40 Burst results for "International Space Station"

NASA Standards Inform Comfortable Car Seats

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 14 hrs ago

NASA Standards Inform Comfortable Car Seats

"NASA researchers soon, discovered that win astronauts relaxed in space. Their bodies automatically entered a particular posture. This is innovation. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future initial skylab research and follow up studies on the International Space Station. Looked at the angles made by joints and the positions assumed by arms and legs. When astronauts simply relaxed in microgravity, this information was used to create a set of man systems integration standards rather than simply allowing function to dictate design health safety and productivity became important factors for designing everything from workstations to space vehicles in the early two thousands Nissan Motor. Company turned to the NASA research to develop a more comfortable seat that would allow drivers to efficiently operate a vehicle for extended periods of time debut in the two thousand Thirteen Altima the zero gravity seat had a unique shape that provided support to the whole vertebral column reducing loads on all parts of the body and decreasing fatigue today. The seats are available in several Nissan models and the altima still tops car and driver's list of the most comfortable car seats on the market

Nasa Nissan Motor International Space Station
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

01:35 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Fred and Angi

"There's a reality. Siri's You want to send a civilian in his space space hero has secured a seat on the 2023 mission to the international space station. The Siri's will launch a global search for everyday people from any background who share a deep love for space exploration. There'll be vying for the biggest prize ever awarded on TV. The Select a group of contestants will undergo extensive training and face challenges. Testing their physical, mental and emotional strength qualities that are essential for an astronaut in space. The show will then chronicle the winners take off their stay at the space station for 10 days alongside professional astronauts traveling at 17,000 MPH orbiting the Earth 16 times and it'll end would they return to earth? No, I don't know how much money you get the Oh, I would do that. What? It isn't safe. How long are you up there? 10 days from the biggest price of history. 10 days in space. I need to know what the prizes says. A lot of money for 10 days. They were, like, months and months. I'm not doing that. I could do 10 days like that around by space food out of a toothpaste container Am I doing at Tang and memories and forget about it? They don't have Portela is inspecting. Absolutely not. No, I can't do that have sex in space. I could take somebody to do that with my consider it, you know, I think it's probably challenging. You know, it's been done every day. Just like that. It's zero around. Is there a Russian up there? I can. You know a cosmonaut up there that I can, you know? Yeah, There's a few dudes up there. There would probably like to see you. I mean, you know you went into space space.

Siri Portela
'Space Hero:' Planned reality TV show wants to launch winner to International Space Station

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:24 sec | 4 d ago

'Space Hero:' Planned reality TV show wants to launch winner to International Space Station

"A new reality show promises to be ground breaking or should say, ground leaving space hero. Will chronicle the selection of a person to launch to the International space station deadline, says the U. S production company has secured a seat on a rocket in 2023 will be a border space six Falcon nine rocket with one of those crew dragon capsules, so the winner will get to spend 10 days on the international space station,

International Space U. S
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

00:45 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Do you. Know who the allied and access powers were in World War Two. Automobiles like you but I don't know what those words are. Exactly. But I do know this tribe winner would have won the war that was allowed saying no disrespect. Would have won the war gene I'm sorry. Sir Absolutely, I wonder if the president has been involved in this any way or maybe would like to do something like this in the future NASA and the international beauty conglomerate are teaming up to produce a new campaign filmed at the International Space Station two, hundred, fifty miles above earth. So a NASA spokesperson confirmed on Thursday as many as ten bottles of Estee Lauder popular advanced night repair that's a serum. Will launch into space at the end of the month for some galactic research but probably more of a commercial. So what they're gonNa do is the astronauts themselves are going to film these products sort of floating in space for a new AD campaign they won't be standing or posing with this stuff because they're not allowed to endorse anything but estee lauder is going to space for this new commercial. Space. Pussy. Yes. Trump is ED. Thank.

Estee Lauder International Space Station Nasa Donald Trump President Trump
New reality show promises to send winner into space for 10 days

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 4 d ago

New reality show promises to send winner into space for 10 days

"Now, man, a huge sign up for this. I know there's a new reality show in development. Yes, I will rise like no other company called Space Hero has secured his seat on a 2023 mission to the international space station launching aboard a space X rocket deadline reports space hero will select an ordinary person to launch into space. Choosing someone who has a deep love for space exploration is probably competition's about vomiting. Just cause you know it's a reality show. The show will go on to chronicle the winner's preparation for launch into orbit there 10 days stay on the space station, and they're splash down on

Space Hero
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

00:56 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Innovation Now

"NASA researchers soon, , discovered that win astronauts relaxed in space. . Their bodies automatically entered a particular posture. . This is innovation. . Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future initial skylab research and follow up studies on the International Space Station. . Looked at the angles made by joints and the positions assumed by arms and legs. . When astronauts simply relaxed in microgravity, , this information was used to create a set of man systems integration standards rather than simply allowing function to dictate design health safety and productivity became important factors for designing everything from workstations to space vehicles in the early two thousands Nissan Motor. . Company turned to the NASA research to develop a more comfortable seat that would allow drivers to efficiently operate a vehicle for extended periods of time debut in the two thousand Thirteen Altima the zero gravity seat had a unique shape that provided support to the whole vertebral column reducing loads on all parts of the body and decreasing fatigue today. . The seats are available in several Nissan models and the altima still tops car and driver's list of the most comfortable car seats on the market

Nasa International Space Station Nissan Motor
Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

Innovation Now

01:12 min | Last week

Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

"The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket with cygnus resupply spacecraft on board will head to space. Later this month launching from the mid Atlantic regional spaceport at NASA Wallops flight facility. The Antares launch is the company's Fourteenth Commercial Resupply Services Mission. Cygnus will deliver NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station highlights of space station research facilitated by this launch include a plant habitat for radishes the test of a biologic drug that could be used for the. Treatment of leukemia and the Universal Waste Management System. A new compact toilet that astronauts can use on deep space exploration missions a new three, hundred sixty degree virtual reality camera from a Montreal based film. Studio will also be transported to the station. So astronauts can capture a future spacewalk in cinematic virtual reality cargo resupply from US companies insurers a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station and significantly increases masses ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

International Space Station Nasa Wallops Antares Cygnus Jennifer Pulley United States Nasa Atlantic Montreal
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Part Time Genius

Part Time Genius

03:38 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Part Time Genius

"Got turned into 3000 things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk, a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering correctly. Debris from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction, hitting other satellites and creating new debris. 2013 Hollywood movie. It begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra Bullock servicing the Hubble Space Telescope gazing contentedly back on Earth. This huge cloud of debris from the missile strike through communications blackout. It's a bad situation of North America just lost their Facebook. This dramatic portrayals definitely raised the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate. I think maybe I'm a whole has been a good thing before the issue, even if I might grab a little bit. Scientists love grumbles. That's Brian Weed and again. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space. And he says that opening scene in gravity doesn't capture the true problem. Over the bridge. The captain was portrayed as sort of Ah nuclear chain reaction. Right? There's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite. Where it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long, relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got it. Yeah. So Brian says mitigating the risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites, governments and companies. Change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now. To forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that Preach, especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened. Yet, but space junk is already proving to be problematic. In the short term, it's translating into RIA world costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions do do I change my satellites orbit? Because that cost fuel and that will shorten the lifetime. Your satellite, which isn't good for the commercial space economy, which is kind of booming right now. Yeah, we did That episode all about how space sex is going to put a bunch of satellites up there, Right? You know, in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the international space station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit. Like those used for imaging and weather data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate. Or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors, and that could have negative impacts on the road. Yeah, we're going to need that data We are. But here's the thing. There's no international regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines. Yes guidelines from the Interagency Space Debris Coordination Committee for Mitigating the Risk of debris. Things like deorbit your satellite after 25 years by burning it up for bringing it down. Passive, ate the upper rocket stage, meaning vent all the remaining fuel are training the batteries, so it's not his exploding, so there's less risk for debris. Countries do this, but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement. So until there's greater accountability, space junk will continue to be a problem. Okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution. Kwong, what is being done to clean up this junk? Well, we're not seeing much in the skies. There's been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on earth that could be used in space magnets, Deployable nets, harpoons, a little space fission. Yeah. In the orbital See? Most of this clean of technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit to a place where it can safely burn up. You would need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it. And I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes. So it was a pretty big deal. When last December the Europeans keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast and all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now.

Interagency Space Debris Coord Brian Weed Hubble Space Telescope Europe George Clooney Facebook Sandra Bullock North America Preach Secure World Foundation Kwong Japan
The 'mighty mice' that went to space could help protect astronauts' muscles and bones

CNN 10 (video)

01:05 min | Last week

The 'mighty mice' that went to space could help protect astronauts' muscles and bones

"Far as television goes out has been on the air in years, but he has been in space in a manner of speaking these have been called mighty mice. They're genetically modified mice that have twice the muscle mass of unaltered mice and forty of them were recently center to. For. A study on. Muscle. Mass. The daily force of gravity people and mice normally lose muscle NASA says in space flights lasting five to eleven days astronauts can lose as much as twenty percent of their muscle. Those who spent months on the International Space Station regularly exercise to help prevent this loss, but this kind of training might not be possible during long term spaceflight. So scientists have been experimenting with mighty mice to see if the drug could be produced one day that could help astronauts keep their muscle in a microgravity environment of drugs. Especially, those related to maintaining or increasing muscle mass have a ray of unwanted side effects. So researchers are looking to create treatments that avoid those and as. Far, as the mice were concerned, the genetically altered ones were able to keep more of their muscle mass in space and recover it faster once they got back down to Earth

International Space Station Nasa
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Part Time Genius

Part Time Genius

01:50 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Part Time Genius

"Satellites all bingo. So today in the show space junk why it's a problem and how it's building up in the final frontier with little regulation, and a lot of trash will tell you about the first planned mission to pick up space junk. We are tackling a question from listener Rachel Weiss on space junk, this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth's orbit. So how exactly does that happen? Okay, first, let's consider what satellites are made out of metal. Plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving so quickly that they don't fall towards the earth. Kind of like, you know, if you had to put a boat in a body of water You want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing. That's more of a jaw who we met earlier. He says that from Sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies, pieces becoming unglued. Satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is onboard A and, of course, they can cross flight paths and collide with one another. And whenever a satellite shed pieces, they tend to not shed one but many, many pieces hundreds of thousands of pieces, depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space. Affected not only by gravity but other physical forces. So a pressure no thermal radiation charged particle environment interactions with, you know, magnetic fields. And all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next. The little that falls back to Earth, which is one object today, on average, burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability Because you're going to ask me this question. I haven't. But there's a scientist Mark Matin E at NASA's orbital debris program, who has its one in several trillion. Honestly, I still don't like it. But okay, Matty the people, you should worry about more astronauts right. The international space station actually has a tracker to monitor For collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Well, but I feel like if there was a major collision, I would've heard about it, right? Yeah, there hasn't been a major collision. You know the U. S military, NASA and other agencies and groups around the world. They track debris and warn of potential collisions. But there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in 2015, for example, the crew on the international space station had to hide in there. Saul use capsules, basically the station's lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that. No. Spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way, but only if they have ample warning. So the whole space faring community was pretty rattled. When in 2007, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites. They were testing out anti satellite technology. Brian wouldn't remembers tracking this big explosion for the U. S Air Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was kind of like, wow. Ryan was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris. And in the end, we ended up cataloguing more than 3000 objects so that one satellite got turned into 3000 things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk, a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering correctly..

Nasa Rachel Weiss Cluttering Ryan Saul Matty Scientist Brian U. S Air Force Mark Matin E U. S
"Mighty mice" stay bulked up in space but not untreated mice

Ben Ferguson

00:27 sec | Last week

"Mighty mice" stay bulked up in space but not untreated mice

"Genetically enhanced mice that were on board the International Space Station are revealing clues that could lead to health advancements in zero gravity. Researchers say the mighty mice produced a molecule that helped prevent muscle and bone density loss well in space and the recovery of muscle and bone mass once a returned to Earth. The results could lead to therapeutics for astronauts before they had to

International Space Station
"Mighty mice" stay bulked up in space but not untreated mice

Vicki McKenna

00:27 sec | Last week

"Mighty mice" stay bulked up in space but not untreated mice

"Were on board. The International space Station are revealing clues that could lead to health advancements in zero gravity. Researchers say the mighty mice produced a molecule that helped prevent muscle and bone density loss well in space and the recovery of muscle and bone mass once they returned to Earth. The results could lead to therapeutics for astronauts before they had to space Health Update. Sarah Lee

International Space Station Sarah Lee
Experimental drug boosts muscle and bone mass of mice in space

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 2 weeks ago

Experimental drug boosts muscle and bone mass of mice in space

"Maybe this will work in future astronauts. Or maybe it won't. But an experiment involving a muscle building drug prove successful in mice who were injected before being sent to the international space station. In weightlessness. Untreated mice lost considerable muscle and bone mass. But the so called mighty mice did not. A drug blocks a pair of proteins that typically limit muscle mass

Experimental drug boosts muscle and bone mass of mice in space

Tim Conway Jr.

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

Experimental drug boosts muscle and bone mass of mice in space

"Mice have returned to Earth with bodybuilder physiques, a research team sent 40 young female black mice to the international space station aboard a space X rocket. After a month long stay 24 regular untreated mice lost considerable muscle muscle and and bone bone mass mass as as expected expected up up to to 18%. 18%. But But the the A A genetically genetically engineered engineered mighty mighty mice mice that that had had double double the the muscle muscle maintained maintained their their bulk. bulk. The The treatment treatment involves involves blocking blocking appear of proteins that typically limit muscle mass. The findings could help develop therapies for astronauts before they had to space as well as people on Earth who are confined to a bed or need will chairs

'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

Tim Conway Jr.

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

"Some mighty mice have returned to Earth with bodybuilder physiques, a research team sent 40 young female black mice to the international space Station aboard a space X rocket. After a month long stay 24 regular untreated mice lost considerable muscle and bone mass as expected up to 18%. But the A genetically engineered mighty mice that had double the muscle maintained their bulk. The treatment involves blocking a pair of proteins that typically limit muscle mass. The findings could help develop therapies for astronauts before they had to space as well as people on Earth who are confined to a bed or need Will

International Space Station
'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

Marketplace

02:57 min | 2 weeks ago

'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

"An update on some muscular mice who spent a month on the international space station. NPR's John Hamilton reports that these mouse tre knots were part of an experiment that may show how humans can stay strong during interplanetary voyages. Without Earth's gravity, muscles and bones could get weak fast. So astronauts on the space station spend two hours a day exercising. Back in April. Jessica mere, Andrew Morgan even made a weightless workout video. This next exercise is cardiovascular exercise with T two treadmill to Bundy's. My Artists are holding me against the treadmill. Pretty fun to have an extra spring in your step. Intense exercise reduces bone and muscle laws but doesn't stop it, and that's a problem if you're headed for, say, Mars. So in December, researchers set some very special mice into orbit. Some of the mice were just along for the ride. Others got injections of a drug that in activates two substances that occur naturally in the body. They're called myostatin and active in a and normally their job is to limit the growth of muscle and bone. Dr Se Jin Lee of the Jackson Laboratory says when they reached the space station, all the mice got lots of exercise. Once they get up there, they've become very active, and in fact, they have a name for race tracking because they're you know, running around quite a bit. After a month in orbit, the mice splashed down off the California coast and were rushed to a lab in San Diego. Lee says normal mice that did not receive any treatment lost more than 10% of their muscle mass. And he says bone loss was an even bigger problem. They lost a substantial not a bone in space. And then even after being on Earth. They actually continue to lose a little bit more bone mass. Lee says the mice that got the drug did much better. The drug was effective, not just in preserving the mussel mess and bone mess that was being lost. But actually caused the muscles and bones to grow. The drug also reversed muscle and bone loss in mice that got it after they return to Earth. Dr. Emily Jermain Lee of the University of Connecticut, says a human version of the drug could help both astronauts in space and millions of people on Earth. That would be a miracle. For a person, either with primary bone disease, primary muscle disease or a combination. But Jermain Lee, who is married to Se Jin Lee cautions that so far the treatment has on Lee worked in mice. They had a phenomenal response to the drug without apparently any bad side effects. That's Not necessarily something that we could extrapolated to humans, but she's hopeful and says experiments on people are underway. The research appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Emily Jermain Lee Bone Loss Bone Disease NPR Bundy John Hamilton Jessica Mere California National Academy Of Sciences Andrew Morgan Proceedings Of San Diego Jackson Laboratory University Of Connecticut
'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

WBT Afternoon Programming

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

"Mighty mice to the international space station say the animals held onto their muscle during the month long flight. A research team reporting today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the regular mice lost considerable muscle and bone mass in weightlessness as expected, but the eight genetically engineered mighty mice as they call them. Launched with double the muscle, maintain their bulk and ate normal mice that received mighty mouse treatment while in space returned with dramatically larger muscles, researchers state the findings hold promise for preventing muscle and bone loss and astronauts on prolonged space trips like toe Mars missions, as well as people here on America are confined to bed or need wheelchairs. But they say Till sometime to determine if they could do that safely and help people. Check. The weather forecast next

Bone Loss National Academy Of Sciences America
Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

Short Wave

05:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

"We are tackling a question from listener. Rachel. Weiss space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? Okay I. Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving. So quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. But jaw who we met earlier, he says that from sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, and of course, they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. Tend to not should one but many many pieces, hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, environment interactions with you know magnetic fields, and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. But there's a scientist mark. Matinee, at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow. But I feel like if there was a major collision, I would hurt about it, right? Yeah. There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in two thousand, fifteen, for example, the crew. On. The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, thousand, seven, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. Technology. Brian Weeden, remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. So that one. Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and contentedly back at Earth. When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. Even, if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It. Yeah. So Brian says. The risk of space junk involves convincing people, launching satellites, governments, and companies to change their behavior. Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, it's translating into real world costs a satellite. Field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, which isn't good for the commercials base economy, which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah. We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

International Space Station Brian Weeden United States Nasa Cluttering Rachel Weiss Spacex Cracks Lake Scientist Mattie America Hollywood George Clooney Navy Sandra Bullock Secure World Foundation Director
Space Crops

Innovation Now

01:02 min | Last month

Space Crops

"The space crop production lab at NASA Kennedy Space Center is a web of research labs equipped with plant growth chambers of all sizes designed to simulate conditions on the International Space Station in these labs teams of researchers apply chemistry, biology, microbiology, and engineering to find the best ways to make plants grow in space. The passive poorest plant nutrient system is one of the latest food production technologies developed in the NASA lab this system. Uses a ceramic poorest tube and water nutrient bags connected in a loop to feed plants. Nutrients are pumped in through a combination of capillary force and the same evapotranspiration process that moves water in plants on earth with no moving parts and requiring no electricity. The apparatus is simple to assemble and fully autonomous minimizing the amount of time astronaut farmers would need to spend tending their

Nasa Kennedy Space Center International Space Station Nasa
What's In A Scientific Name

Your Brain on Facts

05:12 min | Last month

What's In A Scientific Name

"From loon example of a trial by in Hunan China called Hans Solo to a butterfly Pea flour reminiscent of Georgia. Oh painting called Couture Couturier Turn Tia. The naming of species offers almost as much in the way of entertainment as it does scientific classification. The official rules for naming species set down by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature are surprisingly simple. The name must be spelled with the Latin alphabet and must not be overtly offensive and that's pretty much it. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Most of US know that the animals we call by single name such as a horse actually had a two part name in that case equis Columbus. In contrast to astronomical bodies like stars, Asteroids and planets which are under strict naming conventions overseen by committees, there's almost unfettered freedom it comes to zoological nomenclature. The name can even be on sense string of arbitrary letters. While there is a wealth of name fascination to report on from plants to drugs to telescopes. Ourselves today to the Animal Kingdom. For as long as we have had records and probably longer mankind has sought to classify the world around us in an effort to begin to understand it. This is called taxonomy the study of the general principles of scientific classification from the Greek words for order or arrangement and science. Three centuries before the common era aristotle grouped animals I by similarities like where they lived and then hierarchically with humans naturally at the top. Not, every animal fit well into this system though ducks posed a particular problem as they had the bothersome habit of living on water on land and spending time in the air. It would be eighteen hundred years before another natural philosopher as scientists were called, then would try their hand such as Andrei sessile, Pino Italian physician, and botanist who sorted plants by the structure of their fruits and seeds. The first scientist to use a binomial or to name system that we would recognize was Swiss botanist guest sparred Boeing. Some six thousand plants by genus and species in sixteen, twenty three. There were several inconsistent and sometimes conflicting systems of classification already in use when Carolina's wrote his. SYSTEMA naturally in seventeen, thirty five. Laying down the system we use to this day. Lena's was first taxonomic east to list humans as a primate, but he also originally classified whales as. All living things were sorted into them, Feilim class order, family, genus, and species. Many of US memorized that in middle school by way of a new monarch like King Philip came over from great Spain. Housecat for example, is kingdom and Amelia filed them cor data meaning it has spinal cord. Class Mammalia order can Adora family feel a day genus fearless and species cactus. A lion diverges at the genus Pan Terra, which awesomely means reaper of all and species. Leo. So the scientific name for Lion Is Penn Tara Leo. This system can be visualized as an enormous branching tree with its trunk, very broad and its branches increasingly specific. We. Still name some animals in accordance with their appearance with a little poetic license thrown in for good measure. The tiniest and most pastelle of the armored mammals was christened the pink fairy armadillo. A. Hand Size Lizard with a gift from a meese camouflage was given the fairly metal moniker satanic leaf tailed Gecko. It's actual religious beliefs remain a mystery. As advertised, the star nosed mole has a burst of delicate sensory tendrils on the tip of its snout. Also, sacks myuka Flores is an unappealing worm who lives off the bones of dead whales which would explain its name bone eating snot flower. A bacterium that was taken to the International Space Station, and exposed to cosmic radiation earned the Latin moniker for traveler of the void. China boasts a salamander species that can grow to a whopping one point. Eight meters were nearly six feet long. It goes by the name. Hell Bender and this reporter for one will not argue with it.

Zoological Nomenclature Penn Tara Leo United States Scientist Couture Couturier Hunan China Myuka Flores Hans Solo Animal Kingdom International Commission International Space Station Official Pan Terra Georgia Carolina Ducks China Adora Lena
NASA Astronauts Splash Down in SpaceX Dragon Capsule, Capping Historic Mission

Ernie Brown

00:56 sec | Last month

NASA Astronauts Splash Down in SpaceX Dragon Capsule, Capping Historic Mission

"Three. It's a home sweet home for NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Robert Bank in after their space X crew Dragon capsule made a successful splashdown landing and the Gulf of Mexico Sunday asked afternoon Thie astronauts returned Earth from the international space station was historic first. Marking the success of the first commercial crew flight test. NASA hopes that the successful mission means that the United States will no longer have to hitch a ride with the Russia with Russia to the international space station, Dan Did you watch this? Not the landing per se, but least the takeoff. Where was that? A month ago? Yeah, that was one of the coolest thing about that was watching. The miles per hour on the side of the screen, and it just getting into the the thousands. That's crazy. You don't see that very often. I don't know about you, but I sure I sure as heck I've never seen that

Nasa Russia Doug Hurley Mexico Robert Bank United States DAN
Trump Wants to Ban TikTok, NASA-SpaceX Mission Success, & Unemployment Benefits Expire - Monday, August 3rd

Rob Talk Podcast

09:57 min | Last month

Trump Wants to Ban TikTok, NASA-SpaceX Mission Success, & Unemployment Benefits Expire - Monday, August 3rd

"It's Monday August third president trump wants to ban TIKTOK. Info on the NASA spacex mission success plus unemployment benefits have expired why trump's team is interested in Biden's VP pick and more. Welcome to Rob Song, podcast where I bring you the latest Progressive News and politics and ten minutes or less I'm Robert Cunningham thank you for tuning in. Let's get informed. So president trump announced on Friday night that he wants to ban Tiktok Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that trump would be making an announcement on these matters in the coming days he said this on Fox News Sunday morning futures where he also said that Tiktok, the Chinese owned short form video APP needs to be taken down via executive action in addition to Tiktok. Mike. POMPEO. Pointed to we chat, which is a Chinese messaging APP saying that both of these are feeding data directly to the. Chinese Communist Party quote for a long time a long time. The United States just said well goodness if we're having fun with it or if a company can make money off of it, we're going to permit that to happen president trump said enough going on the secretary of state added and we are going to fix it and so he will take action in the coming days with respect to a broad array of national security risks that are presented by software that connected to the Chinese Communist Party. Microsoft has emerged as wanting to potentially by all US operations of tiktok accents reports that trump does have a deal on his desk where Microsoft would lead acquisition of the US operations of six talk and Microsoft seems to believe that it's possible that a total separation can happen from tiktok parent company by Dance. It's important for you to understand that presidents normally can't just order a ban on individual companies like this but the fact that Tiktok has a foreign owner allows the Treasury Department to have broad. Authority over it. Now, at this point, it's unclear whether trump is going to allow Microsoft to buy it or if trump is just going to push for an all out ban, we don't know. But what we do know is that this is super weird coming just months before an election six does have one hundred, million US users, and so it is rather strange move it could alienate some I mean granted I don't know if it would make much of a difference, but it just seemed strange. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Bankin are safely on earth after a historic flight to and from the International Space Station provided by SPACEX Axios says on Saturday afternoon both astronaut splashdown into the Gulf of Mexico after about two forty, eight PM eastern time a space x vessel was able to recover both astronauts from their crew, dragon? Capsule. Hurley in bank in two month mission was the first time that people have been launched into orbit from the United States. The end of the space shuttle. Program in twenty eleven. This new move of partnering for Space Exploration, with private companies can allow NASA to act more of like a buyer instead of a provider of these services now and will free up NASA's budget to focus on things like getting people to the moon and eventually other planets in the future. In fact, NASA and SPACEX already have another trip planned this time for six months with multiple. NASA. Going up to the International Space Station, this will take place around late. September. So be on the lookout. Additional unemployment benefits of six hundred dollars per week expired on Friday July thirty first and reportedly the White House Senate. Republicans and Democrats are all know we're closer to a deal? Apparently, all sides are on board though for another twelve, hundred dollar check like was done with the cares act earlier this year the main point of disagreement is the additional unemployment benefits six hundred dollars extra. A month is what people have been receiving since the cares act was passed Democrats want to continue at that rate while Republicans want to. Bring that down to two hundred additional dollars per week while eventually moving holy to seventy percent of lost wages Republicans additionally wanted to get a one week extension on the six hundred dollars per week of additional benefits passed quickly. But the Democrats are refusing because they think that the Republicans are just GonNa. Use It as just a quick win and move on. But the Democrats are saying that they want a full robust bill. Now, the Democrats have proposed a three trillion dollar deal while the Republicans are looking to pass. A one trillion dollar deal, and as of yesterday junk Schumer the Senate Minority leader said that there were significant divisions remaining but good progress is being made quote. We made good progress. There are lots of things we are still divided on and we're not close to an agreement yet, but we are making good progress and I'm hopeful that we can get to an agreement. Now they're going to resume talks today. Okay. But do not be fooled. The Republicans are trying to place the onus here on Democrats but Democrats came. Up with a bill back in May the bill back in May like I said had a three trillion dollar price tag. It was approved by the House but then has not been voted on in the Senate and Senate Republicans want to have a one trillion dollar bill that does not do nearly enough in my opinion. So but as of right now you know who's GonNa Suffer America, the American people that are unemployed we just had on Thursday. One of the worse GDP records for quarter ever if not the worst. The percentage of GDP lost was close to thirty three percent. I hope we get a deal soon things are super hard to pass in Washington obviously, and I'm glad that the Democrats are sticking their feet in and trying to get this thing passed the Democrats are not perfect and I fear that they're going to cave too much here. But we've got to get something done because there is an eviction crisis looming we need to renew the moratorium on fictions. Now CNBC just posted a study recently that twenty two to fifty nine percent depending on the state that you live in of renters may be facing eviction as a result of the corona virus economic circumstances these numbers are horrifying and I'm sure this isn't the last time you'll be hearing about it. Trump's campaign paused ads over the weekend, which is really weird because they wanted to rebrand their messaging and new ads launching today are going to be depicting Joe Biden as a puppet of the radical left. This comes from two senior campaign officials but the most recent internal polls show that the puppet of the left's attack on Biden is going to resonate with voters and speaking personally in someone who lives in a very heavy trump territory. The this is the talking point that I've heard Oh Biden's not the problem it's. Going to be the VP you have to look out for as if Kamla Harrison. Some sort of crazy radical assuming he chooses someone like her speaking of the VP spot trump's campaign is very interested in that because the quote unquote radical left thing that they're going to be using their ads is a placeholder for whoever Joe Biden ends up picking. By the way, we will learn who Joe Biden is going to pick around on tenth multiple sources have suggested he said now he pushed back his self imposed deadline from. The first week of August to the second week and one source has said that it's going to be August tenth now. So be on the lookout here. No matter who Joe Biden picks. I think that Joe Biden is well-positioned. Of course, we all have to go out and vote that. This is not a matter of that we have to vote even if we live in California or Massachusetts or Oklahoma Even for God's sake, we have to vote for Joe Biden, but it doesn't really matter as much who he picks. Think this go around because trump's campaign is reportedly very upset that Biden doesn't have the unfavorability rating that Hillary Clinton did in two, thousand, sixteen, all of this trump at drama gotta be Biden's campaign to respond Andrew Bates. Director of rapid response said quote the American people know Joe Biden and after seven consecutive months of failed leadership during the worst possible health crisis in generations they know that our nation's capacity to join the rest of the world beating back cove nineteen has been crippled by one overriding burden donald trump. Representative James Clyburn of South Carolina said on Sunday that he believes trump is trying to put a cloud over the election and that he does not plan to leave office. If he loses Clyburn told CNN that the American people had better wake up to trump and he compared trump to Mussalini and said Russian President Vladimir Putin is akin to Hitler further representative Clyburn said quote I don't think he plans to leave the White House. He doesn't plan to have fair unfettered elections I believe that he plans to install. Himself in some kind of emergency way to continue to hold office. Now, all of this is to say everything that Clyburn is saying here means that we have to so overwhelmed the vote that trump cannot cheat. We have to force him out of office because on January twentieth at noon no matter how hard trump tries he will not be the president if we overwhelmed the vote and like Joe. Biden. So that's what we have to do. If you need help getting registered in your state, go to vote Dot

Donald Trump Joe Biden Democrats Nasa President Trump United States Tiktok VP Mike Pompeo International Space Station James Clyburn Chinese Communist Party Microsoft Pompeo Fox News Rob Song White House Senate
NASA astronauts splash down in SpaceX Dragon capsule, capping historic mission

Kim Komando

00:41 sec | Last month

NASA astronauts splash down in SpaceX Dragon capsule, capping historic mission

"Capsule with US astronauts on board returning to earth using an ocean splash down all going well, especially with the scalding reentry. That was the 12 minute reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, And that's where the heat shield comes into effect. It's 3500 degrees fair. The hype is like a giant fireball coming in, and everything went absolutely perfectly All those Apollo missions by the way, 45 plus years ago back in the late sixties and seventies. Follow those capsules with those astronauts splashed down in the Pacific is the 1st 1 has splashed down right off the coast of Florida boxes. Phil Keating. NASA astronauts Bob Banking and Doug Hurley back home after two months stint On board the international space Station,

Phil Keating Doug Hurley United States International Space Station Bob Banking Nasa Florida
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 7 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 7 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 7 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 7 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 10 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We bring in the experts, scientists engineers and astronauts, also, you know, the coolest information about what's going on here at NASA. So it's twenty years ago on November twentieth. Nineteen ninety eight the first element of the international space station called Zarya was launched a space. It was the first step towards two decades of international cooperation scientific research and discovery we're sort of used to talking about the international space station, now crews, come and go and laundry journeys and during each journey. The astronauts are conducting hundreds of experiments doing spacewalks and making it all look relatively routine. But of course, to get to this point you had to start somewhere, and that was with Zara the first element of the space station designed constructed and flown as a joint effort between Russia and NASA it was a critical step and a critical module to provide power propulsion guidance. And all. The essentials that would enable the first module to be attached and to function properly. So with me to tell the story of the first element is Doug Drewery. He's the former F G B program manager and launch package manager for the mission. You hear us say f- GB allot it stands for functional cargo block. But a gene set of cease since his translated from Russian Doug had a variety of jobs during his twenty two years at NASA, including leading the joint u s and Russian teams for the successful development and launch of Zarya. He's now the president and owner of his own aviation company. So with no further delay. Let some bread head to our talk with Doug Drewery to tell the story of our first steps in this the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station. Enjoy. Doug. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. To celebrate twenty years of the international space station. Thank forever me. All right. We're we're gonna take it all the way back and even beyond that, I think because twenty years ago was the actual launch of Zarya. But, but it started even before that and started even before it was Zarya sort of set the scene before before this even came into place. What was happening at NASA where where we well. We started space station back way back with space station alpha that evolved into space station freedom, we went through several redesigns space station freedom. There is a major redesign few years before we started talking to the Russians. It was called a pre-integrated trust redesign where I ended up leading the Ambi three and NBA which was yes wanted P one segments around orbit today. It's the pre integrated trust and. Then we went up to our critical design review on that. When there is another station. Redesign we were were at the time. We were divided into work packages JSE was worked package to. I don't remember which who had all the other work, baggage is power being done out of one place and all these various things. So anyway, we were we were told to redesign and with a new inclination. We were supposed to go to fifty one six degrees of inclination, which we knew where the Russians were flying. But of course, every time we queried that it was denied that anything to do with it. It was just supposed to be another redesign of the station, which we'd been through so many times before for budget cuts, and this and that J A C did an option C, which was a single launch to orbit an SLC option, which was basically modifying a shuttle external tank and. Fitting out with various levels Marshall, took basically the freedom design. Much like the current space station and instead of back in the work package. Two days where we were launching outboard in we relaunching solar rays first than propulsion modules. So we'd have command control on orbit. And we kind of built up to the point where we built a trust first. And then added the pressurized modules broadened crew Marshall took the approach of bringing up the modules I and then building outward on the trust power them. So several different. I mean, this is a very dynamic time with the inter this idea of space station is there, but what you know. How do we make this a possibility and everyone's redesigning it trying to come up with the right strategy. You're going through design reviews, but don't even know what what the space station is gonna look like at this point..

Zarya NASA president program manager Zara Marshall Russia NBA JSE F G B J A C twenty years fifty one six degrees twenty two years two decades Two days
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts, scientists engineers and astronauts, also, you know, the coolest information about what's going on here at NASA. So it's twenty years ago on November twentieth. Nineteen ninety eight the first element of the international space station called Zarya was launched a space. It was the first step towards two decades of international cooperation scientific research and discovery we're sort of used to talking about the international space station, now crews, come and go and laundry journeys and during each journey. The astronauts are conducting hundreds of experiments doing spacewalks and making it all look relatively routine. But of course, to get to this point you had to start somewhere, and that was with Zara the first element of the space station designed constructed and flown as a joint effort between Russia and NASA it was a critical step and a critical module to provide power propulsion guidance. And all. The essentials that would enable the first module to be attached and to function properly. So with me to tell the story of the first element is Doug Drewery. He's the former F G B program manager and launch package manager for the mission. You hear us say f- GB allot it stands for functional cargo block. But a gene set of cease since his translated from Russian Doug had a variety of jobs during his twenty two years at NASA, including leading the joint u s and Russian teams for the successful development and launch of Zarya. He's now the president and owner of his own aviation company. So with no further delay. Let some bread head to our talk with Doug Drewery to tell the story of our first steps in this the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station. Enjoy. Doug. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. To celebrate twenty years of the international space station. Thank forever me. All right. We're we're gonna take it all the way back and even beyond that, I think because twenty years ago was the actual launch of Zarya. But, but it started even before that and started even before it was Zarya sort of set the scene before before this even came into place. What was happening at NASA where where we well. We started space station back way back with space station alpha that evolved into space station freedom, we went through several redesigns space station freedom. There is a major redesign few years before we started talking to the Russians. It was called a pre-integrated trust redesign where I ended up leading the Ambi three and NBA which was yes wanted P one segments around orbit today. It's the pre integrated trust and. Then we went up to our critical design review on that. When there is another station. Redesign we were were at the time. We were divided into work packages JSE was worked package to. I don't remember which who had all the other work, baggage is power being done out of one place and all these various things. So anyway, we were we were told to redesign and with a new inclination. We were supposed to go to fifty one six degrees of inclination, which we knew where the Russians were flying. But of course, every time we queried that it was denied that anything to do with it. It was just supposed to be another redesign of the station, which we'd been through so many times before for budget cuts, and this and that J A C did an option C, which was a single launch to orbit an SLC option, which was basically modifying a shuttle external tank and. Fitting out with various levels Marshall, took basically the freedom design. Much like the current space station and instead of back in the work package. Two days where we were launching outboard in we relaunching solar rays first than propulsion modules. So we'd have command control on orbit. And we kind of built up to the point where we built a trust first. And then added the pressurized modules broadened crew Marshall took the approach of bringing up the modules I and then building outward on the trust power them. So several different. I mean, this is a very dynamic time with the inter this idea of space station is there, but what you know. How do we make this a possibility and everyone's redesigning it trying to come up with the right strategy. You're going through design reviews, but don't even know what what the space station is gonna look like at this point..

Zarya NASA president program manager Zara Marshall Russia NBA JSE F G B J A C twenty years fifty one six degrees twenty two years two decades Two days
"international space station" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Rule science on the international space station presented by science at nasa nessa researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the international space station in two thousand eighteen new atomic refrigerator will blast off for the space station it's called the cold atom lab or cal and it can refrigerate manner to one ten billion of degree above absolute zero just above the point where all the thermal activity of atoms theoretically stops at this temperature atoms lose their energy and start to move very slowly explains rob thompson cal project scientists at nasr's jet propulsion laboratory or jpl at room temperature adams bounce off each other in all directions at a few hundred meters per second but in cal they'll slow down a million fold and condense into unique states of quantum matter count is a multi user facility that supports many investigators studying abroad range of topics eric cornell physicist at the university of colorado and the national institute of standards and technology will be leading one of the first calix perriman tes cornell and his team will use cal to investigate particle collisions and how particles interact with one another ultracold gases produced by the cold atom lab can contain molecules with three atoms each but which are thousand times bigger than a typical molecule this results in a low density fluffy molecule that quickly falls apart unless it is kept extremely cold how is particle behaviour affected as more particles are introduced what can be learned about quantum.

nasr eric cornell physicist cornell rob thompson university of colorado national institute of standard hundred meters per second
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Were um so widely recognised now by the academy of of surgeons on the ground that it's being taught to 'upandcoming surgeons like our training program are software systems are being tied in to new clinicians and to use that on the ground because when you think in terms of telemedicine um you can can deploy these ultrasounds everywhere and it and it is being done that way um more and more telemedicine happening rate as for our troops who were in a place where they can't get access to hospitals or to um communities that don't have access to clinical facilities so dr coast them remotely swaleh mattiello remotely so the ideas name at this ultrasound out there you look as someone who's been trained up on how to use it even if they're not a doctor who got people who can use it send the information back to the doctors wherever they are and the doctor can make a diagnosis so those kinds of um benefits we don't hear a lot about because it didn't affect ultrasound doesn't affect our everyday lives here but there are also won't as as because out of pure basic need we started looking at specific tissues on i ask that you would not normally use an ultrasound to look at you would you sound like an xray or an mri but we have gotten need driven and so um so uniquely useful headed this ultrasound techniques it out driving clinical decisions on when the using ultrasound verses an mri verses an xray and and all these different components so new techniques coming out of ultrasound so not necessarily in you in your house will benefit but not you know your health your health are better job yet maybe the doctor can order enough san instead of him are i am yates some better results are different results were faster results who knows very who another benefit um is that um this this a laboratory this set of laboratory scientists have.

software systems
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Tons and tons of cosmic rays and sending i don't even know what gigot trigger much at all night probably data yeah garriga by teased for that way because it doesn't hurt and only i assess can handle that kind of data and power demand to keep something up there for so long there's kind of cosmic behaviors while but also you can put put experiments in the outside of space station to expose them to atomic oxygen or the ultraviolet radiation or the intense thermal swings yeah um we have put different types of materials out there before and get them home and look at the damage caused by external environments m for example one of those was a paint that's now a been used on the mars rover curiosity who's up there um uh put its protecting its powers critical power unit that was tested on station first oh you put elegant paint outside and see what sean i did best okay fair comey dealt with spacesuit pieces and vehicle pieces we gotta find um paint on on the spacex launch vehicles that were tested on station and we've actually flown microorganisms on the outside of space station to to see how those survive than little type of in poorest little the new living organisms that go into hibernation and then bring them home and find out what space 250 ago it's it's got that external platform unlike anything other so i'm guessing bring him home is also a pretty good thing to do right because you can you can play with something but then you can also get it back down to earth yet is at a those are the rainy capability as the ultimate goal for any researchers to get your sample home if you're a life scientists there were physical scientists.

spacex
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We had a really one of my favorite experiments is a very elegant a simple handheld experiment uh developed by mark wise little out at portland state university and he's a phenomenon with fluid behavior and um and what we got from the his experiments was a whole new set of open source code now understanding how fluid behaves in space in different geometry is of of containers so a square triangle honeycomb whatever he's got all those models and now if you as a researcher or anyone interested in building propellant tank or of fluid tank for space have a cad mal you can go stick your design into that software program and see how fluids is going to behave in your system and yes so for the first time ever we have these models that we can design more efficient propellant tanks more efficient water handling systems that's going to help us explore a now also because we now are getting a better handle line fluid behavior in space uh we're also able to apply it to groundwater ing of our agriculture okue that plants take up water in the soil it's all the same it's capillary fluids capillary action the way that water moves through a a medium to get to its source um because we took gravity out we could really focus on looking at cavalier behavior and now we can apply it to groundbased watering systems we can apply it to a tiny little lab on chips anything that uses fluid movement and you don't want to use a battery you want to leverage gravity and in all kinds of advancements are coming out of this simple elegant um series of research of that came out of uh i s s so it's really really cold that's amazing so going back those those cad models are is that assuming you're you're system is in a weightless environment or is that for any system that's assuming that yours designing for a weightless environment i c yucca so if you wanna designed for the next vehicle that you know that we launch.

portland state university source code researcher mark wise
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We can launch air just like we can launch water you can lodge a tank of super pressurized air usually in a liquid form and then feet it into the atmosphere but the main way we get it is from water we use the system called the oxygen generation system that actually takes water splits the atom split the atom but uh splits at the or water molecule into oxygenhydrogen and then we could take that oxygen and pump it into the atmosphere then they are in the pure oxygen atmosphere so there's other stuff in there there's a lot nitrogen share so very sanita earth's atmosphere right yes airbase cleaning act same composition atmosphere that we have on earth and actually the same pressure to so there's there's no big difference there uh that feeds into some of the stuff that do for spacewalks but that's completely different tanja and go on it so we we we split the water molecules so then you have your oxygen which you just feed directly back into the cabin and then you have hydrogen which you can vent overboard if he just bill up a bunch of excess hydrogen or there's of process in a in a payload up there it's it's used as more of a technology demonstration so it's not really in the in the critical path so it's not a critical piece that we have to have run at all times but it's called the sobotta uses this abbadi a process where you can take that hydrogen the ad left over from your water.

tanja
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It they generate pretty much a comparable amount to keep everything that we want on board and that's that's all life support that's keeping the lights on a that's running all of the experiments on board all of the different hardware just keeping the station you know oriented and the right attitude and flying in in any time amin every everything everything everything race powered by the solar rays and it i mean it's it doesn't generate an overwhelming access of energy by any means because again you are spending a lot of time in darkness so those batteries are getting used pretty much constantly were in the process of swapping the batteries were upgrading yeah vardi upgraded uh one fourth of them go switched out nickelhydrogen for lithium ion that is correct that's right lithium ion if away more efficient right yeah but that i mean that's that's the power story it's it's it's all solar energy through those bigs and they are they are very large in we come back to the football field the american football field and alaji having clarified yet yet uh that the solar arrays or basically each each solar rays the size of an and so on and their eight of those yes that are the size of annan's her thing like a pair of their hero or you're a pair of four so yet for it's tough because like you one pair actually to array blankets and but they're are very large yes yeah okay so that's power right so we already talked about water because you need to recycle water and make sure you have enough and waters rates means have to launch and he recycle its ottmar fish in and it's very very clean so what about air right that's one thing you think about like what a human needs shelter for our water food you didn't really think about air but at something you definitely needs and a again that's something we kinda take for granted a hair is just it's it's air everywhere down here in europe they're the arena you're in a sealed environment you're basically in a big sealed ten can in the need to fill that with their so they.

solar rays lithium ion solar energy annan europe amin football
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

elia us europe jackson space exploration peggy whitson tina japan billiondollar eight league
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know going to mars or you know our farflung aspirations of spreading throughout the the solar system and the galaxy and everything when you compare it to that it's you know doing hang quotes easy but it's still a monumental undertaking yet and that's why so we're doing that just like you said we are the in the future where we want to go far right so we wanna go to mars we wanna really just expand our presence in the solar system so the international space station is a great way to practice that it's a good like you have a good understanding of what it takes to live in space to operate in space you could do a ton of science and learn how things interact and then he learned how things interact he can design better systems to make them work better i think one of the once acc ethic capillary action i think was a it was a great one like the way that fluids move in phnom in spaces kinda cool because they sort of like create a ball and there's there's no down so if you're trying to design lega system that uh it like a rocket system in order to propel fuel you need to the fuel isn't gonna go down ranking kinda needs to have that sort of capillary action and a path to get there like little little those little tiny things are things that make the huge difference and then able to kind of explosives would all comes to down to gravity that's kind of the the old differentiator between why everything we do in outer space is different from the way we do it on earth total the most of you touch on his.

solar system acc
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So it's like a way to practice really for it is for things further out because it's not really far up rights linked to 150 miles think about it were still in their earth's protection men like oh yeah oh protected by the irs magnetic field will spaces funny in that going up it it feels like it's so far away space but it's two hundred fifty miles that's not that far i mean i feel like the city of houston is two hundred fifty miles it's not but i mean to 150 miles on a cars a is a short road trip but at two hundred fifty miles straight up at the rocket ride that's that's a slightly different road trip but it is it isn't that far away i mean we still kind of our right on the doorstep there's there's a a really great quote in the the paramount of space movies armageddon were only says you know we're not even our in outer space yet this is just like the beginning and that's kind of where the station is it's it's in space it's in what we call lowearth orbit so so pretty close i mean they could get into so you spacecraft and be back on the ground inside of a couple of hours so i mean you're so right on the doorstep you not really way out there yet but it's getting ready to go way out there well that's the whole so nasa describes it as earth when lyon two right so i i kinda like the way they section at off right earth reliant means exactly what you sent right so something goes wrong you can just happen spacecraft and the home in three hours and it's easy to get stuff there because it's only a i mean some so he's rise of in as little as like six hours ray relatively relative george speight is only rocket science side to trivial i hit it all and even the even after admonish myself it's still not easy to go to space it still i mean liz rocket scientist literal rocket science hugely complex and there's always inherent risk and all these other things but when you start comparing it to.

irs lyon george speight houston nasa scientist three hours six hours