35 Burst results for "International Relations"

"international relations" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"international relations" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You think were you might not. That's an interesting point. It's interesting because the democrats say that. The republicans are a source of this kind of division which you were kind of alluding to in your last four years. But it's also the case that the democrats are the ones who are behind identity politics. Who who is the by most accounts the leading republican In a race to become the nominee and twenty twenty four. She's a person whose family came from south asia. She's a first generation and she was governor. Not have some some sort of urban northeastern state or california. She was governor of south carolina. So you know we need to be pretty cautious about this and look at south. Carolina has a republican black. Senator and georgia has a democratic black center. I'm not trying to say that. There's not discrimination..

south asia california south carolina twenty twenty four first generation republican Carolina democrats republicans georgia northeastern four years Senator last
"international relations" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:00 min | 2 months ago

"international relations" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Where there or florida where there many fewer rules where the taxes are lower so that keeps some pressure on them. What the european union has tried to do is prevent that competitive quality among its members. Stay so win states. Try to reduce the rules so that they can compete more effectively. The european union snow that violates our general rules. And we're gonna keep the same rules in place everywhere. So i think that one question is when bureaucrats say an india make it very the they tend to make it difficult in part because you just have to go through so many levels of bureaucracy it just takes forever and the same is true now with environmental permitting in the united states if you look at the pentagon the pentagon the biggest office building at the time in the world when it was built the whole pentagon was built from the idea to completion in eighteen months eighteen months and and in fact when each section of the pentagon was completed it was occupied. So the building began to be occupied. Well before the eighteen months was up you couldn't even get an environmental permit in eighteen months. Now it would take years to get an environmental permit. And you can see with keystone pipeline. You get the permit and they revoked the permit and all of this imposes a huge costs. Which which is difficult to see on ordinary you can see the cost on the people who will the keystone pipeline. They are unemployed right away when you set up a biden new roofs. What you can't see is the overall cost on the economy So easily those are very real and you see them in india of course all the time. Great right yeah. I think that was an important issues. So as you mentioned. If i have a high regulation california. I have. I could substitute i can move to florida but that is not the case in you right. If i'm a successful undermining it is not really possible for me to pick up and go to france and it is. It is the same in india too. So you'll products and services as of custom designed for for locations that you know you sort of pin down in small geographies that you don't have to substitute that's an interesting point. You really making two points. One is is there a unified market for goods and services and that was one of the reasons. that.

france european union one question eighteen months california two points each section One one of the united states years florida india
How To Steal Back Your Identity

How To! With Charles Duhigg

05:19 min | 2 months ago

How To Steal Back Your Identity

"The greatest betrayal of abbey. Ellen's life began with a newspaper assignment. I was reading a story about detox diets. And i need to quote an expert and someone suggested this guy. Abby is a journalist and the author of duped a book about this fateful interview and the bizarre life altering aftermath and so i quoted him Actually it was in the new york times called a fact check. I said are you still in florida and he said no. I'm in the navy now i rejoined. I'm opening up a hospital for kids with cancer in iraq and afghanistan. And i said that's awesome. I want to write about that. Keep me posted and so he sort of did so. We'd never met in person until all why a later that when he finally was coming to new york city where i was living because he had to give a big talk at the un clearly and so he came to do is talk of the un and we went to dinner six months later abbey and this man who she calls the commander were engaged. They moved in together in dc. Well he worked at the pentagon. Abby went to grad school for international relations. But the more time she spent with the commander the more abby sense to something just wasn't quite right. What i made you suspicious. Me told me he had met his first. The first ex wife who's really his second ex wife but his first when he rescued her when she was held hostage in iran. And i said the age didn't add up. I said when we in iran he said oh it was a secret mission. You wouldn't have heard about it really well. And then i thought okay the someone has to do these jobs like better better. Decoy this nerdy asthmatic. Doctor you know like like why not and then. He told me that he worked at guantanamo as the medical director which he did that was part of the problem is that he kind of mixed fiction and fact together and one of his patients was a very wanted terrorist named osama bin laden. And i said that is impossible. And he said the president doesn't know and then i got like all you know. Carrie mathison a homeland. Like god. who's the jihadist. And who's not and who knows what it was. I was gasoline making myself crazy. Suddenly abby found herself using her reporting skills to investigate her own fiance she talked to professors about whether the commanders impressive stories could even be possible. Never like yeah. That's the possible. The final straw was when we went out to dinner with my parents. And we had brussel sprouts and he raved about the brussels sprouts and when we got out he said that meal was awful and i said why did you lie. And he said. I wanted to make them feel better. And that's when. I said you know what i'm out. There's no need to lie about something like okay. So so he was treating been logging and the president to know about it but it was. The brussels sprouts praised that gave him away in the end. I knew they weren't good but more than that. He admitted that he had lied. He said i wanted to make them feel good. And i thought you lie so beautifully which has flowed out of him. If you could lie about that you could lie about anything when you finally did confront him. How did he react to that. Well i left him. I said i'm out. So i never talk to him again. And i didn't find out until a year and a half later that he in fact had been stealing identities and when he was a drug addict. And i got a call from ncis and they said you know there's a doctor who's been writing prescriptions for vicodin and he's been using a bunch of people's names and identities and you're one of the people. Do you know this guy. Do you ever prescription. And i said well. No 'cause i prefer valium and so of course but anyway so he went to jail to make a statement against him. I just started researching all this stuff about this guy. Heaven the guy you're about to marry steal your identity is obviously different than casey's going through but it actually has a lot more in common with her situation than you might think abbas wrestled with the kind of psychological trauma that really defines any breach of trust. And she understands the obsession. That's now leading. Casey to work twenty hour weekends on her case. So you're in this kind of like luminol space of you may be probably sort of know them. But you don't know and you're not sure if you're ever gonna find out right. Can you kind of describe where you are with all this well. I kind of actually have this idea that i might want to sort of help other victims by maybe writing a book about the experience. I guess what i'm trying to do. Is you know sort of gather information about how other people handled it and how they move forward with their lives. But i don't necessarily want focus too much on our case. Because i feel like it's not mentally healthy evian. You've seen more people get duped and cope with getting duped than the next by by a long shot. So i'm curious to hear sort of your take on. What's the most interesting thing to me is. When i was reading the book was a how many people i spoke to. Who had been duped and most people didn't wanna talk about it or use their real name because everybody felt completely humiliated. So when you talk about writing a book to help people and what i tried to do anyway is at least make people feel less stupid. And if you're gonna feel stupid that's okay because everybody's stupid then

Abby Grad School For International UN Carrie Mathison Iran Ellen New York Times Pentagon Navy Afghanistan Guantanamo Osama Bin Laden New York City Brussel Iraq DC Florida Cancer Abbas
How world leaders are reacting to Joe Biden's inauguration

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:03 min | 3 months ago

How world leaders are reacting to Joe Biden's inauguration

"Outgoing message is that america can be counted upon again and indeed our allies around the world are sounding a hopeful. Note this evening already. The commissioner of the european union writing to the new president on twitter. Thank you for the inspiring inaugural address and for the offer to cooperate. Europe is ready for a fresh start. So we've got that going for us and british front pages also declaring tonight. That democracy has indeed prevailed our chief foreign correspondent. Richard engel has more overseas reaction from london. Tonight here in europe among america's allies there is a sense of relief. President biden said he wants to re engage with the world to which our allies are responding. Welcome back china expects its confrontation with the united states to continue under the biden administration. Russia today mostly focused on all the security in washington a way to show that the united states is still sick but around the world among our allies. Today was more about healing. Our international relations

Richard Engel United States President Biden European Union Twitter Biden Administration Europe London China Russia Washington
Technology and Human Stories Intersect at the International Spy Museum

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

04:00 min | 3 months ago

Technology and Human Stories Intersect at the International Spy Museum

"I think my story really begins the story that led me to the international spy museum. I think it really begins on nine. Eleven saw on the day of nine eleven. I was in the royal airforce photographic intelligence. You know a friend came and said you have to see what's happening. I was kind of irritated. Thought it was going to be some banal thing on tv or something but we had the us running. All the time and the north tower had been struck and watch the tv and and the south terrorists struck. So i guess. I guess it just really really brought home to me. The i felt like an actor on a play by understand what the plot was. So i guess in one way or another ever since. Then i've been trying to work out. What the plot was. So ultimately that led me to leave the royal air force in two thousand and five and go back to skill and really since then so the past fifteen years of been bouncing around between -demia libraries and museums. And i'm very pleased and throw to be no other international spy museum and so what sort of Of course of study prepares you for what you're doing today. Yes as a good. It's a good question. I think the first thing that i thought to myself was okay so if i want to understand the plot. What's the best way to do so that late. Myth is a anti-national relations ond modern history. So those are the two subjects that are really packed up. And ron worth. And i guess try to just read redes- broadly and his way as a kid just to try to get a better sense of my own place in historical team an owner journey. I think one of the things that are really fascinating was it was still developing knives in the military the rule that that computing and cyber at plays and the modern world so thus saith trust of maine spot i guess international relations in history to directly. Answer your question. And so what was the direct path that That brought you to the spy museum itself. So i came to a had been loving up in new york. Spent a couple of years. The nine eleven museum on your was back in the uk for a but an anna kim to dc again for a fellowship at the library of congress and it was from there that the job came available at spy and i just seem to check all the boxes so through my heart in the rain and after her name. Munson around seven different interviews Thankful and glad that To put me unless. I am here well for those who may not be familiar with the international spy museum. Can you give us a little bit of the background. And the mission of the museum itself. Yeah the so the background of the museum as started Starting around twenty years ago recently. Twenty nineteen we moved to a brand new building on foreign plaza down near the river. Here in dc we tripled over a exhibition. Space will have around. Nain thousand objects are believe and we basically try to educate hit an international audience on the world of intelligence and espionage so the number of different ways. We do it through our exhibits. People can command and go through our exhibition space through the artifacts. Obviously were the key. Get to see some of the things that they may recognize from popular culture or from reading the news and also through a podcast on our programs.

International Spy Museum Ron Worth Redes Royal Air Force Anna Kim DC Maine Library Of Congress Munson United States New York UK
Iran Contra | Bud |

American Scandal

03:53 min | 3 months ago

Iran Contra | Bud |

"It's february ninth. Nineteen eighty seven. Eleven pm robert bud mcfarlane the former national security advisor to president. Reagan was locked in his home office in bethesda maryland. A suburban community on the edge of washington. Dc furiously typing away. Bud's wife john to has already gone upstairs to bed but bud can't sleep. He has a lot on his mind for weeks he's been mired in political scandal. That's rocked the reagan administration to its core. A scandal threatens to take down the president and everyone around it involves backroom deals shady arms dealers offshore bank accounts in the cayman islands and illegal covert operations. They're calling it. The iran contra affair bodies known for being tightly controlled even intense would all day long. He's been feeling unhinged as he hears voices of newscasters swirling through his head. Evening some officials here are calling it the worst scandal of the reagan presidency and costing him a top adviser. The president was still maintaining today. That is iranian arms. Deal was not a mistake. The attorney general said later former national security adviser mcfarlane had also been aware of the escape. A major turning point was a few weeks. Back during reagan's state of the union address but hasn't been able to get out of his mind. I took a risk with regard to our action in iran. It did not work. And for that i assume full responsibility the goals were worthy. We did not achieve what we wished and serious mistakes were made in trying to do some serious mistakes with buds. Name all over them his misdeeds her public knowledge now and people in congress want to exact their pound of flesh in just a few hours but is scheduled to appear before the tower commission and investigative body appointed by congress to look into the iran. Contra scandal he'll be forced to answer difficult questions about his activities potentially illegal activities during his time in the white house but is a marine marines are trained to fight not navigate a swamp of scrutiny partisan politics his entire life. All he wanted to do was serve his country now he feels like he's failed and if he does go down all his ideas for international relations will never be heard so he types and types deep into the morning essays covering everything from arms control with russia to diplomatic relations in the middle east recommendations for his former boss. President reagan who didn't to listen even when bud had his ear. Maybe he'll listen now but something else. To handwritten notes was wife john. The woman with whom he spent the last thirty three years of his life asking for her understanding and forgiveness. He gets up from his desk walks to the kitchen and puts a stack of papers on the counter with the letter to his wife on todd then he pours himself. A glass of red wine reaches in his pocket. Pulls out a bottle of pills valium he puts one in his mouth and uses the wind to wash it down and then another and another methodically until every pill in the bottle is gone in all bud. Swallows thirty tablets. you bows. His head says a quick prayer before heading upstairs when he climbs into bed. Jonah is still awake. She can send something. That's different but what's wrong. Nothing but reaches over and takes her by the hand. I just wanna hold you for the good night. good night. John kisses him on the cheek. It's all part of their nightly routine but denied but knows in might be the last turns off the light plus is is weights.

Robert Bud Mcfarlane Iran Reagan Reagan Administration Bethesda Cayman Islands BUD Mcfarlane Maryland Congress John Washington Contra President Reagan White House Middle East Russia Todd
Brazil's President Downplays Pandemic Despite Rising Cases In His Hometown

Weekend Edition Sunday

06:24 min | 3 months ago

Brazil's President Downplays Pandemic Despite Rising Cases In His Hometown

"Acknowledges this or not. President Trump leaves office next month with an awful statistic attached to the last year of his administration. The number of Americans who have died from the coronavirus The U. S. Has led the world for months in covert 19 deaths behind the U. S. Is Brazil, but so far the pandemic has done little damage to the standing of its president. Joy your Bolson Aro. The latest coronavirus hot spot is his hometown Rio. Deja, narrow. NPR's Philip Reeves is there and sends this report. Wear outside a bar below the Sugarloaf Mountain. Thies drinkers don't seem worried by this city's new surgeon deaths or the growing waiting list for beds. Hundreds of mass close people crowd together. The only bubbles here are in beer glasses when the pandemic began, most people in this part of Rio tried to follow the rules. Closed businesses and stayed home. Medical experts approved Brazil's president president did did not not broke broke apart apart point point My My sure sure Jacob Jacob Ostinato Ostinato downplayed downplayed the the Corona Corona virus virus from from the the start. start. His His chest chest ized ized governors governors and and mayors mayors for closing local economies. He surged Brazilians not to be cities. Everyone has to die sometime, he says. When Brazil's death count rose above 5000 back in April. Also not a was asked to comment. Okay, let me get prosecuted so well, the president replied. Sorry. What you want me to do about it? That number is now above 190,000 Thea. Other day, Boss Narrow, addressed a packed crowd of supporters. He didn't wear a mask, nor did most of them. In Rio shot A Marcus watches both scenarios conduct with alarm that's led you those are the epitome it off of there, like a market is a community leader here in seduction, today's or city of God, It's one of Rio's many for Bella's about 1.5 million people live in them, They're often pour over crowded neighborhoods neglected by government. When covert arrived, Marcus and his fellow activists decided the city of God must protect itself. Those introducing the six inch think faith. We launched the social media information campaign, explains Marcus. He handed out masks and went door to door urging residents to socially distance. You said back out of the temple market, says his mission became harder after Boston Otto called the Corona virus a little flu. Both Granados stands since the beginning, absolutely pushed people to think there was nothing going on. It wasn't serious or they didn't need to do anything that I said Williamson is from catalytic communities along profit that supports community development in for Bella's. She says, when someone who must work to survive here's both scenarios messaging. She just thinks, okay, well, if the direction from the top is that there's no big deal, then I can go back to business. As usual, Williamson's organization runs a project tracking covert cases in the favelas. It's long, several 1000 deaths, but condition too tough and getting reliable data is difficult. I don't trust the numbers at all. Just don't the true picture is likely, much worse. Got it inspects units downtown toe. Williamson recently chaired an online conference in which people from for Bella's talked about what they're going through now, my only a disguise his name look a sugar, which our people are dying at home because they can't get healthcare, says A woman called Anna Paulus. Alice Ela says, C'mon, I opened is seen amiable, another handle a local service. Says she lost five friends to covet in one week. When both scenario took office, many commentators derided him as a know nothing. Retired Army captain from the far right, that's wrong, says Marcus Nobly, He's Glover. Of course, his clever he's clever in his cunning. Nobody has written a book about bullshit, narrow and is one of his faces critics. Let's get rid off this discourse that postal nado is dumb that both tomorrow is crazy. He doesn't strategy. You think that he's stupid? He's not both the knowledge popularity has actually gone up since the pandemic began. He made a bet that despite the thousands of deaths at the end of it, Brazilians will care about their jobs. All of the stone cool is professor of international relations at the Should Tulio Vargas Foundation in Sao Paulo, Even though his strategy can be considered to be morally reprehensible, you know, from an electoral point of view. It's actually quite effective. Both scenarios. Unexpected popularity also has a lot to do with money worried about soaring unemployment, his government's funding the most costly welfare program in Brazil's history. It's making emergency payments to 65 million of the poorest Brazilians. Well, God, by shown on that plan was in fact approved by Congress. Yet the president's getting the credit while other side's going there, Jenny, Although President Chinese there was another, it was a brilliant idea says You've done the same thing. Silver sells coconuts and cocktails. On a beach in Rio called Prive Amillia. He was stuck at home for several months because his beach was closed by Cove it when we do we've got step Gordon Carter. That was really tough, He says. Emergency payments about $120 a month. Helped his family survive that silver used to be a leftist, You know? God, I miss you both on audio. If we my everyday my Jamie. He says that the next election, both Sanada gets his boat real dish. Nero is now gearing up for the new year in an unusually subdued mood. Normally, there's this to look forward to a massive New Year's Eve party for more than a million people on Copacabana beach that's canceled. Most here are waiting for the vaccine. Even that is a source of friction with boss and arrow. Medical experts want as many Brazilians as possible to be vaccinated. The president's critics say he seems to want the opposite. Bull scenario has said mandatory vaccinations off a dog's, which you will know what time I was here, he says. He won't be having one it punch it up. And that's that.

Brazil RIO President Trump Philip Reeves Jacob Jacob Ostinato Ostinato Boss Narrow Williamson Sugarloaf Mountain Granados Marcus Bella Anna Paulus Alice Ela NPR Thea U. Retired Army Marcus Nobly Should Tulio Vargas Foundation
It's coronavirus do-over time. What would we do differently?

Coronacast

04:01 min | 4 months ago

It's coronavirus do-over time. What would we do differently?

"I'm health reported teigen tyler an opposition and journalists alter norman swan wednesday the ninth of december. And it's episode. Two hundred of the corona cast so when we hit the one hundredth episode. We buy setback and went. Oh my gosh. We never thought we'd get to one hundred two hundred. I know it was like two hundred years two hundred days. Well it feels like a silent day to answer these questions from dane. Who says what do you think is the most important thing we've learned about. Nineteen in the last year and if we had a time over again what would we do differently. Well let's do something different. You answer that first to you. Know what i think. At an individual level we would have been more mentally prepared for the challenges of these. See the personal challenges of these see but from an infection control perspective especially in australia Harto corinthian outbreaks notwithstanding. I really do think that we have done an incredible job of keeping levels of the virus incredibly low in australia when we say overseas. What could have been here in australia if we hadn't taken that really hard stance from the beginning. So here's what. I think we would do differently. So the first thing. I'll start is internationally and this is a wishlist. I wish that we had had a more cooperative world when the virus hit if we'd had a more cooperative world you know. This is just wishful thinking but we had a habit of world without authoritarian fragile leaders in china russia and the united states. This would be a very different pandemic. in fact it may never even escape from china because they would have dealt with it transparently and they would have controlled it than they would have told people about it and they're told people about it in december. They're abroad in international help into wuhan market and checked where come from and the world would have pulled together on china's behalf and helped china out but we came into an environment where nations were operating by themselves and it was every state for themselves. And that's the sex. The ground for the pandemic so do differently do international relations differently. The biology of a pandemic organism is almost the least important part of that organism of the pandemic loss of different organisms can cause pandemics. It's human behavior that causes the pandemic so the way we live the way we act. Politics works so international travel works. That's what creates a pandemic what we would do. Differently is have a world that's more pandemic aware and aware of their behavior and aware of the broader implications beyond beyond the personal. That's what i would do differently than international level. The wild thing about that is that if we had done that we never would have nine. What scale of crisis. We would have averted but we do know that. This isn't going to be the last pandemic pathogen that if we ever encounter and saw are we need to take these lessons going forward so that the next pandemic is a fisa like this one should main. I'm a comeback to something. We said on corona cast probably in march march april the of the beginning when prevention works. Nothing happens and so the most important thing we've learned we should have learnt is or if you went back in time is that the general community knows that when you actually have prevention working nothing happens. So that's a lesson for everything and we're facing catastrophe with climate change but it's a slow moving catastrophe and if we actually act on climate change not very much will happen and that's what you actually want to happen. So people talk about all paul early in the seventy s sixty s and seventy s doomsayers population and. so on. The are all wrong because nothing happened. Nothing happened because people did some stuff about that sort of thing and of course nothing happened. So what we learn from this is successful. Prevention is dull and boring because nothing happens. There's no drama.

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan Australia China Dane Wuhan Russia United States Corona Paul
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 5 months ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
Will Israel welcome a Biden administration?

News, Traffic and Weather

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Will Israel welcome a Biden administration?

"Well wishes for President elect Biden and Vice President elect Harris coming in from around the world or salutations from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Ah, fan of the current president. 18 Jawad is an international relations expert in Israel's Bar Island University by then has very good record on Israel when he served as a senator for 36 years, But he also Wass vice president during the Obama administration, which did not have that friendly relations with Israel. A venerable Saturday night Live didn't miss a beat, tackling the weekend's election news. Incredible day Dave how returned to host Saturday Night Live's first post election edition, Same as he did in 2016, this time, just hours after Joe Biden's apparent presidential. I've never felt so alive, which is ironic, because I'm not that a lot. Jim Carrey there in the Cold Open as Joe Biden celebrating his victory with Alec Baldwin as a defiant Donald Trump reminding America of who he is. Christopher Watson, ABC NEWS Baseball's Washington

Bar Island University Israel Obama Administration Jawad Benjamin Netanyahu Saturday Night Live Biden Harris Joe Biden Dave Jim Carrey Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Christopher Watson America Abc News Baseball Washington
Trump's achievements in the Middle East

Between The Lines

08:58 min | 6 months ago

Trump's achievements in the Middle East

"Donald. Trump's foreign policy is all too often met with derision or simply chairmanship? Isn't it? The critics Maki's diplomacy and they pan the choice of son-in-law Jared Kushner as a Middle East envoy. However just dies away from the US presidential election. Trump has had a few certifiable victories to put in his closing advertising pitch to the American people. I'm of course referring to the peace deals between Israel and Bahrain the United Arab Emirates and Sudan these have been brokered by the trump administration well to tell us more about the significance of these Abraham. Cords. For the Prophet of Jews, Christians and Muslims alike. Let's tune to Greg. Sheridan, he's foreign editor of the Australian Gregg welcome back to the show. Glad to be with your. Greg, your assessment of trump foreign policy generally. Well I think. The media has done generally around the world agree poor job on analyzing trump because themselves have become. So polarized there the all against trump or a small minority of the mural for trump whereas I trump has had some wins and some losses. stylistically he's been very unorthodox and at times on counterproductive but you can look back inside that what trump has been a bath is being creating leverage. The United States in K. relationships is put tariffs on China, and that gives him something to negotiate with Jonah He's put sanctions on Iran that. Gives him something that Iran wants to get rid of an in every relationship? He's got leverage for the United States. Now I think he's done a lot of specific things that have actually been quite good. You can certainly criticize the way he talks about alliances, but it these actions rather than his words quite a lot of the things he's done have been very successful especially in Asia and the Middle East is increased the US military budget more than any other president and American allies. Niger very happy about that the allies in Asia. Have Been Critical of China and most inclined to stand up against Jonah namely Japan India Vietnam Singapore Australia a couple of Damon our full hours course I very good relationship with trump role. Bilaterally, a lot of his relationships been very successful India and Australia. His administration has built the quotes the quadrilateral security dialogue. He has recognized the nature of the Chinese threat to the international system and do American interests better than any other president. Andy's moved the debate along at the same time. There's been a lot of chaos in his administration, the White folks terrible but I think he's had some real wins and I think he's done very well in the Middle East. Okay. We're talking about the Middle East You have argued in the astride newspapers I amount to a major step forward in the pace there why these Arab states altering their relations with Israel is it because of the mutual fee of Iran or is it because the US has leaned on the Motley? Well it's by the size I think Tom plus some other factors as well, but you've just got to pause. And model at the size of trump's achievement in and. To even out of these words, probably you know get you sort of condemned by all international relax plots society at. A. O. Over knocks the of international relations would would excommunicate you for saying it. But you know Israel has five peace treaties with Arab nations. Three of them have come under Donald Trump. He has said we back Israel one hundred percent is move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem tremendous symbolic sign of his commitment to Israel. But he has said we all sat back the security of the Gulf Arab states and are opposed to Iran and we kind to put sanctions on it. We think the nuclear deal when far enough now, the Gulf Arab states all agree with trump about Iran. But also items cells to some extent lost interest in the Palestinian cause. They're certainly not going to allow Palestinian view of Israel to be a roadblock. Now, they say Israel is a very good security Patna and they are encouraged by the US administration to might place with Israel if you just change in your ABC's ready national with me Tom Switzer my guest is Greg Sheridan foreign editor of the Australian. Now Greg you've been one of Australia's leading defenders of Middle East policy for decades. Trump came to power on an America I strategic. He's goal a piece to be to reduce significantly America's military role in the Middle East. We just talked about this grand aimed Iranian coalition that can contain tyron wants the Americans have gone given that America is now energy independent moralists isn't this retrenchment from the middle. East if trump is reelected, isn't that a good thing? Well. I think. It's makes Grill Tom. I think it is probably a good thing. The thing tonight is about trump is that on the whole he has implemented a lot of his foreign policy promises. If you put trump's record on the Middle East, all together it's pretty impressive. The US defeated Isis and he's decided that the Iranian. Nuclear deal is a very bad deal. I agree with him about that because it recognizes the legitimacy of Iran's nuclear industry allows enrichment of uranium a whole lot of other things and then allows in a very short period of time I'm sales to rent said trump said that's completely unacceptable. He wants a new and much better they'll, and in the meantime he's applying sanctions to Iran. has significantly diminished Iran's ability to cause mayhem in the region but that brings me to the point about what happens if Joe Biden is elected knicks wiggle the polls. Many of the pundits the betty markets point to a Democratic victory next week if a bottom administration comes to POW, Greg dozen that increase the chances of everything you've just been saying being wound back, I? Mean wouldn't Baden for example. Revert to the Obama nuclear deal with Iran. Well Eight. That's what he says he'll do allow. Kind of the problem. So the final point from the past there is that trump is not engaged in any new military adventures whereas even Bama engaged in the regime change in Libya which had absolutely eleven offers consequences now, Baden. It's very unclear. What kind of Administration Baden will provide his advisors at the moment seemed to be dominated by retreads from the second, I. Bob. Administration Susan Rice and Ben Rides. But then his party has moved along why for an elect- with Anastazia. Cortes and Bernie Sanders and the influence of the crew he says he's going to make climate change the center of all of his foreign policy I think. He may repeat a mistake of trump's, which is simply to try to undo everything his predecessor is done whereas trump has left Baden assuming button does win trump was left on a lot of leverage tramples. Authorized the elimination of the commander of the Iranian could force SOMAINI and. The, Iranians, like everyone else are scared of trump and they're. Constrained by not knowing what he's going to do even though he hasn't done any major military intervention, I don't think I've boughten will WANNA put more troops back into the Middle East or anything like that. The story of the last ten or twelve years really has been Americans will will say trying to get out of the Middle East and finding it very, very difficult to do so but Baden would be. Tremendously mistaken if he didn't try to capitalize on the successes, trump might I certainly don't think he's GonNa WanNa Talk Sudan or by Ryan will will the United Arab Emirates? Out of normalization with Israel, but will is administration base smart enough to keep it going with other Gulf states in trump was saying the other day that he thinks Saudi. Arabia can might place. With Israel, we'll that would been shattering. That would be I don't tectonic shift in the Middle East and Baden if he's smart or his administration as. Will keep going down that road and then God bless them. They can get all the accolades for forever success they won't themselves. But if they get back to the Paragon the John Kerry paradigm, you've gotTa somehow miraculously solve the Palestinian problem before we can do anything else Well, I think it could be much less effective than trump.

Donald. Trump Middle East Iran Israel United States Baden United Arab Emirates Greg Greg Sheridan Sudan Administration Baden Tom Switzer Jared Kushner President Trump Australia China Editor Maki
The US will ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday. What happens next?

The 3:59

04:29 min | 7 months ago

The US will ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday. What happens next?

"So let's let's at the basics either way there's this band coming in place on Sunday on both tiktok talking we chat what does this mean? What's going on with this ban? Essentially what's going to happen is that starting on Sunday, you're not gonna be able to download we chat. Or tiktok from the APP stores. In the United States, we're assuming that that means all of the APP stores although a lot of these details are still very unclear but I would expect that you're not going to be able to access the APPs from the Internet after Sunday will you will be able to do is if you've already downloaded them, you'll be able to use them for a certain amount of time it's really unclear. How far this is GonNa go for tiktok. It's going to be the deadlines November twelfth for we chat it seems to be Sunday. So if you're using we chat, you're just kind of out of luck but it's GonNa be really interesting to watch how people respond to this and how it shakes out because we're talking about some of the largest social networks in the world suddenly being disrupted in a way we haven't really seen her before right in another less about. Let's focus bit on Tiktok as it is a viral sensation here there are tens of millions of users tiktok. What happened they're able to use it but the as interested no update software updates or no way to to to continue to maintain that APP is that is that what happens? Yeah. If you've been following the apple in epic saga. It's very similar. So. You know when when epic decided to break apple's APP store rules over payments thing essentially, what happened was that apple kicked the APP out of the APP store. So everyone who had already downloaded, it could play it but you couldn't download it new or get updates, and over time the APP stopped working as well as all the other ones because there were software updates that were new in that game new parts of the game they put out that you couldn't get. Tick talks obviously, not a video game, but I imagine that this is going to be what happens. We're GONNA SEE UPDATES come down and they'll probably try to maintain it as best they can so that people who already have it in the US can keep using it but eventually, if this doesn't get sorted out the APPS, just GonNa stop working. So let's roll back a bit. Why are these bands being put placed essentially this is all coming down to a national security conversation these. APPS are you have to think about it? These are some of the first APPs from China to really take off in the United States and I mean really take off and. I think that it's caused us to rethink about a lot of how we talk about the Internet in the last few years I started hearing a lot more about China's version of the Internet and our of the Internet and setting these two things apart. They've always been slightly different but there's now like a concerted conversation over this issue and what China is doing, and this is what led a little bit to this national security concern. Essentially, the government says, Hey, this is a Chinese collects date on Americans. It could be used by the Chinese government, which isn't factually wrong but there's zero evidence that that's happening and the company obviously would say that it isn't but. We're hearing these national security conversations and these these warnings without any actual evidence about what's going on. Yeah. It's important to note that the Commerce Department held a conference call the press this morning they were asked explicitly to offer concrete examples of the. Chinese government spying or taking advantage this data and Commerce Department did not provide examples and this is very similar to the situation that. Has Been Around Weiwei right always a big Chinese telecommunications provider. It also got banned earlier this year by the trump administration but there had been for years allegations of potential security concerns, but we've never seen any evidence of it. So it's it's one of those things where like. You. Kind of have to take the government on faith than the argument that that they are indeed doing the right thing in protecting us but it's Obviously, there's a lot of skepticism and a lot of uncertainty or unknowns with the situation. and. Let's be honest right. When it comes to international relations, the government doesn't have the best track record of being forthright with the American people and we have a lot of examples of that. So there's already broken trust here and I think that is part of why you see people constantly asking this question

Chinese Government United States Apple China Commerce Department Weiwei
Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:30 min | 7 months ago

Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

"Earlier today. European Commission President Ursula von Delaying gave her first State of the Union address to the European. Parliament. It's fair to say that it has been and will be more closely scrutinized than the setpiece usually is the EU is beset like the rest of the world by an ongoing pandemic and associated economic turbulence, and also attempting to ease the United Kingdom out of the block with as little damage to the fixtures and fittings as possible and the UK's latest history on x over the last week or so demonstrate that this remains an unsolved problem while joined with more Bite Niamey Leery Europe correspondent at the Irish Times. Niamey before we talk about the details of what Slovan delay and had to say, did it strike you? There was an overall theme or tone she was swinging for I. Think it was quite striking. Future focused. She talked about how can we get out of the Democrats economic repercussions in a way that says. The continent for the future. So it was very much to do with tying together the various different goals whether that's a climate and economic development where increasing digitalization on. Also a one section of her speech, which I thought was particularly strong was on discrimination and efforts at kind of acknowledging the reality in the block of racism and discrimination. Based on sexual orientation or religious beliefs. So it was quite wide ranging and then the other aspect of it was. She proposed making it easier for the EU to come up with common policy when it comes to international relations particularly on matters relating to human rights sanctions. So just as a liberation on that idea of general tone this being her first state of the Union as as commission president does it does it seem that we understand what her idea of the European Union is. I think she Saturday as being. A sort of an unfinished project what it ought to be somewhere where people can have a quality of life get paid fairly for work have social protections that you're does better on that than other parts of the world, and that's part of the reason why able better able to weather the pandemic but that it's not enough and she said that there would be a new framework introduced to. Member states to set minimum wages in order to make work pay property. Then an in addition to that there was the The section on discrimination which I think was unusual in acknowledged the struggles in the block in terms of she mentioned a particular discrimination against Rome people on also the LGBTQ I free zones in. Poland or she called out as inhumane. And so I think she's she was quite strong meticulous division of the block as being a place where people and live more freely with rights and have a better quality of life in general but I think that she also you know it's it's. It's quite telling that she. She had. Many. Difficulties take me in terms of international relations they were for her to talk about it was difficult relationship with Russia difficult relationship with China difficult relationship with the United States difficult relationship Britain as well. Well, let's talk about some of those difficult relationships and because we are here broadcasting from London let's talk about the difficult relationship. The now has with the UK did brexit get much of a mention? She did mention us. So she said that with every day that passes it becomes more difficult for deal to be reached and she also said that. The EU would stand by with the agreement would never at go back on its the an agreement that had been passed by the European Parliament Anheuser Commons and that had been jointly agreed by the UK Andy you to Protect citizen's rights but also she said first and foremost the Good Friday Agreement on the department and it was quite interesting as well to know that she she also quote the late John Hume, the Nobel laureate. And former SDLP leader from dairy and she said that she described him as one of the Great Europeans. And mentioned that he he recently passed away on us used a quote from him to kind of talk about the strength of diversity which I thought was quite. An interesting use of quotes. It was notable high. She was sort of writing in that story, which is I suppose a Northern Irish story really into this story of the European Union. You mentioned the difficulty of the relationship with Russia and obviously the country of which us live underlying walls defense minister. Germany has found itself once again. On the front line over that relationship having taken in the apparently poisoned opposition politician Alexei Navalny did she took you light any kind of? Way of how the e you can live alongside Russia. She was quite I thought her words were quite firm on Russia's so she said. That the poison she mentioned the poisoner Nevada and said that it wasn't a one sauce and she said, no. Number of gas, pipelines is GONNA. Is GonNa fix that relationship she also am I thought spoke quite in quite heartfelt way in solidarity with the people of Belarus Moore she said that they'd be brave and gone out on the streets and they should have the they shouldn't be pieces on someone else's chessboard what she said, but they should have the ability to determine their own future. You said at the top of this item that she attempted to link the recovery. Well, hopeful eventual recovery from the pandemic the associated economic problems to broader themes of climate in the future on climate in particular. Did she have anything of note to say. So. What? What under nine has proposed that the target for the block to reduce emissions should be increased fifty five percent by twenty thirty, that's compared to a previous commitment to forty percent. This is compared to nine thousand, nine, hundred levels of emissions, and she said that this would be vital in order for the block to reach its Paris Agreement commitments on also its goal of becoming climate neutral by twenty fifty on the way she she described the landmark agreement of the e you to join me borrow seven, hundred, fifty, billion, euro. As an opportunity to do this by directing at least thirty percent or thirty seven percent of the investment towards green initiatives. So things like development of green hydrogen. Renovating homes with. Forty percent of emissions and also. Increasing the car charging network electric vehicle charging that things like that an while this could go in. With kind of digital developments there. For example, at fast broadband were available continent wide including in rural areas that would both alive for rural development but also for things like you know people to work from home more easily and things like that. So she she s she she argued that these things could go hand in hand essentially. But Green groups have been quick to come out and say that fifty five percent of the target isn't enough now some of them had themselves called for that in the. In the past but I guess with the scale of the disaster that they say we're facing, you know they're always going to want to push for more and more ambitious targets

European Union Poland President Trump European Commission United Kingdom Ursula Von Delaying Slovan UK Sdlp Alexei Navalny European Parliament Anheuser C London The Irish Times Germany Rome Nevada Russia
Thai Protests: Thousands Join Rally in Bangkok

BBC Newshour

04:29 min | 8 months ago

Thai Protests: Thousands Join Rally in Bangkok

"Several 1000 students chair speakers on a large stage, but Thomas at universities sprawling out of town campus. In the two months since Thailand ended, it's covered, 19 locked down, students have revived and expanded their anti government protests. With smaller rallies almost every day in some part of the country, their grievances are familiar and widely shared the military's involvement in politics, a constitution weighted against opposition parties. The harassment of political activists. With the economy tanking in the absence of foreign tourists. There is no shortage of anger, but this protest, though another issue moved centre Stage One ties usually avoid. The monarchy. Ah lawyer Anon Nampa, who had been the first to break the taboo a week before called for an honest public discussion of Thailand's most powerful institution. That happens in the mind. The end of the rally, a young woman stepped forward dramatically through clouds of dry eyes and read out a 10 point manifesto complaining about royal intervention in politics and demanding a complete overhaul of the monarchy, limiting its powers on its spending. Nothing like it has been heard before in public here, where the monarchy is officially held to be sacred and untouchable. Guantanamo, Japan and international relations professor at Chulalongkorn University. Has watched her students become ever more radical in their views. You know Thailand, they're not, you know, that is a very extremely sensitive issue. You may be prosecuted by the law. Between the monarchy and our only witness. So the official view that the monarchy is above politics. Young people don't believe that anymore. Don't believe anybody has the difference from the heroine's generations. The students say that access to social media has opened their eyes to the reality of Thailand's power structure. We have to try too. Start talking about it, making it a new norm for the society that it's okay to talk about the money. The previous generation got inducted by this state media and the state education for a very long time. Our generation is like the 1st 1 to really know what is going on the government comprised of conservative royalists and military men, who have pledged their whole lives to defend the monarchy. Seems unsure how to react Time Minister pray Oh channel teacher said they would investigate thoroughly looking for any group that might be instigating the students finding out what the real intentions are. They can protest, he said. But we will check whether they've broken the law. Theo end of last week 1/3 activist leader was quite literally dragged away. And arrested on sedition charges. Is a prevailing fear here, but the security forces will eventually be ordered to put down the protests didn't deter thousands more from joining the largest demonstration yet this weekend. Bangkok's symbolically important democracy monument. Thiss was a lighter, more humorous affair than Thomas sat with a more diverse crowd. References to the monarchy was turned down. Anon. Nampa was there now on bail after being arrested, So did he fear that force would inevitably be used to suppress the movement because it has so often in the past in Thailand? You don't believe they'll dare do that, he said, because if they do, they'll be killing young people 15 to 30 years old. King watcher. Alongkorn returned to Thailand briefly last week for a rare visit from Germany, where he stayed throughout the covert 19 crisis a decision some ties have compared unfavorably to their situation under lock down. In keeping with the monarchy's official status, he said nothing publicly about the protests. Everyone in Thailand is wondering how the palace and its backers in the military will respond. Jonathan head reporting from Thailand.

Thailand Anon Nampa Thomas Official Harassment Alongkorn Guantanamo Bangkok Chulalongkorn University Jonathan Head Thiss Theo Professor Japan Germany
China Says U.S. Ordered it to Close Houston Consulate in 72 Hours

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:38 sec | 9 months ago

China Says U.S. Ordered it to Close Houston Consulate in 72 Hours

"Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson weighing when then reacted to the US order. On July 21st the U. S abruptly demanded the Chinese Consulate general in Houston cease all operations and events. It is a political provocation unilaterally launched by the US side, which seriously violates international ball, basic norms governing international relations and the bilateral consular agreement between China and the U. S. China strongly condemns such an outrageous and unjustified move. Which will sabotage China U. S relations. Media reports in Houston said authorities responded to reports of a fire at the consulate,

Chinese Consulate Chinese Foreign Ministry China United States Houston U. S. China
China warns UK 'interfering' in Hong Kong affairs will 'backfire

Politics and Public Policy Today

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

China warns UK 'interfering' in Hong Kong affairs will 'backfire

"To the evening Standard, the actions from the British government drew a stinging response from Beijing. In a tweet, China's ambassador to London tweeted quote the UK blatantly interfered in China's internal affairs and contravene international law and the basic Norms governing international relations. China has never interfered in UK is internal affairs. The UK should do the same to China. Otherwise it must bear the consequences.

China UK British Government Beijing London
Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:46 min | 10 months ago

Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

"I'm not by background attack person I come from a liberal arts background I studied politics in languages at university, and I was fascinated in international affairs I was always interested in history and politics. And that developed into a into a study of international relations, so I I studied. To universities in the UK Newcastle, which is in the north of England, and a Master's degree at Bristol University in the south and it was really. While? I was at Bristol that I developed. An interest in joining the foreign, Service Exams for the for the Foreign Service while I was at university there and I joined the British Foreign Office in in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, and that took me on a fascinating professional journey, had the opportunity to study Arabic while I was in the Foreign Office and that took me to the Middle East. where I I had a couple of postings. Including some time spent his adviser to UK and US military forces during the war in two thousand and three, and over the course of my my government career over the course of my Foreign Office career I increasingly focused on national security issues. So you know things like counterproliferation, counterterrorism and Cybersecurity, and so that that really took me sort of further towards the the work that I now do but really my my leap into startup space, and and the work that we now do with with cybersecurity companies that was that was triggered towards the end of my government service, I spent a couple of years as an adviser. Downing, street a prime. Minister's Office that was two thousand ten eleven twelve, and around that time there were number of reviews taking place into UK national security, and that flowed some very interesting work around cybersecurity as a as a tier, one, a national security threat, and and you know I I was involved in some of that work. And after leaving, government decided to to make it one of the things that I would focus on. And so, what are you involved with today? What is your day to day like these days? Well since two thousand fifteen with my co-founder grace, cassie, who was another friend of mine from Foreign Service Days A. WE wanted to put in place. A way to support entrepreneurs. In the! Early days of establishing a cybersecurity company we had seen in our time. In government that the this was one of the most important. Challenges and opportunities of of the of the of the decade and we felt that weren't really any. Systems or structures in place to provide the support that was needed. This is fascinating complex area of technology and business, and while there were united some fantastic institutions in the UK there were already a number of significant companies operating this space. We couldn't see the number of innovative new companies emerging that we that we expected to say on the E. found in in somewhat more mature ecosystems like the US, and and to some extent Israel, so we started, Ceylon and Ceylon was A. In early days and experimental accelerator modeled to some extent on programs like Y combinator, but dedicated to Cybersecurity, so we initially Ranna three month program in London, and it's really grown from there and over the last five years we've. We've run ten programs in London and four programs in Singapore and we've had with one hundred companies come through those programs, and so we we spend our. We spend our day odd as in running those programs finding and supporting those entrepreneurs, and then, and then continuing that that support once they leave the program. Can you give us some insights on the state of Cybersecurity and entrepreneurship there in the UK? Yeah well I think it's developed. significantly certainly over the the ten years. That we've been really focusing on this and. Definitely we've seen that. Over the five years we've been running ceylon there really wasn't a a community of of of cybersecurity startups here in the UK back in in the first part of the last decade. We we've helped to capitalize that community here, and there is now a thriving startup ecosystem right across the range of technologies, but definitely in cybersecurity. And I think there are now there are some really quite successful companies that have been set up and developed here over the past five years, and it's now very much part of a a broader technology system here in the UK. And part part of the reason for that is that? The UK has a good reputation in this space, but it's also a a good place to to set up a business if you'll from somewhere else It's been a draw for talent. globally and we certainly saw that in in cybersecurity. We could see the talent. In cybersecurity was was very much distributed around the world. It wasn't just an isolated pockets, and and we found in. Many people wanted to come and. Join our program and get the business started in the UK, and as a result there now you know tens, if not hundreds of of interesting small companies in this field. Is there, even a geographic advantage of of being where you are. I'm thinking you're sort of you. Know equidistant to S- to some of the other important centers of cybersecurity. There's no question. I think you know. Greenwich Meantime has been a competitive advantage for the UK in many different areas of a of business and finance. Over the centuries I think it gives us a genuine advantages being as you say, in time term sort of equidistant between. The economies of the of the of the Americas and those of The Middle East Asia, and that definitely that definitely helps you know having the the economies of Europe on on our doorstep, and you know the last forty years at least strong connections to those economies has been helpful. London has been a melting pot for anybody trying to start a business seek finance and I. Think you know the world the world does come to London or at least it did until we were hit by the pandemic I. Think it will nonetheless emerge from the current crisis is one of the world's great global cities, and and so you know geography masters in Business and certainly been helpful to the development of the cyber ecosystem here.

UK British Foreign Office London Ceylon United States Foreign Service Bristol University Newcastle Greenwich Meantime Counterproliferation Co-Founder England Singapore Middle East Asia Europe Middle East. Israel Americas Grace
Hacking Our Way to Innovation with Rebecca Love, RN, MSN

The WoMed

05:21 min | 11 months ago

Hacking Our Way to Innovation with Rebecca Love, RN, MSN

"So here. The woman we really love to dig into wine. Nurses decided on that sealed in particular. So what made you want to be nurse so nursing was a second career choice for me? I had gone for Undergrad in a degree in international relations and a minor in Spanish and I thought that I was going to be a lawyer to be honest and I was working on a presidential campaign at the time when healthcare was a big issue. I remember being these rallies and everybody was talking about healthcare and there were no nurses in the audience or a lot of Ernie's or a lot of lobbyists or a whole bunch of people that know nurses and I don't know about you Daniel but my mom's nurse. Do you have any family members who are nurses in your family? My Grandmother was okay and so that was my piddle movement. My mom came out and we went to dinner and she said we really think you should be a nurse and I remember her. It was an interesting time the politics going on and I remember thinking you know what? How can you be a member of? How can you speak to the choir if you're not a member of it and if everybody's talking about healthcare but nobody a nurse here? How do we really know what needs to change? And what the problem. Yeah and that was where my life turns recognizing that to really impact change in healthcare. I probably had join healthcare Do that and that's where my journey began. That's amazing it's topic. I've talked to a couple of friends about we've talked about on here to how there isn't representation in Congress in government of nurses like what we're actually going through what we face on a daily basis. I think that's fascinating at that. Made you change your career path. That's amazing well. It's funny that you say that because the statement that made me change my career path was at my I want you know. I said I wanted to be a lawyer and my mom said to me she said you know there's plenty of strong lawyers out there in the world and she said but I can tell you is being a nurse. There's not enough strong nurses out there. I need more strong nurses on there to change. What nursing looks like to the world and and you to become a nurse and at that time? I didn't know what that meant. I I remember. It felt really importance. But it's now ten fifteen years later that I look back and I recognize those words shaped everything that I've done in nursing every step of the way and I know your own story about how hard times it was for you to be a nurse and how it's challenges we faced how you didn't always feel like you fit in are you also didn't feel like you had a voice and that was hard for me and I'm and how to learn how to navigate. What sometimes feels like a very disempowered profession to become more voicemail and more recognized but more importantly that necessarily placated she but really just given a seat at the table is. Hey you got this. You know what you're talking about and I respect your opinion as much as I respect. Everybody else is around the table. Not so much. Hey I'm just giving it placeholder for a nurse to have at the table. It's really sit there and say we want them here. Because we we get that you guys have value add. That's been really interesting place to come from and I don't know you know in your own personal With your conversation if you guys have felt the same kind of challenges at times yes One hundred percent. And that's something that I think just Added onto years of being like repressed as a nurse that led to ultimately me burning out at the bedside. And that's something that you've been really trying to champion a lot for to in that you know there's this fear like aren't nurses are burning out after two years we're reporting out all these new grads but they're burning out so quickly yeah two hundred fifty thousand nurses. We graduate a year in this country and we lose over fifty percent of them by the bedside within spheres a practice the largest exodus of a profession that nobody talks about and I like you left the bedside as a as an rn. Within two years. I went back to Grad. School became a nurse practitioner for that exact feeling of feeling so like I didn't have that voice and every time I stepped in and I felt like there were so many near misses where I begged you know for changes to happen or orders to be changed or medications to begin our interventions to happen literally knowing that things were going wrong but not having the ability to make those decisions to change. There's outcomes depending on other people to make those decisions and only be given. The toolbox is a nurse to sit there and say well I really think I really believe are really feel that we got to make this big this change or get medication and not giving the tools to actually effectively voice. Why I had the you know the knowledge in the expertise to make those decisions at everything I always did had to be signed off by somebody else because as I was considered for lack of a better world credible enough or had the license or the intelligence to be able to recognize that what we were seeing. Mary made sense it. We should be able to take initiatives to save patient's lives because that was always really hard place for me to citizens to sit there and beg other people and then sometimes it literally and I'm sure you face it if you felt like you were burnt out so often begging to make the changes that we did an often being told. Hey stay in your lane like if you see problems but your job is to be a nurse and to do those things. Your job is not to challenge the way that things are being done and under mentally. That always sat wrong with me Fundamentally because you probably nursing school told hey you're you're the advocate of the patient where you really get on but when we got out in practice man it was tough

Undergrad Ernie Daniel Congress Mary
Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

Between The Lines

12:41 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

"Former Prime Minister Kevin right on the geopolitical consequences of the pandemic. He predicts the coming post covered. Anneke plus Iraq believe it or not. It's future looks brought today than it has an any point in the past Dick. I'd stay with us for my chat with Linda Robinson from the Rand Corporation. She'll tell us while we should not give up on Baghdad's fragile. Democracy Corona virus continues to take a toll on the health of nations around the world. One thing has become clear the winners and losers not who we might have expected a year ago. The virus is taking an uneven and unpredictable. Course through the world defying. I usual assumptions about power and resilience. Some small poor countries being left relatively unscathed all powerful prosperous nations. I've been ravaged. So what does this mean for global order and for the strategic robbery between China and the United States? Will everything change or is the virus? Mealy accelerating trends that were already in place. Former prime minister of Australia. Kevin Rudd is the President of the Society Policy Institute in New York. He's written an essay in the most recent issue of Foreign Affairs magazine in New York. It's called the coming postcode Enki and he joins me now. From Queensland's Sunshine Coast Kevin Rudd. Welcome back to between the lawns. Good to be with you on between the lines. Now you'll recent essays titled The coming Postcode Anneke Y Anneke. You're good real turns color of international relations you would know that realists assume that. Anneke is in fact the natural state All the International Society of states rent was Headley Bull who wrote about this crowd along time ago and Australian realist and Australian realist. Ten within the real documents that order actually represents the exception rather than the rule So why do I argue this I argue it because the current order as we've done since forty five is underpinned by and large by US geopolitical pound Gio economic power secondly That's become challenge at least by China Thirdly the Cova crisis has turbo charge The hit on American real and perceived power. But there's a full factor as well. Which is the impact which the Cova crisis has on China's Powell not least the damage to its economy the flow through effect to its ability to spend on the amounts of money on its military and on the belt and road initiative example but more importantly international perceptions of China in the developed in the developing world. So where do we end up? We end up not with The same old order as in the past but a slow and steady drift towards more anoc order. We're both China and the US damaged and the institutions of global governance with the UN. The will bank the National Monetary Fund the G. Twenty etc become increasingly the terrain for geopolitical battle. Between these two wounded POWs a K. Sunday the country's the victory he but some analysts say that China's heavy handed approach eccentric lockdowns violence. That's been a political win for Xi Jinping in Matt strengthened the Central Authority of the communist regime. How would you respond to them? Well let's look at That argument within China itself. There's been a huge hit on the accompany And as a result of that China will have its worst gross numbers twenty twenty the Ted in over half a century since the end of the Cultural Revolution almost That is huge. It undermines She Jinping's China Drain which was One pillar of which was for China to quadruple. Its G. D. DP by twenty twenty measured against two thousand levels this single year of itself. Economic non-performance blows a hole amidships in that and then secondly on top of that. Tom You've got the problem which arises in terms of internal political debates within China so and I think some growing levels of resistance to Xi Jinping's on leadership and finally as I mentioned before The blowback around the world in terms of the economic damage To economize both developed and developing causing a big question mark to a rise in terms whether China has in fact being the risk to the world's best friend because of the outbreak of this virus. So these factors I think. Qualify the overall argument you hear from some the China's authoritarian model in managing the crisis domestically translates into a geopolitical win the China internationally. I don't think that necessarily holes walk conversations. Do you think heaven. I going on right now in Beijing over China's place in the world I mean is the division division over this so-called Wolf Warrior this is the and diplomacy we often hear about a division between that Wolf Warrior. Diplomacy versus say China's desire to promote soft power. Chinese politics in some respects is not dissimilar to elements of politics. We and other countries. That is you find nationalist. Ten internationalists you find a local ists globalists' you find audio logs versus as it were reformers and pregnant at this and so the as political system while it's Control by Xi Jinping's leadership still has all these tensions and personalities within it so the debates now I think are of a twofold. How do we allow this to happen? In the first place what failed in terms of the processes insistence China put in place after the Saas Crisis of two thousand and three to prevent a pandemic or epidemic as it was then from happening again. The second debate is how the Hillary you get the economy back together again given the China a economy with forty percent of Gdp comes from the traded six or the economy and International. Trade is being blend. Bits by this crosses and the other debate again between nationalists internationalised is the one. You've just touched on the Tom. Which is China's wolf worried diplomats out there launching attacks against any critique of China's performance On the one hand defend the party's legitimacy and on the other hand older more seasoned diplomat saying this isn't actually contributing much to the improvement of China's global image those discussions and debates underway. At the moment we're talking about this wolf warrior diplomacy. What do you make of China's recent boycotts threats of boycotts of Australian Exports Bali? Beef what what's going on well as I've said in other recent interviews since those public statements by the China's ambassador Australia it's unacceptable in my view for any ambassador accredited to any country to receive public threats against the host country In City five years of more dealing with the Australian China relationship I don't recall previous Chinese ambassadors of having done that not by any Australian diplomat ever having done that irrespective of the crisis of the day with was ten on all the things that I went through when I was in office etc so I think as a matter of shall we say diplomatic practice. What occurred then was regrettable as as being some of the hotline commentary. Which emanated from the Chinese nationalist media? the bottom line is however the Chinese nationalists have seen The effectiveness All the some of these sorts of measures when applaud various countries in the past sorts of economic leverage which China replied to no way out to no way through the Nobel Prize Committee Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to a famous Chinese dissident And I've also seen how those Economic Leverage points of work with various of the Europeans. So this is not alien to the Chinese playbook my argument about China's Australia's management of The relationship in prison is that if the Australian government's of the view and a view I in general support that there needs to be an independent international inquiry as to the origins the virus transmission of the virus notifications to the WHO and threw them to the world community etc. Then again to put that Ford isn't as trade in government and then do some work on it. I get a few other governments to come along with you an advance that through the multilateral machinery which rather than just blow it out as a thought bubble That's the way which you do. Real things in the international community rather than I. Fear sometimes pitching a diplomatic initiative primarily for domestic political leverage into straighter. What complicates matters? Further is president trump's theory that the virus was leaked from a lab in Wuhan and raises the question. Why would China agree to enquiry without losing this between the lines on? Abc Radio National. The familiar voice. You're hearing is former prominence to Kevin. Rudd is now president of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York. We've been talking about his article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. Kevin we'll talking about China and how it's paid a price as a result of this current ivars. Let's turn to the United States. How badly damaged is the use in your judgement? I mean we'll recover reasonably quickly With a change of administration in November or does the damage go deep. Perhaps too deep for recovery has been deep damage politically. The the. The House is a divided house within the United States. Those of us who have followed. Us politics of the many years have rarely seen it This divisive and that actually is a real factor in terms of constructing a post presidential election national consensus on how America engages the World. And the future. American politics has become so binary including on America's own future will view on the economic damage. It's huge. This is the biggest hit on newest economy at least since nineteen forty-six and the recovery from the war and probably since the depression the end of the depression and thirty three So this takes a while to recover But the American economy know a history of resilience. Look what happened after the global financial crisis? But well I was going to make the point to is enormous capacity for change and renewal. I mean you think about its recovery from the civil war that oppression in Vietnam. You being a bit too pessimistic. Kevin. Well I live in the United States and I actually listened to the debate on back in Australia now and when my American interlocutors Republican and Democrat Friends of mine over twenty years who A positive let's call it. The Foreign Policy National Security Policy Machinery signed that it's become increasingly hard to forge consensus these days across the aisle on America's behavior in the world That is a real issue. Then it's not just my external analysis it's part of the internal analysis within the US itself. Do I think the United States can come through the domestic political Malays and the Economic Destruction? Which has occurred? Yes I do. Because it's remarkably resilient country But I think a precondition is that We see a Democrat. Win this November it's not that. I am a A cheerleader for Joe Biden. Personally I barely know the man Bought he's lucky to put together a mainstream Competent Foreign Policy and National Security Policy Tame as opposed to Frankly the chaotic nature of the trump administration on most foreign and national security policy questions. And that I think is necessary for America to rebuild. Its alliances abroad rebuild. Its credibility in the eyes of the risks of the will and to overcome what has been an extraordinary period where America rather than taking the lead in the global recovery From the virus both in public health systems and economic terms as simply being missing in action and in fact the unable to contain it's the damage domestically

China United States Kevin Rudd Anneke Xi Jinping Australia Anneke Y Anneke President Trump Prime Minister Foreign Affairs Magazine America Baghdad New York Linda Robinson Rand Corporation Dick Joe Biden Iraq Nobel Prize Robbery
"international relations" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Veron's one of the big losers. The price of oil has plummeted and Iran because of Zone incompetence An ideology has reacted badly to the cove. Nineteen threat did not close down pilgrimage and other such things. It was only a few months ago that the biggest story was the Iranian shoot down of the Ukrainian civil airliner just the other day we saw the Iranians how to big friendly fire incident so this is a regime. That is in real trouble. I think on the other hand. The regime is doubling down on some of what they're doing two things particularly they're trying to push the United States out of Iraq immobile the 2015 nuclear agreement the one that we unilaterally exit a few years ago the Iranians are trying to push up against the edges of that what they have done and we're estimating is they have reduced the amount of warning time we would all have by we. I mean the outside world including the US intelligence agencies. They have reduced the amount of warning time significantly. We would have if they made a mad dash to put into place the prerequisites of nuclear weapons. So I think Iran is doing two things they continue to try to destabilize the region or pushing in directions that they see as good for them particularly in Iraq and they're they're pushing the edges of the envelope on nuclear capabilities and the real question is what will the Israelis do. What will we do about the former? What will we in the Israelis do about ladder? So Ron is at one him. Worse off because of what's happened in the oil markets with the pandemic and they're also in many ways even more aggressive and that's a dangerous thing probably of this virus sudden come along. It's quite possible that this would have been the biggest international foreign policy crisis moment what to do about Iran but now we're so distracted and our ability to focus is obviously so so limited that we're not paying as much attention. Perhaps to what the Iranians are up to as we should. How widespread do you believe? The long term Fax this code. Nine teen will be so far. I you referred to before I think. It accelerates history rather than change changes history that a lot of the trends that we saw the United States distancing itself from the world a worsening U. S. China relationship the Iranian and the North Korean challenges. All these things were in place what I think it does. Though is it adds to it significantly and it edge to it at a time where it takes away our own attention and focus and economic resources for dealing with it. And that's what I think is really dangerous by previous book was called a world in disarray. So the world was already in disarray. And what this is going to do is add significantly to the disarray with the United States and China are going to be less able to cooperate to deal with any challenges and the United States itself is not going to have the bandwidth Or many ways the inclination to deal with it. I I actually think this is in some ways about as worrisome. A moment as we will as we've all experienced and what the covert nineteen pandemic has done is reinforced a lot of a lot of tendencies. That were already there. The question is at some point. Do we reach your tipping point. I don't know but again if you're not worried you're you're not paying attention and anything else you'd like to say before we close my only messages. There's nothing foreign about foreign policy that This is really important. And what happens? You know member that commercial years ago it showed a bunch of people in car. Something at Las Vegas misbehaving wasn't exactly clear what they had been up to but it was clearly no good. And the Tagline for the tourist bureau was what happens in. Vegas stays in Vegas and if there's a message I wanNA leave to anyone. Listening to this is what happens. Whether it's Wuhan or Afghanistan or Paeon Yang or Beijing or name. It what happens. There doesn't stay de Globalization is a reality how we respond to it. That's a choice. That's our choice to make. But the reality of twenty-first-century life is that the world matters and we have got to get smarter about it. Thank you so much with great to talk with you as always a pleasure. Thank you Richard. Haass President at the Council on Foreign Relations. His new book is titled The World I introduction. And that's all for today. Thanks to them if you reached out to let me know what you want me to capture during this very difficult time. Please do continue to let snow. What's on your mind? You can find his son. Facebook and twitter or ascended is an email d. our podcast at W. A. M. U. Dot or our theme music is composed by Jim Grundberg at Van. Landsverk of Wunderle show is produced by Rebecca Kaufman and Alison Brody. Thanks for listening. We're all please stay safe bewail. I'm Diane Ray..

Iran United States Veron Iraq Las Vegas Council on Foreign Relations Diane Ray Facebook Wunderle Ron Richard Beijing Paeon Yang Jim Grundberg Rebecca Kaufman U. S. China President
"international relations" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Veron's one of the big losers. The price of oil has plummeted and Iran because of Zone incompetence An ideology has reacted badly to the cove. Nineteen threat did not close down pilgrimage and other such things. It was only a few months ago that the biggest story was the Iranian shootdown of the Ukrainian civil airliner. Just the other day. We saw the Iranians how to big friendly fire incident so this is a regime. That is in real trouble. I think on the other hand. The regime is doubling down on some of what they're doing two things. In particular trying to push the United States out of Iraq immobile the 2015 fifteen nuclear agreement the one that we unilaterally exit a few years ago the Iranians are trying to push up against the edges of that what they have done and we're estimating is they have reduced the amount of warning time we would all have by we. I mean the outside world including the US intelligence agencies. They have reduced the amount of warning time significantly. We would have if they made a mad dash to put into place the prerequisites of nuclear weapons. So I think Iran is doing two things they continue to try to destabilize the region or pushing in directions that they see good for them particularly in Iraq and they're they're pushing the edges of the envelope on nuclear capabilities. And the real question is what will the Israelis do? What will we do about the former? What will we in the Israelis do about ladder? So Ron is at one him. Worse off because of what's happened in the oil markets with the pandemic and they're also in many ways even more aggressive and that's a dangerous thing probably of this virus sudden come along. It's quite possible that this would have been the biggest international foreign policy crisis moment what to do about Iran but now we're so distracted and our ability to focus is obviously so so limited that we're not paying as much attention. Perhaps to what the Iranians are up to as we should how widespread you believe the long term Fax this code. Nine teen will be so far. I referred to before I think. It accelerates history rather than change changes history that a lot of the trends that we saw the United States distancing itself from the world a worsening U. S. China relationship the Iranian on the North Korean challenges. All these things were in place what I think it does. Though is it adds to it significantly and it edge to it at a time where it takes away our own attention and focus and economic resources for dealing with it. And that's what I think is really dangerous by previous book was called a world in disarray. So the world was already in disarray. And what this is going to do is add significantly to the disarray with the United States and China are going to be less able to cooperate to deal with any challenges and the United States itself is not going to have the bandwidth Or many ways the inclination to deal with it. I I actually think this is in some ways about as worrisome. A moment as we will as we've all experienced and what the Cova nineteen pandemic has done is reinforced a lot of a lot of tendencies. That were already there. The question is at some point. Do we reach your tipping point. I don't know but again if you're not worried you're you're not paying attention and anything else you'd I say before we close my only messages. There's nothing foreign about foreign policy if I have a message that this is really important. And what happens there you know? Remember that commercial years ago it showed a bunch of people in car. Something at Las Vegas misbehaving wasn't exactly clear what they had been up to but it was clearly no good. And the Tagline for the tourist bureau was what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas and if there's a message I wanNA leave to anyone. Listening to this is what happens. Whether it's Wuhan or Afghanistan or Paeon Yang or Beijing or name. It what happens. There doesn't stay de Globalization is a reality how we respond to it. That's a choice. That's our choice to make. But the reality of twenty-first-century life is that the world matters and we have got to get smarter about it. Thank you so much with great to talk with you as always a pleasure. Thank you Richard. Haass President at the Council on Foreign Relations. His new book is titled The World I introduction. And that's all for today. Thanks to them if you reached out to let me know what you want me to capture during. Minsk very difficult time. Please do continue to let snow. What's on your mind? You can find his son. Facebook and twitter or ascended is an email dr on podcast at w. a. m. u. Dot or our theme music is composed by Jim Grundberg Advan landsverk of Wunderle show is produced by Rebecca Kaufman and Alison. Brody ranks for listening. We're all please stay safe be well. I'm Diane Ray..

Iran United States Veron Iraq Council on Foreign Relations Las Vegas Diane Ray Facebook Brody Jim Grundberg Advan Cova Ron Beijing Richard Minsk Dot Paeon Yang
"international relations" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Night Diane on my mind. Heroin Fire and global order long before the current pandemic guest Richard Hearts his thinking and writing about future of international relations. What is me? America's global leadership is pointing which country will fill that void and is the international community capable of solving major problems. These are questions. Richard Haass addresses in his book titled The World Three PM Production and he says her mountain by will the Global Trans already underway. Richard Houses precedent the council long relations. We spoke Monday afternoon. Richard has right now. We seem to be focused so much on ourselves. And what's happening in our own country? So why do you think that this book you've written on? The world is important right now. Diana totally understandable. Why we might be focused on ourselves. Given the terrible human an economic told at this and make is having on virtually all Americans on the other hand. We shouldn't forget for a moment that it came from outside our borders it began an obscure part of China city. Wuhan spread from there to the United States and in that is the beginning of wisdom that in this modern global age. We all find ourselves. Living IN BORDERS DON'T ACCOUNT FOR LAW. Distance doesn't account for the word local has been stripped of its meaning. So yes I understand why we're turning inward but we should not ignore the lesson that this is essentially something that began outward and we have to understand that our security our prosperity our lives depend upon what goes on in the world. The world matters fundamentally To every American so how significant do you believe? This moment is for not only our country. The world moments significant in and of itself just given the economic toll It's extraordinary amount of not just wealth that has been eliminated but the amount of jobs the idea that Miss Country. Twenty twenty five percent of Americans are employed. This is this is reminiscent of the depression. There's no other historical parallel of this scale or magnitude and other countries or many other countries are experiencing or will experience commensurate problems of or not reading about it a lot but will will face widespread unemployment. There'll be massive refugee flows around the world. So the this to me is is the. It's hard to exaggerate the significance economically. I don't know how many people are going to lose their lives but to many and then politically. This is going to change things this is. This is going to take a lot of the trans that were existed and it's going to intensify them it's going to reinforce them so while in principle some people are saying we'll hopefully we'll come out of this and we'll learn some important lessons and put them to good use from their mouths to God's ear. I would love that to be the case. I worry though that might not happen. If you've written that you feel that the basic direction of world history is not going to be so much changed as accelerated. What do you mean by that? We're looking to translate replace before you or I or anyone listening to this ever heard of covert nineteen. What were they? The Middle East was a terrible part of the world. Democracy was beginning to be something of retreat. Us Chinese relationship was worsening U S. Russian. Relations had worsened a long time ago. The European project had lost all momentum. Brexit was the big story. North Korea was busy building nuclear weapons and missiles Iran was beginning to press against its neighbors in all sorts of own ways. Many countries were erecting barriers. To immigrants will look now. All of those things are true time something. None of those things has changed for the better. If anything many of them are simply continued or gotten worse. I didn't even mention climate change. That should have been on my list. And what's happened is the reason. I'm worried is distracted for good reason where we began our conversation. We're turning inward so you have these things going on. We're going to have fewer resources to deal with them. Were understandably going to be spending so many resources to take care. Workers who have lost their jobs and the rest of the. It's a really bad combination. A world of some of these trans emerge newly-emerging problems because of the pandemic and United States and other countries. That are looking inward. I don't see how in that there's a recipe for obvious progress. We'll even before the code. Nineteen came upon us. There was talk that the United States was losing. Its position as world leader. Where do we stand now? Does that process temps had fi- or accelerate to really good question. We were beginning to or continuing to our position as a world leader less because of the rise of others though there was some rise in places like China more because we decided we were essentially tired or no longer interested in playing the role were Alito. It's so interesting in the world is people are always measuring power empowers important but what really matters for influence is power plus will power plus interest United States over. The last few years has been getting objectively stronger but our influences going down. Because we've lost a lot of our will to play a large role in the world. Plus the example we set is not one that many others want to emulate and that's where again the Dacoven nineteen experience as has rea- has reinforced fronts. So there's very little inevitable in history. I've been lucky enough to work for four presidents of the United States. You know wonderful really interesting experiences and my single biggest takeaway is how little is inevitable. So even though the United States has our the fact that we use it or don't use it that's the result of decisions that policymakers officials choose. Choose to make. So I think I'm prepared to argue that position. World is objectively. Got Worse. Not because it had you not because it was baked into any cake but we simply decided that we are going to walk back from our traditional roll. Meanwhile others are busy doing what they're doing from China to North Korea to Iran. Meanwhile I what I think is really interesting about this moment. Industry these global challenges like infectious disease like climate change like terrorism. The kind of thing we saw nine eleven you have this whole new overlay of problems in this global modern Europe again. That's what makes this demanding time and it makes the act of the United States seem to have lost its it's interesting playing a leading role that much more consequential because it'd be emergence of these new global challenges when you say we we had lost our will. Who is we interesting question looking when it comes to foreign policy under our constitution under our political traditions? An awful lot of discretion louder to belongs to the executive branch and ultimately to the president. I think you saw a slight degree of American loss of interest under the Obama Administration for example the The decision not to react to the use of chemical weapons by Sharia after the red line was crossed the decision not to follow up the intervention in Libya. The decision more broadly tobacco off the Middle East. I think there was a sense that the cost of farm policy gotten too high but that Pales into significance compared to this administration what is decided not to do the withdrawal for more international compacts than I can count in general the American first stock trend which is a signal to the rest of the world that we don't much care anymore. The lack of value of America allies at alliances. So a lot of this yes does flow from the Executive Branch from this administration and from this president And the American people though are to some extent involved with it because these are our elected representatives at some point we all bear responsibility for the the government. We have so when you look at the world today as it faces his his copay nineteen how would you characterize the international community's response to it compare contrast it to ask the? Us We may not like my answer. I don't think there is much of an international community is one of the phrases. People in my business is used a lot. I wish there will run if there had been one. We might have done more about various genocides. We might have done more prepare and perhaps prevent the pandemic like this. We would certainly be doing an awful lot more about climate change. So the fact is there isn't much of an international what we see around. The world is a whole range of outcomes some countries. If this were a clash should give them. Aides the South Korea's Germany. A few others where you see really competent leadership tremendous social discipline. Impressive in the number of lives lost is is very few and so forth other countries like the United States Russia and some other very low marks. So there's a tremendous range And but the collective response is. It's one of the ironies of this here. It is a global challenge. Everyone's affected but there hasn't been all that much ago global response. What we mainly see. Our national responses certain countries have been good about stockpiling producing protective equipment. Or have been good about fielding a effective accurate tests. I sound three again. Other countries like ourselves have not so. But we don't see much of a collective response of weather is R-.

United States China Middle East Richard Haass America North Korea Iran Richard Houses Richard Heroin Diane Richard Hearts South Korea Diana Wuhan Executive Branch Brexit rea
"international relations" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Meghna Chakrabarti. And this is on point. Cataclysmic events change the trajectory of human history. The twentieth century contained at least two of them World Wars that transformed nations and how those nations saw each other and work together. The Kobe global pandemic already holds its own place in history. Will it change? How nations work together. Though or the Lens through which they view themselves and the global community those are still open questions but want to begin to tackle them today and we will start with our own Jack Beatty on point news analyst in Hanover New Hampshire. Hello there Jack Mega Okay. So do you think that the global pandemic of Kovic Nineteen has the capacity to to bend the arc of human history in a new way in a new direction? Jack well it it it could. That seems to be one of the possibilities of the moment. Lincoln said the dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present as our case is new so must think anew and act anew no dogma of the past is more resonant in the US security establishment then that we need a huge defense budget of now seven hundred billion dollars a year to protect against foreign threats and yet on April sixteenth. Nearly two times the amount the number of Americans who were killed on d day died of covert. They weren't killed by a foreign adversary. They were killed by an invisible enemy from abroad but could've easily have originated here and the question is Is the is the idea of national security that dogma adequate to our current case suppose instead of spending seven hundred billion on defense we were spending a five hundred billion on defense and the other on on you know protecting ourselves against these new transnational invisible threats. Climate change is one of them. So it would seem that we're we're we're all money. I don't I'm not I'm not clear that even a dime of that. Seven hundred billion has helped protect us in this crisis and I think it's drawing attention to one of those preps plastic moments in history when countries can realize. Wait a minute. Our idea of national security and threats to it has to be redefined Because our cases new and we must think anew and act anew now in a couple of minutes. We're going to be talking with a veteran diplomat who served across four different administrations for different presidents. At least in in the United States here but but Jack this is an issue that's actually sprung up in a couple of conversations that we've had over the past couple of months. I just wanted to listen back to a moment if from our conversation with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright was just two weeks ago and she in fact Said something that you're reflecting on right now. She said this pandemic is showing US. That national security is no longer simply about guns and ships in spies. I would've seen it as a national security issue because what has happened. Recently is that health issues have become national security issues. Hiv AIDS and a Bola and an understanding that it takes working with other countries. That's former secretary of state. Madeleine Albright a couple of weeks ago but Jack I hear you saying that. Even if certain people at high levels of administration are are saying we have to reframe what national security is and I think they are and have been for. Some time are you. Are you saying that we have yet to see if that will actually transmute then to changes in policy where administrations decide to put their money? Like where we put our money where our mouth is essentially yes. We'll national priorities shift with a new perception of risk and. I think that should be one of the questions in the election. The president boasts that we of the defense budget. He says I've got I've it's the biggest in history. I'm so proud of it. We'LL JOE BIDEN. Step up to that challenge and say well no that's not defending us against adequately against our real threat. We need to curb that defense budget preps preps curtail some of our more ambitious foreign policy goals and direct ourselves to protecting us a Trumpian term the American homeland. Well Jack Stand by here for justice. Second because I like to welcome into the conversation Richard Haass. He's joining us from New York. He's president of the Council on Foreign Relations. Also a veteran diplomat who has served the United States under four presidents including as the senior Middle East advisor to President George H W Bush. He was also director of policy. Planning Staff of Under Secretary of State Colin Powell. He recently wrote an essay in foreign affairs. Magazine headlined the pandemic will accelerate history rather than reshape. It and we have a link to that at some point. Radio DOT ORG Richard Haass. Welcome to the Program. Good to be with you. There's much to explore a here in in your recent writings but I would like you to respond to what Jack is saying. He saying that this is a moment that could or at least should change the lens through which we view how we define American national security. What do you think about that? We'll let me say I'm about fifty percent Jack and fifty percent not okay. The fifty percent on with them is. He's right to say a madeleine. Albright made the same point that our notion of what constitutes national security needs to expand and it needs to expand to include things like Pandemics to deal with climate change US digital security. So we've we've got to take all that into account but the old agenda hasn't gone away. We still have to think about what Russia does look what Russia is doing in Ukraine in in Georgia. We still have to deal with what Iran is doing in the Middle East. North Korea has been busy building nuclear weapons and medium and potentially long range missiles sort at a moment in history where we have both old agenda for national sturdy. And we've got to expand it to to take into account this this new agenda the other area where I would take issue. Jack is Yes. We're spending seven hundred billion dollars on defense and that's a lot as a percentage of our Gross National Product. It's only about half as large as that number is. It's only about half what we average during the Cold War so I think we've got to keep it in perspective and we face a situation where we have all sorts of weak states. We have terrorism. We have proliferation threats. We do have a rising China. We do have an alienated Russia. So actually think the national security agenda that will greet the new president whether it's Donald Trump or Joe Biden is going to be enormous. It's going to have old fashioned security threats as well as new fashioned security threats including the consequences of the pandemic so I actually think it's not a time to cut the defense budget. What it is. Time to expand other aspects of national security spending. We ought to be doing much more in development date. We're going to have to do a lot more. In economic support for countries that are coming out of the the pandemic. We should be doing much more to deal with climate change and so on and so forth. So it's actually an extraordinarily demanding time. Where again we have the fusion of an old agenda with the emergency new agenda. Jack is honoring. Do you want to respond to that? Well there's no doubt that these other threats have are still there but I think that our perception of these threats which you know in the case of China is notional right. There's a big big expanding power and we're frightened of it and so on That that these notional threats have to set against the real the proven the empirical. The you know the warranted in the casualty reports threat that we see from Disease that we see from these invisible enemies and and I think it's a matter of WHA. What's the threat perception here? Are you worried about China? A rising China or are you worried about disease that could originate in China and that only through some cooperation with China. Can you can you combat that? Are you worried about China? Are you worried about the Chinese develop of an vaccine? Will they share it with an America? That seems to be hostile to it on on on. All security grounds. I don't know yes. We can't run away from the world on the other hand. The world has come to us in a new way. And I think we have to look at. We have to you know great are threat perceptions accordingly. Well let me just say it's not either or we have to be concerned about China's growing power and how it is using it over the last couple of days we seen for example a a crackdown and Hong Kong against democracy activists. We've seen China also be active much more certainly in the South China Sea At the same time we've got to find ways to cooperate with China For example on dealing with the pandemic and I think that's the foreign policy challenge when it comes to China is. How do we push back when necessary at the same time we protect areas of actual or potential cooperation? Say to deal with North Korean nuclear challenge to deal with global health challenges. That's a real challenge for American statesmanship I hope we're up to it. I haven't seen a lot of evidence that we are well. Richard Haass I'm thinking back to something. That Secretary Albright told us a couple of weeks ago. I mean she is. She reiterated her assertion that she is an optimist. When it comes to America's role on the world stage. She's she's an optimist she said a with. She's a cautious optimist. She put that qualifier in there. Do you share her same optimism right now. I wish I could say yes. I'm sorry to say I don't. I guess I would say. I'm a sophomore of a pessimist not happy about it and let me also be clear when I say. I'm a pessimist doesn't mean I think anything is inevitable on that defeat us. The lesson I draw from having worked for four presidents is almost nothing notable the people who are in positions to make decisions wields enormous influence. They can shape history. They can bend history Whether if you look at the other big crises of recent years was coming out of the Cold War. The things we did or didn't do when Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait or the two thousand seven eight Financial Crisis. Almost nothing was preordained. So I actually believe that people can can make history the reason. I'm somewhat more pessimistic than secretary. Albright Right now is over the last couple of decades since the Cold War ended. We've really squandered our influence in the world. We don't have a lot to show for you now have a rising China. You've got an alienated Russia. Climate change is far worse than it was We show very few signs of having learned from this pandemic Just to give you a more recent example. We're looking at a situation where millions of hundreds of millions of people around the world could face enormous hardship. Today's The fiftieth anniversary of Earth Day. It's hard to argue that the earth is in better shape than it was so my concern is simply that the agenda is is enormous and it's not clear to me where up to it. Well we are talking this hour with Richard Haass. He's president of the Council on Foreign Relations. He recently wrote in foreign affairs and article headlined. This pandemic will accelerate history rather than reshape. It will explore why he says that when we come back from. Break Jack Beatty on points. News analyst is also with us so.

China Jack Madeleine Albright United States president Richard Haass Jack Beatty Russia Council on Foreign Relations JOE BIDEN analyst America New York Meghna Chakrabarti
False rumors on coronavirus could cost lives, say researchers

All Things Considered

04:35 min | 1 year ago

False rumors on coronavirus could cost lives, say researchers

"Falls in covert nineteen the disease caused by coronavirus has killed more than fifteen hundred people and has spread beyond China but the World Health Organization says there's another threat spreading faster false information they call the spread of misinformation about the disease and info damask and we wanted to learn more about how coronavirus misinformation is spreading online so we're going to discuss it in our regular segment troll watch coverage from is a professor of biology at the university of Washington he researches the spread of scientific disinformation on social media and has been looking at coronavirus misinformation he's with us now from member station K. U. O. W. in Seattle welcome to the program thanks a lot though it's great to be here what are the myths that are out there let's start there there's a wide range of different stories that are out there they range from misinformation about simply about the rate at which the disease is spreading misinformation about how many people it's killing and then you get some really wild stuff out there like stories that it might have been a bio weapon it is not is there anything that could that could capture the imagination get people scared get people to spread them further so what's behind all this disinformation this misinformation what's behind it this is a really fascinating case because there are a whole bunch of different sources of the misinformation and they have a whole bunch of different motives disingenuous actors they wanna spread of misinformation to make trying to look as bad as possible and decrease trust of people within China for their own government and decrease trust from people outside of China and for the Chinese government they could potentially lead to various kinds of disruptions of you know normal international relations or normal international commerce and so forth I then you get people that are simply spreading misinformation for profit using this to sell you know snake oil treatments of various kinds and then finally there are a lot of well meaning people that are scared and are not able to get good information and are sharing that because they're trying to take care of their friends and family which is a very natural and human emotion of course why does this misinformation spread so quickly one of the things that's making the misinformation spread so quickly in this particular case is that there is a information vacuum there's a ton of uncertainty surrounding what's actually going on with this virus people are looking for answers that provide certainty most experts are unwilling to give answers like that because we simply don't know I can give you a very broad range of how infectious the disease might be how many people it might reach how likely it is to kill you but I can't give you a sharp number what people really want to hear the sharp numbers in this of someone makes them up and give states them in ways that seem authoritative those are the kinds of pieces of this information that are likely to go spreading rapidly across social media what happens when you get that wrong information I think they're a whole bunch of things go wrong when a when the public is misinformation about epidemic like this one is of course people may believe that they should be spending their money on some kind of bizarre health tonic that'll protect them when it actually won't another risk is misinformation can drive bad policy decisions so if people believe that this is a very very dangerous disease that's spreading very very rapidly that might be able to be controlled by strict nation level quarantines that can drive hardcore isolationist policies that will not necessarily help control the spread of the disease could even make it worse so how do you even start combating this misinformation we see that it spreads so fast and frankly it often looks like it's coming from somewhere that's reliable the main thing that I would encourage people to do is to try to pay attention to trusted media sources have you ever at any point seen mainstream media fact based media amplifying some of these stories that are out there of course especially in a fast breaking situation like this it's inevitable that you know fact based media make these mistakes we even see in cases where top scientific journals in the world published things that turn out to be false because we simply don't have the best possible information as fast as we want it and there's a premium on on immediacy what's good is the ferry very rapidly are corrected taking information that may be twelve or twenty four hours old from fact based media is often a much safer strategy than trying to find information from the last hour in the swamp of this information that is a social media represents

Coronavirus China World Health Organization
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"I think he's going to be piano here's the two questions I have first of all I worry that Steve Kerr is going to be to me what he did in two thousand fifteen and sixteen which is keep keep Steph from being great with those like sixty point games by sitting in the fourth quarter we can't have that I want all of that but also what do you the second thing he's GonNa shots he wants Eka create his own shot so you know I think he'll be fine but on other thing you mentioned I don't think they're going to be drilling people by as much so our hope for these fourth quarters now is these games are going to be a lot tighter support so maybe he'll he'll challenge challenge Kobe I'm okay with it I think he is going to get physical defensive attention we saw it looked we saw it with the cavaliers in the in the NBA finals couple years in a row that was sort of the book there's nothing you can do to stop this guy so let's just fits quickly overpower him and especially without some of the other guys they have to pay attention to I'm curious to see what happens I still would buy though I'm going to buy Steph curry stock over and over and over again because we've seen the proof I wanna get to James Harden who is leading all players but tennyson per game in the preseason dip to about seven and a half per game last season because he was the one shooting and is apparently no you cannot yet justice yourself in the NBA Do you buy or sell hard at ten percents per game this season basically leaning league I sell only because coming onto that roster is the league leader in assists and I just think Russia's going to have the ball on his hands enough that it will create yeah I know today Westbrook easiest sister Gordon have other guys that can shoot three's he'll get the assist of his career this season well we will see I I have no idea how this whole experiment is GonNa work which one of the most fun things for me going into the season I'm not sitting here feel better buying if Westbrook were better shooter off the ball like he's not a guy on a catchy the now you can kick it to him on the other side he getting go and I think that's true but he's not unlike Chris Paul who actually playoff the ball I mean that's not a guy you can leave open from three you can't pull it on Westbrook is not designed absolutely look I mean it's not unclear through the better shooter is great so in theory one should have the ball in his hands and passing to the Baxter will be with us next to discuss.

Steve Kerr Steph Eka Kobe cavaliers James Harden Russia Gordon Westbrook Chris Paul Baxter NBA Steph curry
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"Coming up we're GONNA play the stat market love this segment new on the jump this season should we buy ourselves I am seventy one percent field goal percentage those far stick around to find with the NBA preseason upon us that can only mean one thing ESPN fantasy basketball is back you can sign up now on ESPN DOT com slash fantasy basketball US WANNA know what goes with the jump fairly League draft is today this is with all of our producers producer Steve Looking to defend his title his team is the stone cold Steve Martinez I should also note that Danny was kicked out of the League so join a League out there William Kick League I believe it was a lineup setting issue you so I I do not gamble on basketball because I covered welcome back to the I'm GonNa ask gamble though because I'm Rachel Nichols I'm here with Marc Spears and Kevin Arnovitz and it is time to get into our numbers game here this stat market there's the opening because their numbers so of course you believe them it's more of would you buy stock that those numbers will go up or if as I williamson was the stock would you sell him because this is the best it's ever GonNa get and you WanNa make your money now so the first one is a doozy in four preseason Games Zion Williamson is shooting a whopping seventy one percent from the field in keeping in mind he shot sixty eight percent from the field last season to do so this is not an anomaly so Kevin do you buy or cells I on stock right now listen it's seventy one percent this is gonna sound like an insult but it's actually a compliment I'm selling because seventy one percent is like de'andre Jordan Rudy Gobert guys only take shots at the rim Zion is GonNa be all over the court I saw him hit a three pointer the other night he is going to be scoring from the elbow losing showing off the dribble there's he's not GonNa Finish in seventy one I suspect it'll be in the Oh sixty s and that's really good for a guy who's multi-purpose as he is I'm buying up seventy one I'm gonNA tell you by stats wise that's even better than what you mentioned in this Last Three Games he's made twenty nine to thirty six shots eighty percent he's making eight free throws per game so we're GonNa get a lot of easy buckets but probably made the most talent status preseason he against Rudy Gobert he had nine points three or four from the field and he made three or four free throws against Rudy Gobert one of them was a mess cutback turn around and dump if you could do that against Rudy Gobert I think he could do that again. A lot of guys play he's talking about was incredible I mean this guy I was I was a wait and see on Zion I've waited I've seen you know it's the only because this is the best defensive basketball player in the world in in eight within an eight foot range of the hoop he was defenseless against design Williamson. It's unbelievable this is going to be let's move onto another fun Guy Steph curry who's leading all scores this preseason averaging twenty nine per game Steve Kerr said over the weekend that curry at his is at his peak both visits the and mentally so mark do you by yourself curry dropping at least twenty nine a game and potentially leading the League in scoring again he was killed the Chase Center last week twenty five minutes late to the game but yet he had forty points with five thirty lifted third quarter why are you going around him out like that there is traffic ends of world but he was amazing in think about possessions that Kevin Durant is given up that he is now going to get and clay's not there the box score and it's like all those crooked numbers they actually had to expand the size of the column because the guy was like twenty three for thirty seven and the numbers are so wide that's going to be his stat line on a regular basis especially with clout he is going to leave the league in scoring.

Rudy Gobert Zion Williamson Steve Kerr basketball Kevin Steph curry Kevin Durant Kevin Arnovitz Rachel Nichols Steve Martinez ESPN Steve Looking US NBA League producer Danny Marc Spears
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"Healthy availability is the most important thing but also we'll just get you there you can get talent to the playoffs but winning a championship the question is the personalities like you might see happening Houston because the Personalities Work Russ James Harden you might see it happen in La the Lebron James and you might see at work just here with the clippers largely because quiet leader and then Paul George for number two score and he was sixteenth and usage I've been there and be effective so if the personalities Mesh I can see a championship run regardless of talent there so early it's going to be okay assuming it doesn't get reentered or anything and that's really the reason not to rush him back just want to make sure that he is really solid last week we discussed Tim Bontemps report on the Celtics decoding of Jason Tatum. This preseason tatum and Kobe have worked together over the last year and change and tatum was also one of the first Kobe subjects of the detail show on ESPN plus member new favorite word ever know Kobe didn't teach me anything bad everything we talked about and he showed me was great aright as if player today you would you like to see more or less Kobe in Jason Tatum's game this coming season every over we'll give you the same answer again. They want more Kobe Kobe mentally ready and if we're going to do this the Jason Tatum are we going to do this to Kyri Kawai Paul George Deren Fox were all working out with Kobe at the Mamba Academy this past season as well the the game is perimeter game and as greatest Kemba Walker addition is to the Celtics you need a dominant wing player a two three four two win at this level you look at the K D's the choirs Lebron's Alaska eight finals MVP's were wing so you need to lean into the potential of a Jason Tatum largely because I know you can bet on a Campbell or Gordon Hayward who are both twenty nine years old he's twenty one he showed us magic early yeah he sort of was off his second year but the fact is sixteen points if if you unlock the potential lean into the Kobe mind set I think you're gonna be fine I mean more endless I mean more in the sense that was a bigger perfectionist working on his craft in the footwork and the mechanics and I'm going to the single most lethal player from this position yes if Jason Tatum does that in at one hundred twenty percent level that's wonderful less in the sense that look don't think Jason Tatum is going to be as good as Kobe Bryant and as a result there are nights when dare use controversial statement here and I just think there are nights Win it can't be about your personal mythology and mono maniacal dry irrespective of what your other teammates are doing on the floor like like he he can't beat Kobe nobody can be Kobe and so in that sense I think he'd give us the four were shots of the night that he took last year you can eliminate those from the Diet that one in Boston Celtics more Kobe I want him to be more aggressive he's bigger stronger now and him being more aggressive also I think makes it easier for kimball walkers takes pressure off have more thoughts in the mid range but we're GONNA get into that because the Bulls Analytics Department wants Zach Levine to either shoot threes or attack Iraq the based on their calculations and trends across the League Levin said he's willing to accept their advice but push back a little bit on the notion of what a good shot is here's what Levine told the Chicago sun-times quotes I grew up being a fan of Michael Jordan Kobe Bryant Fan I think the mid range is a lost art now because everyone is moving toward the threes and the analytics I understand that because of how it looks how it sounds like it makes sense but sometimes there's nothing better than putting the ball in your best playmakers hands and letting him get the shot he needs rather than the one you want and I have lost thank said this as we have covered the sport for long enough that we've seen like the mid range the mid range don't know the lost art of the mid range the whole Cornucopia there yes three is more than two two is more than zero so it got the shot and you can take it and it goes in the basket that's good because if you were then working hard to try to get a three or working hard to put yourself in position closer that is just seconds off the clock that you might not be getting it and so I just economy and I I just think like no one is saying that if the guy is wide open at nine thousand nine hundred dribble backwards and take a shot people young players are being told that they are I hear it's a question of impulse control back I watch Zach when he takes a lot of stupid shots I think what the answer is it's not about there's some very good high-percentage two point shots cj mccollum and Kevin Durant can tell you that right I think the question is Zach Levine in their fourteen seconds on the shot clock and there's a very large person in your face they hand seventeen feet do you fire the ball or is it possible that your professional teammates might be able to manufacture a slightly better shot from three or two or one or zero Robert and like the bottom line is it's like the guy takes a lot of dumb shots and it's a reason the bad ti- but that's different from saying don't take shots don't just slow the shots are called the Koby kill spots that's why everyone is like trying to be a part of teen mom because those are the most effective mid range shot and if you look at those numbers it's so depressing like the Rangers and as you alluded to but to me it's just funny because it's a tug of war between coaches and their analytics departments and players who just want to play their game but the happy medium in my opinion is just okay Zach Levine if you're going to be the star this team if you're going to be the guy with the bomb their hands you have to be surrounded by shooters and you do have that capability with Lauri Markkanen and Otto Porter so don't feel bad about it but I sort of confused like this he's a pretty good three point shooter thirty seven percents point shooter we just see his highlights when he's dunking so I totally understand that tug of war you have to take the right shots but the right shots you have to really study and make sure you take them timing but if you're trying to be in a in an organization where you're trying to find your way you have to feel like you're the man and you can do what you can do but realize that it's not just you you have to be surrounded by people that will take the three because that's what you're coaching is mutually exclusive to the player on the team and for his game he could do it all I I really think he's going to be one of the top three scores in a league top five scores in the league he's going to put up thirty every night but it says athleticism the twos cool to threes or cool but I think he's GonNa get a lot of dunks and a lot of hype I love Dogs Yeah kind of point by the way when you say oh it's bad shutter good shot the mid range itself is not by definition a bad shot or a good shot three point shot is he referred to me Jordan hey look there you go the three point shot is yes a quote good shot if you're making them it's a bad shot not which by the way was the theory when these guys were playing why they took fewer threes now people are better at taking three pointers but you still don't WanNa take a bath three right unless your stuff in which case you can take any three you want the little man's don't like all these kids that's all they wanna do now yes I do think and that's why I said said today like it is true right that players are being told don't take a mid range shot no matter what not sometimes oftentimes being like this is the prevalence that's happening with coaches and like Chennai wish you can score at the Rim like you know what if you're gonNA shoot the long two of your foot just behind the three like that is what we're preaching to players that bad advice it's it's that advice in the sense that it takes away your rhythm the game for so long one way and now we're transitioning to a different way of basketball it's it's bad advice if the next thing you do after that is not going to yield at least two points yes again threes more than two but two is more than zero and if you have a two point shot lined up and someone saying no move yourself around do something else and that next thing doesn't yield the two it's in the two is better pretty true all right and with that today thank you so much for joining us today mark we're keeping you around and.

Kobe Kobe Jason Tatum Lebron James Russ James Harden Celtics clippers La ESPN Houston Paul George Tim Bontemps Kyri Kawai Paul George Deren F Kemba Walker Mamba Academy one hundred twenty percent twenty nine years fourteen seconds seventeen feet
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"The needle have to say I appreciate it to make misleading convert beverly thank you may confidence Marcus smart had a couple of no look plays over the weekend this past Robin Williams last night staff and this little steph curry has three pointer I want what do you think today Marcus Smart preseason offense no management here I feel like this is like the one legged move James Maybe we just keep it in the preseason until oh you knock it down once or twice consistently but it's cool I like I like the confidence I think we lose face I missed boostes checkout Nicola Yokich going for a windmill Dunkin practice well not maybe do we try in a game do we not chance of Yokich like trying to wrestle a live bear during a game other is wrestler for real then him I met I met both the brothers and I was like I'm of small he tried to pitch going on a driving road trip to drive to every single nuggets rogaine the day didn't touch and that might have been okay for you didn't professional wrestler yeah mystery check out this from Lonzo design for the long range let me see here he goes ooh rain what do you think of Lonzo Zion that will connect their I mean we thought long had a goods onto labron young even better in transition I'm here I had two thirds court pass to Lonzo underneath a couple nights later so this is going to happen in the end I think Lonzo Green Tea may present I think so it was great team you know who's GonNa Unlock Science Potential Zion Williamson Sarah Ago Miss Intense action here's Lonzo on the Brig tosses up alleyoop let Heaven was this for Zion or Brandon Ingram the answer is Zion and because if you're at the guy dishing the assist you want the more capable finisher so you can get that in Zion is a better finish all respect but at the end this was a two for one this is the problem that the Pelicans are going face entirely this is where teamwork makes the we'll see anything for Johnson the stat sheet what's up their legs space invaders music on the back I am not getting the joke make adoration the TACO fall experiences here to stay in Cranston Taco signed a contract with the Celtics over the weekend I am not sure it is happier about this me him I don't know come on he is the number one fan favorite in the leagues and Spud Webb. Ooh I'm thinking Bovin yeah he does know jump dunks lines and everyone in Boston could really use it just saying become Anthony Davis dealing with a sprained right thumb he heard it in the Lakers preseason game on Saturday all playing in China Davis had the MRI Adrian Watson ASCII reporting it came back Clean Kevin how concerning is this injury for a d send some injury history so we have some good news here first of all I think it's concerning marginally on two levels one is to the extent that the gap between number one number seven in the West is going to be really tightened you don't want to be playing game one on the first weekend of the NBA playoffs on the road the second for the Lakers and this is kind of a laker thing is if he's not around maybe they start out seven five nine and seven hundred eighty it's a team that's vulnerable to chatter to static and to the they don't play up to play closer to five hundred dollars to seven fifty ball now there's this all this way and then we start talking about Vogel's John then we start talking about everything else so like you want them to be situated in playing well in October November just sort of like like the keeps the wolves away from the door I ain't got no worries no problem Cooper's know if it's a thump spring that's something you can sort of manage the came clean that means everything is pretty much structurally sound people just don't some rob on to go out there and play yeah I know the worry the worry words are thinking about like you alluded to Rachel Almanac my back there's a long list that Anthony Davis has been I know my ankles everything my finger expert there's been long list of injuries that he's had but they're alden small Nixon knacks relatively healthy the last few years I think what happened early kind of maybe unfairly stayed with EXAC- but he's always at least sixty one games in the NBA with the exception of last year we're pretty much shutdown minutes research shows not an injury exactly precisely worried at all I think you know the other team in L. A. With Paul George that situation is a little bit more worrisome but right now present when your thumb spring you pretty much still good so we will get the Paul George situation to your point about the start though there's two issues with the early start they have to come out of the gate strong because of your point the chatter factor all of that they also have to come out of the gate strong because their schedule is soft at the front of their schedule when you are team that has a lot of national interest we've talked about this before on the show your schedule is beck loaded rape because you're on those prime time ABC Saturn in games those are going to be great you're also GonNa be what TNT wants on Thursday nights coming for the end of the season so teams the Lakers are scheduled for those games more rockets is a number of teams mattress to La and that means the first half of their season is a little bit of a later schedule because those marquee match chops are happening in the second half of the season if you don't do well in the first half of the season is not getting any easier chatter you talk about we'll only get ramped up she's not worried I'm not worried because I barely have opposable thumbs so it's a good rule of thumb none of us should be coming up we'll talk about Jason Tatum he will not be D- Kobe people he will not the Celtics forward said. Kobe doesn't deserve the blame for his sophomore struggles but the tatum actually need to be more like Kobe to stay successful in the NBA exciting thing to be able to talk about so stay tuned it's Wednesday on ESPN ESPN APP we will have another NBA preseason doubleheader for you Fox Knicks from Madison Square Garden at eight eastern then it's up to staple center for the warriors taken on the Lakers our coverage begins at seven o'clock eastern with NBA countdown and welcome back to the jump we are now joined by Marc Spears from the undefeated Mark Medina from USA Today showed some footage george working out prior to the clippers scrimmage against Melbourne united on Sunday for the video Medina also reporting doc told him PG won't be available for their first hand the regular season so this whole up Paul's Clippers debut would be November thirteenth against the rockets now our mark right here you spoke to Dr. verse is their urgency for the clippers to get PG back in action either by that date before that date maybe laughed about doc said he'll know in a week's time what two pregnancies was going to be what he's hoping for and he said Hey this isn't descript we want it but it's better than not having script at all so pause looking good he shooting good but he's not playing against anybody he's not getting any contact we do expect Hawaii to be back but as far as Paul George I think but week doctrinal lot more about as return yeah it's interesting to me I'm not worried again just because again you you alluded to it like having him is better than not having him mhm but when it comes to pull Georgia's production people forget he was number two in scoring at twenty eight points per game last year number one and steals like that's something you WanNa work and have at the beginning of the season especially with the difference schedule but at the same time I think the chemistry is going to be there largely because this is a good group you have no problems in the ownership you have no problems with the coach you have no problems with the front office yes you have a good solid team so he can just sort of jumped in there but you're right like as hooper you wanna go against Hooper's contact so when you're available ten games out it might be even earlier than that that you have to start like getting a rhythm back and that's something that the team will have built from the start of the NBA regular season death the defense teams that can absorb a loss leaks in the early in the season the clippers are designed to do that first of all there's a guy who can eat up possessions who's pretty good similar letter secondly they are the kind of personnel where I just you know baffling the heartless has been a starter at the three slash four position that they can help them more than tread water right and again they can win games absolutely even without Paul George the personnel that's a team that I was talking to one. NBA Coach you said you know what we're going to see a lot of teams go in and play the clippers and score eighty five points yeah this year and I just think the defense personnel the ability to win a game even if you don't if you have a little trouble manufacturing jobs on a given night when you have defensive personnel you can just win games early in the season against inferior opponents not miss a beat here's the bottom line on level of concern and let's say it's worse than November thirteenth let's say December thirteenth okay if The team was as constituted Paul George wasn't on the clippers right and then on December thirteenth came out and said we treated George you know what everyone would be okay with that and feel pretty good about the clippers chances I must say I feel okay that this is enough time in December two Kim in and make it into a good playoff run and they're not even doing that because he is around the team and all the chemistry stuff you're talking about we see them fishing together all of that kind of stuff the point of course these are all an easy going group of guys this is not trying to put in a real live wire into the situation rate for Lou Williams might art some games so maybe take some of that score jeopardize the whole six manage year issues going on there like it but he said he'll do whatever he wants me uh-huh she is really interesting to me especially when it comes to the clippers because a lot of people are either like building chemistry over years and that's where you see the championship teams win as you see in the Wbz insist firsthand we had a lot of town on our sports team but having that chemistry having the.

clippers Lonzo NBA Lonzo Zion Zion Paul George Nicola Yokich Lonzo Green Tea Kobe Robin Williams Marcus smart Spud Webb rogaine labron young steph curry Boston Cranston Taco Bovin
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

10:22 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"Today's opening ten draymond green and Diangelo Russel won't not plantain as preseason game against the Lakers nor will Lebron James a little too early for load management here what's happening what we learned from Washington Championship series of it's never too early for a head start on it current la sparks. I also weird saying former because it happens oh but it's it's one of the many notable things pass I'm very happy but you guys are here coming up we'll talk about Anthony Davis sprained thumb we've just got the results of his right good news for Lakers fans we will discuss that later I though so what did you guys get into last week anything interesting happen at work anyone's deal anyone else's launch at at the break room me I went to China with the NBA. Oh I don't know all hell broke loose you guys know what happened I'm not GonNa make you sit three long rehash of every detail except to point out the rainy of twitter being the outside business probably most responsible for shaping and expanding the NBA Culture in recent years and being a tweet that nearly took the whole thing down the entire experience was absolutely surreal particularly on the day that the Chinese government was removing all the banners an MBA sign inch that had been around town imagine if you're a Lebron or Kyrie or Anthony Davis and over a twelve hour period you're watching out your hotel window as lone worker on a cherry picker is ripping down your face strip by Strip not surprisingly this led to a pretty tense meeting between the two teams and Adam silver when he first got to Shanghai sources told me that several prominent players voiced their frustration to silver fueling in the middle of all this and it being asked to address the situation to local Chinese reporters before or even instead of silver himself being scheduled to do so I'm also told that silver was asked pointblank whether anything was going to happen to Daryl Morey because several guys felt that if a player had cost the league millions of dollars with a tweet there would be some sort of repercussion the answer of course was that the League is not going to discipline Maury what is going to happen to the NBA China though that is a lot more tricky last season more than six hundred forty million people in China watch some order NBA programming you could take every man woman and child in the United States and forced them to sit down and watch us on whiteside attempt free throws does and you still wouldn't even come close to that number so make no mistake the NBA in in the China business and will remain so but also I can say this after this past week it's an arguable that being in the China business is going to be more challenging for both the league and the players who promote shoes over there and that's not as bad thing there are big important issues at play here that deserve a high level of attention and I certainly wasn't happy that the League decided in the end to cut off all media access for the nets and Lakers entire trip if there's a league you're going to be over there and profit from it you have to be willing to questions about being over there and those questions aren't going to stop just because everyone's returned to the state the Lakers play the warriors tonight here in La I imagine there's be more than a few microphones present and the players in that meeting with silver were right for the large part it is they who will have to face them at least they do get to do it at home and only I will say I am thrilled to be back home as well bring on that break room fridge that's suddenly sounds just about my speed guys I think this the question of what's next for the NBA in China is an interesting one and you played in China Genetic Yeah I have played in China and it's really interesting because a lot of people have opinions about what's going on over there the NBA should be there or not but I don't think you understand how amazing the sport of basketball is until you go overseas witness basketball played and you see the Dan and how big the culture disorder gravitates towards this for everyone assumes that soccer's international sport basketball a close running second and I played China and I had an amazing experience I've played in the Hunan Province for law young we were undefeated on top of the world and you know it's funny my sister also played in China and cultures are different like she doesn't have a person that was a little bit more racist tall the cultural changes I was like eating the fish immerse myself in their fan countered those hard past the Fried Scorpion of I do think that China the appetite for basketball is there and at the end of the day what really hurts the fans again I played in China sister played in Russia close to Ukraine when things were literally popping off these are decisions that athletes have made over time to be there largely because it's an income but also because when you go there I realized that basketball is just a part of the community and the community doesn't have many choices but to engage in such a beautiful sport so I think it's a very very huge fraternity for the NBA to be in China now get the moral interests but at the end of the day to me the fans matter it's a fans that I saw skew Italy the fans my sister saw on course for the fans the young and my sister in Shenzhen Guangdong that's to me what matters most I mean I think what we've seen here's the here's what I mean for about a decade the League has been performing the magic trick which is it's established itself as a very progressive league that is interested in cultural and political issues at home while at the same time they've been able to cultivate this market without ever actually having to address some of the politically insensitive politically culturally sensitive issues over in China and that's all over now this to me in an era we talk about it on this show all the time player self-determination players more than an athlete Hashtag I'm a business common I am a global brand here's the thing being a global brand means the actually have to confront a lot of the challenges that come with being a global brand they're global brands that we know have entire hartman dedicated to governmental affairs public affairs that helped the basis of these brands you confront some of the questions that are facing it in wife's difficult what we learned is there's so many different constituencies went you leave the borders of the United States and by the way those constituencies aren't going to agree on every issue so how do you navigate it but I'm pretty sure the bass note basketball questions only is not a tenable strategy anymore if you have aspirations to be a global brandon I think players should of those aspirations you're going to have to approach it like a golden rain you're going to have to weather it is sitting down and talking with spurts having people advise you on how to navigate these oranges but I don't think it's unfair for people to say hey look you know their profits over there and that's fantastic how do you feel about extra why because basketball questions only runs counter two more than an athlete it can't be both I think players should embrace the challenges you sending your monologue but it's going to be very interesting to see especially players like Klay Thompson. Cj mccollum Gordon Hayward who deals with Chinese shoe companies that's their primary it's not that they're that they're trying to promote in China for their American brand there are as you say these prominent players there primary shoe deal is with the Chinese and that's going to be but it's a new day for them and again I think it's a challenge that should be embraced I think accountability but good thing and and but basketball questions only no that's not gonNa work I like the idea that when you talk about all of the advisers and people that NBA players in business with whether it be an agent or manager or someone who works with their shoes or someone who works with their press dealings that they all should now add some sort of global ambassador title to someone who is to your point I'm not joking I this is this is to your point that if somebody is sort of this global brand you need to start adding sort of the corporate layers that we see with apple with Levi jeans with all those kinds of things I have a question for both y'all I mean you played over there and you always who were there I think one of the things and trying to navigate this issue and understand what is next league do you sense that the anger is exists primarily at the state and party level in China or are there hundreds and millions of agree Chinese fans who were not going to go by the Lebron shoe when it comes up I mean that's the question is to the extent that there's indignation where exactly does it like I think it's possible for us uh-huh and I think when you you try to limit it to basketball questions only like the players don't want to speak on it I think we saw this with coach Steve Kerr is not that we don't want to speak it's just that there's a time a place in a person to speak and you have to be educated to one point however billion people's crises and and they're interested in what matters to that I'm on on a grassroots level on a local level on a national level like we are not necessarily as athletes qualified to answer those questions now I do think basketball questions we only works when it's like okay you're in a situation where safety can be handled and I think for the players and not have a platform to speak I think the we shape that largely because it's such a complex issue athletes want to speak but they want to speak from a position of power in a position of knowledge and it's hard to do that so I think that's what the league and the country sort of protected them from that situation I think that I think you kind of at some point have to let the questions be asked and then you have to have smart answers for them if you're going to be overseas as I do think by the way it is okay to sit here from a different country and say I have an opinion on this or that I just don't think that you can have an opinion that is speaking for an entire country read that you are not a part of and be have not spoken to every person for jokes I as well as Lebron James or Steve Kerr okay we'll be talking about so much more on this show including the results of Anthony Davis just came through Laker fans sigh of relief or is this just the beginning of any size of relief for the entire season we'll talk about that next on the jump I'm pretty sure a new house the hunt what makes you say that the furniture is levitating on the.

NBA China Lakers Lebron James Washington Diangelo Russel twitter Anthony Davis Cj mccollum Gordon Hayward twelve hour
"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on The Jump

"Welcome to it I'm Rachel Nichols here with our senior writer Kevin Arnovitz former WNBA number one overall pick today Goo McKay all of that.

Rachel Nichols Goo McKay writer Kevin Arnovitz WNBA
"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Near so amazing I am it was such hard work. I am sweating. You're spending and I'm sweating for no reason I sweat that was <music> are episode for today guys. We love you yeah so much. You are so much fun. We have the best time with you and if you like what you heard you can find us on twitter and Instagram at let's get cynical you can rate us. You can review us you subscribe to us and we will talk to you people. It's literally so much fine if you have questions if you have concerns if you're like wait a second. I didn't quite understand that part of it. We're here now. We're here to answer well. It's surely we love answering but yet we love you so much as we will see you next. When say I'm on and I'm rags and we play Roller Derby be together yeah we do? We also host this kick ass podcast called for our POW podcast so frau is a podcast that focuses on those really uncomfortable conversations racism and sexism sexism and mental health and physical health and basically anything that is gonNA become a really interesting conversation anything that kind of like this is your dad off the one that voted for trump. That's what we want to talk about. You can find..

frau twitter Instagram
"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"I strikes in disagreements and then response wants to strike so like when trump almost yeah nuked Iran yeah La vets which is a response to them shooting down a drone drone so it's like that it's that kind of stuff like you just don't know like they shut down a drone like we really couldn't have anticipated concert to a certain extent sure and so what's your response to that like that yeah yeah that moment of like uncertainty and lack of clarity relations. It's literally like every relationship with a man I've been in it. He just shut down my drone. Do I bomb him right. No not an accurate yeah. I'm so funny okay. I'm GonNa make so many comparisons verizon's to international rages and my dating life. It's going to be incentive strong choice. That's what I bring to the table Game Theory. I bring my reality okay. I welcome with open arms because like when you're dealing with sovereign nations yeah I know right. It's hard right there. Bitch of vary meaty bunch. They don't like nations like to do things that are in their own and best interest and so they're not going to do something for another country without getting something in return. Because why would you do that yeah and there are so there's many country Joe many different bad big eh types of leaders Lord. Yes there are a lot of personality through many a lot of a lot of colorful personality. It's like you can't what how you treat. Germany is not how you treat Taiwan. I know that's one hundred percent so there are four basic types of like I guess you could save force. Oh also I should say all of the all of the most of these notes ninety percent of them have come from. My <hes> Columbia undergraduate international repel yeah deduction international relations class though it's taught by Brooke Green so shaking notes I assure as fucked dig into course works online and download them again good. Yeah I mean I pay the money for the degree came in handy came in hand look. It's really come in handy right now. You are carrying this episode. Yes so therefore different types of force that countries can use against one another yeah. Do you want to do definition. I'm GONNA do gather motor definition and that's GonNa be me reading off the page. It's going to be incredible so the four basic types of force our number one defense that were you that is that is where you ward off attack and attack attack or limit damage. I Love it defense basic. I watch football. I got an okay. The second type of basic force is deterrence which is use threat of consequences to dissuade actor from changing behavior so deterrence just being like if you do this yeah we will do this. Exactly that is a bomb us will destroy your country or if you bomb you no one else a hey country if you Bombay country than we see country are got major foreign aid like short is is that you know like any kind of you could do that game too. It's not just about like a retaliation of physical four right monetary yeah yeah tariffs chiefs yep tariffs exactly the third basic type of force is compellance which is USA forced to change behavior so we're using force to encourage you to change your back. No you're going to compel compel compel the power of Christ. Come Palacio Iran. What's that proud of the exorcist? Okay thank you have you seen yes just had a moment of two priests going going the power of Christ compels you the power of Christ compels you and her body is like floating in the air and they're just saying over and over again being like God. I hope this work something six and then finally our body lowers back down. It's incredible. It's a along seen dialogue. The power of Christ compels you so when you're thinking of components in international relations I encourage you to think of the exorcist and Linda Blair floating player being up here and we're just trying bring her down here. My God that movie is so scary. It's very scary. I love it l. about movie so that's compelling so it's using force to change behavior Yep and then my favorite number four so wagonry which is when I walk in a room now swaggering show for prestige. You're just like your your flexing your flexing your muscle..

Iran verizon Linda Blair Palacio Iran La Brooke Green Joe football Bombay Germany Taiwan USA one hundred percent ninety percent
"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"international relations" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Every week works and sometimes it doesn't your face changing with all of those moments. I have a don't don't progressive upper later in the episode this typical I am Lizzy Stewart and I am Arden Wallet Hausky and today we buy we arden is going to be talking about international relations and I'm going to be asking asking a ton of questions yeah throughout this. We're GONNA talk about international relations like the theories behind it not any specific moment yeah time. We're not looking at like the U._S.. v China no go ahead. I'm Ann Hammond I and I know we're just looking at what is international relations and how to how do countries like interact with one another one of the various theories about that because much like domestic politics. It's kind it's about norms and there's no true guidelines. It's all about you know reading the room and what is this kind of dating it kind of injury and sometimes lives are at Stanford Yeah we are going to D- are defined the relationship. I'm so excited I I've looked through the notes that you've come up with and I can be honest that a lot of this stuff I have never heard of but I feel like happens every day every day and honestly like once you go once you have somebody tell you what international like what the different kind of contracts you can use to look at international relations are like when somebody tells them to you you're like oh it's actually fairly simple and fairly common sense and then you can look at given situations and be like oh I get it. I China is you know our relationship is fraught with China because they hold a lot of duck out of that anyway shout to China China High China. Hey you're listening. Hey hello so what is international relations you tell me who's out international relations. It's basically the most high-stakes kind of complicated Game Theory Great Question Number One. What is Game Theory? I have heard of Game Theory Yeah. I'm not going to attempt to divine it. I'm going to let you define it but I just want to note every time I've heard of something I've heard of game theory very so great got for me. Lazy Won Twenty Five. There's an I may fall on my face by the end of these four baiters in Boston. I will carry you and US through this episode. You just give you the sign and I will take over. What Game Theory is reading your notes great so game? Theory is a way to study or look at strategic interactions between various actors like and could you like and and Ayman Right Brad Pitt Matt Damon Brad Pitt Angelina Jolie rapid gymnast in like you say Jan Jan acid. I'm not I'm not editing that out you have it'd be held accountable for the atrocities that you make this room. Jan Acid who's that because I was trying to be cool and say jen asked was too far ahead Vange N._S.. Jen Ashton shout out to jam Assen friend of the show. It's not it's not if not Jennifer Aniston. I'm so sorry asked and you know what it's close to my idol in this life the person who I would go to war for Sean Astin yesterday who is an excellent actor sidebar from Game Theory. If you have not seen Sean Aston's work you are missing out on talking about Rudy I am of course talking about Rudy. Rudy is as an incredible film. It's an incredible film from a filmmaking standpoint from acting standpoint and it's about football I couldn't ask for more. I couldn't ask for more. I'm so I just Sean Astin if you're listening. I know you're not but if you were if I found out that you were listening that you knew that I existed would burst into flames. I burst into tears of holding my face..

Sean Astin China China China High China Rudy Jen Ashton Jan Acid Arden Wallet Hausky I China Lizzy Stewart arden Jennifer Aniston Ann Hammond Boston Brad Pitt Assen Matt Damon Brad Pitt football Angelina Jolie Ayman
"international relations" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"international relations" Discussed on Between The Lines

"The new interesting Feis in the election is San Diego who's a forty nine year old businessman, who's the running might propose Riyanto. He's proving quite a dynamic figure. He was. The most amick figuring the election the first election to bite week or so ago, he's going out on the election campaign trial doing the sort of things that Jacoby used to do when he was the front runner in the election when he was running for president making people think he appeals the young people. I think he's a face of a future Santiago Greg failures at right easy. The face of the future. I think you use. That's he's not the only fight for the future. Most Indonesian political observers any political actors believe that jacuzzi will lean we ne- election on seventeen to April this year. And so the real focused thing turns to twenty twenty four when the next election will be held, and it's people like Sunday ago. There's a whole lot of characters law came who younger more dynamic have cut their teeth in locally ship roles and ready for the next step. And so that will be quite an exciting regeneration of Indonesian politics. But we're going to have to white four or five years to see the melon. What about a judge's daughter is controversial? Attempts to release the jailed cleric accurate Basha. This is the Bali bombers, so-called spiritual leader has that backfired. Well, it has I think what you're saying. There is is a case of election campaign dighly tactics sort of triumphing longtime careful strategy, but I think on the other hand it also shows that date within needed an Asian system within Joko government. There are people who really inclined to Cape a lead on Slavic, fantasies and a bus. She is organization. And so there's been such a backlash against it. That is now on review and seems as I that's not going to go ahead. And let's remember the autobahn two thousand two Bali bombings killed more than two hundred people, including eighty eight Australians, if you just change in urine are in on, Tom. Switch them, I guess the professor Greg feely from the ustralia National University. And Greg Earl he's a former af correspondent in Jakarta. We're talking about the Indonesian elections in April now about half of Indonesia's. What is it about two hundred sixty five million people they younger than thirty extrordinary? Greg feely to what extent today? Subscribe to a more conservative interpretation of Islam. I think it's a divided. So that's a large group of people many teens millions of people and they feed across a religious political spectrum. So there are certainly these erasing trained of puritanism amongst many in that millennial group the why they can chew religion is much more conservative than what they parents obeying sorts of people who wear extremely modest clothing who disapprove of homosexuality and the like, but however, if we look more closely those people as individuals, we often find that their private lives, a still actually quite cosmopolitan. And so things are not quite as I say when we look at the reporting in newspapers when we look at surveys when we go to people's houses when we talk to them about what kinds of things I during the. Providence what Kanda personal relations? I have secure relations. I have often we find it's far more complex picture, but nonetheless of rule the chain these towards conservatism, Greg will agree with that. I think just because people publicly manifesting themselves as as more sly make doesn't mean fanatic. I don't think this sort of trained that you sing Indonesians being played at another society's appeal uniquely Indonesian one even in western societies in some ways and Saudis young people becoming more Christians in some places. So I think as in complex -ociety people look back to their traditions and old cultures. Sometimes cherry pick speaks of them and sort of return to them. Okay. So the consensus he is that we should really be allowed by these developments in Indonesia Gregg fairly. What are the implications? He for our relationship with Jakarta over the next five years. Well, I think one of the things to emphasize his both of the leading the prison candidates are not particularly Slavic figures. Even though they go to. Trouble to court these limit vote. And if he's Lomb was on a con of fundamentalist surge in Indonesia, you would say the presidential candidates, not the boss presidential candidates, but the presidential candidates having that kind of slamming fly, and I dont nonetheless for country Laka strata, we have to fact Islam elements more in our into our diplomacy..

Jacoby Santiago Greg Greg feely Indonesia Jakarta jacuzzi Greg Earl San Diego Riyanto Basha Cape a Bali president Kanda ustralia National University professor cherry Tom five years
"international relations" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"international relations" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With tom keene and lisa abramowicz i'm bob moon and this is the opening bell investors seem to be making no sudden moves as we start one of the busiest weeks of the year during which three of the world's major central banks will set interest rates president donald trump will meet with north korea's leader and uk prime minister theresa may we'll address rank and file lawmakers and urge them to back her on brexit let's check the markets now and the s and p five hundred is up a single point less than a tenth of one percent at twenty seven eighty the dow jones industrial average up twenty seven points that is a tenth of one percent at twenty five thousand three hundred forty one the nasdaq up two points less than a tenth of one percent seventysix fortyseven and that's your opening bell thom lisa bob moon thank you so much we've been trying to advance the conversation over the last number of weeks on our international relations did that earlier with the korean expert from columbia university and now joining us forever associated with the fletcher school tufts and with princeton robert hormats he's the former undersecretary of state for economic growth energy and the environment working with president obama and bob hormats of course for years a good supporter of what we've done here at bloomberg on the economy and bloomberg surveillance ambassador we are thrilled to have you with us this half hour you know graham allison it harvard who speaks of the tension between china and the united states where will that tension be if mr trump has a successful korean summit well i think a successful korean summit probably will be a relief in terms of the relationship between the two countries because the us has been pushing china to be more helpful to the cause of getting the north koreans to denuclearize and the chinese have been upping their sanctions under us pressure but also the chinese do not want instability in north east asia and if the summit were to fail the chances of instability would probably increase or at least the perception would increase that the united states and north korea going to get back into the sort of shouting match they had just before the the the current thought began to emerge the way this works bob is somebody gives up something and usually the.

united states harvard graham allison bob hormats princeton fletcher school uk president lisa abramowicz bob east asia tom keene china bloomberg obama robert hormats columbia university