18 Burst results for "International Space Station Program"

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:57 min | 6 months ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Thanks for coming on. Houston we have a podcast today. Appreciate your time. Yeah, happy to be with the all my all my friends at NASA there. And I wanted to start with this. We're taking a snapshot here where we are twenty years past when you first arrived on the International Space Station and set the course for continuous human presence. What are your initial thoughts right off the bat of achieving this milestone? Well I'm kind of amazed that between NASA and hall the International Partners that we frankly that we've got gun Many. Many people at the outset of the international, space station program. decided it was mission impossible and it was never going to happen but The team has proved them wrong. Well, that's perfect. Well, let's take a deep dive then Feel like you're the perfect person to talk to about this, just just diving into exactly that what were those obstacles that made it seem like mission impossible. So let's start with the landscape of of NASA and international partnerships in the early ninety s when we were just kind of getting the International Space. Station program and the thought of what would be the international. Space. Station up and running. Well, the idea for space station is not at all new. certainly even before World War Two people were talking about. Humans traveling in space and what we would do there And I think von Braun had many sketches There Are Walt Disney shows on rockets going to space stations but really got off the ground if you will. both in the US and in the Soviet Union with manned laboratories we had skylab. and. Then the Russians had a number of sal you space stations and then eventually one that they called. Mir Doesn't a Reagan started.

International Space Station International Space NASA International Partners Houston von Braun Walt Disney Soviet Union US Mir Reagan
"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

10:38 min | 6 months ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"So it was it was always there and inspiring to me. My time in Russia was so interesting and so fascinating. What I look back on is the personal connections that I had with with my fellow engineers and. Colleagues over there. What I found being part of the International Space Station program and not just Russia. But our colleagues in Japan and Europe and Canada is that underneath it all we all have the same goals and we all have the same passions and people are just driven to accomplish this joint goal that we have together asked my russian-language used to be a lot better than it is now. Russian is not an easy language. I would say for a non native speaker. Takes a lot of effort to keep up. It's sort of a what we would call a perishable skill, and as of late I have not had that opportunity. So I could probably sit in class or he can't sit in class and listen to all the technical information I need to understand that. But then having a conversation is not going to go very smoothly these days. I was assigned quite late to this mission and so my training. Time been much much shorter than the rest of my crew mates. It was very, very exciting because I wasn't. Expecting it my. Ground duty within the astronaut office was being part of the leadership team in the astronaut office. So I was more of a management type and then all of a sudden. Friday was a manager Monday I was a crew in training, and so it's a huge shift in how your day goes. So typical training week I don't think there are typical training weeks. Every week is different. Every day is varied and we usually have a mix of space station training as well as crew dragon training. and. So Sometimes we have. Also, we have training with our international partners which is. A Nice challenge in this environment. Yeah the kinds of things that we trained for for this mission everything from how to handle emergencies on the space station to how you fly the crew dragon spacecraft to how you do. A variety of experiments. Well. There are a few differences in training between training on the Soyuz flight and training. For the crew dragonfly. One. On the Soyuz, I was trained as the pilot on that spacecraft, and so I had a lot more hands on flying the space craft training. I'm not the pilot on this particular flight so I do not have to train for those duties. And the other big difference is now the training is an English and before it was in the russian-language. Oh, I'm looking forward to being on station living and working there and. Just. Spending time with my crewmates on the station. There's so many things that make. Living on the space station special. You are in a pretty small environmental. The station is quite large by many respects, your with a set group of people for a long period of time, and so you really get to know each other so much better than you have been able to on the ground we're already a family but then. So many people can relate to being in one place with your family for extended periods of time is is A. Different There are so many things that you can do station. What I like about it is is everyday really is different. You Get up and you do something different and you may be doing biological experiment one day you may be doing maintenance on equipment the next day and the day following that you'll be doing. Some sort of experiment in chemistry and so just being able to participate in so many different things I find exciting. Last but not least, we have JAKSA astronaut. Soichi Noguchi. Gucci will also be a mission specialist for crew one like Shannon, Walker working with the commander and the pilot to monitor the vehicle during the dynamic launch and re entry phases of flight and keeping watch on timelines, telemetry and consumables. Noguchi will also become a long duration duration crew member aboard the space station. He was selected as an astronaut candidate by the National Space, Development Agency of Japan Nasdaq currently the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Jaksa in May of Nineteen ninety-six. Noguchi Gucci is a veteran of two space flights one on the space shuttle and another on Russian Soyuz during SDS one, fourteen in two, thousand, five, new Gucci became the first astronaut to perform a spacewalk outside of the space station. He performed a total of three spacewalks during the mission accumulating twenty hours and five minutes of spacewalking time he launched aboard a Soyuz spacecraft in two thousand and. Nine to return to the station as a long duration crew member new Gucci has a unique perspective on flying on both the shuttle and the Soyuz to the International Space Station. Noguchi recalls his previous experiences and what he's looking forward to taking a third spacecraft to the orbiting laboratory. IGUCHI discusses his training, his family, the importance of science on station and the importance of international collaboration here's switching Gucci. Hi. My name is so each Noguchi from Japan I our mission specialist. One on Kuan Mission to International Space Station. Well Michelle will be. Help Support Commander in the pilot. On spacecraft. Crew Dragon, and of course, once arrive on the space station I'll be aboard engineer and do lots of science and maintenance and spacewalks, robotics, kinds of work. Well. I'm really fortunate enough to have. Good crew member. Hopper is our commander. He's A. Natural leader is we thought for and caring and really fortunate have. Great. Commander like him. I I would say he's the best rookie ever I. Don't know any other gas from of who is really capable and knowledgeable. And Fungi as well. Shannon Walker? We spend longtime together. we're in the same age. and. I really respect her on her knowledge Is a school and for me, it's more like a running mate because we. Specialists, mission specialists. I'm this mission split one and she's mission spacious to and together we can share the knowledge. Kind of backup each other to accomplish big Mr. Gould. So we are very happy to to interact with each other. So four of us, the great team, and obviously we have a lot of different background. And diversity definitely gives us a great rigidity to our crew. Yeah I was fortunate enough to fly. To different vehicles so far space shuttle and Russian Soyuz and this new SPACEX is obviously launched like capsule. This is more like a so use and docking sequences is quite resembling to the space shuttle and landing is totally new. We're GONNA. Be splashing down into the ocean just like a polo so. A little bit of a different flavor is a combination of the. Special vehicle which mankind the devil so far. So it's very exciting My I fly was two thousand and five hours on the space shuttle Discovery is this one fourteen and I was two weeks flight. And we have a five year training for the next flight and my flight was two, thousand, nine ended up two, thousand nine that was on the Russian so us. And was launched from Baikonur. So it's roughly five years between those. My Soyuz flight. Lasts about five and a half months I launched. The day before Christmas and I come back a few days before the. Few days after June. So yeah roughly six months. So I did three spacewalks park in two thousand five. Oh Yeah. Bio means happy to open the hatching, go outside and have found for six hours and don't want to come back actually. Well Space Walk is is fun period. Narrow people ask me for the spacewalk is dangerous is any risk and? Yes of course, there's a risk involved with a high risk environment and adrenaline rush type of activities but we definitely enjoyed everything flows, but it's very slow and the view is just mcnichols. This nothing between you and earth and just open space, and we can definitely enjoy the view and also all the task we train for many many times on the ground usually under the pool Soviet. By the time you do the space walk you know all the task by heart. So it's actually very enjoyable and it's very fun and really looking for to go back into the space. Walk. I have my lovely wife and three daughters, and they are now in Japan, of course in this situation. COVID nineteen day not freely come to to hear I. Don't have much chance to go back to the parents. So that's kind of a separation. That's one. Tough situation for me, but we'll be we. We'd be together although we're physically separated. Yes. My kids are fortunate enough to our ten, my two previous launches the first time on the space shuttle their. Elementary School and. They just enjoy. Traveling to Florida of aside from the locket launch and on my Soyuz launch, they are almost the teenagers and they can understand those. Anxiety and. the the feeling of the rush and a feeling of excitement and so so second time with more memorable. Hopefully, this time they're now grown up but they're still. Very happy to come to seat dad launch so. Be Nicer..

International Space Station Soichi Noguchi commander Noguchi Gucci Russian Soyuz Japan mission specialist Shannon Walker Russia Japan Aerospace Exploration Ag astronaut candidate Europe Elementary School Michelle Canada Development Agency of Japan Na Florida IGUCHI
"international space station program" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

03:17 min | 8 months ago

"international space station program" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

"Welcome to 12:02 the human factors podcast the podcast that covers all things about humans technology and particularly the vet in between with your host. Very curbing. Welcome to this episode of 12 or to the human factors podcast. If you are frequent listen to this podcast, then you'll know of a particular fascination with human factors of spaceflight and operations in space. This is really topical moment with great enthusiasm Point people on Mars as well as huge steps in commercial space space flight and those Associates Partnerships there for an absolutely delighted. This episode will be very much focused on this space theme, and I'm very honored to be talking to a number of HR practitioners in the NASA Orion Space Program will go into more detail about Orion Mission shortly, but let's get to know I guess a bit better first month. So if I can ask you if tell us who you are and what your official role is and the quick overview of your career to date William if I could start with you. Yes, I'm glad to be here. My name is Josh Foley on the NASA System Manager for Orion human engineering at the the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. My background is my academic background. I have bachelor degree in aerospace engineering and a systems. Sorry a master's degree in systems engineering team much of my much of my post post graduate work has been in safety and Mission assurance and several years ago. I transitioned over into the human factors domain over here JC Jason if I could ask you the same question. Sure. Yeah. Hi. My name is Jason Hut I am the crew systems integration lead for Artemis to for the Iranian program as well the huge generating leads for Artemis to I've been here at Johnson Space Center for Twenty-One years started out for Seventeen years were on the supporting the International Space Station program, where as an instructor for the crew and supported crew training as well as operations for space station over that time and for the last four years. I've been the crew station crew systems integration lead for Orion dead. Which essentially means that it's my responsibility to make sure that the integrated cockpit design comes together and such a fashion that the crew can safely and successfully execute any right off Ryan missions her arms program missions Sarah. So I'm the deputy sisters sisters manager in the Iran human Engineering Group and my background is that I created from Northwestern for undergrad in biomedical engineering then University of Pittsburgh was a masters in bio engineering then spent about nine years in the anthropometry and biomechanics for so long. It's been about two years in oil and gas and then I've been here about five years at the Orion human Engineering Group at.

Johnson Space Center Orion human Engineering Group Iran human Engineering Group Orion Mission International Space Station Artemis Jason Hut Josh Foley JC Jason Associates Partnerships NASA Ryan Houston Texas official William Northwestern
"international space station program" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"international space station program" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Space walks are coming over at the international space station program manager Kenny Todd says the extravehicular activities are EVA since they're called are being done to swap out batteries again would like to get as many of these NDAs done as we can we we think it's somewhere between four and six to get both of these power channels swapped in terms of their batteries space walk scheduled for Friday and then a week from today meantime NASA is renaming its DC headquarters posthumously for its first black female engineer Mary W. Jackson became the space agency's most senior engineer in nineteen seventy nine overall her career at NASA spent thirty four years now said a straighter Jim Bridenstine says Jackson was an important part of helping put American astronauts into space she was one of the hidden figures whose story was featured in the book and the movie of the same name Jackson died in two thousand five at the age of eighty three well coming up in the news at seven thirty the latest on the report on the out of the about whether the Holyoke soldiers home and also a warning about a fox in Hudson stay with us have you inherited an IRA since the start of this year or do you expect to and heard one of the future hi this is Mike Armstrong from the Armstrong advisory group if you've inherited a retirement account in recent months from someone other than your spouse you need to come up with a plan to withdraw all of the money from that account within ten years as a result of the new secure act are brand new guide for the month of June is called inherited IRA is the new rules of the road and explore strategies to take our undies from inherited accounts while also dealing with a new ten year withdrawal rule it'll also help you understand how the corona virus.

Kenny Todd EVA NASA Mary W. Jackson senior engineer Jim Bridenstine Mike Armstrong IRA program manager DC engineer Holyoke Hudson
"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:45 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I'm Pat Ryan on this podcast talk with scientists engineers astronauts and other folks part in America's space exploration program and today we're focusing on very cool science part honest when we talk about science being conducted on the International Space Station. We're usually talking about something happening. In one of the mini laboratory facilities inside station's modules the destiny lab or the Columbus or Kibo laboratories. But those are not the only spots where science is done for instance black November. We spent three episodes one seventeen when eighteen the one nineteen discussing spacewalks to restore operations of the Alpha magnetic spectrometer it gathers data on cosmic particles from out on the top of the stations. Trust pointed out towards space there are a number of other scientific experiments gathering data from out on the station's exterior. Many of them are pointed down from a perch. Two hundred fifty miles up. The space station provides a stable platform for scientists who are interested in a different perspective on the home planet. One of those scientists is Dr Williams. Stephan off an internationally recognized researcher in remote sensing of urban geological and ecological processes. He is manager. The expiration science office in the Astro Materials Research and Exploration Science Division located at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston Steffen off serves as the International Space Station Program Scientist for Earth Observations and Ajay AC- for remote sensing of Earth. Today we're GonNa talk about some of those experiments and why they matter including some experiments that turn out the really outstanding photographs of earth that have been taken from the station. Be Sure to check the episode Web Page and the show notes because there. We posted the photos that we're talking about so that you can see them and follow along as also. There are links to other sites where you can find other photographs so on the occasion of Earth Day. We offer a look at Earth from orbit with Dr Will Steph Nov. here we go On County Court we will.

International Space Station Johnson Space Center Exploration Science Division Pat Ryan Kibo laboratories Dr Williams America Ajay AC Stephan Astro Materials Research Columbus is manager NASA researcher Houston Scientist
"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"One the view from above. I'm Pat Ryan on this podcast. Talk with scientists engineers astronauts and other folks about their part in America's space exploration program and today we're focusing on very cool science part honest when we talk about science being conducted on the International Space Station. We're usually talking about something happening. In one of the mini laboratory facilities inside station's modules the destiny lab or the Columbus or Kibo laboratories. But those are not the only spots where science is done for instance black November. We spent three episodes one seventeen when eighteen the one nineteen discussing spacewalks to restore operations of the Alpha magnetic spectrometer it gathers data on cosmic particles from out on the top of the stations. Trust pointed out towards space there are a number of other scientific experiments gathering data from out on the station's exterior. Many of them are pointed down from a perch. Two hundred fifty miles up. The space station provides a stable platform for scientists who are interested in a different perspective on the home planet. One of those scientists is Dr Williams. Stephan off an internationally recognized researcher in remote sensing of urban geological and ecological processes. He is manager. The expiration science office in the Astro Materials Research and Exploration Science Division located at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston Steffen off serves as the International Space Station Program Scientist for Earth Observations and Ajay AC- for remote sensing of Earth. Today we're GonNa talk about some of those experiments and why they matter including some experiments that turn out the really outstanding photographs of earth that have been taken from the station. Be Sure to check the episode Web Page and the show notes because there. We posted the photos that we're talking about so that you can see them and follow along as also. There are links to other sites where you can find other photographs so on the occasion of Earth Day. We offer a look at Earth from orbit with Dr Will Steph Nov. here we go County court we will.

International Space Station Johnson Space Center Pat Ryan Exploration Science Division Kibo laboratories Dr Williams America Stephan Ajay AC Astro Materials Research is manager Columbus NASA researcher Houston Scientist
"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's my second time flying Kazakhstan first time on the Gulfstream g three aircraft. It's an older. Private jet converted into a research plane. Pilots and scientists will take this plane out to different parts of the world like Greenland or even Hawaii and can load a variety of instruments onboard. Some that study air the water ice. Lots OF CLIMATE STUDIES IS BILL. Aaron's John. What are the pilots? That flew the G. Three their mission call the oceans melting greenland where we were flying over Greenland using a radar pod measuring heights. Glaciers we also had emission where we drop zombies out of the back and measured water temperatures and salinity. All around Greenland is very adaptable. Today it's being used for what's called a direct return mission. All of those climate instruments are no longer on the plane instead it set up for taking astronauts home and fast two beds a staff of medical professionals plane that can take them to the other side of the planet in the day right back to the NASA Johnson Space Center although get to see their families again and they'll get to see NASA scientists and medical professionals who will be studying how they adapt to Earth's gravity and make sure they get reconditioned back to quote unquote normal life but on the way over the have an extra seat for me the public affairs officer on a good day. My job is pretty simple. Report the landing while everyone else is working to make sure. The operation runs smoothly. My job is to let the world know what's happening. I get a satellite phone about to the desert call into the NASA TV broadcast and talk about what I'm seeing live right there on the on the bad day. It gets a bit more complicated. But I'm feeling pretty good about this trip because of who I'm flying with Kenny. Talk has been with NASA for more than thirty years. He's there as a representative of NASA's International Space Station program and from NASA side. Making sure everything runs smoothly my role there really When you look at the team of professionals that we take over there we have to have a Somebody that acts as liaison to to Rossa viata which is the which is the senior leadership group that runs a search and rescue forces on the Russian side and so I see my primary role is helping to make sure that our team is getting what it needs relative to working with Russian counterparts. Kate Rubens there as a representative of the astronaut office. She's been on the other side of this before landing from space writing back in the plane from Kazakhstan and she has a pretty good idea of what the crew will need when they land. Shannon Moynahan is the air doc. It's her responsibility to take care of the cruise medical needs on the trip back home and she's well prepared to handle that. Everyone else on the plane is there to make sure the plane is ready to fly back. There are pilots. Already stationed at one of our layover cities. The Kazakhstan cruise the crew goes commercial to Europe and then flies the airplane to to Kazakhstan and stays so we have to cruiser. Do this to our big problem. Here is on the way over there. So we have a crew duty day limitation of fourteen that can be extended to sixteen hours provided. None of the flight is between midnight and four. Am from the place you left. We can go to eighteen hours with three pilots. So those are our crew. Duty Limitations Baugh. Typical mission to Kazakhstan takes about eighteen hours to get the wrong going eastbound. It takes about twenty two hours generally coming back westbound. So there's no way to do that. Point crew just no way so We have to have to cruise. We have to pre-stage proven. I get sort of nervous packing for trips to Russia. Where for so long and there are so many important items to consider that a usually give myself about a week to make sure have everything in order. I've been studying the order of things and some highlights from the three space travellers. Six month journey that I'll be able to bring up during my short report but it takes a lot longer than that to make sure things run smoothly so much of the space station program especially once. The space shuttles were retired. The Soyuz launches and landing have occurred approximately four times a year. This is Chad row. Nasa's human spaceflight program director at Russia. Who's the NASA lead for logistics on these trips and as you can imagine planning for each of those campaign against many months beforehand the earliest stages of planning consists of the finalization of the space station? Like I am. This is essentially a sequence and schedule and it includes significant events including launches and landings of all the bills but also things like extra vehicular activity and other major events that happened on board. I accept that play. Planning process is establish is the formal launch and landing dates and that ends up being what we go forward with once the space station program manager Kirk Chairman and the Russian Space Station Program Manager Lexi Sterling. The COP come to an agreement on the dates now. Those states can dance around a little bit so replant are common. But once we know when a rough execution as launches and landings will happen then we begin our planning sequence internist. This is Bill Aaron Strom. These things take a lot of time to plan these. We start them out. Probably four or five months ahead of time to start the plane We are what we what we call a state aircraft because we're owned by the United States government for a state aircraft normal commercial around private corporate jet can just go pay some fees and go fly anywhere. They wanted world. We can't do that. We were because we work for the government. We have to go through our embassies. We have to get what we call. Overflight clearances we have to get these these things all have to be coordinated well in advance in four or five months in advance were putting out requests for overflight clearances. I show up about thirty minutes earlier than we were told to show up to the g three but I'm still one of the last ones. They're everyone's already chosen a seat. They placed their bags in different areas and laid out some of their essential items. Everyone has a different way of doing things. Some folks deprive themselves of sleep before this trip so can take a nap on the first leg. Others prepare movies books or music. Some folks were nice enough to bring breakfast and Coffee. A must for me. My job was to bring chips. And Salsa forgot them last time. But I'm GONNA make sure everyone gets to have them this too. That's one of the big social contributions of public affairs officer on these trips but it doesn't come until later in the store sure it used to be a private jet but for the most part this g three has been gutted to make it more practical for NASA use. The beds are in the back in between where we're all sitting and the little breakfast and coffee spread. The seats are pretty comfortable in. The bathroom..

Nasa Kazakhstan Greenland Bill Aaron Strom NASA NASA Johnson Space Center public affairs officer Russia International Space Station Rossa viata Russian Space Station Hawaii representative program manager Shannon Moynahan Kate Rubens Europe Kenny United States
"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:17 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Stelo. What does it mean to be the chief scientist in the ISS Program Science Office or thanks Patrick? That's that's a good question and it's interesting from the perspective of what it means to be a program scientist so the ISIS program is a group of of managers that helped bring all the wonderful experiments that we have to the space station Those managers have the responsibility. For not only assuring that The vehicles the rockets get there with all of the payload and that the station operates the way it should But also in terms of the chief scientists making sure that all the science is integrated into the plan so that it can be performed on orbit so we serve a purpose to both prioritize all the incoming science and to provide an independent advisory role to the program manager for Questions regarding the the the flight of that science and because the the science is an important part of the International Space Station Program. But not the only part. This is an so you're helping with the integration of that that science Goal into the whole program. That's absolutely correct. I mean space station has been a great vehicle. Not only to showcase our engineering capabilities being able to assemble it on orbit This huge juncture and ultimately awesome laboratory. That we've got up there but it's it's also this international collaboration so as we have our NASA science solve our international partners have their science and we need to integrate our roles with with their sciences. Well if we focus on the science part of it how do you characterize the overall science mission of the space station apart from any individual experiment? Yeah that that's a great distinction. Because I really see it as a two-fold science mission first of all there's the the science to bring discoveries and knowledge about how we're going to continue and enhance our capability to explore space and secondly there's the National Lab mission which is to return benefits to the earth so both of those science focuses are really the heart of what we do on space station to help with our exploration mission and then also return new discoveries and science benefits to Earth at you point out an important point that the International Space Station is designated as a United States national laboratory in a and that's the point of that designation it is and it's also a unique national laboratory in the fact that it is multidisciplinary nature most for national labs are focused for one specific scientific area. Where the I S is. Just this incredible multidisciplinary laboratory where you have biology right next to physics in in Iraq onboard. The space station. It is also unique in the sense that it is in space and it has very little gravity. A what makes that environment attractive to researchers. Why do they WanNa do experiments where there is no gravity so unlike here on earth all right so let's talk about microgravity and what that is just a to help everybody out of course there is gravity in space in fact most of the gravity we feel on earth is right there present on the space station however it's counterbalanced by the centrifugal force that we feel as we're in orbit so essentially were in free-fall the entire time and that results in a micro gravitational force That our experiments are exposed to over time. And it's that overtime part. That's unique about the space station. We can simulate microgravity on earth but we can only do it for a few seconds in the case of a drop tower where you drop an item in freefall. That's good for about two to ten seconds or you could go on a parabolic flight like some of our aircraft to and that gets you about twenty two seconds of microgravity exposure. Or if you're on a sounding rocket one that just goes up and comes comes back down you're talking about six minutes of microgravity on Space Station in orbit were able to maintain that microgravity level for very long time and that allows us to look at processes that need to develop over a long time for instance wound healing. We WanNa know what happens to At if they have to recover from a wound in microgravity. Does it take longer does it? He'll differently. That's a process that takes time and so being able to study that in analog models on the space station requires us to have a long amount of time. Growing plants is another great example. You can't grow plant in a couple of second so we need that exposure over time to be able to tell us what the impact of microgravity is on this organism both of those examples. Strike me as research. That's really important if you're planning to send people to keep them in space for long periods of time like you would do if you sent them away from Earth. That's part of what we're what does kinds of experiments are aimed learning more about. That's absolutely the exploration part of our mission. It's how do we conduct science? That's going to help us with our exploration goals especially for the artist program. Artists of course has multiple destinations one of them being sustainable presence on the lunar surface the other being the eventual exploration of Mars and those voyages are going to take a lot longer times to to be able to reach those destinations and also to be able to make maintain our astronaut health during that time so a lot of our investigations are focused on doing those tasks. We also need to look at things like technologies. How do we close the environmental control system loop that means? How do we make sure all of the stuff that we used to keep ourselves healthy? Oxygen Water food is recyclable and We can get back as much as possible of that. We need to close those loops to be able to support a mission to Mars over a long duration. Because we can't bring all of those things brand new things with us. That's right as we step out across the solar system those platforms we have get and smaller. I assess is a big stepping stone. However are lunar base will be much smaller and Mars probably a much smaller outpost as well so we can't just afford to bring all of that mess with us. We have to figure out ways to be smart and recycle. Most of our goods are there. Particular kinds of experiments that are the International Space Station is really good at hosting Providing a place for certain ones of the disciplines that that are underway in terms of discoveries. I think what you're getting at is is oftentimes were surprised when we make discoveries in orbit about the way something behaves and two of those fields while we make discoveries in in all of them two of them are most prevalent. And I think that's in fluid physics because of the way fluids behave in microgravity In microgravity the the surface tension force is the largest force you have and that has impacts on the way fluids behave in systems and we want to know how they behave because fluids are prevalent in fuel tanks in Marino Nicolas systems in all areas. Where you know you have to process water or other Critical fluids and eclipse being environmental control. That's right But I think it's good example in that environment where there's only microscopic level of gravity fluids liquids. Don't come down to the floor. They don't they're not pulled down like they are on earth and you've gotta find out what they are going to do exactly and bubbles don't separate so bubbles can delay havoc on your your system so if they don't come out or you can't position them correctly it becomes a difficult Case for your system to be able to manage that the other area where we're continually making discoveries is in the human system just exactly what extended duration microgravity exposure does to the human system A couple of years ago We discovered What we now refer to as sands or spaceflight Acquired Neurotic Syndrome sands is A case where we've seen astronauts vision deteriorate after long duration stays on orbit and this happens to some people and it doesn't happen to everyone and so is very critical for us to understand one if we can tell if someone's going to be susceptible to to this deterioration and to how to prepare counter-measures to help them and and make sure that their vision is in severely impacted on a long duration mission to be clear the the impact is. I've understood it as has been. I guess the best way to say is fairly minimal. That astronauts have their vision has has degraded a bit. But it's not like they've had a dramatic decrease in vision. Is it well? Some of it can be most of it has been reversible but some has not I again it is variable based on the individual But some of the impairment can be significant with cotton wool spots noticed in the field of vision and and other impediments to to normal twenty twenty vision. Which would like our astronauts all to have short. And and it's gotta it's gotTa be annoying to know that it happens to some and not others and you're trying to figure out why absolutely and this is where the human research program comes in and they're dedicated. Research is really aimed at scientifically looking into the background. Cause for this happens and then investigating countermeasures to help it Help tolerated over time. Those two examples then fluid physics in the human system that the human life sciences the International Space Station is trying to figure out things we need to know to support future exploration does right. Is there a running total in you know? In more than nineteen years now with human crew members on board. How many experiments have have been run on the station? I'll say a lot. But the actual number is two thousand nine hundred seventy one investigations as retailers as of the end of increment Fifty nine so close to three thousand in that represents just over four thousand different investigators that we've had participate in that research and those investigators have come from one hundred eight countries and regions so just not The US and its international partners. But we've Taken in research and had a CO principal investigators in principal investigators from one hundred eight different countries. And that's more countries than our even partners in the space station project. Far for the whole world is pretty much in. Well not yet do we. We would love to have them join good We're getting there. We're getting in the introduction. I mentioned that you are also had the responsibility as the station's R- In the Stations Research Integration Office. Can you explain to somebody outside the building what that means sure so When we get a research sponsor who comes in and now might be somebody like NASA's Human Research Programmers Base life Biology program come in and they sponsor research and select a Pi. And give them a grant to do this research that. Pi then needs to figure out how to get their experiment to the space station. They do that. Using payload developers and the Research Integration Office as the office here in the NASA I s Pergram that helps those payload developers through all the sea of bureaucracy that surrounds NASA requirement to fly your investigation on federally owned via. I can't imagine so we step in to help them with the tough stuff that understanding the safety and vehicle requirements making sure. They've put together a schedule that gets them to the launch on time and then understanding their science requirements and how that translates into Performance of their investigation on orbit so being able to help Our Payloads Operation Center in Huntsville understand how.

Space Station International Space Station International Space Station Pr NASA US ISS Program Science Office scientist program manager Stations Research Integration Patrick ISIS Research Integration Office Huntsville Iraq Marino Nicolas Our Payloads Operation Center Neurotic Syndrome cotton wool spots principal
"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

16:09 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's brought us more of an understanding about the universe about the effects of gravity about the benefits that research can bring to all of humankind. The International Space Station has taught us what humans are truly capable of and inspired so many more to do and pursue great things all because in the pursuit of human space exploration space stations have held an important status in its history and generations of space explorers before us and even early thinkers new. This pursuit was so important. So today we're taking a journey through history and the history of space stations coming on the podcast. Today is Dr Gary Kit Macher Communications and education mission manager in the International Space Station program. Kim Mockeries worked at NASA for thirty five years and has written several books about space. Stations including Nasr's reference guide to the ISS and he's also taught several courses about space station spaceflight and space commercialization at Mit Sloan School of Management and the University of Houston. So here we go from concept on paper to space stations of history with Gary Kit. Macher enjoy five county mark. You have to ask Gary Kit.

International Space Station Macher Communications Gary Kit Dr Gary Kit Nasr Mit Sloan School of Management Kim Mockeries ISS NASA University of Houston
"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"That story is Dan Goldin. Who was the administrator Peter. I think he's the longest serving administrator of NASA if I'm not mistaken but he sort of laid the foundation pre decatur planning team. I know one of the slogans slogans was faster better cheaper. you know he had a lot of focus on. Mars and there were a lot of good things that were happening. Pre Nineteen Ninety nine. You had this discovery of a meteorite India right that could brought them more questions of is there really life on Mars. There were like maybe a little hints in there yet. Great things like Pathfinder. You had the Hubble servicing mission. Things were things were going well right. In the late nineties well Yes for the most part they were the faster better cheaper. Initiative initiative was really considered a great success and like you said Pathfinder and sojourner rovers were really really very very highly acclaimed. The there were a couple of notable failures. You had the one thousand nine hundred ninety nine Mars Polar Lander and then the Mars climate orbiter which impacted Dan Goldens thinking at that time hi and Ed also the space station and the shuttle were starting to encounter some cost overrun so he was really starting to think at that point in time that we needed to start planning for the poche shuttle and post station Shen period right yeah and that's kind of where where this all kicks off right so so one thousand nine hundred ninety nine the formation of the Takeda Planning Team. Let's get right into it what were some of the first steps to get to what would be the EPA of if i May I just wanted to mention engine. A couple of the reasons that Dan Gordon wanted to establish a decatur point planning team when we interviewed him for this book he just sort of take them off in quick fashion but the more we thought about them the more significant they seemed so in no particular order he mentioned four different factors one was this again. This is one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so the next year would be a new presidential election a new administration because President Clinton already served two terms so he wanted to prepare a slate a game plan for the next president whoever that would be so. That's that's one item. another thing was he wanted to prepare for such a time where there would be a a a bull market if you will there would be money available in the economy to do big things in space right and then a third thing was he wanted to integrate robotic spaceflight and human spaceflight previously he felt that culturally. NASA had suffered from operating under these distinct silos if you will were the people who did robotic space science didn't didn't really cooperate much for the people who did human spaceflight and then last and perhaps at least. I don't know he he sort of decried. What was the slogan that was common. Lee heard at the time of Moore's or bust and by that what he meant was he wanted a truly compelling rationale to send humans to Mars if if there was one and he wanted more even more than that he wanted Eh truly compelling rationale to do whatever the game plan would be not just talk about things that sounded cool but why are we doing doing them fundamentally and I know one of the one of the I guess main items to make this successful was to have the right people. I know there are some key players in this whole story and I'm. I'm Mike Butcher the name so just correct me if I if I do. Steve Zaka wits yeah okay okay. I know he's a very key player in this. I believe at the time in one thousand nine hundred nine he was with the office of Management and Budget Chief of science and space programs but there's also Jim Garvin Lease Guerra some other folks that he recruited to really focus on these initiatives well so Steve Asako. It's over at O. M. B. He came up with the idea he and his team to give NASA five million dollars per year over the next few years to initiate these studies which became the Decatur Planning Team the people at Naso like Lisa Guerra and Garvan and Harley thrown sin were chosen and by the heads of the office of spaceflight and and Science Joe Rothenberg was in charge of spaceflight and Ed Weiler was in charge compliance at that time I say so as taking it was it was a signing these folks to different areas and having them focused their efforts on unifying into a common common goal that's correct and it was top down it was it was control of this and the inspiration of course came from Dan Goldin Steve Izhak quits but it was really being managed at NASA headquarters and I by by the by the heads of spaceflight and science and they were or pulling from the NASA centers but the idea was that whatever policy would be developed would be implemented by headquarters in the priorities would would be set by headquarters wiler and Rothenberg work dubbed the stakeholders and so they they got to choose who would be on this his team okay were they were they were some of the leadership of this decatur planning team and and you are mentioning a top down sort of strategy and I believe that was you know the Decatur Planning team team was organized or maybe executed in phases and that was part of phase one which was the charter was this top down strategy and I believe part of that was a a forward-looking strategy not to not to look at past concepts as much and I know one of the big key drivers here was to be science driven and technology enable able right. That's correct yeah and what was the what was the I guess reasoning behind that why why be science-driven well they breath part of it was Dan Goldin was looking for a new rationale for spaceflight and a lot of people at NASA at that time also thought that the scientific tiffin goals as they were being articulated by the science community. The National Academy of Sciences were really solid ones that deserved consideration. Shen and could really help set the pace for future space flight and determine where we should go for how long we should go so Dan Goldin I think grabbed onto that and some of the personnel on the team reflected that desire to have science the scientific goals determining the pace and the the destinations and the other half of that was technology enabled and the idea there it would really be that technology are the state of technology would influence the pace of exploration program as well and where we could go yeah. I know that in terms of being science driven I can. I can say confidently now. You know working very closely with the International Space Station Program. That's is definitely one of the main drivers of communication and efforts even on the space station now so that's that's definitely still true today. You know when we're talking about laying the foundation for what is his twenty first century space travel. I believe that's still true today. I know especially in these early phases I believe one of the one of the ideas was to be quote destination independent you know like designing technologies and and being technology enabled and understanding and driving toward that science but being having no place to go initially. I believe had its own hazards. Yeah that's correct. That was a big discussion from the very beginning from the very first meeting was not being tied to any specific destination although they were later kind of lay lay out clear destinations to go the the real concept here's to develop the capabilities to go wherever you want wherever later on the science determined or whatever other factor determined would be the best place to go and one of the funding strategies. Was this other quote buying and by the yard what does that what does that mean well. It's really the same concept oh it's related to to the other science driven driven technology enabled in the sense that you have to devise the program to sustain the political winds and the budgetary ups and downs and and so we were and and this is what distinguishes has the DPT This is one of the things that distinguishes dpt from what eventually was the vision for space exploration. The concept at the very beginning was that under Dan Goldin was that this was not a big announcement was not likely a big announcement of sending humans beyond low-earth orbit so the idea was really to to slowly early gradually develop these capabilities so when the time came if there was a shift in public opinion or a shift in Nasr's budgetary fortunes than we would have the technologies in place to do it but we couldn't do that with one with a big apollo announcement we they were really thinking this was going to be gradual and so we had to slowly develop those capabilities and technologies right and sort of the idea that we knew new basically what kinds of technologies we needed so we might as well get started on those so whether it's in space propulsion or crew and Creuse crew in life sciences safety issues to maintain the health of the crew on the mission long duration mission those kinds kinds of things we knew what we needed to develop so we might as well just get started as much as we could sort of building generic technologies that then could be tailored toward toward the particular mission right and that eventually led to I guess in two thousand phase two of this whole to cato planning team was actually thinking one of specific architectures and I know one of the key points here in this story was the why river retreat what happened there well will some people who participated indicate oh planning team felt that it was certainly a watershed moment but not a good way and for a variety of reasons there were some go golden sort of the DPT participants at the time sort of felt that Gordon lost interest in what they were doing when before he was very interested in what they were doing joked about being part of the team himself and this kind of thing and it turned out that there were some other things that were weighing on the administrators mind at the time such as ISS assez cost overruns that not everybody knew about within at the time and other things so it sort of shifted a little bit but and things moved on from there a little bit but at the same time they were still thinking about some of their earlier goals and this phrase of sneaking up on Mars came about a little bit earlier before then and it's worth just mentioning that the idea was sort of as Glenn was saying before that we would have sort of a plan on the shelf for when circumstances dictated it because the idea was that a lot of people in the space community wanted to send humans to Mars but we again needed to find a compelling rationale and the right time for the right time period to initiate such big program so until then we the decayed planning team sort of worked not in secret but they were their work was was called embargo meaning wasn't widely discussed with other NASA people and certainly not outside because the idea was that they would be given some figurative space to work out these different ideas for how to build these technologies now they they would need that we now would need to have the science driven missions right. Yeah is kind of enabling the capabilities so in that time did head come. They were already ahead of the game terms of technology and capability right okay now now after that. I believe this is when George W Bush comes in and now we're starting to get away from the decatur planning team. I know there's some changes in administration and then even the name of the Cato Planning team so what's happening there. They're so at that point. The Decatur Planning team becomes the next exploration team or the exploration team all these names get a had to keep in mind and and actually soon thereafter whereafter we also have a change in leadership over a NASA Sean O'Keefe succeeded Dan Goldin as as the NASA administrator and at the level of the planning team Jim Garvin who was the leader was replaced by Gary Martin who who was then also named the space architect yeah NASA space architects based architect okay so so then what title right that is pretty awesome right so so Sean O'Keefe and Gary Martin this. I believe these leadership changes are are one of the key drivers in. I guess the how the the difference between the Decatur Planning Team and next what's how is how is O'Keefe a little bit different from golden in terms of the ways thinking well. O'Keefe walked in and he the first presentation to him from the team he was. He was really kind of shocked by chocked because he thought that's what NASA did. He didn't think this was new. He thought he thought NASA was supposed to be doing this kind of long term planning all along long and and so he was just. Kinda surprised that they were keeping it secret and he was surprised that it was it was such a big deal he he and he gave them full room to to go ahead and and do more studies dig deeper into the the issues that they you had been thinking about now..

NASA Dan Goldin Decatur Planning Team decatur Takeda Planning Team administrator Ed Weiler Sean O'Keefe Dan Goldin Steve Izhak International Space Station Pr Mars Polar Lander Dan Gordon Mike Butcher office of Management and Budge India Peter Dan Goldens National Academy of Sciences President Clinton
"international space station program" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"international space station program" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You get the you can get two hundred items to go look at by camping and the Russians are pretty good they have a lot of canned food which are kind of nice because it comes pre hydrated which is a little bit of a difference but again I think it's it's that experience but I think that thing it's need is now the average folks can start thinking about what it's like so even though it's still very expensive and it's still gonna be or a few folks it's the first time you can start now seeing that Hey there is a future this is the very first step of us going to a new frontier with with normal folks and then that's pretty exciting bill thank you so much for your service to the nation builders to Meyer Soviet minister for human space flight at NASA but prior to that he was in the space shuttle program the international space station program and you know America has been the leader I we we have great Russian partners there's no question about it that did you know without without these the at least on this level the two nations get along very very very well and so that has been a that has been a boon to the human experience in space an obvious you have a bunch of other nations are all trying to get there in other folks either on board their national space station or launch their own orbital space programs in some there's you know some I think was a China wants to go to the moon soon they want to try that it'll be interesting to see you know I have it with new technology and the the ability dated to be micro small you know so much data now available and you know they're not in the Isle of what what what literally took us to the moon before you now have that computing power on your phone right so it's pretty amazing stuff Sir thank you for what you've done and you know you can you keep the dream of you know maybe getting off this rock eventually alive thank you for that like prison but we have an amazing team that that works with me and supports me and again I think what's really need this this is a chance for us to challenge private industry and challenge the private sector to see what they can do with this tremendous facility so were unleashing that entrepreneurial talent that lives in the U. S. they can let us do amazing things so I can hardly wait to see what they'll do and who knows teaming with the private sector there's no no limit to our future that's true cancer in the first place right when you stop and think about all right now today Raytheon and United technologies are merging which is pretty pretty while you watch those old movies you know from like the Apollo program everything and everybody had a white jumpsuit manner and name on the back of it so you know which guide which they were responsible for right and so those are those are some of the most important industries in America thank you bill appreciates to answer thank you trash disposal three thousand dollars per kilogram this is on the NASA that allow for kilogram yeah and your captive fifty kilograms so and that's for your crew now for regenerative regenerative life support Graham and and you get it you'll be familiar with the metric system no toilet and life support even thousand to interface yeah you sort of need both and that's not an option supplies which includes the food the air crew provision supplies medical kit and exercise equipment that's made it a this is twenty two thousand per crew per day you can do storage for a hundred and five dollars per C. T. B. E. per day first we will be here okay I guess we're ready to go to your data downlink link makes a Verizon look cheap fifty Bucks per gigabyte I see that's a problem yeah I mean you couldn't be posting on Instagram what that would be to be up there more about Netflix yeah the manager Netflix is up there all right I'm not going this is this doesn't seem like the best deal since highly unaffordable right now but I like a bill tells us about future and think about the five bedroom house row just think about that yeah it was a good way of saying you didn't buy cubic space yeah that was good yeah the five bedroom house no problem all right well it is it is accepted as exiles and stuff all right coming up yes your chance to show you right now look at that these guys hold on right now caller.

three thousand dollars fifty kilograms five dollars
"international space station program" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:07 min | 2 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on WGN Radio

"But does that include air or not? I think that's all inclusive air. I believe I don't know if there are other extras that you might want to check. Oh oxygen an air. Oh, that includes oxygen. Oh, that's different to when we do air inclusive. Here on the ground oxygen is copped up there dot com. What you know what, why should we answer these questions are selves, when we had the guy who's actually in charge? This is a certified NASA badass. This is an absolute honor to talk to you Bill Myers with us. He is associated minister for human spaceflight at NASA. But over the years. You are part of the shuttle program, and then part of the international space station program. So thank you very much for being with us. And I hope that we live up to at least your base expectations of what this is going to be like. So now is up to anybody who's willing to pay or they're commercial concerns here that there are people who would be able to be in line here, I go, there national space station if they had some sort of business practice to have to go up there for. We've set it up at from NASA perspective is, we just say the opportunities available, and then we've laid out, you know what kind of things you can do onboard station. And what kind of things that are there, and they're pretty open? And but then it's really up to commercial companies to make the negotiations to, to get a centrally a rocket to take to space station and to make all the training arrangements, and all the other deal. So. And asks his role. And this is we said, hey, we've got this great facility onboard space station. And we have some spare capability that we can use. We'll make it available to the private sector. And see if they can make a business case of taking private astronaut missions to station, and it's more than just private astronaut missions, it's also a bunch of other commercial activities to test things on space to build new research capabilities to effectively utilize the space station. So we're making it available to private industry to use. However they can to to generate revenue. So then they'll be buying directly. And then we NASA can just be one of many users go into space, so that thirty five thousand is what you pay to stay there. But you gotta get yourself there. Exactly right. You still have to pay for transportation. Can you raise your transportation or I feel like I'm talking to a travel at your are you ranging, the transportation or is it do I have to call on Moscow? I have to call for the transportation as well. There's a bunch of companies out there that are be putting together business plans that you'll be able to call and they'll make the arrangements of it'll be kind of a turnkey saying where you go to them and over range for training for you though, arrange for the, the ride up and down from space and also the time on space. So it's, it's up to these companies to figure out how to put all the pieces together to give you your ride to space. So is there like a three day two night, minimum, what do you have to do when you get free? Right. What happens up there? I mean you can't just come up and go back. Right. You gotta stay for some period of time. I would imagine. Timeframe is up to thirty days. But again, but I think the, the cover thing is, we're trying to do is, it's really up to these companies to figure out how they want to build the business case. So all the things you just described like, how many people come together at once do they buy an entire rocket to buy a portion of a rocket up to NASA to decide it's up to these new companies to figure out what the business case is to figure out what what the plan is moving forward. So, so NASA made this unique facility available to folks to us for not only the private astronaut missions, but also for these other research opportunities. Why is it what we're doing it? We only made like a small portion really available. So it's still used for its research, which we're doing for us on the NASA side to get ready to take humans of, you know, beyond lowers orbit eventually out to the Mon to the program in twenty twenty four but we're using space station for our own purposes. There's really serious research going on to look at biological things to look at new medicines to look at building better fiber, optic cables, a whole bunch of stuff is going on. That's still goes on, for our purposes, but we had some spare capability and time above that. And so we're making it available for others to United. So this is about maximizing the asset basically. Yes. Exactly. Right. Okay. Space exploration. I'd imagine you're going to bring in a lot of extra. Finding some extra. Trying to jump start a lower orbit economy. If you think about it, right. We, we know we, we have these companies now that are going to be carrying our crews to space station for Nasr's purpose. But we bought that from a company so they own the launch vehicle service. So now others can use that same launch service to take others to station, and we're giving them a destination. So we're trying to jump start. That lowers orbit economy to see if companies can figure out a way to make revenue and effectively, create a marketplace in space and lowers orbit around here. So as a certified, NASA bad ass, I think that should just be on your business card, Bill. Do do you do? Are we gonna eventually now for the program that you just talked about, which is going to the moon? And then and then, you know then I'm ours mission. I think what are they talking about twenty twenty eight or twenty thirty two or whatever that, that number is, is are those going to be private contractor rockets is NASA going to be back in the propulsion biz? Where where does NASA see itself? What we're doing right now is we're working on two programs for us called the Orion program, which is a capsule which will be a deep space capsule launch crude configuration around probably twenty twenty or twenty twenty one and then we're also working on a heavy lift launch vehicle, which is a little bit smaller than the center but will seem with a new capability a little bit larger than to Saturn launch vehicle in Nasr's building both of those, but then we use a lot of commercial launches around those to go. Do these moon missions? So we're doing things very differently. So we have NASA provides unique capability that doesn't make sense for the private industry to go. Do can you describe which I would say, like these big rockets? They can take, you know, say sixty metric tons, seventy metric tons to lower, but there's not much need for anybody to watch that other than for some kind of big government mission. So those make sense for the government to do, but the smaller launches like satellites, and cubesats and all that there's a whole commercial watch industry that's getting spun in that area. So, so NASA does a unique things that don't make sense financially yet for others to go do. How do you feel about just the whole private space exploration, and you hear of the big tech guys like we just mentioned, Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, getting into this in a real way. And you know being a major player in this arena moving forward. They work hand in hand with NASA, and is this all good thing for all of us. Yeah. I take it tremendously. Great thing you know, spaceflight really demands. The best of all of us and it requires a partnership. So, so the, you know, the private sector, sometimes they can move faster than we can, they can make decisions and move. But then, when it takes a lot of analysis, and maybe a lot of resource at NASA can help with that. So this teaming in this relationship with the private sector, it's been very helpful for both of us. And what's really exciting about this time is now we can talk about things like having people. Go to space station, right? Average citizens go. I mean, we did a little bit with the Russians when the Russians did their spaceflight participant program. But now. We're able to do it more. So, so this is exciting because we're open and space up now, to the general population. It's not just something elite astronaut just for anybody. I mean he's still need thirty five thousand dollars a night. And we don't even talking about transportation yet. I mean there's there are still some things to, to work out here Bill. Let's be honest, but it is. But it's a start. Definitely a different way of talking about it right in the past. Right, for sure. And I think that's the, that's the exciting thing we were just joking before you came on about the idea of coming up next, how you can go to space like twenty years ago would have thought that was a bit. Well, it's not really a bit anymore. You can't you can't actually now go to space, if you want to have the right amount of cash on hand to do something like this. But now when back to this idea of, eventually, there are private companies that want to build space hotels, sort of in the in the vein of the international space station for those who would be availing themselves of this, NASA opportunity to go up as a private citizen, an entity to go up to the international space station. What are you get for that? How big is the room is at one bathroom. Is it a sweet? What are we get? Space station today. There's two bathrooms and there's and there's a sleeping compartment, which is kind of like a telephone phone booth size thing. And there's a sleeping bag of which you can crawl in and velcro yourself to the wall to go to sleep. So. And. For. You get you get a cycle or or you get a resist of exercise device and you get to to run on a treadmill. So now you do that, though, as a man, it'd be fun to be weightless and running on a treadmill that I wouldn't worry about my ankles. I it is a it's when you see the pictures, national space stations, what, what people are doing their it's tight quarters. You know, everything looks bigger on television, and it is. So, you know you go to the museum of science and industry here. They've got got capsules from all the different programs all man's face, and it's it is amazing how small everything is. So you gotta be ready to get a like the people are gonna be out there with, and they're still going to be. I would imagine cosmonauts and astronauts, right? Yeah, they're still going to be the cosmonauts and astronauts, essentially taking care of station doing this research that I talked about. It's critical for us to, to keep moving forward. And then there's also some, some research, we're doing really for own purposes to understand how the human body adapts to space for long duration spaceflight, but I think you'd be surprised about how much room there is on station. It's, it's about the interior volume of a five bedroom house..

NASA Bill Myers museum of science Nasr United Moscow Elon Musk Jeff Bezos thirty five thousand dollars seventy metric tons sixty metric tons twenty years thirty days three day
"international space station program" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Seven ten K long, NewsRadio WFL a first day of March. And it's going to be a warm lead. With a high of eighty degrees at sixty two degrees at News Radio WFL, a guilty plea from bay area man accused of violently dragging a shark behind a speeding boat in Tampa Bay two years ago. What are the two suspects in the shark dragging case? Michael Wenzel pleaded guilty in Hillsborough circuit court. It's part of a plea deal offered by the state one of his felony animal. Cruelty count has been reduced to a first degree misdemeanor and a second felony charge has been dropped Wenzel has been sentenced to ten days in the Hillsborough county jail and eleven months of probation. He'll report to the jail on March eight during the preceding Wenzel smiled in court to which Judge Mark wolf asked quote. Is there something funny about this? The second suspect Robert Banak rejected the state's over and will stand trial on aggravated animal cruelty charges June twenty-fourth, he is facing a maximum ten years in prison if he's convicted Sharon Parker, NewsRadio WFL a while. Her son recovers a Pasco county. Mom, vows to do what she can to catch. Those who attacked the boy fifteen year old Jeffrey Lehman was jumped last week while walking home from school and three suspects remain on the loose. Stephanie bird says they put her son through hell, and she wants them all to pay. She says whoever knows where the suspects are needs to contact deputies before they prey on another. Other innocent victim, President Trump and North Korea. Now have conflicting stories about what led to the breakdown in their summit in Vietnam. But Eckerd college political expert Tony Brunello says he's actually glad there was no deal struck between Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong UN I think at the end of the week for week. It's been for the president the country's veteran off at a deal wasn't made that future summits, Kim Jong UN or put off I actually think the North Korean leader overstepped and ask for too much. And I think interestingly president got up and walked away with the right thing to do Brunello believes. It's better the US takes its time and trying to come up with a denuclearization agreement with North Korea rather than the making a hasty one. They are counting down at the Cape. Kirk Sherman with the international space station program says they're looking forward to the test launch of a crew capable dragon capsule. It's now less than twenty four hours away. We've you this vehicle not only as as the crew transportation for this for our crews. Coming up, but it's also really really important to us from a cargo standpoint the same vehicle. Same systems will be flying are cargo starting on on Sierra's twenty one. So a really an important milestone for the international space station program. The dragon will be carried into space top of falcon nine rocket from launch complex thirty nine. At the Kennedy Space Center launch time is to forty nine AM on Saturday since two thousand fourteen Americans have added about twenty minutes to their weekly Dr times new research from AAA shows that over the course of a year Americans collectively spend seventy billion hours behind the wheel. Triple A. Spokesman Mark Jenkins says Moore driving means more danger as the amount of time you spend.

Michael Wenzel NewsRadio WFL Kim Jong UN Tony Brunello North Korea Hillsborough county jail President Trump Judge Mark wolf Tampa Bay president Kennedy Space Center Robert Banak US Spokesman Mark Jenkins Jeffrey Lehman Stephanie bird Pasco AAA Kirk Sherman
"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Under your area? We will tell you right now, whereas underway recovery tests going on just off the shore of San Diego as we're preparing to make sure that we're ready to support the recovery of the Orion capsule in our crew members. So we conduct quite a number of tests both at our neutral buoyancy facility here and out in open seawater. So we can make sure that all of the pieces of the puzzle that have to work together. That we know where they're gonna land that we can get there in time that we can get the crews out of the vehicle so they are not throwing up get them safely onto a ship. Get that ship safely to shore. If there's any medical conditions that occur. Do we have the right helicopters and have we made arrangements with the local area hospitals? So there is a lot of effort going on by a lot of different people to make sure that we have this capability in place. Whether we're landing on one of the commercial vehicles or whether we're landing in our Orion capsule. S Q question about it. I don't know Ryan. One I strongly recommend not going through that. If you don't have to especially since you'll have you'll probably having crews that have been up there longer. Okay. And originally years ago? Remember, the Ryan was going to land on land. Can you tell me why they changed? Now, it's water landing to feel sorry for I feel like I should call up. Our Senator director and former Orion program manager to answer that question. No, I cannot tell you exactly why that happened. What I can't till you is the original plans, whereas est- and this new proposal came up, but we do understand. And we do recognize that it is not preferable. But there were technical decisions that were technical considerations. That were put in place to make sure you can ask Mark when we get off stage. It's back to gender. So four gateway into Ryan are there additional lessons learned from a hollow that you think will be incorporating? Absolutely. So. As the administrators stated in the video that we watched for Paulo our goal was to get to the moon. But for the gateway program our goal is to stay there. So from this space policy directive, we have been chartered to lead the development of an innovative and sustainable exploration program that starts at the moon and allows us to use the gateway as a base as a base to go off beyond the moon to Mars. The program that we're we've been chartered. You're set up we've been tasked with combining with joining forces with our international partners, and even new international partners that we have not had any experience within the space station program and also joining forces with the commercial industry. So when you look at Apollo, certainly we're going to look to the Apollo programs for lessons learned about remembering what it's like to operate in the lunar vicinity and potentially one day on the surface of the moon for the international space station program..

Ryan Orion San Diego program manager Apollo Paulo Mark Senator director one day
"international space station program" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Bush is being remembered as a war hero. The forty first president passed away at the age of ninety four and Friday night. Bush was born June twelfth nineteen twenty four the sign of Republican Senator Prescott Bush of Massachusetts. He graduated from Phillips academy and handover and joined the US navy on his eighteenth birthday. Bush is said to be the youngest pilot in the navy to receive his wings while flying combat missions in World War Two. He was shot down twice. It was honored with the distinctive Flying Cross for heroism under fire. Bush expressed the philosophy of living outside of yourself part of something they apart of the community give others the emphasized do instead of complaining it comes naturally. And so I think for people just to sit and whine and complain about things in life. That's not good enough. You got to be in the game. Get off the bench getting a game. President trump. His wife say they are mourning the death of former President George Hw Bush in a statement he released on Twitter. Trump said the forty first president inspired generations of his fellow Americans with his essential authenticity. Disarming wit an unwavering commitment to faith family and country. He wrote that the bushes life will stir future Americans to pursue a greater cause. Alaska officials will be busy this weekend. Trying to assess the damage following yesterday's seven point zero magnitude earthquake north of Anchorage. Authorities say state and national guard helicopters were flying over south central Alaska. Trying to get a big picture look at the damage. Meanwhile, Anchorage police deployed drones to look for large scale damage on the ground teams of engineers spent much of Friday afternoon and evening checking public buildings for structure damage, but so far have not come across any major issues. You're listening to the latest from NBC News Radio. North Carolina officials are voting to investigate election fraud in the ninth congressional district. Republican Mark Harris defeated democrat, Dan McCreevy by nine hundred five votes out of nearly three hundred thousand cast, however, a bipartisan election board unanimously voted earlier this week not to certify the results because of concerns over absentee mail in ballots in bladen county residents of that county are giving sworn statements that people came to their doors and urge them to hand over their absentee ballots that they had not requested a tesla driver in California California's under arrest after the highway patrol spotted him sleep driving while the car was on autopilot. Brian shook has the details. Officers say when the model S driver failed to yield to a traffic stop on the one. Oh, one in San Mateo Friday. They pulled alongside him to find him either asleep or passed out they pulled in front of the car, which eventually slowed from seventy miles per hour to thirty miles per hour. The forty five year old man was taken into custody. In Palo Alto after failing sobriety test. Nasa is keeping an eye on the bacteria and the international space station program called microbial observatory has discovered an antibiotic resistant bacteria on the ISS toilet seat. Nesta's MO has found that microgravity made bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics known hazards to astronauts include radiation and low gravity but NASA is becoming more concerned about bacteria both in the ISS. And in the astronauts, Hamilton creator and star Lin Manuel. Miranda now has a star on the Hollywood walk of fame. A rift on some of his lyrics from the musical in the heights. Reports of my fame are still probably greatly exaggerated the Grammy Tony and Pulitzer prize winning artists, most notable work includes writing the musicals Hamilton and in the heights Di mutual NBC News Radio. Don't.

Senator Prescott Bush President George Hw Bush president Trump Alaska Phillips academy US NBC Anchorage Massachusetts Nasa Lin Manuel Palo Alto Anchorage police North Carolina Twitter Grammy Pulitzer prize
"international space station program" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"All states or situations. Toxics fifty K S T E Rancho Cordova, Sacramento meadow. NBC news special report. Alaska earthquake experts are saying the death of yesterday's seven point magnitude earthquake may have lessened its impact. No deaths were reported and damage was limited mostly to roads bridges and buildings. According to Joey Yang chair of civil engineering at the university of Alaska. Anchorage energy from the quake had dissipated to a large extent. Minimizing the damage. Experts say the tremblor was centered about twenty five miles underground estate experts calling yesterday's earthquake the most significant tremblor to hit the region since the great Alaska earthquake of nineteen sixty four then earthquake was the largest in US history. Registering nine point two on the Richter scale seismologists, Mike west said yesterday seven point zero quake triggered about half dozen significant aftershocks above magnitude four point five followed by several smaller ones. Dean you chill? NBC News Radio. North Carolina officials are voting to investigate election fraud in the ninth congressional district. Republican Mark Harris defeated democrat, Dan McCreevy by nine hundred five votes out of nearly three hundred thousand cast, however, a bipartisan election board unanimously voted earlier this week not to certify the results because of concerns over absentee mail in ballots in bladen county residents of that county are giving sworn statements that people came to their doors and urge them to hand over their absentee ballots that they had not requested a tesla driver in California's under arrest after the highway patrol spotted him sleep driving while the car was on autopilot. Brian shook has the details. Officers say when the model S driver failed to yield to a traffic stop on the one. Oh, one in San Mateo Friday. They pulled alongside him to find him either asleep or passed out they pulled in front of the car, which eventually slowed from seventy miles per hour to thirty miles per hour. The forty five year old man was. Is taken into custody in Palo Alto after failing a sobriety test. Nasa is keeping an eye on the 'Bacterial and the international space station program called microbial observatory has discovered an antibiotic resistant bacteria on the ISS toilet seat. Nastase ammo has found that microgravity made bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics known hazards to astronauts include radiation and low gravity but NASA becoming more concerned about bacteria both in the ISS. And in the astronauts, Hamilton creator and star Lin Manuel. Miranda now has a star on the Hollywood walk of fame. He rift on some of his lyrics from the musical in the heights. Reports of my fame are still probably greatly exaggerated the Grammy Tony and Pulitzer prize winning artists most notable work includes writing the musicals Hamilton and in the heights de mutual NBC, News Radio..

earthquake NBC Alaska Nasa K S T E Rancho Cordova Sacramento meadow Lin Manuel Palo Alto Joey Yang university of Alaska bladen county Pulitzer prize North Carolina Grammy Mark Harris Miranda
The International Space Station Begins

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

The International Space Station Begins

"So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time

Mir Station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center SDS Zara Spacewalking Nasa United States Jim Newman Commander Official Mr. Cabana Director Mr. Bob Nineteen Ninety Eight Hour
"international space station program" Discussed on Orbital Paths

Orbital Paths

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"international space station program" Discussed on Orbital Paths

"Three everyone knows that one of nasice major goal is to observe and explore planets all over the universe well for forty years now nasa has been monitoring a theory unusual planet in the orion spur of the nazi way gaqsiq this planet has all the ingredients for life that has an atmosphere rich in nitrogen and oxygen this liquid water falling out of the sky in pooling into oceans on the surface the polls of this plant are covered with sheets of ice and over time we realized the isis chongjin very dramatically in fact just recently a huge iceberg broke off of one of these i sheets that iceberg was about the size of the state of delaware nasa has been monitoring all these mysterious changes on a planet pretty close to home you may not have realized that nasa flies missions to earth will i have to say is i didn't even know that either kristie hanson runs logistics for operation ice bridge and not submission the studies changes at the earth's polar regions i worked on human space flight international space station programme hubble work with astronauts so when you say the general public didn't i worked at nasa for eleven years and i had no idea hey aircraft that fly all over the planet collecting data on earth sciences from pera six this is orbital a show about the cosmos and i'll place in it i'm michelle fault i want to get some of the big questions people have been asking since early july that's what that big new iceberg broke away or clubbed to use a term favoured by iceberg both france's i drove have to nasa goddard space flight center one of the chief scientists worth not operation icebreaker degree to talk with me oh wow his name is joe mcgregor and he's a glaciologist the guy studies glaciers.

nasa kristie hanson joe mcgregor michelle france eleven years forty years