40 Burst results for "International Space Station"

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:45 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Have tested anybody apartments your business which relatively conductor compared to the then not a good by charter to get sick if you up with much can mexico too much and pretty much twice a day with no. I'm using i'm talking about is and the idea now is to go to queensland and try it again there and then i guess pitch it to nasa the batch of interact stick different to get and some uppercut interested in the contract. Because they've got some of the earth will be part of the things. There was some options and on the country's space. I mean that's right have applications much anytime once. The years as professor james mcnair a from the royal melbourne institute of technology university and this space time still to come the first evidence of water vapor and the jovian moon ganymede and roger. officially places. New sequoia issue seventy-five five checkmate on display for the world. To see all that and more still to come on space time Evidence of water vapor is being detected in the atmosphere of judas largest moon ganymede this water vapor forms one is from the moon surface sublimate turning directly from solid ice into a gas. The discovery was made in comparison between you and archival observations and the tag by nassar's hubble space telescope. Previous research offered circumstantial evidence. The five thousand two hundred sixty. Eight kilometer wide jovian moon bigger than the planet. Mercury contains more water than all the earth's oceans however temperatures there so cold water on the surface is frozen solid gaining meads oceans lie roughly one hundred and sixty kilometers beneath the crest therefore the water vapor being detected now is not represent. The evaporation of this ocean. The discovery was made when sternum is reexamined. Hubble observations carrying last two decades in nine hundred ninety eight hobbles imaging spectograph took the first ultraviolet images of gani made and then revealed colorful auroral ribbons of electrified gas. These bands provided evidence of a weak magnetic field. The observations were explained by the prisons of molecular oxygen. But the problem was some of the features didn't match the expected emissions of a pure molecular oxygen atmosphere so scientists that the time hypothesized that the discrepancy was caused by high concentrations of atomic oxygen however more recent follow observations supportiveness genome mission combine two thousand eighteen dead from hobbles cosmic origins spectrograph with the early archival images from the space telescope imaging spectrograph taken between nineteen ninety. Eight and twenty ten and surprisingly it shows this hardly any atomic oxygen in ganymede maids atmosphere..

James Mcnair Royal Melbourne Institute Of T Nassar Queensland Nasa Mexico Roger
Russia Blames Space Station Lab Incident on Software Failure

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

Russia Blames Space Station Lab Incident on Software Failure

"A Russian space official who's blamed a software problem on the newly talks science lab the brief detail to the international space station out of position the twenty two ton Russian lab unexpectedly fighters jet thrusters off the docking on Thursday the space station was knocked out of its proposition for forty seven minutes before NASA and Russian controllers regain control the flight director of the space station's Russian segment says that a short term software failure was responsible and a direct longed to turn all the labs engines was mistakenly implemented but the station is in its normal orientation at the moment he adds the crew is planning to open the hatch to the lab later Friday

International Space Station Nasa
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

00:56 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"With early filters centered around australia and canada using a backpack prototype for mining and mineral prospecting at being so compact meant it also had some office applications in space with saizen waiter premium. The system could be matter on the surface rover or attached to a spacecraft in award. One of the targets will be the tunnels left by ancient volcanic lava flows. You thought to exist at shallow depths below the surface of both the moon. Mas these caves. I thought it'd be suitable for housing space colonies. That's because they provide protection from both meteoroid impacts high energy ultraviolet radiation and other energetic particles that also provides from extreme luna temperatures which can range from over one hundred degrees celsius during the day down to minus one hundred fifty degrees at night based on the depth and surrounding geology lavish ribs thought to provide stable environments around minus twenty degrees celsius but wall space colonies on the moon might happen in the long term a more. Immediate target will be mapping frozen water ice deposits on the moon sea water can be split into hydrogen and oxygen and these can be used for rocket fuel oxygen in can also be used for breathing and simply building. The water is could be used for drinking. Mcnary says that after the lavertue testing in queensland later this year work will begin on optimizing map. Rad's spacecraft use making it compatible with spacecraft equipment and other space-based science instrument packages a couple of years ago at the question. Some wanted to work out a way of sticking right onto drones to map inside of another thing. They came to a sensitive and frankie national ground right on canada toge- sitting around her research project. So at my t. We you're using throughout the conventional electric centennial. Just because i knew from finding some work be wasteful with electric field and they have to be caught away devices. If you're working on at say ten hertz. An electric turnaround would have to be fifteen meters long to get on on sensitive. Look i could feel the detect. A few didn't so yes we went. We eat a lot of testing. We don't to. I guess it you take apart or i am adam. Electric cord wave antenna. That's the bit that you would pull up. And out that way than setting about seventy five to be ideal but the am antenna. It's always felt right with wiping around and just because radio which is around the mega. You actually need the seventy five to us out concept that new every day ready since i was a boy yes reason no one had tried to try to leave right off a chest you the best it from very high cooking right just tried might be good without actually think i'm of doing and the test now is to see how well it works in a real world situation and we can't afford to tested on the moon right now but queensland lava caves could be the solution to that problem that's good move on four..

Canada Mcnary Australia RAD Queensland Frankie Adam
Pizza Hut Space Delivery

Ghost Town

02:16 min | 3 d ago

Pizza Hut Space Delivery

"What do you tip for pizza delivery to lower orbit. I don't know but i'll bet it's astronomical. The commercialization of space recently took a turn for the tasty windpipe giant. Pizza hut delivered a six inch. Salami pie to the international space station. We completed the first. The fastest and the farthest pizza delivery ever so far pizza hut leads in the commercialization of space race. Pizza is competitive and no one knows that more than pizza hut what can separate any product from its competitor is the marketing and in two thousand one. Pizza hut became the first restaurant chain to deliver to space. That's a pretty good flex if you're a pizza if you're in the highly competitive world of pizzaria ing to be able to say that you shot a pizza into space. Your mood papa. John's so it actually started with pizza hut advertising marketing things. Outside of the box the pizza was delivered via the zvezda service module and launch from biking or in kazakhstan on a proton k rocket and the second stage of the rocket displayed a pizza hut logo of course and was part of the company's dramatic throwing money at pizza hut to shake things up to be more competitive. Because also if you remember pizza hut from what i remember from the eighties can go to the restaurant. It was a experience it was like. Oh we're getting a pizza hut and as obviously delivery pizza was the delivery was pizza. Maybe other kinds of food chinese food might be delivered or or or you know sushi might be delivered but people were just getting more delivery and sometimes going out less or when he came to restaurants were like well. I don't really think of pizza. Hut is a restaurant. I think pizzas being delivered. Yeah as somebody who is a former pizza delivery driver and maker and worker You know how do we compete. And even within the other pizza chains out there. Because we're not the only game in town. Yeah let's throw a million dollars one million dollars twenty years ago. Wow into pizza delivery and space

Pizzaria Ing International Space Station Pizza Kazakhstan John
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:39 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"The readings were caused by moss quake activity and knocked the wind. Scientists examined the primary or pay waves which followed by the secondary s waves. These waves can show up again. Later in the seismic graham after reflecting off lays inside the planet so seismic grams wiggles can reveal properties such as a changing for city or a more fractured layer. Interestingly all of insights most significant quakes appear to have come from the one area serapis fossey a region volcanically active enough that lava may of flowed there within the last few million years opening spacecraft even spotted the tracks of boulders at a p to roll down steep slopes after being shaken loose by mas quakes. Curiously however no quakes have been detected from the more prominent volcanic regions like fasces. But it's possible. That many quakes including lodger ones. Eric herring in a way. That insight can't take that's because of shadow zones caused by the core reflecting seismic waves away from certain areas and preventing quaker from reaching inside this space time still to come and you'll australian instrument which could hope humans live on the moon and i evidence of water vapor on the jolyon moon ganymede. All that and more still to come on space time. Scientists hoping to identify luna water ice deposits and lunar lava tubes which could be used to provide protection for human habitation on the moon have developed new miniature ground penetrating radar which would be especially useful for spaceflight. The new device was developed by mobin startup company cd three d. and tested at the role mobile institute of technology. University are mitee. What makes it special is that it uses magnetism rather than electric resistance to scan deep below the surface and it's compact the prototype device. Notice map brad is just one tenth. The size of existing ground penetrating radar systems yet can see almost twice as deeply below ground. It's more than one hundred meters allowing it to identify minerals. Ice deposits ovoid such as lava tubes. The company behind the device has now received a grant from the australian space agency is part of the agencies murder martin initiative the further developed the prototype including testing the unit by mapping earth's largest accessible lavertue systems. The andrew caves in fan of queensland cd. Three d. c. You are a mighty professor. James mcnair says is smaller lighter and uses no more power than existing ground. Penetrating read devices yet again see twice as deep as existing technologies. He says what makes it. Unique apart from its size is how it operates using a different frequency range using the magnetic rather than the electric component of electromagnetic waves the magnetic waves emitted and detected by device measure conductivity and electromagnetic wave reflections in order to identify what lies underground voids in water is provide strong reflections over. Various metal deposits have high conductivity innate levels map reds addition development focused on facilitating drug surveys mining applications.

Moss Quake Serapis Fossey Eric Herring Mobin Role Mobile Institute Of Techn Mitee Graham Australian Space Agency Mapping Earth James Mcnair Brad Martin Queensland
New Russian Lab Briefly Knocks Space Station out of Position

Buck Sexton

00:18 sec | 3 d ago

New Russian Lab Briefly Knocks Space Station out of Position

"International space Station, was briefly knocked out of position this afternoon after Russian space lab accidentally fired its boosters after docking program manager Joe Montana Montalbano on how they fit. State Service module engines started firing to recover us in the attitude. There was no damage to the space

International Space Station Joe Montana Montalbano State Service
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:51 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Still wants all. The problems of sorted out knowing kill will enhance the capabilities of the russian segment of the space station serving as the new russian docking. Wouldn't space walk airlock. A feature operations nike rosa provides sixteen outside and fourteen inside workstations. And there's room for six cubic meters of scientific equipment as well as almost five keeping made his of storage living accommodation for another crew member. And it's a quick with the european space agency's robotic arm the first on a russian segment to make room for noriega the russians of jettison their long-serving peers docking port piece was undocked by the progress. Seventy seven cargo ship and the pair then went to a fiery grave burning up in the atmosphere over the south eastern pacific ocean internationally designated satellite junkyard. It'll still take several months. Multiple space walks the fully integrated the new module with the rest of the space station. However it stay might not be very long with moscow planning to leave the national space station. The next three to four years taking the russian segment of the albany outpost including a with them. They now developing a new russian space station the first module which is already under the construction and moscow has big plans to work with china on a new luna space basis. Well this space time still to come discovery of a molten core in mas and new instrument which could hope humans live on the moon all that and most to come on space time you.

European Space Agency Noriega Nike National Space Station Pacific Ocean Moscow Albany China
International Space Station Briefly Loses Control After New Russian Module Misfires

KOGO's Evening News

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

International Space Station Briefly Loses Control After New Russian Module Misfires

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:38 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"This is space time series. Twenty four episode eighty eight for broadcast on the second of august. Twenty twenty one coming up on space time high drama aboard the international space station discovery of a molten core in the red planet mars and first evidence of water vapor on gibb's moon ganymede. Oh that and more coming up on space time. Welcome to space time. We'd stewart gary. The international space station is now stable again. After russia's new nike multipurpose laboratory module started firing. Its thrusters briefly sending the orbiting outpost out of control for forty seven minutes. The space station lost control of its orientation stations position being k. forgetting power from solar panels and for communications. The incident happened well. Cosmonauts were inside the new nordic module for the first time. Carry out their initial leak and inspection. Czech's suddenly norger ignited. Its thrusters setting the space station out of no more in tation. Forty five degrees out of alignment when russian mission managers at star city near moscow realized what was happening. They fired up the visitor. Module's thrusters to try and stabilize the space station. However noriega's thrust cape firing resulting in the two modules essentially fighting each other with noise. Pushing the station out of alignment and zvezda trying but failing to correct the movement. Eventually mission managers. Ten on the thrust is aboard a duck progress cargo ship that allow them to regain attitude control and stabilize the motion of the space station until like burned up. All its feel. The opening outpost is now back on the full control flying in good configuration with nasa houston control and russian flight director working through the issue while the russian federal space agency. Roscosmos is trying to determine exactly what went wrong aboard they shining you module. Meanwhile jackson acer the other two major stakeholders in the space station a monitoring the issue in real time. The incident is caused nasa to postpone the second flight of at least one hundred style on spacecraft which was meant to fly to space station the twenty ton noida was launched aboard a russian proton rocket from the back in oak cosmodrome in.

Stewart Gary International Space Station Russia Noriega Czech Nasa Houston Control And Russi Moscow Russian Federal Space Agency Jackson Acer Nasa Noida
Russia's New Nauka Module Readied for Launch to International Space Station

Liftoff

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Russia's New Nauka Module Readied for Launch to International Space Station

"I want to start with the russian multipurpose laboratory module which is i believe called naga for short. But it's it's a it's the new russian module For the irs. They've been working on for years. It's actually ready for launch supposed to launch on july twenty first. This is a big deal. Eight days later it will dock at the airport of these leads. The service module at the iss so the being added to the russian segment of the iss and in fact the cosmonauts are in the process of dumping some old stuff off the i s to make room for it in particular There is a docking port called peers. That there they. They did a seven hour long space walk last month. Who was the second spacewalk to disconnect peers from the space station they disconnect this docking module. Because it will be replaced by the new multipurpose lab module so peers gets disassembled or like disconnected. And it's going to be attached to the progress. Seventy seven cargo ship. And then they're going to deorbit those guys and they burn up in the atmosphere and that's the end and then knock a arrives and then they'll the cosmonauts will need to do another space walk to plug it all in and install everything there but then they will have a new russian science module and the iss will expand even further for the first time in a little while. So that's interesting on its own. I think the russians haven't had a dedicated science modules. So now they're they're gonna have their own dedicated science module. There's also i think a really interesting piece of hardware on this module and that is something called the era e. r. a. stands for european robotic arm. That's pretty good

IRS
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 2 weeks ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson Compete in Space Race

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:59 min | Last month

Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson Compete in Space Race

"Is heating up. Just weeks before Amazon founder Jeff Bezos his history making launch into space, Richard Branson now says he's going to do it first with his Virgin Galactic space flight Unity 22 astronaut there is there one Richard Branson. Will be evaluating the customer spaceflight experience. It will be the company's first fully crewed spaceflights. Branson will be joined by two pilots and three other mission specialists. Virgin Galactic spacecraft launches from beneath a custom carrier airplane before being shot to the boundary of earth and space, reaching supersonic speeds within eight seconds. Fire fire The window to launch opens July 11th just nine days before Jeff Bezoza launches with his brother and two others aboard Blue origins, New Shepard, Do you see the earth? From space changes you It changes your relationship with this planet with humanity. It's one Earth one of the seats on that flight selling at auction for $28 million for an 11 minute flight to the edge of the atmosphere and on Thursday bases, announcing that 82 year old Wally Funk Will be his honored guest on that flight. She underwent astronaut training in the sixties but never flew to space. Now, she tells bezoza what she'll say after this flight. I will say, Honey, that was the best thing that ever happened to me. And while SpaceX has announced its plans for its all civilian flight, its founder, Elon Musk won't be on it. Still, he has been awarded the major NASA contracts and has sent astronauts to the International space station. But Branson is trying to become the first of the three to soar into weightlessness. Ending his surprise announcement with the teas, and when we return, I will announce something very exciting to give more people the chance to become astronauts. Because space does belong to us all, and the company says

Richard Branson Jeff Bezoza Jeff Bezos Virgin Galactic Branson Wally Funk Bezoza Amazon Spacex Elon Musk International Space Station Nasa
A Trip to Space: This week's space news

A Trip to Space

01:07 min | Last month

A Trip to Space: This week's space news

"Talk stoop down thousand. Sign up to fly to space watching us virgin license. Nasa is trying to fix the hubble space telescope after a memory module failure forced the agency to shut down the conic orbiting observatory. The problem is with the payload computer which halted on june the furtive stopping the spacecraft from collecting science data the telescope and instruments or working as expected but they rely on the payload computer to operate over the next week. The team continue to assess hardware to identify if something else may be causing the problem. European space agency's looking to six astronauts. Join its core as well. As twenty reservists the will operate from academia. They will travel to the international space station. And one day onto the nasa lunar gave. it'll be in orbit around the moon. A total of twenty two thousand five hundred and eighty nine people have applied and submitted a medical certificate in the hype of to the next round. The six will be confirmed late. In twenty twenty two

Space News Astronomy Science Nasa European Space Agency International Space Station Academia
Astronauts Deploy a Second New Solar Array for the International Space Station

Purity Products

00:16 sec | Last month

Astronauts Deploy a Second New Solar Array for the International Space Station

"The international space station has a new solar array. A total of six solar panels were installed during an almost seven hour spacewalk. The project was completed by astronauts from the U. S and European Space Agency was their third spacewalk in just over a week. The new arrays have a 15 year. Life

International Space Station European Space Agency U.
What Becomes of Astronauts' Dirty Laundry?

Kottke Ride Home

02:07 min | Last month

What Becomes of Astronauts' Dirty Laundry?

"How do astronauts do their laundry so much attention is given to how they make food and go to the bathroom how they sleep and exercise but what about cleaning their clothes. It turns out the answer is very simple. They don't quoting fast company closed. Take up valuable storage space needed for food and other essentials not to mention that the average cost of taking a hound of items to space is about ten thousand dollars says retired nasa astronaut. An engineer leland melvin zone. Astronauts are space bound for months or years at a time. They have to recycle clothing out. Shirts and shorts not to mention undergarments. Only every five to seven days. We don't have the up mass to keep throwing away our clothing. Melvin says using the term that means the capacity of the vessel to carry items to space used clothing then usually returned from the international space station to earth and expendable cargo vehicle or burned up in the atmosphere in a capsule full of trash. Some more creative. A scientist wants reported using an old pair of underwear as a source of nutrients for growing his tomato and basil plants. End quote and that last one is true nasa reports that i assess expedition six officers. Don t sewed some of his used underwear into sphere and covered it with russian space toilet paper a kind of double layer woven gauze as a stand in to grow some seeds that he'd brought on board because well they didn't have any soil and it turned out to work. So if you're out of soil in desperately need to grow some plants rapamycin underwear. I guess but wait. There is more russian scientists once theorized that they could use their used underwear to power. The spacecraft quoting nasa the scientists on board space station mir began designing a system that would use bacteria to digest the astronauts cotton and paper underpants. The researchers said that it was even possible that the methane gas given off when the bacteria eighth underwear could be used to help power the spacecraft

Leland Melvin Nasa Don T Melvin International Space Station
Astronauts Make Second Attempt to Deploy Solar Array

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:12 sec | Last month

Astronauts Make Second Attempt to Deploy Solar Array

"And two space walking astronauts are outside the international space station. This latest spacewalk is aimed at advancing work on the station's solar array. They're installing new solar panels. Trial. Snyder NPR

International Space Station Snyder Npr
China Launches First Astronauts to Its Space Station

Kottke Ride Home

02:08 min | Last month

China Launches First Astronauts to Its Space Station

"Yesterday. China successfully sent three astronauts or taikonauts to their tian module which will eventually become their completed. Tian gong space station. Nia haisheng bombing and tongue hongbo whose identities were kept secret until a press conference on wednesday will spend three months aboard the module bringing it into service and preparing it for the next phase of the space station's construction. It will be the longest crude mission by the chinese space agency to date the tian gong. Space station will end up looking. Like a big cross and will include crew quarters science labs and even a hubble class telescope when completed it will be a fifth of the mass of the international space station in china is open to having foreign on board to collaborate three more. Crude flights are planned to complete construction which is scheduled to be done sometime in twenty twenty two quoting the bbc. A fighter pilot nia haisheng. Fifty six is said to be china's oldest astronaut in space. He's a veteran of two previous flights which included a fifteen day visit in two thousand thirteen to the prototype station tian gong one this has since been de orbited his crewmates leo boming fifty four and tongue hongbo forty five are also from air force background lease earlier spaceflight experience was on the shenzhou seven mission in two thousand eight. That's all him participate in china's first ever spacewalk mr. Tung is the rookie on this occasion. Having never before gone into orbit and quotes in addition to landing a rover on mars last month china became the first country to send an un- crude rover to the far side of the moon in two thousand and nineteen while the us has been prohibited from working with china's space program for a passed by congress in two thousand eleven which is part of why china has to make its own space station because with the us leading the international space station partnership china therefore can't be a part of it. Nasa has been outwardly congratulatory of china's recent achievements with administrator bill nelson sane in a statement yesterday quote congratulations to china launch of crew to their new space station. I look forward to the scientific discoveries to come and quotes

China Tian Gong Space Station Nia Haisheng Tongue Hongbo Tian Gong Leo Boming International Space Station BBC Tung Air Force UN United States Congress Nasa Bill Nelson
Space Station Gets New Solar Arrays in Spacewalk

WBZ Morning News

00:40 sec | Last month

Space Station Gets New Solar Arrays in Spacewalk

"Of giving their home a power upgrade two astronauts on the international space station or putting on their walking boots this morning, American Shane Kimbrough and French astronaut Thomas Biscay will install the first of two brand new solar rays during a plan 6.5 hour spacewalk. The arrays roll out Kind of like a carpet. They arrive packed away in canisters aboard a SpaceX dragon just a few weeks ago, they're much smaller than the station's current set of a raise. But new technology makes these more powerful and more efficient astronauts installed the first of the old ones 20 years ago. Another spacewalk Sunday as planned to install the second new array, with four more to come during the next three years.

Shane Kimbrough Thomas Biscay International Space Station
NASA, SpaceX Announce New Target for Next Crew Dragon Launch

Clark Howard

00:31 sec | Last month

NASA, SpaceX Announce New Target for Next Crew Dragon Launch

"SpaceX is delaying the next band launch of a Falcon nine rocket from the space coast by a few days. The upcoming crew. Dragon mission could get a Halloween launch lift off of the Crew three mission set to happen now no earlier than October 31st. The previous date was October the 23rd. It'll be SpaceX's fourth ever. Man launch NASA as four astronauts. Uh For NASA astronauts, along with astronauts from the European Space Agency will again head to the international space Station.

Spacex Nasa European Space Agency International Space Station
Making a Home on the Moon

WSJ The Future of Everything

01:53 min | Last month

Making a Home on the Moon

"All right. Hello everyone it is. Twenty twenty and luca. And i are on board the international space station. We have a to video cameras. Astronaut drew morgan is floating between parachutes and seats. The space season is so crammed with stuff that it seems like even his camera is having trouble fitting in directly outside his capsule just a few feet away and also floating around is his crewmate. Luca parmigiano the two were giving viewers a tour of the international space station the iss on the other end. There is luga. And he's in the on the living module the habitation module of the soyuz. Go ahead luton's coordi- action. I agree with that yeah. The iss is bigger than you might imagine. It's about the size of a six bedroom house gear. There are two crew borders back here on either side. There's a table here happenings together. We have at this is dr. Morgan is now back on her. After a two hundred and seventy two day. Stay on the iss in some ways. Now that i'm back on earth it feels like a blur while it was up there and i was passing my sixth seventh eighth month on board. It definitely at time did feel like i have just lived there all my life. Nick constant work including more than seven spacewalks. meaning you leave the spacecraft and go out into the void. It sounds exhilarating. But morgan says parts of the experience actually become kind of rain and part of that is the environment of being enclosed in the same setting all the time around the same people and the routine every day like groundhog day and in many ways you know it tends to make it very difficult to distinguish one day from another

Drew Morgan International Space Station Luca Parmigiano Luca Luton Morgan Nick
Astronaut Handovers at the International Space Station

Innovation Now

01:14 min | Last month

Astronaut Handovers at the International Space Station

"That the commercial crew program has begun flying crews a forum on us commercial spacecraft. The full crew of the international space station has expanded to seven people. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future to ensure that the international space station is continuously staffed with astronauts and cosmonauts a new crew now launches and arrives at station before the prior crew returned to earth this results in a short period of time where there are more crew than usual on board as of april. Twenty twenty one. The station had seven permanent crew quarters or personal spaces for astronauts to sleep and work during their. Stay so how to eleven. Astronauts share the seven crew quarters when the new crew arrives. They don't crew members work with flight controllers to identify temporary campout locations in modules with the least activity during the handover period for those few days. The station is bustling as new crew. Members familiarized themselves with their home in space and crew members preparing for their return to earth. Spend time packing cargo and doing refresher training for

International Space Station United States
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

08:24 min | 2 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Were using. We'll talk a lot more about this panel or using the space station heavily to develop those capabilities so that's it that's mealy. Thanks so much. And next up at jennifer fogarty. High is a pleasure to be here in an honor to be on a panel I am the chief scientist for the nasa human research program. I have been with nasa sixteen years in total Spent my career working most of it in medical operations trying to understand the risks associated with spaceflight and making sure that the crew members are healthy and have the countermeasures. They need to be successful. It for mission requirements when i moved over to the human research program I became in charge of very large and diverse portfolio of research as trying to enable human spaceflight exploration and we use platforms such as international space station. Not only understand how the body changes over time and how humans respond us basically but then how do the tools that we introduce like exercise countermeasures or nutritional countermeasures. Help them opting mayes Their performance in health and sustainably be able to manage the stressors better gonna occur for exploration missions which we have not experienced yet. Thank you so much. Anti around out our panel. Today we have laura shaw low Said i'm laura sean i Work in the international space station program office at nasa johnson. Space center houston In my whole career working Support systems Thermal control of sport And so now we're establishing a testbed on board the international space station As robby mentioned detest out those technologies And so we'll talk about my role in that which is create this this test bed and all the hardware goes into it and i have been an about about twenty two years or so and work life support almost that entire time awesome. Thank you so much for joining us without further ado. Let's dive into some questions. The first one is for you robin. You've said before that the best is yet to come. And we're on the cusp of some huge payoffs from our investment in the international space station. So can you elaborate on that absolutely been talking a lot about this anniversary that we're celebrating. Twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. Which is just an amazing accomplishment. It self our team makes it look easy. but in fact it's not To sustain the international space station continuous crew as we look back on that that amazing accomplishment in the last two decades. We're really looking forward. We're looking forward to what the next decade holds for the international space station and in all of our mission areas. I feel like we've already accomplished so much. But the best really is yet to come so we'll be talking more. Today in the focus of this panel is on how are using it The space station for exploration. And we have all these capabilities That require the international space station as a testbed to close these gaps for future missions. Though we're going to be closing gaps Up we're also going to be doing more cutting edge. Research in medical fields manufacturing All kinds of for benefit to life here on earth stem activities. All of those the international partnership By itself is. I think you know as you mentioned we have all these countries participating up to one hundred. Eight countries have participated in some way in activities on the international space station. And we're filling in the map right of a global participation in this amazing platform we're also seeing more countries want to send astronauts into space and and then our final area commercialization so we're trying to enable commercial economy and low-earth-orbit. We're opening up the space station for private astronauts to come for the first time and commercial activities. We've got twenty one commercial facilities now on the international space station owned and operated by private industry or about to launch the anoraks airlock on space x twenty one adding yet another commercial capability. So that's why. I say i think the best is yet to come. We're about to really reap the benefits of In all of these mission areas from the international space station. That's really exciting. Thank you so much. The next question is really for any of you. Maybe even all three of you How are we currently using the space station to enable future exploration genuine. take verse. yeah it's it's been an exciting opportunity Several years ago when they completed station from a construction standpoint. But as you heard from robyn still going to continue to evolve and change as a testbed but we also were able to get enough crew up there where we can focus significantly on science and one of the components of science not the only but one of the components human research drilling characterize what happens with the human by over time Space lake has has some stressors associated with it but it also has some absence of stress that one of the big ones we try to understand is the body non experiencing gravity for significant periods of time And the the human body we've discovered is incredibly adaptable. But we're trying to understand. Where does that adaptation take you for periods of time. That are longer longer than what we experienced on stations though you use something like station. And the powers of the national lab that are there was the up and down mass the capability to bring samples down. Send harbor up and bring samples down. The do you tailor studies over its all-time course. Because what's important about looking at change over. Time is your ability then to predict burp. Huger time periods. That haven't occurred yet and build that confidence that you know where this system is going. So i think this station has just been remarkable with allowing us to look at multiple crew members. At a time men and women people of different ethnicities to really get a a comprehensive sense of what people of the future might be looking at. And how would we help them survive and not just survived but really perform to the mission standards that we expect for something like a three years. Mar mars mission though is one of our many analogues. But it's our our most high fidelity analogue because it is based operation. All right coming up next. We actually have a question. I think this might be for you. What have we learned from human research on the space station that is preparing us for the missions to the moon and mars refer the missions a feature coming up in the near term for especially for the moon. I think it was allowing us really to position ourselves to learn how to do. Human subject research in a very constrained environment There's also risks associated with doing research so we're always balancing enabling the mission to occur in doing research on subjects But we have to remember that it is field research so when people are going to go into space and go to a planetary surface understanding how they perform on something like a particular activity is part of what we have to understand when they don't even further away so i think as a learning opportunity for the scientists in just executing the science on those missions as much. It is the data. That's gonna come back. The data really is invaluable One of the questions we have about microgravity which is primarily. The situation on the international space station is the body I call it like one of the most energy efficient manner known to man in terms of it will stop investing in systems that you don't regularly us so i think it's probably pretty well known about spaceflight is you do lose some bone and muscle.

Twenty years jennifer fogarty Eight countries sixteen years Today three years nasa johnson earth next decade laura sean first time robyn up to one hundred three first one about about twenty two years Mar twenty mars moon
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I'm pat ryan on this podcast. We talk with scientists. Engineers astronauts all kinds of experts about their part in america's space exploration program. Today we turn to look forward in time to the future. Space exploration that the international space station is making a reality since before its first component launched from earth nineteen ninety eight. The major goals of the international space station have included supporting world class science research creating benefits on earth promoting international cooperation boosting the commercialization of space and supporting the future of space exploration. Which is to say using the space station flying close by and lower orbit to learn what we need to know so we can go back to the moon and then to the big destination to mars how to make use of this relatively permanent platform only a couple of hundred miles away in the sky to answer our questions about how to support people in space on journeys that will take years to complete. This is the sixth in a series of nasa sponsored panel discussions in recognition of the twentieth anniversary of continuous human presence. On the station we brought to the other starting in february this time. A panel of nasa experts heavily involved in planning those future missions talks about what's to come and how the partner space agencies around the world are leveraging. Today's research to become tomorrow's technology for the first human journey into the solar system. The moderator is nasa public affairs officer leeann cheshire from the johnson space center. And she will introduce you to robin givens jennifer fogarty and laura shaw. Okay then here we go county. We have i'm leah..

leeann cheshire Today february sixth mars jennifer fogarty tomorrow earth laura shaw first component twentieth anniversary first human pat ryan couple of hundred miles robin givens earth nineteen ninety leah moon eight america
"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

04:07 min | 2 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Could far out two million views. Different strokes okay. What here's my angle on this casting right. First of all did not know. She acted but i think that. That's like literally why she might be successful is because she's such a who in the mainstream this like acting thing in this big movies. Weird will not seem weird if anything like nobody will focus that. She's a singer to like and that is perfect. Like there's no distraction. She's obviously good. She obviously auditioned like person. Because i don't think she was hired from clout like i think she auditioned and was good. That's it seems like that's the case. Here right maybe. It helped her. Get in the door for an audition. But i don't think that this got her job is that she's like this pop singer that is critically loved but not very popular right. They don't care about that necessarily so. I think that this is like why this is such a good pick and why she might really launched an acting career off of this if she wanted a big one. She's acted in that. I just we were just talking about good turned up. Charlie turn up. Charlie yourself as a dj. She's been in a couple episodes of that. Okay it was a netflix show. So like she's acted before but not a whole lot and so this is like her big acting break. And it's huge. Because it's john wick. Four and these movies are huge huge. She playing his daughter. She must be playing his daughter or something. Like google assembled daughter show. She could be a villain remember when ruby rosanna john wick movie. She's villain like she could easily be a village be like his partner like holly berry was in one and that was a big deal. Like ruby rose you. You never know. We won't know until it comes out but the point is it's very high profile. Got a lot of headlines for this yet. I think it was like unexpected but in a great way was like oh she's gonna kill you know it wasn't even like a grown. It was like this girl is clearly a triple threat. You know this girl is clearly got it. And i think because of her being a little bit under the radar that she has more chance than anyone to turn this into something. She's not just like britney spears and crossroads. It's like that everybody like safra votes again. But don't mean like everyone's crossroads and was like woo britney spears and crossroads like this is not maybe this th- rena can actually play a role. She can actually act and be taken seriously. I suspect she can. She like her and her videos. Remind me of a dimension to exergen whether just like very artful yeah vary like performance based and acting seems like an obvious step for her. Here's a really quick quiz. So they get really bummed me out. Is that in the newest version of spotify. They put serena. I don't these quizzes. Yeah i don't like this is really really easy. Three leagues bobby. Number number number. But who has more monthly listeners. Bb rexha or rena saw yama pb. Rexha for sure because meant to be was a number one And i and. Unfortunately i think rina's had a number one like that and like maybe rex. Who has twenty seven million monthly listeners. Rena salvo yama has to me must also. Bb's plan the wall off or july party and rina's and john wick movie so to clearly you have different paths as different types of artists so levels of who. Yeah you know mind you both things. I respect absolutely playing the wobble. Fourth of july starring. In john wick to me. Those are both lucrative so i had my first like house guest like while i was away. Somebody stayed here which was so nice. Go don't think i've ever had an apartment where i felt comfortable doing that. I don't know never had a bad apartment but more just like somebody would wanna stay here. And i'm like so happy for the mistake like water. My plants like it made sense. You know for somebody to stay here. While i was away and they actually really enjoyed staying here and one of the things they said was like. Oh your your bed is comfortable. Or whatever and i was like. Oh what an honor actually. It's a helix mattress. I got it from this podcast. Add in that. Made me feel really special. But ultimately that i was like i know i have a frigging comfortable mattress because i also see better.

holly berry netflix john wick ruby rose Four spotify ruby rosanna john wick first rina two million views both wick britney spears serena Charlie twenty seven million monthly Rena salvo yama woo britney spears rena saw yama First
"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

06:23 min | 2 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Like skipping around a fake neighborhood on a universal backlot in an old navy up twelve octaves and like sped up times too. it's different. It's not her vibe but she sounds great right like that's great god. Who else did the elton john tribute i. i forget. It was definitely three artists and he was like right there on stage and they kept like singing to him. You know and demi did Fuck deputy song that was like so demi you could tell they were like this is my anthem and it was. I'm still standing and it was like. Oh wow demi like yes but is let's hear them saying not what i would pay for them. But whatever got imagine being locked down for a year and a half and dying to go to like a live event and the one you get a ticket to is the iheartradio music awards twenty twenty one and you have to watch. Demi levato saying i'm still standing. I mean i guess. I'll take it. You say that sarcastically. But it was a great. I mean i watched a lot of those performances and they were fantastic. So i would be okay with it if i was elton john. Maybe not so much. Who and who else look in the description who else was singing it demi her and who else. Oh brandi carlile. Who cares okay continuing. Sorry got that right brandi. Carlile is the most who cares artist of all time we have grammy's artists may have who cares artists brady carlos a little bit of both carlisle. Do i always mixer go-goes girl though but they're totally different. Linda carlisle me too. And i never checked to see if they were different for many many years and i don't think anyone has but she's very different so that's what's so amazing. I don't think anyone really has been really has okay. I love school about he I was trying to make this call. And i asked him say times missile number. I hope that that was not detectable by you guys but if it was i'm so sorry anyway. Little evert removed the twenty four million dollar diamond for had. And i just wanted to make sure you knew Okay crunch crunch. The time has gone. End of an era of the diamond is gone. It almost feels like a stunt. I'm sauce now. If that it was a stunt and if it was it was a great stunt because like wow and then he now dating jt. i'm still like o j t. Like a perfect couple. I feel like it's jt situation where jt's like. I can't look at this anymore. I can't look at this. Have you heard the new city girl song. Torque you later. It's so good to work you later in so good anyways. Yeah but my. My question was like what happened to the diamond. Be stone is gone. And according to page six god. What a great right up earlier. This week vert posted photos and videos on his instagram stories with his girlfriend city. Girls rapper jay. Jt with the pink stone. Conspicuously mia calling z. Vert vert because it's offensively. That's how journalism works really funny because his last name isn't vert names work earlier this week. Lose last name is not vert remain. It's would if anything like it'd be confusing do you think. Jt was like can. I have the stone. just give me the stone. can. I put us in a necklace. Please see if she showed up with like a necklace with the stone. That's good narrative. Fuck that would be amazing. And she'd be like yeah like pussy whipped took his took his face stone out and gave it to me. Like that's so good. What was the story whenever he got it and people were like. Why didn't you turn this into a ring or necklace. And he was like 'cause lose it right he's like what's in my head. It stays there. Did you see the funny screen. The people were posing their applies. Where like i guess thanos like took the rock out like the whatever. I don't yeah marvelous kind of got it. I was like okay. I know there's something called like infinity stones. But i don't know what they do. I think somebody had a fantas- had a stone in his head or don't call. Don't call odd mentioning marvel. just don't grind conversation to a halt okay member and marvel. I feel like there's like meg salter intonation here like yeah like the data's comes in and he's you know there's a stone's make stelter impression needs worst watch videos. That was funny. She didn't fake pride campaign video for like butter company. Talk so funny. Great part of hats last comic. So good in hacks. Hey guys You might wanna know that bb. Rexha headlining the philadelphia. Welcome america foursome. Coli concert on third by wallah can use the crash. Bb of eastbound baby here comes. The sequel did schivonne setup. This lineup like who set up this line. While jane for chevron somebody tweeted the other day that the actor said play chiffon is the same girl who is in the ashley. Oh episode of black mirror. She plays the ashley. Oh stan i was going to mention that but we cut the segment last week about the Chevonne character because i was like i do american. Let tween chevanton aka mayor's gay daughter and the ashley. Oh stan this girl is like a queer cannon now you know because on a roll is like you know one of the most important pop songs of this century. We'll be ticket jinx. It will still be free to the public those wishing to attend the ten can win tickets through a dry developed by wall. Welcome america. I guess we're going. I mean bb rexha and flow rider. Fresh off eurovision seems like it'd be an icon is going to run alina or maybe bb will sing it and flow will. Do the would be amazing. You know would also be amazing when driving the philadelphia. See rex's sing at the wab fourth quarter bucks county candace bushnell touching my lip. Like thinking like oh. Can we make this work..

brady carlos brandi carlile Linda carlisle demi This week three artists brandi Demi levato twenty four million dollar elton john last week Carlile Chevonne ten black mirror Jt this century cannon a year and a half third
"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

08:58 min | 2 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Look more why does that. Sound like christian slater it does. We'll tell you one thing it wasn't christian slater lance bass. Oh fuck i. I saw that shit lance bass sound christian slater yes that was lance bass in his husband's birth announcement which had higher production value than like all of bb rex's videos put together. I'm sorry did it. Not at least the last one at least the last one. They released the tiktok trailer to buns in the oven which wasn't really a trailer. It was just the result of boredom and money. It's the ultimate misunderstanding of what makes a good tiktok very allah jason derulo which assumes that if you put money the way that you would spend money out of normal video into a tiktok it makes it better somehow when it really just makes people say. How much money did you spend on this tiktok when she even funnier of reaction you know even though what. They're announcing his very sweet like they're having twins very sweet. It's a misunderstanding of the medium. This wouldn't feel strange if it were uploaded to youtube. You make video right. Act your age. You know it's like what is quickly. I don't wanna look at this and portrait. I wanna see this landscape honestly win. Tectonics get too expensive looking their quickies. That's that's a rule. That's yeah speaking of jason derulo did you. Did you see the instagram. He posted of him holding baby. Jason derulo he's smiling his perfect. Jason derulo smile. And he's like. I'm loved dressing up jason junior like me and i was like. Oh no he's going to have a whole series of tiktok where like the baby just dresses like him. It's going to be a baby wearing ripped jeans when it's like three days old like the baby will be wearing like the ripped jeans. That's all i can think of is a baby and ripped jeans. You know addict cut from the monday. Podcast my friend. Who lied about her first. Were all the time full. Eli jason derulo. Babies first word is absolutely going to be jason derulo and that's not going to be life now not at all. This baby is either going to say jason derulo as its first words. And it's gonna be on tiktok. Jason derulo senior is going to master the art of deepfakes and make this baby drool-o on tiktok in the next six months. Master the art of deepfakes as it's difficult now to do that. You could definitely easily make a baby. Jason derulo it used to cost lose talking like forty million dollars to make the baby do anything. Meanwhile you literally can make a baby. Jason derulo if you want in like five seconds with like twenty five different options gen z. Doesn't know how impressed we were with babe. Technology bape technology was shocking. Those animals were speak gang right like their little mouse. With who a duck. I know in look who's talking. The baby didn't move its mouth. I know i didn't want to say anything i was like. Don't talking specifically not moving. It's you get what i'm saying like maybe the baby. Maybe i'm talking about like the baby from that commercial. That like what's the baby from the commercial mouth moves those famous progressive e each rate. I'm sorry e. Trade trade baby god e trade. Baby thank you not progressive enough baby. Well just funny. 'cause i can see people hanging up now are calling back and saying oh you got it. Okay sorry ignore my last call by quite grunge. If you had not corrected yourself about look who's talking. Babies not moving their mouth when they talk. Do you know what our hotline would have looked like the opening of look who's talking millions of sperm. Like that is what it have. Looked like bruce willis as a spur racing to call me to tell me god. That movie fucking roles. You're listening to who's there a weekly call in show where we take your questions comments and concerns and recap the opening credits of look. Who's talking movies. But only the first one because the other ones are bad. Okay to is fine. I don't like to three okay. Well and that's that on that. don't do. Don't deepfake that opinion into my baby mouth. Okay here's future bobby. I did a deepfake. God i fucking hate lose talking to hi lindsay bobby and because few calls about this from and i'm upset that i know the difference but i'm james author was the x factor winner who dated to o'hara he's also noted fehb bad person And it was james newman. Who anted your vision for us with the terrible song and deservedly came last that different people. They do look very similar and they released exactly the same sounding music and have worked with lots of the same people on a look the same like it's very light mid two thousand ten twenty fourteen to twenty sixteen Lots of white straight british popstars loved like this During that time so Yeah no. Chris isn't just a comment Love you guys goodful phone criticism. What a relief. I was gonna make a medley of all the calls. Because when i tell you there were many there were many but i loved this one and i love this issue because i'm mixed up to people every british person was like okay. You mix them up but we understand they do look alike they sound like they are maybe the same guy but like they're not the same guy it's fine and then i felt better. You know because. I genuinely made a mistake. We started with james arthur. We v. toward into eurovision and james new men and then we went back to james there when we played the clip of him rapping. Free styling about rita ora calling her like a penis or something else rhyming penis with something. Yeah pl some. It was the worst like rhyming. Happiness penis was better than this guy. Did i already forgot his. Wrap his freestyle. But you know it is our job to be the point of clarity when it comes to confusing british james's but as you pointed out here in the dock there are so many who we british james's lay made a brief list of them. The one that least came up in the daily mail. And i did like a cursory search for like james's that were british that were talked about. So we have. James arthur aka. Rita's ex husband your winner. Yes yes and will read izak. So it's like unreal x factor boyfriend. James newman the eurovision guy. James arjun who's gemma collins is x. Up a lot and we talk about him a lot. Yeah god he comes with a lot in the daily mail. He is so annoying. This guy named james norton who's an actor who's dating imaging boots important. Okay james price from love island dot end. James lock from tally the only way as essex. Yeah should've but yes we have. James newman james argentines norton james price and james lock will. You didn't need me. I will be up front with you. I would have done terribly. Yeah the only one. I would have known as james sergeant other james's i came up a lot lily james lee james camelot and james corden. Who i decided didn't count in this list of names. Yeah but you know who my favorite who we. James is last name james. We don't even know his last name. We just know this and you know what what was that. Okay james who is her producer. Whatever producers this day. We don't know who james's and i know a significant amount of producers on the wendy williams show he might british we. Don't we just know that he goes by james james james. He's the person. Wendy williams calls whenever the wrong zombie face in her monitor. Oh god zombie face the scariest thing ever happened on that show. James james high immigration lawyer calling in with potential answer to the Lottie loss Tagging joe biden back in the country issue if he came to the us on a tourist visa and her naughty news or scandalous or whatever she took where part of a job that could be why she's not being allowed it. She might have violated the terms of her visa by working in the us and she was just here and supposed to be a tourist. I eat not being employed or doing work the us so it could be that. She violated the terms of her tourist visa. And that's why she's not allowed back in not necessarily for the content of the photos overtaken although that is more exciting obviously so she really should be hacking probably jess and Uscis an ice..

james norton Jason derulo jason derulo james corden James arjun James arthur James james James james youtube james lock james newman forty million dollars james arthur lindsay bobby jason james price rita ora first word Wendy williams
NASA: Growing Plants in Space

Innovation Now

01:17 min | 2 months ago

NASA: Growing Plants in Space

"Before astronauts took the first historic bite of lettuce in space every piece of equipment needed to grow that lettuce was tested in a lab at nasa innovation. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped the space crop. Production lab at nasr's kennedy. Space center is a web of research labs equipped with plant growth chambers of all sizes designed to simulate conditions on the international space station in these labs teams of researchers apply chemistry biology microbiology and engineering to find the best ways to make plants grow in space the passive poorest plant nutrient system is one of the latest food production technologies developed in the nasa lab. This system uses a ceramic poorest tube and water nutrient bags connected in a loop to feed plants nutrients are pumped in through a combination of capillary force and the same evapotranspiration process that moves water in plants on earth with no moving parts and requiring no electricity. The apparatus is simple to assemble and fully autonomous minimizing. The amount of time astronaut farmers would need to spend tending their

Space Center Nasa International Space Station Kennedy
SpaceX Returns 4 Astronauts to Earth

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

SpaceX Returns 4 Astronauts to Earth

"I'm Julie Walker SpaceX delivers for astronauts back to earth from the international space station Sunday and it's a historic splashed down in more ways than one the dragon capsule parachuted into the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida just before three AM welcome back to planet earth and things were fine SpaceX for those of you enrolled in our frequent flyer program you have earned sixty eight million miles on this voyage it is back on planet earth okay I will take those miles are they transferable what a way to come home the astronauts flew back in the same SpaceX capsule named resilience in which they launched it was the first U. S. crew splashed down in darkness since the Apollo eight moon shot in nineteen sixty eight the astronauts three American one Japanese spent a hundred and sixty seven days in space the previous record was eighty four set by NASA spinal Skylab space station astronauts I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Gulf Of Mexico Florida Nasa
"international space station" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"From <Speech_Male> it <SpeakerChange> y. Dot <Speech_Male> com <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and that's <Speech_Music_Male> showed the now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> space-time <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is available every <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> monday wednesday <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and friday through apple. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Podcasts <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> stitcher <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> google podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Okay casts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spotify <Speech_Music_Male> cast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> amazon music <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bites dot <Speech_Male> com soundcloud <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> youtube. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Your favorite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> podcast download provider <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> space time with stewart <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> gary dot com <Speech_Male> space <Speech_Male> times also <Speech_Male> broadcast through the national <Speech_Male> science foundation <Speech_Male> on science owned <Speech_Male> radio and <Speech_Male> on both iheart radio <Speech_Male> and tune <Speech_Male> in radio. <Speech_Male> And you can help support <Speech_Male> a show by <Speech_Male> visiting the space time <Speech_Male> store for a range <Speech_Male> of promotional merchandising <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> goodies <Speech_Male> or by <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> becoming a space time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> patron which <Speech_Male> gives you access to triple <Speech_Male> episode commercial <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> free versions of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this show as well as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> lots of burners audio <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> content. Which doesn't <Speech_Male> go away. Access <Speech_Male> to exclusive <Speech_Male> facebook group <Speech_Male> and other awards. <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> go to space time <Speech_Male> with stewart. Gary dot <Speech_Male> com for full details. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And if you want more space <Speech_Male> time please check <Speech_Male> out our blog where you'll <Speech_Male> find all the stuff <Speech_Male> we couldn't fit in the show <Speech_Male> as well as heaps <Speech_Male> of images new <Speech_Male> stories loads <Speech_Male> videos <Speech_Male> and things on the web. <Speech_Male> I find interesting or <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> amusing. Just <Speech_Male> go to space time <Speech_Male> with stewart. Gary dot <Speech_Music_Male> com la dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all one word. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And that's tumbler. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Without the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can. Also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> follow us. Through at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stewart. Gary on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> time with stewart <Speech_Music_Male> gary on <Speech_Music_Male> through space <Speech_Music_Male> time youtube <Speech_Music_Male> channel on <Speech_Male> facebook just <Speech_Male> go to facebook dot <Speech_Male> com forward slash. <Speech_Male> Space time with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> stewart. Gary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and space time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is brought you in collaboration <Speech_Male> with australian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sky telescope <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> magazine <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your window on the universe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you being listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to space time with <Speech_Music_Male> stewart gary <Speech_Music_Male> this has been <Speech_Music_Male> another quality podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> Production <Speech_Music_Male> from bites dot com.

"international space station" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

10:29 min | 3 months ago

"international space station" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Supplements more than three point. One million people of now being killed by the nineteen virus and another one hundred and fifty million of been infected since the deadly disease first emerged in wuhan china and was spread around the world. Scientists have ruled out. The long accepted idea that a sudden outbreak of asthma cases some of them fatal across melbourne back on november twenty first two thousand sixteen was triggered by water and thunderstorms the hypothesis. Was that the war in the broke up able and pollen which is commonly suggested as the mechanism underlying thunderstorm asthma. Instead the new model suggests that lightning may have played a role the authors looked at mechanisms including mechanical friction from wind gusts electrical build up and discharging during conditions of low relative humidity and lightning strikes. Their results reported in the journal. Plus one suggest that these mechanisms likely all operated together in tandem with one another but the lightning strike mic was the only one generate a pat those sub pollen particles following the path of the storm and also more accurately describes how the patent of emergency calls for ambulances evolved after the storm. Scientists have found a new way to help the when the volcano is about to erupt character. Tale signs of volcanic eruption include increased seismic activity changes in gas emissions and southern ground defamation but accurately predicting eruptions isn't the tories hard as not volcanoes babe exactly the same and also because very few of the world's fifteen hundred or so all canes have monitoring systems in place it means at best volcanologists have just a few days warning now a report in the journal. Nature geoscience claims. Satellite observation may lead to earlier predictions of organic eruptions months in advance researches with nasa jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena california and the university of alaska in fairbanks of us more than sixteen years of data from the moderate resolution. Imaging spectrometers aboard necessary tehran. Akwa satellites did detect subtle but significant increases in hate emissions over large areas of a volcano. In the years building up to an eruption scientists believe the hit increases may be caused by interaction between magma reservoirs and hydrothermal systems. Deep underground twitter is often referred to as the toilet door of social media. Which is why. It's not surprising that a new study has found that if you really want to go viral on twitter you need to be negative. The findings reported in the journal of the royal society opens. Science looked at tweets from the student referendum in catalonia in two thousand seventeen it found that negatively in tweets increase the chances that tweet would go viral. In fact each new negative word increase the average number of tweets by three point four six percent digital positive word decreased by around seven point one four percent. The analysis also found that tweets from verified accounts. Were retweeted some twenty three point. Five one percent lists and those from non verified accounts. The dutch newspapers divorce kant is reporting. Chinese tech giant. Huawei is able to eavesdrop on all conversations taking place in one of the netherlands largest mobile networks. The paper claims. Wow way has a hidden back door into the network of major dutch telecommunications company giving it access to all customer data. The report claims the dutch intelligence agency. Avid is now looking into the extent that the chinese government is able to use this back door to spy on the government of the netherlands and moments of phone calls and communications of it would not comment on the report but said that it was undesirable for the netherlands to depend on the hardware all software from companies from countries running active cyber programs against that interests and that included china and russia. Australia's competition and consumer commission is one federal court ruling that google misled users on how to turn off their location data tracking history. The courts found that because of requirements forcing people to check no and do not collect data in two separate settings google able to continue collecting location history and web application activity on some android and pixel cell phones with the details with by alex. Harv roy from it. Wide dot com google facebook and other internet companies have long lived by the rule that it is better to ask for forgiveness than it is to us mission and that's why companies will automatically into something and white feed up out because they know the vast majority of people want up down and in twenty seventeen and twenty attain between the march twenty. Seventeen the thirtieth. I'm coming up. the remember. Twenty eighteen people had two locations where it was asking. Australians who the mission to track the location. And i didn't make it clear that the the first one was a specific location history. The second one was an activity and through an app activity who were still able to get a whole bunch of information about its users can t cracking them. Even though you would logically assume that. If you look i stray off that you'll location with longer be trek now. We know that. Google businesses all about proving up as much of the world information as possible that making it easily organizable in searchable habitat also cracking people across the internet as other companies. Do as well. They're not the only ones that can build up a profile on you who you are you know. He you like politically the sort of things you like to eat that place you like to go. And that can do quite a profile about you and Clearly this disturbs people who wanted to switch relocation services off and in fact as people are listening to this broadcast iowa's fourteen point five will now be available and it exclusively allows people to tell apps not to track them and we've seen nutrition privacy labels like nutrition labels in the back of packages food where apple is forcing developers to state in detail. What they are doing when you adopt and then at that caused people google to white month for petty various of their absence. People like facebook. Put full-page reticence in the major us newspapers to decry this upcoming transient and could be bad for consumers but then recently settled down this. This could make us stronger. What doesn't kill us makes us stronger. There's sort of point data giant trying to eat from the app way so to speak. But the whole thing's about privacy. Now we live in a world where you'll privacy doesn't exist anymore and ronald reagan once said that you know we shouldn't be generation that tells children was once like to live in a world that was free and talking about the us but equally we should not be the generation that tells us children and grandchildren but it was once like to live in a world where people didn't know what you every second of the day and i think there's going to be an you know there's going to be this huge revolution to wolves privacy and respecting it by companies to truly make sure that what's private private and isn't being on sold to the highest bidder on the internet. The famous saying says you know if the part that you'll using the internet is free. Then you were the product because they're collecting information better about you and the iowa. Software update wasn't all that new from apple lots of new products released so launched a brand new. I'm mak twenty. Four inch model was very small. Basil's the i'm mackin selfish. Eleven point five millimetres phenyle depending on how you look at it. You new one processor inside. There was talking about being extradited him to but not yet. That's the chip inside. That replaces the processor. It comes in multiple colors. Looks very cool and even has a key buddhist touch. Id and go to the apple. Come website you'll see. Putting even commission about the second product was an ipad pro the twenty twenty one models which also have the m one processor and so what really differentiates. And i've had now. Is that the ipad touch screen. You can use a stylus and you can buy keyboards and mice. But i've had yet run mac. Apps will mac apps come to the ipad. I think we have to wait for the worldwide coca conference in the middle of this year. Find out but apple also launched tags which is a competitor tile and apple is able to use the billion high funds and ipads and macs out there to securely anonymously track devices without apple knowing where anybody else into that information and then you can attach one of these to your wallet various things and you can track them and even if the device is lifted on the other side of town because there's normally a lot of people with iphones imacs can pick up those signals and tell you with precision where it is apple also launched a new podcasting That also allows you to subscribe and pay. Consecrate is directly in an attempt to curb people spotify. Apple's ipad pro. They also launched in the twelve point. Nine introversion the liquid retina xy or extended dynamic range display. This has the same color calibration as the pros plays that were like five thousand dollars thousand dollars for that and and even thousand those extra quick those reference monitors although i sound expensive with five thousand compete anyone from anywhere in the thirty thousand dollar range so actually quite cheap but of course you know a giant. The screen is coming in these tagged with you on the field now. The ipad pro twelve point nine. Each has the same color calibration. So you've gotta production ready to via video anyone that has to work with ultra-precise colors and they even have two terabyte model now. Available always the highest price. The one in two zero ghana's will come re sixteen ram the ones below that come with achey and the school on the side is now a comfortable court. Looks signs the usb but this just opens up a whole range professional application suffice transfer more. There was also new apple tv. This is using the i twelve processor from a couple of years ago. But it's a step up from the. I think the i ten used the path and apple can even get you to put your iphone to your tv screen and it will use the light sensor on your offense properly. Calibrate the output of the tv. When you're looking at it through your apple tv that have a new. Tv remote that he's back to silver and at the top of the remote. There's a little of click wheel that click we'll come high pods but you can swell your arm around the circular patch wheel and you can scrub backwards and forwards through video in a way. That's much more. Yeah then then. Just holding down the button on the previous and is also a new purple iphone. Twelve exciting day today. That's alex sahara roy's.

Huawei ipad pro ipad catalonia ronald reagan Four inch Twenty eighteen people iphones iphone november twenty Google march twenty Eleven point Apple ipad pro. Each thirty thousand dollar Twelve mac pasadena california
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle. That would take off for many months in years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets Venus and Mars now our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific Looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the Cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the CTB's the stowage bags the computer systems. The communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank you.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Intelligence Systems US CTB Michigan Houston ISS Gary Australia KUPUNA Mister bigalow
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"This is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle that would take off for many months or even years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets. Venus and Mars now. Our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the. Ctb's the stowage bags the computer systems communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Houston US Intelligence Systems Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Michigan Chikuba ISS Marshall Center Alabama Japan Gary Ctb Australia
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

elia us europe jackson space exploration peggy whitson tina japan billiondollar eight league
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know going to mars or you know our farflung aspirations of spreading throughout the the solar system and the galaxy and everything when you compare it to that it's you know doing hang quotes easy but it's still a monumental undertaking yet and that's why so we're doing that just like you said we are the in the future where we want to go far right so we wanna go to mars we wanna really just expand our presence in the solar system so the international space station is a great way to practice that it's a good like you have a good understanding of what it takes to live in space to operate in space you could do a ton of science and learn how things interact and then he learned how things interact he can design better systems to make them work better i think one of the once acc ethic capillary action i think was a it was a great one like the way that fluids move in phnom in spaces kinda cool because they sort of like create a ball and there's there's no down so if you're trying to design lega system that uh it like a rocket system in order to propel fuel you need to the fuel isn't gonna go down ranking kinda needs to have that sort of capillary action and a path to get there like little little those little tiny things are things that make the huge difference and then able to kind of explosives would all comes to down to gravity that's kind of the the old differentiator between why everything we do in outer space is different from the way we do it on earth total the most of you touch on his.

solar system acc