa
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | Last month

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
The Right Tools

Innovation Now

01:08 min | Last month

The Right Tools

"Prior to installation of the robotic tool stowage unit nassau's robotic external leak locator was stored inside the international space station. The tool is an important unit. Used to help astronauts identify dangerous ammonia leaks in the space station's cooling system but deploying the robotic nose was a complicated process that was dependent on the availability of an airlock involved waiting an additional twelve hours to allow the gas analyzer to clear itself of internal gases and required astronauts to travel outside the station. The newly installed robot hotel is now the leak locators home and the leak. Location process is much more streamlined. As long as dexter. The canadian space agencies robotic arm is available. Dexter can use the tool to detect ammonia leaks eliminating the need for astronauts to perform the same task during the spacewalk. Meanwhile the external storage unit provides a warm protected place for critical tools like the leak locator to be stored until they are needed again for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet.

International Space Station Nassau Dexter Jennifer Poet
SpaceX cargo ship brings Christmas treats to space station

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:30 sec | Last month

SpaceX cargo ship brings Christmas treats to space station

"In space for the first time to space X cargo ships are parked side by side at the space station. Here's CBS News Space Consultants Bill Harwood, the first in a new generation of on politics, space sex dragon cargo ships carried out a textbook rendezvous with the international space station. Then flew itself in for docking. Cargo dragon, which is loaded with about £6500 of equipment and supplies, is doctor just a few feet away from the crew Dragon spacecraft carried for astronauts to the station last month.

Cbs News Space Consultants Bill Harwood
SpaceX launches next-generation Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | Last month

SpaceX launches next-generation Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station

"Lift off of the Falcon nine and upgraded Cargo Dragon, the first cargo passel to dock to the international space station. Private company Space X, launching the latest version of its Dragon Dragon cargo ship packed with more than £6000 of supplies for the international space station, 250 Science and Research Experiments, also on board. Wins news time. 11 55

International Space Station Space X
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:03 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle. That would take off for many months in years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets Venus and Mars now our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific Looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the Cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the CTB's the stowage bags the computer systems. The communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank you.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Intelligence Systems US CTB Michigan Houston ISS Gary Australia KUPUNA Mister bigalow
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:51 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"This is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle that would take off for many months or even years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets. Venus and Mars now. Our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the. Ctb's the stowage bags the computer systems communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Houston US Intelligence Systems Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Michigan Chikuba ISS Marshall Center Alabama Japan Gary Ctb Australia
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 11 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"international space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"international space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"international space" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Rule science on the international space station presented by science at nasa nessa researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the international space station in two thousand eighteen new atomic refrigerator will blast off for the space station it's called the cold atom lab or cal and it can refrigerate manner to one ten billion of degree above absolute zero just above the point where all the thermal activity of atoms theoretically stops at this temperature atoms lose their energy and start to move very slowly explains rob thompson cal project scientists at nasr's jet propulsion laboratory or jpl at room temperature adams bounce off each other in all directions at a few hundred meters per second but in cal they'll slow down a million fold and condense into unique states of quantum matter count is a multi user facility that supports many investigators studying abroad range of topics eric cornell physicist at the university of colorado and the national institute of standards and technology will be leading one of the first calix perriman tes cornell and his team will use cal to investigate particle collisions and how particles interact with one another ultracold gases produced by the cold atom lab can contain molecules with three atoms each but which are thousand times bigger than a typical molecule this results in a low density fluffy molecule that quickly falls apart unless it is kept extremely cold how is particle behaviour affected as more particles are introduced what can be learned about quantum.

nasr eric cornell physicist cornell rob thompson university of colorado national institute of standard hundred meters per second
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Sitting down and standing up lame down and standing up standing up and having somebody push you a little bit it's all the things that you know that sounds for that sounds really easy like can i stand up i could be an astronaut well after spending six months in space can be a little jari it could be a little difficult and all that feeds back into the research of okay i'm a mars astronaut i've been in space for you know six to nine months on this trip noun gravity environment you need to design the spacecraft the habitat everything to understand that hey for the first couple of hours this person might have to just sitting there chair and do nothing or no we can resume reasonably expect them to pop up in you know do these simple things they might not be able to get out of there space for a couple of hours all all of these different things have to be figured out before you to shove people into the spacecraft kick them off the planet and incentives somewhere else but we're doing that for doing that right now yet man their job is not done when they hit the nail on a final after six months being away from home you hit the ground and you're like i finally done and then the you stand apps it down new accounts crazy stuff and it doesn't stop there oh that's right and it's it's an and again when i when i say they're truly gracious people they they have to sacrifice a lot for the for this i mean you know obviously they get the great view and they're they're in outer space and that's amazing but i mean just training for these missions is usually about two years so you that's two years of you in intensive training awada traveled to all the other partner countries where they trainee one different things.

partner trainee six months two years nine months
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"See and find those countermeasures that happen last really intense i mean imagine get like landing on mars and you can't see anything had become a buzzkill travel sixty million miles and get out everything's blurry that yeah the the the wouldn't make me happy so i know light when a here's another thank when astronaut so astronaut now they're doing on the international space station pretty regularly they're doing longduration increments right so they're doing six months at a time yes uh so this is longer than any of shuttle missions allowed the mission's before it and it's it's all to practice for for emissions missions beyond a lowearth orbit but when they come back to earth right they generally right now they come back in a soyuz landing khazakstan and then we have recovery teams i go get them at but they have a hard time walking right when i when i get out some do it so that's that's part of again the the human body reacting to the different environments when when nash routes i get into space some will nausea some all have some adverse reactions to being a microgravity the same is true that when you're in microgravity furui long time and he come back down to earth hold the sudden there's this this huge weight pressing down on you though hasn't been there for the last six months or vr vr longeuro there there's year your inner ear goes crazy and like all the fluids pulling down again wherever either used to be no up and down but now the sudden there's definitely a down and so it it can be tough just to just a walk i mean we.

adverse reactions six months
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We can launch air just like we can launch water you can lodge a tank of super pressurized air usually in a liquid form and then feet it into the atmosphere but the main way we get it is from water we use the system called the oxygen generation system that actually takes water splits the atom split the atom but uh splits at the or water molecule into oxygenhydrogen and then we could take that oxygen and pump it into the atmosphere then they are in the pure oxygen atmosphere so there's other stuff in there there's a lot nitrogen share so very sanita earth's atmosphere right yes airbase cleaning act same composition atmosphere that we have on earth and actually the same pressure to so there's there's no big difference there uh that feeds into some of the stuff that do for spacewalks but that's completely different tanja and go on it so we we we split the water molecules so then you have your oxygen which you just feed directly back into the cabin and then you have hydrogen which you can vent overboard if he just bill up a bunch of excess hydrogen or there's of process in a in a payload up there it's it's used as more of a technology demonstration so it's not really in the in the critical path so it's not a critical piece that we have to have run at all times but it's called the sobotta uses this abbadi a process where you can take that hydrogen the ad left over from your water.

tanja
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It they generate pretty much a comparable amount to keep everything that we want on board and that's that's all life support that's keeping the lights on a that's running all of the experiments on board all of the different hardware just keeping the station you know oriented and the right attitude and flying in in any time amin every everything everything everything race powered by the solar rays and it i mean it's it doesn't generate an overwhelming access of energy by any means because again you are spending a lot of time in darkness so those batteries are getting used pretty much constantly were in the process of swapping the batteries were upgrading yeah vardi upgraded uh one fourth of them go switched out nickelhydrogen for lithium ion that is correct that's right lithium ion if away more efficient right yeah but that i mean that's that's the power story it's it's it's all solar energy through those bigs and they are they are very large in we come back to the football field the american football field and alaji having clarified yet yet uh that the solar arrays or basically each each solar rays the size of an and so on and their eight of those yes that are the size of annan's her thing like a pair of their hero or you're a pair of four so yet for it's tough because like you one pair actually to array blankets and but they're are very large yes yeah okay so that's power right so we already talked about water because you need to recycle water and make sure you have enough and waters rates means have to launch and he recycle its ottmar fish in and it's very very clean so what about air right that's one thing you think about like what a human needs shelter for our water food you didn't really think about air but at something you definitely needs and a again that's something we kinda take for granted a hair is just it's it's air everywhere down here in europe they're the arena you're in a sealed environment you're basically in a big sealed ten can in the need to fill that with their so they.

solar rays lithium ion solar energy annan europe amin football
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's incredible is alatas spacecraft do this because you you have the sun i mean the sun is we have solar energy here on earth but in outer space you can have even more direct access this on that's very regrettable readily available energy sources italy sat we know how to harness true we know how to make solar rays and we have gigantic ones on board the safe so every all the power unsafe is generated through solar energy and we talked about they see sixteen sunrises and sunsets a day so about half the time there are in complete darkness so there is no son of so what you have is you have these great big solar rays that header generating power and then there's a bunch of batteries on board and the solar arrays it is charging out those batteries surrey time they slipped behind the earth again in there in nighttime those batteries are to supplying power to everything in but it's one hundred percent solar renewable clean son energy very jal solar energy and their massive frei is if i think it's they actually there so big and then produced so much power that actually they do half dead by kind of get rid of some of that power because that is kind of is a little bit redundant writing is one of them breaks like you still have enough power power we ain't you do have redundancy builtin redundancies one of our favorite words redundancy is a fancy word for backup plan he had at nasa we always via backup plans free backup plan so yet even if you lose we call empower channels you lose one you lose to you can still power the majority of all if you're systems on board and even going beyond that if you lose beano a much larger amount of power you can still power your key systems and everything he might just power down other things temporary while you fix the problem but.

solar energy energy sources solar rays italy nasa power down one hundred percent
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

elia us europe jackson space exploration peggy whitson tina japan billiondollar eight league
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know going to mars or you know our farflung aspirations of spreading throughout the the solar system and the galaxy and everything when you compare it to that it's you know doing hang quotes easy but it's still a monumental undertaking yet and that's why so we're doing that just like you said we are the in the future where we want to go far right so we wanna go to mars we wanna really just expand our presence in the solar system so the international space station is a great way to practice that it's a good like you have a good understanding of what it takes to live in space to operate in space you could do a ton of science and learn how things interact and then he learned how things interact he can design better systems to make them work better i think one of the once acc ethic capillary action i think was a it was a great one like the way that fluids move in phnom in spaces kinda cool because they sort of like create a ball and there's there's no down so if you're trying to design lega system that uh it like a rocket system in order to propel fuel you need to the fuel isn't gonna go down ranking kinda needs to have that sort of capillary action and a path to get there like little little those little tiny things are things that make the huge difference and then able to kind of explosives would all comes to down to gravity that's kind of the the old differentiator between why everything we do in outer space is different from the way we do it on earth total the most of you touch on his.

solar system acc
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So it's like a way to practice really for it is for things further out because it's not really far up rights linked to 150 miles think about it were still in their earth's protection men like oh yeah oh protected by the irs magnetic field will spaces funny in that going up it it feels like it's so far away space but it's two hundred fifty miles that's not that far i mean i feel like the city of houston is two hundred fifty miles it's not but i mean to 150 miles on a cars a is a short road trip but at two hundred fifty miles straight up at the rocket ride that's that's a slightly different road trip but it is it isn't that far away i mean we still kind of our right on the doorstep there's there's a a really great quote in the the paramount of space movies armageddon were only says you know we're not even our in outer space yet this is just like the beginning and that's kind of where the station is it's it's in space it's in what we call lowearth orbit so so pretty close i mean they could get into so you spacecraft and be back on the ground inside of a couple of hours so i mean you're so right on the doorstep you not really way out there yet but it's getting ready to go way out there well that's the whole so nasa describes it as earth when lyon two right so i i kinda like the way they section at off right earth reliant means exactly what you sent right so something goes wrong you can just happen spacecraft and the home in three hours and it's easy to get stuff there because it's only a i mean some so he's rise of in as little as like six hours ray relatively relative george speight is only rocket science side to trivial i hit it all and even the even after admonish myself it's still not easy to go to space it still i mean liz rocket scientist literal rocket science hugely complex and there's always inherent risk and all these other things but when you start comparing it to.

irs lyon george speight houston nasa scientist three hours six hours