35 Burst results for "International Space"

Bill Gates looks back at ‘The Road Ahead’ after 25 years and some hit-and-miss tech predictions

Techmeme Ride Home

02:38 min | 3 hrs ago

Bill Gates looks back at ‘The Road Ahead’ after 25 years and some hit-and-miss tech predictions

"Is sometimes cop to the criticism that on this show. We tend to focus on the horse race between the big tech companies. Who's up who's down. Who like roadblocks might be a godzilla of the future and who like maybe intel seems to be sliding towards being an irrelevant dinosaur of the past. The way i like to think about it is that we're covering the evolution and creative destruction of capitalism in real time keeping score of who's the richest person in the world is probably less relevant to that task but only obliquely so for what it's worth. It's worth noting that elon. Musk has overtaken bill gates to become the world's second richest person behind. jeff bezos. Quoting the verge. The tesla ceo net worth now sits at around one hundred twenty eight billion dollars after increasing by one hundred billion dollars this year alone. There is a sizable gap between. Musk and the number one spot which is currently held by amazon ceo. Jeff bezos who has reported net worth of around one hundred and eighty two billion dollars in january. Musk ranked thirty fifth on the list. Bloomberg reports musk's rapid ascent up. The list has mainly been driven by tesla share price. The car company currently has a market cap of almost five hundred billion dollars after starting the year at under one hundred billion dollars. The guardian reports that tesla has the highest market cap of any car company in the world despite producing a fraction of the cars of more established automakers. This year it expects lose. Five hundred thousand cars compared to around ten million for a company like toyota around three quarters of musk's net worth consists of tesla shares according to bloomberg but musk's other major venture space x has also seen recent success last week the company transported for astronauts to the international space station aboard. It's crew dragon spacecraft that follows the company's first crewed flight to space in may of this year bill gates sat atop the billionaires index for years until he was overtaken by jeff bezos in two thousand seventeen bloomberg notes. That gates would probably have a higher net wealth right now if he hadn't given so much money to charity including the over twenty seven billion dollars. He's donated through the bill and melinda gates foundation since two thousand six gates. Moscow have had some high profile disagreements this year in september. Musk said gateshead quote no clue about the viability of electric trucks after the microsoft co-founder said that electric semi trucks along with electric cargo ships and passenger jets will probably never be practical earlier. This year gates told cnbc that musk should avoid making big predictions about areas. He's not familiar. After the tesla's ceo downplayed the risk of the covid nineteen pandemic. Musk overtook facebook. Ceo mark zuckerberg last week when he became the third richest person on. The billionaires index zuckerberg has since fallen to fifth in the rankings. After he was overtaken by french businessman bernard arnault and quote

Tesla Jeff Bezos Musk Bill Gates Elon Intel Bloomberg Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat The Guardian Amazon Toyota
NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

Innovation Now

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

"Masses commercial crew program is a unique collaboration enabling nasa to work side by side with american aerospace companies the commercial companies chosen to carry crews to and from the international space station own and operate their own hardware and infrastructure nasa engineers and aerospace specialists will work closely with the companies to ensure the successful launch of spacecraft from american soil commercial crew astronauts will train like other nasa astronauts astronauts will prepare to live and work in space for up to six months at a time that these astronauts will also work closely with boeing and spacex to understand the new spacecraft launch systems and space suits they will be using the successful launch of crew won the first nasa certified commercial flight marked the move of this revolutionary collaboration from development into regular flights

Nasa International Space Station Spacex Boeing
What is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier all about?

The How in the World Podcast

05:32 min | 4 d ago

What is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier all about?

"You're listening to the how in the world podcast we unravel some of the planet's most perplexing questions about ten minutes. Nope we're not scientists or scholars. We're just normal. People like to figure things out. Sometimes inspiring sometimes informative. Our topics are always fascinating hosted by me mark johnson and my lovely wife me holly johnson. We do the research. So you don't have to veterans day. Twenty twenty was last week and we were watching the ceremony on tv where. The president laid a wreath at the tomb of the unknown soldier. And i had so many so boom. That's how ideas for episodes are born in fact we've had a bunch of ideas recently. I'm not sure what that means. Maybe we've been watching too much. Tv or something. Well have been a lot of events and things going on and questions. Raise like veterans day and christmas. Coming in the spacex mission to the international space station and like our seventh grader pete. Yeah he's just a few good questions lately. And i've got all them in my notes so we'll get to them but before we get to today's episode. I have to mention my favorite veteran dad. Although he passed away ten years ago. I think of every day. He was my hero the very best dad ever in the world. No offence sweetie men take. He was a great guy he was. He had a really interesting time. While in the army. Interesting about the only word. I could come up with their first as a model for army promotional posters literally a poster boy then as a member of general macarthur's honor guard where he hung out with the general and his wife watching movies every friday night. That was a very cush job. But then crap got real when he became a forward observer in the korean war. That's the guy who's part of a team of three who go ahead of the rest of the group in radio back until then where the enemy lines are and stuff. It's a very dangerous job. Maybe the most dangerous in the military at that time yes indeed but he came home then and he met my mom and they had me. Yea so thanks for indulging me a moment to recognize him. Okay let's get to it. I the basics. The tomb of the unknown soldier is in arlington national cemetery and strangely enough. I've never been there. I know the air and space museum. So well i could give tours. But we never went to arlington national. I'm i'm ashamed really. You're mad my school for never taking us there. I don't know but we we've got to do this on our own. We definitely will. The tomb actually contains and unknown soldier from world war. One who was buried ride underneath a memorial which is made of marble like everything in dc tomorrow and the city. It has six wreaths carved into the sides three on the opposite two sides that represent the six major campaigns of world war one on the third side. There are three. Greek figures carved these figures represent peace victory in valor and on the fourth side contains the inscription here rests in honored glory in american soldier known but to god. That's just beautiful. The memorial also referred to as tomb of the unknowns actually has no official name president. Warren g harding officiated the ceremony. That laid this first soldier to rest on veterans day november eleventh nineteen twenty one the tomb of the unknowns generally refers to four tombs world war one world war two korea and vietnam. Three other soldiers were interred in tombs. Right beside the memorial. Those unknown soldiers represent world war two korea and vietnam although the soldier representing the vietnam war was removed once. Dna analysis identified him and he was returned to his family in nineteen ninety eight. He'd only been there like four years or something. The vietnam tomb now intentionally remains empty and is a monument. Honoring all of america's missing servicemen and. Women that's awesome. Yeah one of the questions. I've always had about the tomb of the unknowns. Is how they got the soldier so there's not just one unknown soldier in a war right. I mean. aren't there many. They're just one. And how did they choose this one who would be buried there and where are the rest so tell us about that. Honey yes. That's a great question that i've had to which means probably a lot of you have wondered about it as well for the first memorial. The the world war one memorial they uninsured four soldiers that had been buried in france. They put each in an identical casket and then a decorated wounded. Combat soldier made the choice from these four identical caskets at a city hall in france. He chose the third from the left. And signified is choice by laying white roses on top of that casket. That's the soldier who is in the tomb in dc. The other three were reinterred in france. That's the process that's been used to select the unknown for each tomb and yes there are plenty of unknowns. Buried all over the world.

Holly Johnson Spacex Mission Mark Johnson Army Warren G Harding Macarthur Arlington National Cemetery Vietnam Korea Arlington DC France America City Hall
Astronaut Noguchi says SpaceX ship offers 'best' flight to ISS

Hugh Hewitt

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Astronaut Noguchi says SpaceX ship offers 'best' flight to ISS

"Experienced astronaut on space sex is newly launched, Cruise says riding the Dragon capsule into orbit beats NASA's old shuttles and Russia's spacecraft, Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi says the dragon is a lot of fun to ride Spice Ex delivered its second crew of astronauts to the international space Station late Monday night. The four astronauts held a press conference Thursday and described the launch and their first impressions of the space station. Our new home until next spring. American Victor Glover says. Looking out the window at Earth for the very first time was an amazing once in a lifetime feeling. Jason Walker reporting the

Soichi Noguchi Nasa Cruise International Space Station Russia American Victor Glover Jason Walker
The International Space Station has a 'Robot Hotel'

Innovation Now

00:59 min | 4 d ago

The International Space Station has a 'Robot Hotel'

"The international space station is the size of a football field. The available living space is much smaller than that. You wouldn't want to store your garden tools in the living room and the astronauts are no different. They needed a storage shed on the exterior of the station. So astronauts on a recent spacewalk installed the robotic tool stowage a protective storage unit for robotic tools attached to a mobile platform that provides power to the external robots the unit allows robots access to the tools they use as it moves around the station referred to as the robot hotel. The storage unit is a permanent attachment that includes electrical connections for heaters to keep the stored equipment from getting too cold. Similar technology could be applied to human habitats including gateway to give artemis astronauts or their robotic companions some storage space to call their own for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Police

International Space Station Football Gateway Jennifer
SpaceX makes history with first fully operational mission

The Takeaway

00:39 sec | 5 d ago

SpaceX makes history with first fully operational mission

"News this week Ever since Russian Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space in 1961. Government built spaceships and national space programs have been the on leeway. Astronauts have been able to reach the final frontier. But that changed on Sunday when NASA successfully sent four astronauts to the international space Station on the space X Dragon capsule created by Elon Musk. It was the first privately owned spacecraft used by NASA to send a crew to space. This launch was a giant leap for the private space industry and points us toward a future where space travel may no longer be reliant on the government. It's

Russian Yuri Gagarin Nasa International Space Station Elon Musk Government
Astronauts arrive at International Space Station

AM Tampa Bay

00:11 sec | 5 d ago

Astronauts arrive at International Space Station

"Canaveral stages first launching nine years Sunday, sending four astronauts up to the international space Station aboard the space X private transport truck craft, and that's

Canaveral International Space Station
Russian spacewalk prepares station for new module

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:46 sec | 6 d ago

Russian spacewalk prepares station for new module

"Cosmonauts are currently out on a spacewalk of the international space station. They're making preparations for next year's arrival of a long delayed research lab that is awaiting launch from Kazakhstan. The pair pair floated floated from from an an airlock airlock that's that's been been used used for for the the first first time time by by spacewalkers. spacewalkers. Just Just a a few few moments moments ago, ago, The The two two men men were were working working This This on on some some wiring. wiring. Here Here is is the the communication communication on on NASA NASA TV TV between between the the cosmonauts cosmonauts and and a a base base here here on on Earth Earth on on the the translation translation handrail handrail and and previously previously not not very very convenient. convenient. Wait. Hold on. You got your head Caught up there. Stand by. Hold on. Okay, now you fit through. Okay. The old Russian compartment used for space wash will be removed and jumped to make room for a new lab

International Space Station Kazakhstan Nasa
SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

WSJ What's News

00:28 sec | Last week

SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

"Standing by for contact spacex soft capture confirmed that's the sound of space is crew dragon capsule resilience docking with the international space station. After a twenty seven hour journey that began sunday night. The four astronauts are expected to stay until the spring is part of a nasa mission. It's the beginning of regularly scheduled commercial flights to the

International Space Station Nasa
SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

Ben Shapiro

00:20 sec | Last week

SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

"X docking sequence is complete. Welcome to the ISS Resilience Absolute blasted off Sunday night from Florida. The crew of three American astronauts and one from Japan will spend six months aboard the international space station. President Trump calls it a medical marvel word that a second Corona virus vaccine candidate has passed

Florida International Space Station Japan Donald Trump
SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

Todd Schnitt

00:18 sec | Last week

SpaceX crew capsule chases down and docks with space station

"It arrives at the International Space Station tonight at 11 o'clock, NASA's Kathy leader says the crew could take over just in case I'll be checking out the systems as they get near station and they check the all the different sensors sweets and make sure that things are functioning. Disney execs says the renovation of the classic Splash Mountain Ride is

Kathy Leader International Space Station Nasa Disney
Baby Yoda Is Heading To The International Space Station And He's Got A Really Important Job To Do

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:27 sec | Last week

Baby Yoda Is Heading To The International Space Station And He's Got A Really Important Job To Do

"Aboard the space X dragon have now revealed to us the zero G indicator. And it looked like a little baby Oda. Yeah, Yep. Before astronauts have blasted off last night to the international space station brought a baby Yoda doll on board with them from the Disney plus series, The man DeLorean. It's the gravity indicator. So that means when baby Yoda floats in the air, the Esteban Astronauts know they have reached zero gravity. And have a

Disney
SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule chases down Space Station

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | Last week

SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule chases down Space Station

"Of astronauts is making its way to the international space Station in Space Exes Crew Dragon capsule with a scheduled docking later this evening. Remember Station W AM Athene Orlando, Brendan Byrne has more Three NASA astronauts and one Japanese astronaut or making the some 27 hour journey to the station. After launching from Florida's Kennedy Space Center Sunday night, shortly after liftoff, Space X noticed an alarm on the capsule triggered by a heat system that warms the spacecraft propellants. Team was able to troubleshoot the issue from the ground, clearing the way for tonight's docking attempt. The mission is the first operational flight of space exes Crew dragon for NASA's commercial crew program. The crew will spend six months on board the station before returning to Earth in the capsule. It's washing down off the coast of Florida for NPR

Space Exes Athene Orlando Brendan Byrne International Space Station Nasa Kennedy Space Center Florida NPR
SpaceX launches 4 astronauts to space station in new era for NASA

Daily Tech News Show

01:56 min | Last week

SpaceX launches 4 astronauts to space station in new era for NASA

"One launch second crew of astronauts to orbit. That was sunday evening. Inside the company is crewed dragon spacecraft the first operational mission of the crew dragon which successfully launched at seven twenty seven pm eastern time on top of the space x falcon nine rocket from nasa's kennedy space center in florida nasa astronaut. Mike hopkins victor glover and shannon walker. Were joined by. Soichi noguchi from the japanese aerospace exploration agency jackson after over twenty four hours in orbit which they still are the time of recording. The crucial docket the iss on monday at around eleven pm eastern time. Yeah this was exciting. People were were taking breaks from their crown. Binging to watch to watch a crew get launched Not on non not as a test full crew Getting launched up to the international space station. And this is the return of the united states to being able to deliver its own crew to the iss. The test of course was the first time they did it. But this is this crew was like oh. It's like driving a used car. We aren't the first ones in here. I don't know. I mean it's it's you know there's four of them. I mean i watched it. I i was. I was countdown in an hour plus beforehand. Because i like watching the nasa stream on new two on youtube. I like the commentators. Although there are lots of ways that you can stream it but it all seemed so seemless and listen. I know that this stuff is very white. Knuckled nail biting for anybody who who works in the arena And some folks that. I follow on twitter. Were extremely worried about it because of course you know. It's a big deal but boy was that it was it was a it was a magical liftoff. Everybody everybody clapping. Yeah love it. Good stuff and the kind of inspirational stuff. That's especially needed this

Mike Hopkins Victor Glover Nasa Shannon Walker Soichi Noguchi Kennedy Space Center Jackson Florida United States Youtube Twitter
SpaceX launches 4 astronauts to space station in new era for NASA

KYW 24 Hour News

01:10 min | Last week

SpaceX launches 4 astronauts to space station in new era for NASA

"It's 1 49. When the weather cleared last night in Cape Canaveral, it was launched time They're in Florida. One is now on their way to the international space station before astronauts traveling through space on board. A space X rocket. CBS is Peter King. It is quite a crew of experience Commander Mike Hopkins, the Air Force colonel, flight engineers, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi from Japan. They're both PhDs and the three of them have a combined almost 450 days on the international Space station in previous flights. Navy Commander Victor Glover is the Dragon Pilot, a space rookie, but he's flown more than 3000 hours and 40 different aircraft capsule expected to dock with the international space Station at 11 tonight. Means the crew will spend 27 hours in orbit as their craft slowly maneuvers toward its destination. Their trip would've been shorter. If the crew crew dragon dragon were were able able to to launch launch on on Saturday Saturday is is NASA NASA first first plan plan because because the the station station would would have have lined lined up up in in such such a a way way to to allow allow the the spacecraft spacecraft to to reach reach that? that? The The SS SS in about eight hours, But Hurricane ADA and the bad weather it brought Horse launch officials to delay

Mike Hopkins Shannon Walker Soichi Noguchi Victor Glover Cape Canaveral Peter King CBS International Space Station Air Force Florida Japan Navy Nasa Hurricane Ada
SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule chases down space station

Fred + Angi On Demand

00:33 sec | Last week

SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule chases down space station

"Spacex launched again yesterday for astronauts are now on their way to the international space station. The space x crewed dragon capsule launched from the kennedy space center in cape canaveral. So cool on. Top of the falcon nine rocket last night. It is cool space rocks. Yeah and they're let a little cockpit there with all the screens. I'm like dude as brazil. Their space suits in the rocket. Homeboys yeah on tesla be launching the space. No wonder if they're gonna follow pilot. Wake up when we're there

Spacex International Space Station Kennedy Space Center Cape Canaveral Brazil Tesla
Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

The 3:59

05:03 min | Last week

Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

"With me. Is johnson skillings. One of our copy cheese and the of our latest package on satellites titled signals from earth. Welcome john hey roger so we sometimes take for granted. Space has well allow space. But there's actually a huge amount of trash orbiting earth and that's the subject of the first story in a series way exactly is floating up there a lot and stuff. I mean we think about space is being infinite and it is but then there's our neighborhood right around earth And there are several layers orbit and everything not everything from the beginning the space age but a lot of stuff from the sixties and seventies eighties is still up there and we're talking about rockets satellites and big things like the international space station and then little tiny pieces that have broken off from all those things and so how big of a problem is this. The the sheer amount of stuff. That's up there. Yeah it's it's really big because it's all just spinning around eight skates controlled release trapped by different space agencies by not we do dubai right now and things are going to bump into each other and that could be bad yet. Tell me a little bit about that. Why why is it bad thing as it. Just the potential damage. I mean how big of a problem is it for these existing satellites. Give me a sense of actually. How many lives are up there right now. Year right now. There are a roughly twenty eight hundred live satellites and perhaps three times that many defunct satellites still floating around and not a lot of human traffic there right now going in and out of the space station and for the people for too long there might be some space tourists going out there. So you know. There are people who get into trouble but also a lot of machinery and they're more more salads coming up all the time if there's a sense of how may more we expect. 'cause feels like we're say launching new satellites will explore on your services running off these satellites. What what exactly is sort of the the expected volume of satellites over the coming years. It's a lot. It's hard to put a number to it. You have more and more countries all the time starting own space agencies or saying rockets up then you have commercial space traffic which is not done by the likes of nasa the european space agency. You have private. Companies like yuan musk's space x Jeff bezos and amazon. And all his money going into Rocket projects on its own in space x in particular. They have a new system called starling which is going to provide broadband service to the earth. Eighteen beta right. Now there are about six hundred or so satellites And they're going to be a lot more i mean. Musk has filed paperwork to send up as many as forty thousand of these Satellites are not not be car sized space station size but you know a chunk of metal floating around of their forty thousand is eight a huge number no matter how big or little that satellite is reading this piece and this is by jackson ryan one of our colleagues out of australia. Who is fantastic. These worth reading if the another chance. He talked to nasa researcher. At least cited a nasa researcher who fled the doomsday scenario. Tell me about that right. The researcher is donald kessler in the work. He did start in the late seventies. It's called kessler syndrome named after him in the basic idea. Is that the more satellites or anything else who have floating around in space. The greater the chance of a collision more collisions. You have you're going to get debris more debris brief floating around the maurice floating around and we're chance collisions and you get into this cycle of more and more trash spinning around and just really out of control. So what's being done about this problem. A lot of worrying a lot of thinking about how to handle it but there aren't really a lot a good solution to right now. So some satellites and rockets sly back in earth's orbit they burn up and you know some that can be directed on purpose. Some satellite skid spun into a higher higher orbits andrew out of the way By the are no good systems for dragging satellites space. Picking can't send trash trucks since tweet street. Sweepers around growling. They've been some experiments With things like Basically a big fishing net to grab satellites And even space harpoon to grab him but again you have to be careful because you don't want to fragment you one nice big clean satellite and make it into a bunch of little tiny satellite pieces. That just adds to the problem.

Johnson Skillings John Hey Roger Nasa Jackson Ryan Dubai Jeff Bezos European Space Agency Donald Kessler Musk Amazon Kessler Australia Andrew
New NASA Partnerships to Mature Commercial Space Technologies, Capabilities

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:39 sec | Last week

New NASA Partnerships to Mature Commercial Space Technologies, Capabilities

"Three two one not even gravity contains humanity when we score one for all you just heard. The latest spacex rocket to blast off it taking four astronauts to the international space station. The mission the start of regularly scheduled commercial flights to the iss and at the testament says recent strategy of public private partnerships to accelerate. Human space exploration spacex is the first company nath is approved for routine crew transportation and other operational needs

International Space Station Spacex
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:03 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle. That would take off for many months in years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets Venus and Mars now our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific Looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the Cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the CTB's the stowage bags the computer systems. The communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank you.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Intelligence Systems US CTB Michigan Houston ISS Gary Australia KUPUNA Mister bigalow
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:51 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"This is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle that would take off for many months or even years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets. Venus and Mars now. Our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the. Ctb's the stowage bags the computer systems communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Houston US Intelligence Systems Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Michigan Chikuba ISS Marshall Center Alabama Japan Gary Ctb Australia
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 9 months ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"international space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"international space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"international space" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"international space" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Rule science on the international space station presented by science at nasa nessa researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the international space station in two thousand eighteen new atomic refrigerator will blast off for the space station it's called the cold atom lab or cal and it can refrigerate manner to one ten billion of degree above absolute zero just above the point where all the thermal activity of atoms theoretically stops at this temperature atoms lose their energy and start to move very slowly explains rob thompson cal project scientists at nasr's jet propulsion laboratory or jpl at room temperature adams bounce off each other in all directions at a few hundred meters per second but in cal they'll slow down a million fold and condense into unique states of quantum matter count is a multi user facility that supports many investigators studying abroad range of topics eric cornell physicist at the university of colorado and the national institute of standards and technology will be leading one of the first calix perriman tes cornell and his team will use cal to investigate particle collisions and how particles interact with one another ultracold gases produced by the cold atom lab can contain molecules with three atoms each but which are thousand times bigger than a typical molecule this results in a low density fluffy molecule that quickly falls apart unless it is kept extremely cold how is particle behaviour affected as more particles are introduced what can be learned about quantum.

nasr eric cornell physicist cornell rob thompson university of colorado national institute of standard hundred meters per second
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Sitting down and standing up lame down and standing up standing up and having somebody push you a little bit it's all the things that you know that sounds for that sounds really easy like can i stand up i could be an astronaut well after spending six months in space can be a little jari it could be a little difficult and all that feeds back into the research of okay i'm a mars astronaut i've been in space for you know six to nine months on this trip noun gravity environment you need to design the spacecraft the habitat everything to understand that hey for the first couple of hours this person might have to just sitting there chair and do nothing or no we can resume reasonably expect them to pop up in you know do these simple things they might not be able to get out of there space for a couple of hours all all of these different things have to be figured out before you to shove people into the spacecraft kick them off the planet and incentives somewhere else but we're doing that for doing that right now yet man their job is not done when they hit the nail on a final after six months being away from home you hit the ground and you're like i finally done and then the you stand apps it down new accounts crazy stuff and it doesn't stop there oh that's right and it's it's an and again when i when i say they're truly gracious people they they have to sacrifice a lot for the for this i mean you know obviously they get the great view and they're they're in outer space and that's amazing but i mean just training for these missions is usually about two years so you that's two years of you in intensive training awada traveled to all the other partner countries where they trainee one different things.

partner trainee six months two years nine months
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"See and find those countermeasures that happen last really intense i mean imagine get like landing on mars and you can't see anything had become a buzzkill travel sixty million miles and get out everything's blurry that yeah the the the wouldn't make me happy so i know light when a here's another thank when astronaut so astronaut now they're doing on the international space station pretty regularly they're doing longduration increments right so they're doing six months at a time yes uh so this is longer than any of shuttle missions allowed the mission's before it and it's it's all to practice for for emissions missions beyond a lowearth orbit but when they come back to earth right they generally right now they come back in a soyuz landing khazakstan and then we have recovery teams i go get them at but they have a hard time walking right when i when i get out some do it so that's that's part of again the the human body reacting to the different environments when when nash routes i get into space some will nausea some all have some adverse reactions to being a microgravity the same is true that when you're in microgravity furui long time and he come back down to earth hold the sudden there's this this huge weight pressing down on you though hasn't been there for the last six months or vr vr longeuro there there's year your inner ear goes crazy and like all the fluids pulling down again wherever either used to be no up and down but now the sudden there's definitely a down and so it it can be tough just to just a walk i mean we.

adverse reactions six months
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We can launch air just like we can launch water you can lodge a tank of super pressurized air usually in a liquid form and then feet it into the atmosphere but the main way we get it is from water we use the system called the oxygen generation system that actually takes water splits the atom split the atom but uh splits at the or water molecule into oxygenhydrogen and then we could take that oxygen and pump it into the atmosphere then they are in the pure oxygen atmosphere so there's other stuff in there there's a lot nitrogen share so very sanita earth's atmosphere right yes airbase cleaning act same composition atmosphere that we have on earth and actually the same pressure to so there's there's no big difference there uh that feeds into some of the stuff that do for spacewalks but that's completely different tanja and go on it so we we we split the water molecules so then you have your oxygen which you just feed directly back into the cabin and then you have hydrogen which you can vent overboard if he just bill up a bunch of excess hydrogen or there's of process in a in a payload up there it's it's used as more of a technology demonstration so it's not really in the in the critical path so it's not a critical piece that we have to have run at all times but it's called the sobotta uses this abbadi a process where you can take that hydrogen the ad left over from your water.

tanja
"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It they generate pretty much a comparable amount to keep everything that we want on board and that's that's all life support that's keeping the lights on a that's running all of the experiments on board all of the different hardware just keeping the station you know oriented and the right attitude and flying in in any time amin every everything everything everything race powered by the solar rays and it i mean it's it doesn't generate an overwhelming access of energy by any means because again you are spending a lot of time in darkness so those batteries are getting used pretty much constantly were in the process of swapping the batteries were upgrading yeah vardi upgraded uh one fourth of them go switched out nickelhydrogen for lithium ion that is correct that's right lithium ion if away more efficient right yeah but that i mean that's that's the power story it's it's it's all solar energy through those bigs and they are they are very large in we come back to the football field the american football field and alaji having clarified yet yet uh that the solar arrays or basically each each solar rays the size of an and so on and their eight of those yes that are the size of annan's her thing like a pair of their hero or you're a pair of four so yet for it's tough because like you one pair actually to array blankets and but they're are very large yes yeah okay so that's power right so we already talked about water because you need to recycle water and make sure you have enough and waters rates means have to launch and he recycle its ottmar fish in and it's very very clean so what about air right that's one thing you think about like what a human needs shelter for our water food you didn't really think about air but at something you definitely needs and a again that's something we kinda take for granted a hair is just it's it's air everywhere down here in europe they're the arena you're in a sealed environment you're basically in a big sealed ten can in the need to fill that with their so they.

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"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's incredible is alatas spacecraft do this because you you have the sun i mean the sun is we have solar energy here on earth but in outer space you can have even more direct access this on that's very regrettable readily available energy sources italy sat we know how to harness true we know how to make solar rays and we have gigantic ones on board the safe so every all the power unsafe is generated through solar energy and we talked about they see sixteen sunrises and sunsets a day so about half the time there are in complete darkness so there is no son of so what you have is you have these great big solar rays that header generating power and then there's a bunch of batteries on board and the solar arrays it is charging out those batteries surrey time they slipped behind the earth again in there in nighttime those batteries are to supplying power to everything in but it's one hundred percent solar renewable clean son energy very jal solar energy and their massive frei is if i think it's they actually there so big and then produced so much power that actually they do half dead by kind of get rid of some of that power because that is kind of is a little bit redundant writing is one of them breaks like you still have enough power power we ain't you do have redundancy builtin redundancies one of our favorite words redundancy is a fancy word for backup plan he had at nasa we always via backup plans free backup plan so yet even if you lose we call empower channels you lose one you lose to you can still power the majority of all if you're systems on board and even going beyond that if you lose beano a much larger amount of power you can still power your key systems and everything he might just power down other things temporary while you fix the problem but.

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"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

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"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know going to mars or you know our farflung aspirations of spreading throughout the the solar system and the galaxy and everything when you compare it to that it's you know doing hang quotes easy but it's still a monumental undertaking yet and that's why so we're doing that just like you said we are the in the future where we want to go far right so we wanna go to mars we wanna really just expand our presence in the solar system so the international space station is a great way to practice that it's a good like you have a good understanding of what it takes to live in space to operate in space you could do a ton of science and learn how things interact and then he learned how things interact he can design better systems to make them work better i think one of the once acc ethic capillary action i think was a it was a great one like the way that fluids move in phnom in spaces kinda cool because they sort of like create a ball and there's there's no down so if you're trying to design lega system that uh it like a rocket system in order to propel fuel you need to the fuel isn't gonna go down ranking kinda needs to have that sort of capillary action and a path to get there like little little those little tiny things are things that make the huge difference and then able to kind of explosives would all comes to down to gravity that's kind of the the old differentiator between why everything we do in outer space is different from the way we do it on earth total the most of you touch on his.

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"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"international space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So it's like a way to practice really for it is for things further out because it's not really far up rights linked to 150 miles think about it were still in their earth's protection men like oh yeah oh protected by the irs magnetic field will spaces funny in that going up it it feels like it's so far away space but it's two hundred fifty miles that's not that far i mean i feel like the city of houston is two hundred fifty miles it's not but i mean to 150 miles on a cars a is a short road trip but at two hundred fifty miles straight up at the rocket ride that's that's a slightly different road trip but it is it isn't that far away i mean we still kind of our right on the doorstep there's there's a a really great quote in the the paramount of space movies armageddon were only says you know we're not even our in outer space yet this is just like the beginning and that's kind of where the station is it's it's in space it's in what we call lowearth orbit so so pretty close i mean they could get into so you spacecraft and be back on the ground inside of a couple of hours so i mean you're so right on the doorstep you not really way out there yet but it's getting ready to go way out there well that's the whole so nasa describes it as earth when lyon two right so i i kinda like the way they section at off right earth reliant means exactly what you sent right so something goes wrong you can just happen spacecraft and the home in three hours and it's easy to get stuff there because it's only a i mean some so he's rise of in as little as like six hours ray relatively relative george speight is only rocket science side to trivial i hit it all and even the even after admonish myself it's still not easy to go to space it still i mean liz rocket scientist literal rocket science hugely complex and there's always inherent risk and all these other things but when you start comparing it to.

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