35 Burst results for "International Labor Organization"

Decent Work and Physical Health

The Workr Beeing Podcast

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Decent Work and Physical Health

"Us about decent work yes so. This article is brand new. It was published this year in twenty twenty one and the journal vocational behavior. It's called decent work and physical health. A multi wave investigation and it was written by duffy. Prieto kim rak bugden and duffy Lot of people involved really interesting study and so what it looks at is it. Looks like this idea of decent work which we've talked a little bit about that but just to kind of give a definition so the first time decent work was defined it was defined by the international labor organization. And it was the. I'll just read the quote it's Opportunities for work that is productive and delivers a fair income security in the workplace and social protection for families better prospects for personal development and social integration freedom for people to express. Their concerns organizers participate in the decisions that affect their lives and equality of opportunity and treatment for all women and men. Yeah i would probably found life. I don't necessarily like the way that ends with all women and men and maybe not. Yeah i but yeah. I very good call but other than that. I like the idea of it Obviously you know it's all about having your work meet your needs So there's a couple of different ways that they've talked about it too so just like think about it. The concept a little more They say that work. That is decent Is defined in part by whether or not your compensation is adequate To give you time for non work activities so that means you know you only have to have one job instead of six jobs. try to make it right. Yep i guess so. That's a big piece of it too. And it's all related and tied into this concept this theory that this papers based on which is called the psychology of working theory. And that's basically that theory that when people get decent work it leads to more Work related and general well-being because their basic needs are met.

Prieto Kim Rak Bugden Duffy International Labor Organizati
"international labor organization" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on KOMO

"He'll force a vote on whether there could be an impeachment trial. Now that Donald Trump is no longer in office, the issue might spur litigation. There's no precedent for a former president to be impeached upon leaving office, so that truly is new ground. Listen. Lauren is a professor at the College of William and Mary Law School. She says The expected trial is different from the last one more clear cut in that the factual questions will be Easier to prove, because both of the people in the room as jurors were also there at the time of the insurrection. The trial set for the week of February, 8th on the pandemic, the USC is above 420,000 deaths. Republican opposition to President Biden's nearly $2 Trillion relief packages Mounting, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki says time is running out for Americans relying on jobless benefits We're going to hit Cliff and unemployment. Cliff unemployment insurance cliff. I should say in March, where millions of people won't be able to have access to unemployment insurance. We're going to hit a point where we won't have enough funding for vaccine distribution. The International Labor Organization, a United Nations agency says the pandemic wiped out four times as many jobs last year's during the worst of the global financial meltdown in 2009. Among executive orders signed Monday by President Biden, one mandating the government by American There's a B C's Andy Field. President Trump promoted by and made in America, President Biden now ordering it for anything federal agencies purchase the president will put to work. Nearly $600 billion in taxpayer dollars. That goes toward federal contracting and support of American manufacturing and good paying jobs Spokesperson Jen Psaki, saying they will close loopholes that gave some foreign companies an advantage and supplying the federal government and he failed. ABC NEWS Washington You're listening to ABC News..

President Biden President Trump president Jen Psaki America Lauren Cliff federal government ABC ABC News USC College of William and Mary La International Labor Organizati professor United Nations Washington White House Andy Field
Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

UN News

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

"New data on the economic impact of covid. Nineteen has confirmed what many have been thinking. Workers haven't been hit like this in generations. According to the international labor organization ilo people trying to earn a living suffered massively in two thousand and twenty after the corona virus started spreading globally. Early last year. Ilo director-general guy. Ryder told journalists on monday that the impact has been four times worse than the last major financial crisis over a decade ago. This has been the most severe crisis for the world of work since the great depression of the nineteen thirty its impact is fault greater than that of the global financial crisis of two thousand nine when comparing with the law school Twenty nine teen. We now see that eight point. Eight percent of global working hours will lost in the course of the year. And that is the equivalent of two hundred and fifty five million full-time jobs. These lost working hours came from reduce time at work or what is called unprecedented levels of unemployment that affected one hundred and fourteen million people. The said that pandemic restrictions may have accounted for the bulk of these people leaving the labor market either because they were unable to work or because they stop looking the un body said that these massive losses resulted in an eight point. Three percent drop in global income from work equivalent to three point seven trillion dollars or four point four percent of the world's economy not taking into account cash subsidies for workers.

ILO Ryder Depression UN
Discrimination among reasons why migrants earn 13 per cent less than locals:

UN News

01:20 min | 4 months ago

Discrimination among reasons why migrants earn 13 per cent less than locals:

"If you're a migrant chances are that your pay packet is considerably smaller than other people's where you work. That's the finding of a new report by the international labor organization ilo which is found that the wage gap between migrants and national workers is thirteen percent and growing. The wage gap was highest in cyprus at forty two percent with italy at thirty percent and australia at twenty five percent for the european union. It was less than the global average at under nine percent. Gap may even widen further because of the nineteen crisis. Ilo said on monday. Based on data from forty nine countries that host half the world's migrant workers wage discrepancy can be explained in part by differences in education skills and experience. But discrimination is the main reason why migrants earn less said eiloz michelle later chief of labor migration brunch tackling discrimination in prejudices that are deeply entrenched in the workplace and our society is more important than ever and addressing the migrant pay gap is not only a matter of social justice. But it's also important to reduce inequalities between women and men to reduce income equality between households and basically to reduce poverty overall women migrants face a double dose of wage discrimination warned as they often work in domestic or caregiver settings and in less than nationals and less than male migrants on average

International Labor Organizati ILO Eiloz Michelle Cyprus European Union Italy Australia
"international labor organization" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:07 min | 6 months ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"212857. 9630 This election. Voter turnout could be the highest in Harlan County, Texas, home to Houston, a record 128,000 people voted in person and the first day of early voting last week, 115,000 the second day 105 the next. It's hardly slowed down since now early, voting a smashing records across the country in North Carolina, Georgia and Michigan. All the swing states in the race for the presidency. Have you the surpassed or are approaching 40% of the overall 2016 turn out more than 41 Million people have voted early, either in person or by mail for any Bennett reporting. It may be futile. But Senate Democrats never the last plan to boycott the Barrett confirmation vote of the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday. Senate Democrats are set to boycott voting on Supreme Court justice nominee Amy County bear to the Senate Judiciary Committee. But there is little they can do to prevent Republicans from confirming the president's pick before Election Day. Breaking news and analysis. A town hall daikon. A quarter buyer spend. Abacus slammed the apparel industry, leaving middIe of the 65 million Asian garment factory workers struggling his factories close or cut back on wages. The International Labor Organization is urging the industry to do more to protect their employees in Iowa Report notes that imports from major garment exporting countries in Asia plunged by up to 70% in the first half of 2020. Imports are still well below levels before the crisis hit, costing many workers their jobs. His factories closed or cut back on production that has had dire consequences for those working in the industry, most of them women correspondent Jeremy House. California Pills Court has ordered state corrections officials to cut the population of one of the world's most famous presidents to less than half of its design capacity. Outside of official deliver it. Indifference to the plight of inmates during the Corona virus pandemic state prison officials Can appeal. This is townhall dot com. It's hard to know who to trust when selling your home. If you're retiring, you're looking to sell.

Senate Judiciary Committee Harlan County Supreme Court California Pills Court Abacus North Carolina Houston International Labor Organizati Bennett Amy County Jeremy House president Barrett Texas Michigan Asia Georgia Iowa
UN Agencies Release Joint Statement Noting That COVID-19 Has Presented Unprecedented Challenge To Public Health and Global Food Systems

UN News

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

UN Agencies Release Joint Statement Noting That COVID-19 Has Presented Unprecedented Challenge To Public Health and Global Food Systems

"A group of UN agencies released a joint statement on Tuesday. Noting that the COVID nineteen pandemic has not only led to dramatic loss of human life. But also presents an unprecedented challenge to public health food systems and the world of work according to the International Labor Organization Food and Agriculture Organization. International. Fund for Agricultural Development and World Health Organization tens of. Millions of people are at risk of falling into extreme poverty meanwhile, millions of agricultural workers, worldwide face high levels of poverty malnutrition, and poor health adhering to workplace. Safety Standards Health Practices and labor rights are crucial to cope with the crisis. Effectively, the agencies underscored now is the time for global solidarity and support the statement spelled out especially with the most vulnerable in the developing world

Agricultural Development And W International Labor Organizati UN
Impact on workers of COVID-19 is ‘catastrophic’: ILO

UN News

01:20 min | 7 months ago

Impact on workers of COVID-19 is ‘catastrophic’: ILO

"Covid. Nineteen has had a catastrophic impact on workers the head of the International Labor Organization Ilo said on Wednesday with lost working hours higher than originally forecast and equivalent to four hundred and ninety five, million full-time jobs globally in the second quarter of the year. The bleak news from Ilo director-general Guy Ryder, coincided with an updated media forecast from the UN body lower and middle income countries have suffered most with. An estimated twenty three point three percent drop in working hours equivalent to two hundred and forty million jobs in the second quarter of the year workers in developing nations also seen their income drop more than fifteen percent Mr. Rider told journalists in Geneva the greatest impact was in low and middle income countries. On top of this, these are faces where there are the weakest social protection systems. So there are very few resources or protections for working people to fall back upon. You. Look at it. Regionally, the America's with worst-affected withdraw in labor incomes of just over twelve percent twelve point one percent Mr Rider highlighted that while the governments of rich countries have short up their economies with hundreds of billions of dollars poorer nations have been unable to do the same without such fiscal stimulus working hours. Losses would have been twenty eight percent between April and June instead of seventeen point three percent he insisted.

International Labor Organizati Mr Rider ILO Guy Ryder Director-General UN Mr. Rider Geneva America Covid.
UN agency: US-sought tanker 'hijacked' off UAE now in Iran

Wealth Creator Radio

00:18 sec | 9 months ago

UN agency: US-sought tanker 'hijacked' off UAE now in Iran

"Nations agency says the U. S. Saudi oil tanker hijacked off the coast of the Arab Emirates after allegedly smuggling Iranian crude oil is back in Iranian waters. The International Labor Organization says the empty Gulf sky was hijacked July 5th. It says All 28 Indian crew members disembarked in Iran

Arab Emirates International Labor Organizati Iran
International Labor Organization: 1 in 5 young people out of work due to pandemic

Phil's Gang

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

International Labor Organization: 1 in 5 young people out of work due to pandemic

"Says worldwide one in five young people have stopped working since the onset of the providers in you analysis of the impact of the pandemic on employment the young lady says it's inflicting a triple shock on young people it's destroying jobs disrupting education and training and creating new obstacles to those seeking to enter the labor market move between jobs the agency's director general guy Ryder said young people especially women would being hit harder and faster than any other group without immediate action to help them he warned the legacy of the virus could persist for decades the report calls for targeted government measures to assist young people get jobs and training the BBC's

Ryder BBC Director General
One in five young people has stopped working since the pandemic started

Hugh Hewitt

00:39 sec | 11 months ago

One in five young people has stopped working since the pandemic started

"The international labor organization says worldwide one in five young people have stopped working since the onset of the providers in you analysis of the impact of the pandemic on employment the young lady says it's inflicting a triple shock on young people it's destroying jobs disrupting education and training and creating new obstacles to those seeking to enter the labor market or move between jobs the agency's director general guy Ryder said young people especially women would being hit harder and faster than any other group without immediate action to help them he warned the legacy of the virus could persist for decades the report calls for targeted government measures to assist young people get jobs and training

Ryder Director General
COVID-19: massive impact on lower-income countries

UN News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19: massive impact on lower-income countries

"In nineteen lockdown containment measures threatened to increase relative poverty levels among the workers in the informal economy by as much as fifty six percent in low income countries says new briefing paper issued by the International Labor Organization ILO IT similarly bleak in high income countries where relative poverty levels will likely rise by fifty two percent will the middle income countries will see a smaller increase of around twenty one percent as many as one point. Six billion of the world's two billion informal sector workers are affected by current avars containment measures most working the hardest hit sectors including hotel and food services manufacturing wholesale and retail and among five hundred million farmers producing food for urban areas. Women are the hardest hit overall with no benefits. These workers have no choice but to carry on. In order to feed their families which is endangering government's efforts protect the population and fight the pandemic. It may quickly become a source of social tension in countries with large informal economies. The report says

International Labor Organizati
25 Million Jobs Under Threat From Pandemic, ILO Says

UN News

05:54 min | 1 year ago

25 Million Jobs Under Threat From Pandemic, ILO Says

"Early indications from the economic fallout of Kobe. Nineteen that he could cost up to twenty five million job losses. Globally that's more than during the global financial crisis in two thousand eight to nine speaking to you and US Daniel Johnson Shove Eric. From the International Labor Organization ILO EXPLAINS HOW GOVERNMENTS CAN HELP. Soften the impact for vulnerable works. The Island has made some clearly estimates to look at the impact of covered nineteen crisis on the labour market using islas models. We've come up with an initial estimate that ranges from five point three to twenty four point seven million so the figure of twenty five million is wiped. We have called a high scenario but given the way the crisis has evolved further deterioration economy. This looks increasingly likely. As a scenario for the impact of the shock that the economic shock on the labor market around the world. Now just to put that in context unemployment in two thousand eight nine increase by twenty two million during the global financial crisis so we are looking really at a crisis that is potentially greater than global financial crisis in two thousand and eight nine. Yeah and you also say the the International Labor Organization that it's going to cost globally three trillion dollars or thereabouts. Maybe three and a half trillion. But I think an interesting question is you did bring up the two thousand and eight financial crisis. How many jobs were regained in the economy after that? How long did it take for the recovery? I suppose so one of the key lessons of the global financial crisis and also early crises. That that type of situation in that recession that hit the world takes a long time not only for the economy to recover but in particular the labor market and we saw that it took a number of years for unemployment levels to return to pre-crisis levels in some cases sure and before we get into the policy recommendations from the low to help cushion the blow. Maybe you could tell me how which sectors really are going to suffer. I mean you mentioned in the report that self employees particularly in developing countries going to suffer. Because there's a lot of restrictions of movement on people for example and the move to goods as you've already said so. How are they going to cope in the meantime? That's right so we see a number of under abilities in terms of sectors. Of course they're not only issues in the manufacturing sector which we saw early on when the crisis started in China. But what we see. Now it's strong impact on the service sector so given the constraints to the movement of people and how we're working the border closures. Quarantine majors we all of course necessary to contain the spread of the pan-demic but these are putting major breaks on the way we consume. That's affecting the service sector so retail of course tourism is suffering very shop and severe shock as we speak a group that is particularly vulnerable in. This situation. Are the self-employed because the self-employed need their own safety. Net most countries are relying on their own savings as a safety net and then in in particularly in developing countries. Most of the self-employed don't have that luxury and they don't have access to social protection so they are very vulnerable to losing their income and their livelihood for a period of months which will have a very significant impact on them and their families and really poses a risk of a deterioration in working poverty. As we've pointed out as well so are we going to help them? What can we expect the International Labor Organization to do? And how is it going to do it? We need to see decisive response now. Needs to be coordinated. This is a very important message that has brought out that we saw in two thousand eight. Nine coordinator response is going to be more effective. But we've also highlighted three areas that deserve policy tension and that's protecting workers in the workplace particularly from the direct effects of the pandemic secondly stimulating economy to stop it from collapsing and thirdly supporting employment and incomes in different ways so I think when we look at stimulus that is really being announced by many countries is absolutely critical to ensure that the economy doesn't further collapse and bottom out so we see this informs of fiscal policy accommodative monetary policy. But then really what we need to see and number of countries is stepped up in this area but needs to be done consistently across all countries is special support not only to large enterprises which are important but also smaller enterprises and self employed. So this can come in different forms. It can come in. Forms of guarantee subsidized loans grants. We've seen in a number of countries already. Texas relief relief on other types of costs that the businesses facing because really the east to ensure that those businesses remain in operation. And they're ready to take things forward once a recovery gets underway simply for women and other all workers. We're proposing measures to as much as possible for employment to be retained so these also involves subsidies and types of relief for employers to keep workers on board in many European countries have different types of schemes such as the courts I bite in Germany etc. Other countries need to experiment with what type of support that can give businesses to keep workers in place and this is really critical because of you know we're talking about the service sector. Some of these games may not be as extensive as it is in manufacturing and then because there are many workers who are not covered by regular employment relationships we have casual workers. We have other unprotected workers. It's really also critical to see what other support can come in the form of social protection for women but also in household in general and it's also critical to reduce the burden on women. Because in this situation the extra burden is there in any case is being exacerbated during these time so you know support on paid care leave sick leave that is needed and we see of course in advanced economies but these extra measures are needed. All economies to ensure that workers self-employed women etc. Have that type of support during this

International Labor Organizati Daniel Johnson China Self Employed Germany Eric Coordinator Texas
Coronavirus could see global unemployment rise by 25 million: ILO in India

UN News

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus could see global unemployment rise by 25 million: ILO in India

"New assessment by the International Labor Organization Ilo shows the cove in nineteen pandemic could increase global unemployment. By around twenty five million. Arlos calling for an internationally coordinated policy response. Which would be of particular benefit to South Asian countries like India since a large part of its workforce lack social security and employment benefits. News entry. Shama spoke to the director of arlos decent work team for South Asia based in the UN's India Office Dot Malta. We have learned from two thousand eight nine. Financial Crisis at the coordinated. International Policy Response will be much more effective in getting out of this crisis and limit The rise for example in an employment. And what I mentioned before. So really to protect workers in the workplace to stimulate the economy and employment and also to safeguard income for workers. So that would mean for example extension of social protection also finding ways of part-time work fulltime work teleworking and see how how the social partners can respond to this and likewise with the government help to extend actually schemes so how is assisting the countries especially India to fix the situation which is vast right now. Yes we have two major tools. That really can help also instill confidence and trust in the population in particular to favor social dialogue dialogue between the government workers and the employers about the measures solutions to be put in place and at this important actually to have Workers and the people really to idea to them so that implementation becomes effective likewise we have seen before in crisis situation how international labor standards are proven instruments. Really that become build upon to have a common policy response in for example. We have an instrument that this piece of resilience and working and decent work in this context. So that is just one example so we will certainly work. Was everyone the United Nations all our partners and of course their constituents to support this crisis response from the workplaces shutting down in the context of especially where majority of the workforce and then formal economy. What policy measures do you think would help the workers daily which are in their formal sector? Of course they are kind of hard hit because the global economy supply chains said for a grinding to a hole in this scenario. And what we see is that existing schemes that are already there can be used to be topped up and also in particular reach out to more likewise micro small and medium enterprises are really the backbone of the economy in the unorganized sector here in India. And it is important that they get support from the government in terms of for example in benefits that can be extended to also that the balance and the private sector can support this economic local economic tissue. Really that is so important also for for building but really to save these jobs and for social cohesion in particular any message that I would like to give. Yes really I think. In this crisis times is most important to have a heart is that health needs to reach the people because they really need to be reassured and they need to play a role in this is also visit viruses so it is very difficult to come out and say well I am ill at work or something. Don't can't even afforded but even if you are in a work place. You may not want to do that because you're afraid of losing your job. So people centered approaches of essence at the

India International Labor Organizati South Asia India Office Dot Malta Shama United Nations UN Director
Coronavirus shock will likely claim 3 million jobs by summer

Motley Fool Answers

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus shock will likely claim 3 million jobs by summer

"All being told to hunker down and not leave the house which means many industries that rely on US leaving. The House are hurting and already cutting hours and laying people off of course initially the hardest hit our restaurants retail and travel. It's just it's so painful to read all the articles about the job losses going out there. It really is. It's sort of like being on the beach and just seeing tidal wave coming. It's going to hit. Yeah Yeah So. According to Challenger Gray and Christmas they estimate four million. Us restaurant workers are GONNA face. The risk of layoff was layoffs within weeks as more cities and states shutdown restaurants Marriott International for example. They said they would be furloughing. Tens of thousands employees worldwide the US Travel Association is projecting that four point six million jobs will be lost this year and the travel industry alone. Labor Department reported that about two hundred eighty one thousand Americans filed first time claims for unemployment. That's up thirty. Three percent according to Economic Policy Institute they estimate that three million jobs will be lost by summer and according to the UN's International Labor Organization. They think that twenty four point seven million jobs. Globally are in jeopardy.

Us Travel Association Marriott International International Labor Organizati Challenger Gray Economic Policy Institute Labor Department UN
"international labor organization" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"International labor organization credits Thailand with improving working conditions in the fishing and seafood processing industry but says the series abuses including forced labour main Thailand seafood sector accounts for billions of dollars in exporters annually and employ more than three hundred and fifty thousand workers however the industry began facing the threat of trade sanctions from western nations have for media exposure in two thousand fourteen of poor working conditions and especially the exploitation of fishing slaves forced labor in response Thailand's government began instituting reform measures most effectively by strengthening its legal policy and regulatory framework course by Jeremy house the Jerusalem District Court announced on Sunday that it was postponing Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's criminal trial for two months because of restrictions arising from the operator the coronavirus that Yahoo scheduled appear in court Tuesday this is town hall dot com an iconic race is nearing an end but a crowd of irises probably officials to ask people not to come and watch officials with the Iditarod trail sled dog racer encouraging fans especially those from out of state not to travel to gnome for the finish of the race citing concerns over the coronavirus Alaska had its first positive test on Thursday and since then cities and schools have closed many public facilities and that's happened in nome where the winner is expected by mid week the race goes on though but even Iditarod's paring down was central race personnel only for the finish and race checkpoints leading to gnome of been moved outside of at least two rural Alaska villages Ronda Racha reporting budgeting baseball suspending spring training and delaying the start of the regular season Cincinnati Reds pitcher Trevor Bauer and David carpenter trying to organize a sandlot baseball game in Arizona to pass the time our invited any major and minor league players in Arizona.

baseball David carpenter Reds Cincinnati Alaska coronavirus Alaska prime minister Jeremy Arizona Trevor Bauer Thailand Ronda Racha Iditarod nome Iditarod trail Yahoo Benjamin Netanyahu Jerusalem District Court
Passion and story-telling central to wine business

UN News

09:33 min | 1 year ago

Passion and story-telling central to wine business

"Passion and storytelling a tour of the key ingredients to become a wine expert according to so Michelle Gaetan. A certified smiliar based in New Orleans in United States biscay tone transition from politics to event management and then became came one of the minority of female semillas currently working in the US. She spoke to the International Labor Organization as part of a photography project to mark the the centenary of the establishment of the UN agency. The project cold dignity at work the American experience documents the working life of people across the United States Kevin Cassidy the director of the Islands Office for the United States sent down with her during a tasting event at a wind. Cornball in New Orleans we focus on education that's the main focus here at Swirl I'm a consultant. I work throughout the city. This is one of my main stays. It's one of the places to work at because people come in You know for education for Great Selection Beth. The owner does a great job of selecting electing wines. That are Boutique Artisanal. That's what we focus on so we pour by the glass we retail shop so by the bottles well and a lot of seminars seminars. Which I've been part of Teaching some of the seminars as well so lot of educational efforts here. Did you ever think you'd be doing this. Show twenty years ago I was in D.. We see in politics. I got the hell out of After a very successful race but after that I worked in event management and With a company that was global so I traveled the world but wine and food and people were passion New Orleans is home Tom. I came back five years ago. So what was the inflection point. When did you decide? This is what I'm GONNA do honestly. I was was working on a yacht in in Europe for the company I worked with and I was planning. I planned this big event I loved wine at the time I was interested but when it became a passion and it just became an obsession with this one point out on the after the event the stewardess of the yacht came up and said. Would you like a glass of wine. I was exhausted ahead. You know planned all the travel arrangements for everybody participating summating everything from sunup to sundown and when she gave me a glass of Chardonnay. And I wanted to call bull I tasted it and it was burgundy which I knew the difference between American Chardonnay and and French Chardonnay. But that was the moment when I realized that even within one region lesion burgundy you can have so many different styles ones so at that point it became an obsession and a star trek to get certifications and be where I am today. She wanted take to be certified a lot of drinking a lot of tasting a lot of study. It's very very difficult to test a hard Certification and then I've been through the third level To go on to get your masters I've had colleagues. That have stopped stopped working because they need to study for several years years I decided to move back to New Orleans. My job as a master here would not be worth it. I would have have to go elsewhere so I haven't pursued the master level but I'm very happy with where I'm at but it's a Lotta work. It's it's a lot of studying a lot of work and I don't think most people realize realized you drink for a living. Well really I mean kind of but It's it's it's studying is intense. You give me an example apple of something that you doing recently that you thought this is exactly why I do what I do. I mean that's almost every day. I work in my environment when I introduced somebody to something that they he wouldn't have fathomed. You know people people nervous they. They are scared to say a lot of people are scared to say. They don't know a lot about why but they say oh well. I love of calves but as soon as I give them what I love to do is just give them a simple TESA. Tell me you like bold reds and give you a taste of something completely different that you know you haven't heard of just now. I just poured a pig near leto sparkling wine which is from Italy for somebody and then this. It's amazing how good you know but it's to give people that experience that says. Wow this is cool. You just opened my you know. I just opened their mind up to something something new and different and unique and for me. I go home happy end of the day if somebody's had a unique experience because that's how am I passed. That's how I got started. I had a unique experience experience on a yacht. I like when people leave with a unique experience. I can go home and sleep. You really truly a teacher. I am an educator. I love a love. Educating three characteristics that really important in your business would've three skill sets. Maybe passion is number one because the money is not in this job. There's no there's a lot of money passionate number one number two is Yeah Culture and people and I feel like I'm from New Orleans is a lot of culture in my town in my blood but the the culture what I'm talking about when I say culture culture is the storytelling behind the ones. I think that's so important. It's not about like you said it's not about the technical. It's not about you. How long were the groups mass reading on the skins or how much Mala lactic fermentation to get through? Its you talk about the families and the people behind these wines. I I like stories. That's more of a selling point than the technical data in any level of understanding at my level. You know I appreciate it. Why less because of technical nickel data more because of the story and what? I'm tasting the experience of that moment to read to absolutely being in this industry for a long time and in different states and working in different positions from either selling wine or buying wine and working with customers. A lot of people. Ask me well. What's your favorite wine? which should I drink today tonight? which should I order woods. The best wine. What's the best pairing? My my first question is what do you typically like a woody in the mood for because if I give them my favorite everybody's different so you have to read people so you have to kind of almost dissect their pallet before you recommend to Just more on the kind of job side of things now. You mentioned that in order to go to the higher level. You'd probably have to move from New Orleans but your choice desires to stay here in your hometown so to speak so she wouldn't look mean to you. Workers Important obviously but family in culture very important to so for me. It's finding the balance between my work. My Passion my family culture. That's what working in Sydney. You're you're following it. It's not even just passion. What I often hear from people is that this is my gift on very good? I think I am. I've I've been told that but yes I it's not just passion you have to have maybe a gift or an act but I think that that gift. Your Napkin come with passion. You know you can develop that when you have the passion to develop it and mindedness Chris above until you work before in Washington and you've moved on and you've worked on that boat and you we're putting together planning for Party is now the some a and you have another job that you do as well to to make ends meet here. Yeah so what What have you learned about About yourself and the world around you in in the world of work shall we say and I have learned that that I love experiencing other people in other cultures but also a to be very open to opportunities and that has gotten me along way because there is some opportunities that came. They were presented to me that I I almost feared I've learned not to be fearful and if you if you can't get beyond that you can't be successful and you have to fail and fail and fail before you can be successful or feel like you're good and successful what you do Systems to your canoeist yes absolutely persistence. And yes and creativity to make ends meet. And I've hit rock bottom autumn and I've failed and I've you know lived in cars and sofas and couches and I had a great job in my twenties and I left it all from my passion. And what advice do you give to. For example young women were looking for the world of work looking forward to that. Follow your dreams. Don't let let fear get away and they very open to opportunities even if you don't think it's the right

New Orleans United States Boutique Artisanal International Labor Organizati Michelle Gaetan UN Kevin Cassidy Europe Consultant Leto Sparkling Islands Office Director Washington TOM Party Sydney Italy
Restaurant business is a labour of love

UN News

08:41 min | 1 year ago

Restaurant business is a labour of love

"A woman chef a New Orleans in United States has been telling you a news how the restaurant business business and cooking in particular has been a lifelong labor of love for her Roseanne Rosta. Kerr decided she wanted to be a chef at age fourteen and ultimately opened her own restaurant nine years ago she spoke to the International Labor Organization as part of a photography project to mark the the centenary of the establishment of the UN agency. The project called dignity at work. The American experience documents the working life of people across the the United States Kevin Cassidy the director of the Eiloz Office for the. US sat down with a following a busy shift at her restaurant. Red gravy in in New Orleans. We moved here in two thousand and ten my boyfriend and I and he gave up his law practice to down here and do this with me. I always wanted a restaurant some time I was ten years old. My mom had gone back to work. It was nineteen seventy two and prior to that it. It was a one income family. My father worked. My mother was home. Become you know the seventies you wanted things. It was time for the MOMS to go to work and she did. I had an older brother who was baseball. Football paper route all that that kept him out of the house younger sister that I had to come home and watch and get dinner started which I loved doing. I didn't mind at all. I used to watch Julia Child. And the galloping gourmet everybody else's watching bugs bunny and and and the other thing that's on but I learned how to make a rue when I was ten years old and I didn't even know what I was doing. I just knew that I could make Brown gravy. Maybe better than my mother. I knew that and it got to the point where I was giving my mother. The shopping list come. I'm too young too young to go to the market to give me this. Give me this this that and the other thing and they were coming home to meals that were you know they were good. I thought I was doing well and then when I wanted to go to cooking school in high school in Bergen County. They had a vocational high school. You could go to the public high school you go to a parochial high school or you go to the vocational school which was Bergen Tech and that was where I wanted to go. I knew I wanted to do when I was fourteen years old but they said No. You can't go no job for women. So I went to a parochial high school segregated from the boys which I didn't care for at all and that was the direction that I went when it came time to go to college. I asked again. Can I go to Johnson and Wales. Can I go to the culinary institute but my mom worked at Fairleigh Dickinson University Teaneck and as a result we could go to college college. They're for free so blue collar family. It's either we're going to spend money on the middle child to go to cooking school. Follow some pipe dream or we're all gonna go to fairly Dickinson and I went fairleigh Dickinson and I was going to be an English teacher. What can I do that gets me out of an office because I knew I didn't want to be in an office and I went to school to college for a semester and a half before I dropped out I had gotten engaged young when I was about nineteen years old and once my future husband and I had decided that so we were going to get married and I said well you know what. I don't want to be an English teacher. I know I don't WanNa do that so I quit. And I went to work for newspaper doing classified ads. We got married. We had our children. This is the mid eighties and in the late eighties early nineties when it was time for me to go back to work because my kids. We're old enough that they didn't need round the clock care and we could do daycare. I got a job at a company. Called Dak- I think it was called full working at the corporate kitchen of ups so's my first job as a professional cook. I live I mean the entire resume I said I had a catering business I said I did pies for the holidays but I knew how to do it. I just had to get my foot in the door. Four and it just so happened that it was a female chef who maybe wanted to give me a chance but she hired me and then I'm like okay. I got to talk talk. I need to walk the walk and within six months I was her sous chef so I pulled it off and we kept going. We worked together for a year at that particular account and it was a brand new kitchen. Everything was shining and sparkling and worked. And everything you wanted did there was three and four and then we lost that account because as is with corporate dining they're always bringing in new clients and you lose the accountant and you go work someplace else. So we went from this beautiful corporate kitchen of the United States Postal Service ups to ramp college. And I think the kitchen was five hundred years old. The Grease was certainly five hundred years old. The mice were five hundred years old and I took one step into that kitchen and Chinese and there wasn't anything everything was broken. The officers were small smell bad she left for another thing and they gave me the account. I'm running this account a year and a half after I first walked into the kitchen and managing a one point two million dollar recount. I have no idea what I'm doing. When it comes to the numbers I had to be taught how to take an inventory and I just kept moving up that ladder? I never wanted to stay with. They hired they hired me to make Tuna Salad Chicken Salad and Egg Salad and then from eleven o'clock until three o'clock work the Deli line making sandwiches for people some weird combinations. I mean there are people who put onions and mayonnaise and Salami the on the tuna sandwich. I've eaten some weird shit. I mean I had two babies. I know what it's like to eat somewhere you know. I'm trying to smile Lila. I'm preparing you all sandwich. The whole New York in May is now. I left that for a little while. I don't know how now honest you want me to be on this thing but I did leave the cooking industry for a little while to become New York. City's most vicious dominatrix and I did that. For about out. Five years I worked out of a studio in New York on twenty four while but I didn't like the commute and I didn't like sitting around and waiting to get picked. I don't like authority. And they don't like somebody to look at me and say no. No no I want somebody else so I went into business for myself and I turned the family basement sment into a dungeon slash studio told my kids never come downstairs and this is no place for you. A- and I continue to do that until nine eleven and then all the disposable income in New York dried up nobody wanted to spend money back on frivolity. If we might be going to war at any minute and I got the older I wasn't I wasn't young like the regular Dominatrix matrixes who were like twenty eight and do anything. I was in my late thirties at this so I did that for awhile while decided okay. I can't keep doing this. I'm too old. I'm certainly not GonNa just do anything these guys ask and I also wanted a lot of money. I was getting almost hundred dollars an hour to do this so talk about the lottery. I went back to work in the kitchen for half half of what I had been making eight years earlier but I very quickly work myself going back up again because I wasn't going to stay at that same level and by the time time I left to move here I moved here in two thousand ten. The last cooking job I had was the executive chef at the New York Stock Exchange won't and I left that to go to the county college of Morris to be the director of the account because I wanted to learn the back of the house a little bit. I want to learn the office. I knew how to cook. I knew how to

New York United States New Orleans Director Fairleigh Dickinson University Bergen County International Labor Organizati UN Kevin Cassidy Julia Child Sous Chef Roseanne Rosta Kerr Eiloz Office Bergen Tech Baseball Dickinson Football
News in Brief 04 July 2019

UN News

03:30 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 04 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations escalating violence in ukraine it threatens access to safe border for millions of people including five hundred thousand youngsters you and children's son unicef has warned in an update on these situation in eastern ukraine west separatists have clashed with government forces since february twenty fourteen but you an agency reported that they lost week of june so five separate incidents affecting water and sanitation facilities on the contact mind dividing government unknown government controlled areas of particular concern is damage to pipelines newhall lifter along this of eski donets dumbass channel which provides drinking water to mold and three point two million people on both sides of the contact blind so far this yeah supplies of being disrupted or entirely caught the twenty nine days in addition non workers have been killed on twenty six have been injured since they conflict began including three this year unicef said before appealing for an immediate end judy indiscriminate shelling a vital civilian infrastructure andy protection of auto workers during the first five months of twenty nineteen unicef on thomas have helped nearly nine hundred and seventy thousand people access clean water on both sides of the contact line through water delivery providing water treatment chemicals and by completing critical repairs to gaza now whether world food program o w f pay has expanded operations to reach an additional twelve thousand people facing deep poverty and severe food security highlighting what it cools eight west nutritional situation any enclave you an agency noted with a mom on thursday that seven and ten known refugees are food insecure some four hundred and sixty six thousand people the scale up assistance means that until october wfp can provide food out to support to some two hundred and twenty thousand people in gaza and fifty one thousand people in the west bank divisional support will benefit the poorest families in agency said in a statement with beneficiaries set to receive an electronic monthly foods out west ten dollars divided food of that choice in two hundred accredited retail shops and finally top and is around the world have seen that show of national income rise in the last decade and a half while everyone one else is seen that pay packets shrink by comparison you and economists said on thursday according to the international labor organization or ilo data gathered from one hundred and eighty nine countries shows the roughly three hundred million what goes on around seven thousand five hundred dollars per month in contrast almost half the world's was one point six billion people make two hundred dollars a month while they bumped him ten percent and just twenty two dollars and they will need to what for twenty eight years and the same as these top ten percent in a single month idaho economist russia guy miss gymnast in geneva fucking vision equality is the fog the low income countries how much higher quality than high income countries for example including companies the top ten percent of earners get around thirty percent of gdp whenever it in the buddhist confident the top ten percent governors got around seventy percent of national income according to idaho countries where topping as so that share a

Ten Percent Seven Thousand Five Hundred Do Two Hundred Dollars Twenty Eight Years Twenty Two Dollars Twenty Nine Days Seventy Percent Thirty Percent Five Months Ten Dollars
News in Brief 1 July 2019

UN News

03:43 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 1 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations an increase in heat stress at work linked to climate change is that the have a massive impact on global productivity an economic losses you and labor experts said on sunday highlighting that the world's poorest countries will be west affected particularly in west africa and south east asia the international labor organization or low won't in any report that they lost out but will be equivalent to eighteen million fulltime jobs in twenty thirty and coast at two thousand four hundred billion dollars people working in agriculture are likely to be west hit as these sector will see sixty percent of the total label working house lost from heat stress by the end of the next decade construction will also be severely billy impacted according to a letter with an estimated nineteen percent of global working hours lost by twenty thirty according to iowa heat stress generally a cut above seventy five degrees celsius that's ninety five degrees fahrenheit in places this high humidity in extreme cases it can lead to heat stroke which can be fatal molden one point four million displaced people in over sixty refugee hosting countries will need resettlement next year you in refugee agency said on sunday according to u n h ceo's projected global resettlement needs twenty twenty reports those were the greatest resettlement needs in twenty twenty will be nationals from syria followed by south sudan anti democratic republic of congo globally resettlement needs in twenty twenty all set to rise by one percent compared with this year driven by increased displacement in africa andy america's of six and twenty two percent respectively giving the record numbers of people needing safety from war conflict and persecution and the lack of political solutions sion's to these situations we urgently need countries to come forward and resettle refugees said you were in high commissioner for refugees philippe brandy meanwhile related development you and hcl has added support to a cool for many most states to increase protection for the lgbt community and to be more aware of the unique vulnerability today only thirty seven states grant asylum to individuals on the basis of persecution based on sexual orientation or gender identity according to u n h ceo's assistant high commissioner for protection voca tech and do an independent experts victimology go below us many lgbt i refugees continue to face prejudice and violence in countries of transit and his country's according to mr took while it missed the magic out bulldoze insisted that others are also exposed to disproportionate levels of opportunity attention police abuse violence an extra judicial killings along with forced sterilization cycles conversion therapies and finally della russo should hope the execution of individuals who have contacted the human rights committee for help you and human rights experts have said in a statement addressed to the by the original thirties you went panel cited the case of alexandre phil mickelson even though it had requested did a stay of execution on his behalf to date bella bruce has disregarded every committee request for entering measures not to execute individuals while their cases are on duty committees consideration it said on monday noncompliance with e u n panels request

Two Thousand Four Hundred Bill Ninety Five Degrees Fahrenheit Seventy Five Degrees Celsius Twenty Two Percent Nineteen Percent Sixty Percent One Percent
News in Brief 12 June 2019

UN News

04:06 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 12 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations sedan is sliding into a human rights, abyss UN appointed experts said on Wednesday in a call for an independent investigation into the reported killings of demonstrators and activists in their appeal to the Human Rights Council to establish an inquiry. The five experts expressed alarm at deaths and injuries caused by a military rate on protesters in front of army headquarters in Khartoum on the third of June women have been among the first victims of the violence, including sexual abuse. The experts said adding that dozens of female human rights defenders have been detained arbitrarily some have been released, but several are believed to still be in police custody and in need of medical, attention development echoes similar concerns over the situation in Sudan, by top officials, including the head of unisex Henrietta four on Tuesday. She announced that at least nineteen children had reportedly been killed in Sudan, since military backlash against protestors began earlier this month, the UN. Children's fund has also received reports that children are being detained recruited to join the fighting and sexually abused while schools, hospitals and health, centres have also been targeted looted or destroyed in recent developments. Protest leaders incident have reportedly agreed to end the general strike that broad cartoon to a standstill this week and a willing to resume power-sharing talks with the ruling military council military leaders have yet to formally confirm that participation they successful global economy that leaves no one behind depends to a large extent on countries and companies investing in markets abroad. It's a practice that's known as foreign direct investment, or FDI last year. However, global flows of FDI fell my thirteen percent to one point three trillion dollars UN trade and development experts UNCTAD said a Wednesday representing a slide for the third consecutive year. This is also the lowest level of FDI since the global financial crisis more than a decade ago. And it underlines the long-term down with. Pressure on international investment. Unctad secretary general mukisa Qatui explained, how tax reforms encouraging repatriation of capital in the United States in two thousand seventeen had played their part in the slide are large segment of the decline of FDI to vote economists was accounted for by the change in tax policy. The US where international enterprises with major investments in economists who are taking back in the resources that came out because of taxation, the while investment flows to developed economies such as those in Europe fell to their lowest point since two thousand and four cash flows to developing countries in Africa rose by eleven percent to forty six billion dollars and to Asia by four percent while falling six percent to Latin America and the Caribbean. And finally, one hundred years after the International Labor Organization was created children should be allowed to dream not work. The head of the UN agency, said on Wednesday on the world day against child labor in an appeal to governments. Workers and employers to make a final push to end the practice in two thousand nineteen ILO chief guy, Ryder, acknowledged that substantial progress has already been made with a near forty percent decrease in child labor globally since two thousand but this still leaves at one hundred fifty two million youngsters forced to earn a living with almost seventy three million of them involved in hazardous work, which is simply unacceptable, Mr. rider, said today, the international agreement, banning the worst forms of child. Labour has been ratified by all, but two of one hundred eighty seven Member States apart from cheating, universal, ratification of the convention. Mr. rider, also urged countries to implement all necessary legal measures to make ending child labour possible. In addition, he said, foster, progress is also needed to meet target eight point seven of the sustainable development goals, which calls for an end to child labour by twenty twenty five to do this governments need to ensure the availability of quality education, social protection for all and. Recent work for parents. Mr. writer, said Daniel Johnson, UN news.

UN FDI Mr. Rider International Labor Organizati Unctad Human Rights Council Khartoum United States Sudan United Nations Caribbean Asia Mukisa Qatui Daniel Johnson Europe Africa
News in Brief 11 June 2019

UN News

03:06 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 11 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations in New York Security Council members issued a statement on Monday offering their full support to the UN special envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths, after he was reportedly criticized by the government of the war ravaged country. A fragile ceasefire has largely held in and around the keyboard city of data since the signing of the Stockholm agreement last December the accord is seen as a first move to brokering a lasting peace between opposition who teas and the Saudi led international coalition backing the government in these Security Council statement members gave their unequivocal backing to Mr. Griffiths and called on the parties to engage constructively and continuously with these special envoy in a related development, the UN political and peace building affairs chief, Rosemary, dicarlo, met Yemeni President at rob Amancio Hattie in the Saudi capital Riyadh. They discussed the work of the Yemen envoy, and the way forward for advancing the fridge. Al ceasefire accord, and for returning to dialogue to reach a political solution to the white a conflict, according to a statement attributed to miss dicarlo the discussions were described as productive and miss dicarlo thanked president had for his government's commitment to full implementation of the Stockholm agreement fundamental change to the world of working polluting and e you wide minimum wage is needed to address the growing gap between society's haves and have nots French president Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday in a speech at the international labor organization's Santini conference in Geneva. mR Macron insisted that the accumulation of wealth in the hands of the few from globalization had created a law of the jungle. This had opened the door to damaging, nationalism, xenophobia and disillusionment with democracy. He said also at the Isla conference. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Member Sates to step up the fight against child labor of the one hundred fifty two million children forced to work globally. Some seventy three. Million were involved in hazardous activities. She said in support of Ireland's initiative to end the scourge globally by twenty twenty five and finally a landmark ruling by Botswana's high court that scraps laws against same sex relationships has been welcomed by you and human rights, top official, Michelle Basch, let in a statement on Tuesday, the U N, High Commissioner underlined that the high court had unanimously found sections of the penal code to be unconstitutional, and a violation of human rights such discrimination has impacts that go far beyond arrest and detention miss Bachelet said, noting that the criminalization of lesbian gay bisexual and transgender people could lead to them being denied health care, education, employment and housing, but swan as decision follows similar action in nine other countries in the past five years, including Angola, Belise India, and Trinidad and Tobago in Kenya last month. However, a similar constitutional challenge to overturn laws that discriminate against the. Lgbtq community was unsuccessful Daniel Johnson, UN news.

UN Emmanuel Macron Martin Griffiths Dicarlo Yemen President Trump Stockholm Rob Amancio Hattie Security Council Riyadh United Nations Trinidad Daniel Johnson Angela Merkel New York Security Council Rosemary Botswana
"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Activists say up to a thousand people may have been arrested in the capital alone. There were protests in other parts of the country as well. World news from the BBC Britain, in South Korea have reached a preliminary agreement which would allow her to countries to keep trading in the event that Britain crashes onto the European Union without withdrawal deal. The post Brexit agreement in principle is the first between Britain and a nation nation so Korean exports South Korea experts around six billion dollars worth of goods to Britain. So is ready facing a number of expo challenges as the trade route between Washington and Beijing escalates. More than seven years after his arrest. Lawyers for the German. Born internet entrepreneur Kim dotcom com, making their final bid to stop him being extradited from New Zealand to the United States on copyright related charges. With more details his film, Mercer US authorities have argued that Megara load willfully breach, copyright laws on a mass scale by hosting a legally made movie music, and software files, but Kim dotcom and three executives have maintained the site that we shut down in twenty twelve was designed only as a digital locker for users to store and share large files. If New Zealand supreme court upholds and earlier extradition order, the final decision on the men's fate will be made by the Justice minister, Andrew little, the International Labor Organization is ginning its annual assembly in Geneva, the organization, which this year marks centennary brings together trades, union government leader. An employer's at his meeting. There'll be discussions on policy on sex discrimination in the workplace and the future of work itself in an increasingly digital world. India's leading dramatist garish canal has died in Bank law, as eighty one give canal with celebrated as a playwright with a critically acclaimed body of work that reflected the values and grapple with the problems of contemporary Indian society, BBC news. Welcome to hard talk on the BBC World Service with me. Steven Saka today. I've come to the hay literary festival in Wales to meet a renowned hot surgeon, who's honest unvarnished writing about his life, and death work has given his readers new insights into the reality of life inside the operating theatre Sammy or national family came to Britain from Palestine via Lebanon. He decided he wanted to be a doctor after short hospital stay in Beirut, and he went on to excel in the competitive world of British medical school. He's long been renowned as a heart surgeon in one of the UK's top cardiac treatment centers, the Papworth hospital near Cambridge. He's written two books about his work, fixing broken hearts, the naked surgeon and the angina monologues as the title suggest he's determined to demystify the surgeons. Role. But has he ended up revealing stuff that we'd rather not know ladies and gentlemen, please give a very warm, welcome to Samour Nash if?.

Britain Kim dotcom BBC New Zealand United States angina International Labor Organizati South Korea Papworth hospital European Union Steven Saka Samour Nash Washington Beirut India Andrew little Beijing Megara
"international labor organization" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on AP News

"Playing or listening to the AP digital news network? Unemployment worldwide fell slightly last year. But as a piece Charles de LA desma reports labor analysts say, there's still a ways to go. The International Labor Organization says unempl- seventeen people was likely caused by an electrical short-circuit no foul play is suspected in the early morning fire Tuesday that also injured for people's meanwhile, the Press Trust of India news agency, says police have arrested the hotel's general manager and another manager on homicide charges. The hotel developer had a permit from the fire department to build up to false stories, but the building appeared to have six floors, including an unauthorized kitchen on top of the roof built them sheets of fiberglass. I'm Charles de LA desma. Nasa has declared the Mars Rover opportunity dead after fifteen years on the red planet. The Rover has been silent for eight months now ever since an intense dust storm on Mars thick dust blocks sunlight from the spacecraft solar panels that kept it alive. Nasa says it's set one thousand recovery commands since then and then one final command with no response, the US, Australia, Japan and other countries have imposed curbs on the use of hallway technology, including smartphones. AP correspondent Charles de LA desma says they could be used to spy on their users US warnings about the risks of Chinese telecom. Technology comes governments choosing providers for the rollout to five G wireless internet, which will enable foster download speeds along with greater connectivity. Among devices Washington argues on the Chinese security laws companies such as well, y and z t e could be compelled to hand over data or access the Chinese intelligence while Beijing says such concerns of baseline provisions of. Of China's national intelligence little that differs little from similar legislation in other countries. I'm Charleston with waiting for an answer on government funding. I'm Jacky Quin with an EP news minute top Democrats are calling on President Trump to say whether or not he'll sign the Bill to keep the government open. He said it doesn't have the money that he needs for a border wall. But the wall is very very. On it's way, it's happening meaning he'll get funding. Elsewhere. The president's former campaign chairman was found to have lied to a grand jury in the Russia probe. A judge says that does violate the terms of a plea agreement. A photo of two white Baton Rouge police officers wearing dark makeup has prompted an apology from the police chief that photo taken in one thousand nine hundred ninety.

Charles de LA desma Trump Nasa US AP president Press Trust of India International Labor Organizati Jacky Quin Baton Rouge China general manager Beijing Washington developer Russia
"international labor organization" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Minor improvements to the city's metro system haven't quite destructed visitors from the Cam Kremlin's wasn't global reputation. That's tomorrow on the globalist. No, we're going to continue with today's newspapers. And joining the studios the ovens cat Hannah. Thanks for coming in wanting. Let's talk about migration of the guardian has a big piece in this is looking at this big survey that's been done by the UN. Tell us move. Yes. This is a study by the UN by the International Labor Organization and the headline being the number of people migrating. This globally has risen by about fifth in the post full years. So obviously, quite big numbers. And I think you know, probably way of summarizing it quite well as one of the authors awoke from the study of saying really now, we're stage where my Gration is just a defining feature of the molten weld is putting those things could be changed. It's not gonna be reversed. So it's really about. How do we best to deal with it? What are the conclusions to that? How do we best deal with it think the emphasis here is known about eating, you know, on a nation by nation basis? You know, we can't have individuals necessarily acting alone. There's. Appoint made about understanding the various cools is so whether that could be about widening inequality between countries and people migrating economic reasons one, you know, one factor. I think typically in this increase in numbers in regional conflict example happening in Syria, but also potential contributing factors which pay more role in the future like climate change as well. So again, all of these problems that don't necessarily stay within one particular country against stressing that need for coordinated approach. This seem to be some criticism of Donald Trump implied in was said here talking about how it's not helpful to say they're holds of migrants that are invading. Yes. Absolutely. And I think having quite clear about what type of language that we should be using. And it's something that's directly featured in this report. But generally, not sleep a little migration does tend to be actually within a region. So you know, we tend to forget the when it comes to looking at Syria a lot of that migration will actually be staying within the Middle East. You know to actually really being clear about what? What is happening here in basing actually on evidence as opposed to you know, I think hinted at this point kind of loaded language as interesting just to break down the numbers. Bit of the two hundred seventy seven million displaced people nineteen million refugees two hundred thirty four or over the age of fifteen hundred sixty four million of workers. That's according to various estimates. Yeah. -solutely I think one point there again, the economic migration, you know. I think people have always moved for want of better employment, a better quality of life. That's not something. I think is particularly new, but again the scale which happening as inequality between countries continues to widen is I think something that you know, that does need addressing again, actually just talking about borders, if necessarily helpful because it means that it can will wise it people needing to move to get a better life. Well, if you're planning to move, and you're gonna do it by train and Britain. Good luck. As we know China is here are pretty shocking. Cross rail has run into another problem. Yes..

UN Syria Donald Trump Middle East International Labor Organizati Britain China
"international labor organization" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Welcome back. I'm Shirley jihad in for Ian masters. Joining us now is Robert Poland. He's a distinguished professor of economics and co director of the political economy research institute at the university of Massachusetts Amherst, he's done a lot of work as a consultant for the US department of energy, the International Labor Organization, the United Nations industrial development organization. He's worked with many US non-governmental organizations on creating living wage statutes, both in state levels and in local levels. His books include a measure of fairness the economics of living wages and minimum wages in the United States. Also greening the global economy. His latest work is a big report just released on the cost of Medicare for all. Thanks for joining us. Professor. Thank you very much for having me off. So basically, you find that at this point we could have Medicare for all, and it would cost less than the public. Four prophets system that we have in place currently. That's right. Tell us about your findings the basic findings are very simple and straightforward. Even though as you said, it's a big fat report, the basic findings are that when we introduce Medicare for all one of the great. Niece single greatest benefit is that everybody has coverage. Everyone has decent coverage. So they can get good healthcare. So once that is introduced there will be more use of the healthcare system because right now people about nine percent or uninsured and about nearly thirty what we call underinsured because they can't they have insurance, but they can't afford to get necessary treatment because of costs so you utilization or demand for healthcare will go up. So we say it will go up by about twelve percent on the other side though, under Medicare for all we introduce cost controls in the areas of administration of the system of drug pricing, the fees that we pay for physicians and in terms of the efficiency.

Medicare distinguished professor United States Shirley jihad university of Massachusetts Am International Labor Organizati Ian masters United Nations consultant director twelve percent nine percent
"international labor organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This week strike. What was that? Well, I didn't really have a role in the week strike except that fight for fifteen contacted me just before the strike and said would you be willing to set it in historical and global context? And so that's what I've tried to do. Good. Let's do that right now. Okay. The earliest strike that I found which was in one thousand nine hundred twelve corset makers strike in Kalamazoo, Michigan where the young women said, we know you're uncomfortable with this international. Ladies garment workers union, but we want to foreground that there's a Forman who's putting his hands on the girls whose asking for quid pro quo sex if you want to keep your job, and we've had it. And so they walked out. So they were really the first to make sexual harassment on the job a labor issue. The movement against gender-based violence in the workplace really started in two thousand eleven when the coalition of the Moccoli workers really innovative labor organization of mostly Central American migrants in Florida who are tomato pickers began what they called the fair food campaign. It was a campaign for worker lead safety inspections. It was a campaign for the right to unionize, but it was perhaps first and foremost a campaign against what they call the rape in the fields as recently as this past March. There were women field workers holding a five day hunger strike in the middle of Manhattan front of the home of what a Wendy's executives and Wendy's corporate headquarters to protest that. And then the global peace. That I think is really important is the international trade union federation, which is the biggest union consortium in the world. That's got members in one hundred and twelve countries what they're trying to get is the International Labor Organization to pass a new convention mandating zero tolerance for sexual harassment and sexual violence in the workplace, national governments ratify those conventions when that happens it becomes the law of the land in that country. I want to play you a piece of tape from the journalist and author Lin Farley who spoke to us almost a year ago. Nobody pays any tension kids at the fast food places all across the country. How does Angelina Jolie being sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein or Gretchen Carlson at FOX? How do they help these kids at McDonald's? How does that help them? Nobody cares about them without question. The activism of famous and wealthy women. In hollywood. And in television media has made the country in the world pay attention. I think that it makes people realize how I'm not present this is, but this anti poor bias in the popular culture of this country. And we tend to blame the poor particularly poor women of color for everything that happens to them. So that's one thing that I think's changed the climate for these low wage women workers, but they themselves have insisted on changing that climate the tomato pickers from a Moccoli toured the country for twelve years talking about what was happening in the McDonald's workers are now doing the same. And I think those consumers who saw women in the streets of ten of our largest cities with signs that said, you know, McDonalds keep your burgers, keep your fries. We're tired of your sexist lies. They met with a lot of sympathy. I'm gonna guess because so many women have experienced this. Now, the labor MU. Movement over the course of a century managed to confront raw economic power and create huge body of labor law to protect workers a lot of which has been dismantled. So there seemed to be to forces in play here one the systematic dismantling of labor protections. Verse is this burgeoning metoo movement. So who's going to prevail? Well, low-wage workers have realized that despite all the ways in which labor has lost power in the last thirty forty years there are advantages to the social media era when they conduct their actions, they want professional media to cover them. But they don't wait for that. They are to some extent creating their own record. Right. And they are being their own media. And as a result of that, there's a certain vulnerability even to these unbelievably powerful corporations like WalMart and McDonald's they have been forced to budge a little bit..

rape International Labor Organizati McDonald harassment Moccoli international trade union fede Kalamazoo Angelina Jolie Lin Farley Wendy Forman WalMart Michigan Harvey Weinstein Manhattan hollywood
"international labor organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They also want better training for managers and employees. It was the first multi-state strike to protest sexual her. Harassment in the workplace in US history. And a notable alliance of the metoo group called the time's up legal defense fund and the labor initiative fight for fifteen focused on worker dignity and a fifteen dollar an hour wage analysts or lack is professor of history at Dartmouth College who has surveyed movements to empower the powerless worldwide, and is author of we are all fast food workers. Now, thank you for having me on you had some role in this week strike. What was that? Well, I didn't really have a role in the week strike except that fight for fifteen contacted me just before the strike and said would you be willing to set it in historical and global context? And so that's what I've tried to do. Good. Let's do that right now. Okay. The earliest strike that I found which was in nineteen twelve corset makers strike in Kalamazoo, Michigan where the young women said, we know you're uncomfortable with this international. Ladies garment workers union, but we want to foreground that there. There's a foreman who's putting his hands on the girls whose asking for quid pro quo sex if you want to keep your job, and we've had it. And so they walked out. So they were really the first to make sexual harassment on the job a labor issue. The movement against gender-based violence in the workplace really started in two thousand eleven when the coalition of Moccoli workers really innovative labor organization of mostly Central American migrants in Florida who are tomato pickers began what they called the fair food campaign. It was a campaign for worker lead safety inspections. It was a campaign for the right to unionize, but it was perhaps first and foremost to campaign against what they called rape in the fields as recently as this past March. There were women field workers holding a five day hunger strike in the middle of Manhattan front of the home of what a Wendy's executives and Wendy's corporate headquarters to protest that. And then the global peace. That I think is really important is the international trade union federation, which is the biggest union consortium in the world. That's got members in one hundred and twelve countries what they're trying to get is the International Labor Organization to pass a new convention mandating zero tolerance for sexual harassment and sexual violence in the workplace, national governments ratify those conventions when that happens it becomes the law of the land in that country. I want to play you a piece of tape from the journalist and author Lin Farley who spoke to us almost a year ago. Nobody pays any tension with the kids at the fast food places all across the country. How does Angelina Jolie being sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein or Gretchen Carlson at FOX how did they help these kids at McDonald's? How does that help them? Nobody cares about them without question. The activism of famous and wealthy women. In Hollywood and intelligence in media has made the country in the world pay attention. I think that it makes people realize how omnipresent this is. But his real anti poor bias in the popular culture of this country. And we tend to blame the poor particularly poor women of color for everything that happens to them. So that's one thing that I think's changed the climate for these low wage women workers, but they themselves have insisted on changing that climate the tomato pickers from Moccoli toured the country for twelve years talking about what was happening in the McDonald's workers are now doing the same. And I think those consumers who saw women in the streets is ten of our largest cities with signs that said, you know, McDonalds keep your burgers, keep your fries. We're tired of your sexist lies. They met with a lot of sympathy. I'm going to guess because so many women have experienced this. Now, the labor. Movement over the course of a century managed to confront raw economic power and create huge body of labor law to protect workers a lot of which has been dismantled. So there seemed to be to forces in play here one the systematic dismantling of labor protections. Verse is this burgeoning metoo movement. So who's going to prevail? Well, low-wage workers have realized that despite all the ways in which labor has lost power in the last thirty forty years there are advantages to the social media era when they conduct their actions, they want professional media to cover them. But they don't wait for that. They are to some extent creating their own record. Right. And they are being their own media. And as a result of that, there's a certain vulnerability even to these unbelievably powerful corporations like WalMart and McDonald's they have been forced to budge a little.

International Labor Organizati harassment rape McDonald Moccoli Harassment US Dartmouth College Kalamazoo international trade union fede professor of history Angelina Jolie WalMart foreman Lin Farley Wendy Michigan
"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Had some role in this week strike. What was that? Well, I didn't really have a role in the week strike except that fight for fifteen contacted me just before the strike and said would you be willing to set it in historical and global context? And so that's what I've tried to do. Good. Let's do that right now. Okay. The earliest strike that I found which was in one thousand nine hundred twelve corset makers strike in Kalamazoo, Michigan where the young women said, we know you're uncomfortable with this international. Ladies garment workers union, but we want to foreground that there is a foreman who's putting his hands on the girls whose asking for quid pro quo sex if you want to keep your job, and we've had it. And so they walked out. So they were really the first to make sexual harassment on the job a labor issue. The movement against gender-based violence in the workplace really started in two thousand eleven when the coalition of a Moccoli workers really innovative labor organization of mostly Central American migrants in Florida who are tomato pickers began what they called the fair food campaign. It was a campaign for worker lead safety inspections. It was a campaign for the right to unionize, but it was perhaps first and foremost a campaign against what they called rape in the fields as recently as this past March. There were women field workers holding a five day hunger strike in the middle of Manhattan front of the home of what a Wendy's executives and Wendy's corporate headquarters to protest that. And then the global peace. That I think is really important is the international trade union federation, which is the biggest union consortium in the world. That's got members in one hundred and twelve countries what they're trying to get is the International Labor Organization to pass a new convention mandating zero tolerance for sexual harassment and sexual violence in the workplace, national governments ratify those conventions when that happens it becomes the law of the land in that country. I want to play you a piece of tape from the journalist and author Lin Farley who spoke to us almost a year ago. Nobody pays any attention to the kids at the fast food places all across the country. How does Angelina Jolie being sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein or Gretchen Carlson at FOX? How do they help these kids at McDonald's? How does that help them? Nobody cares about them without question. The activism of famous and wealthy women. In Hollywood and intelligence in media has made the country in the world pay attention. I think that it makes people realize how omnipresent this is. But there's a real anti poor bias in the popular culture of this country. And we tend to blame the poor particularly poor women of color for everything that happens to them. So that's one thing that I think's changed the climate for these low wage women workers, but they themselves have insisted on changing that climate the tomato pickers from Makali'i toured the country for twelve years talking about what was happening and the McDonald's workers are now doing the same. And I think those consumers who saw women in the streets of ten of our largest cities with signs that said, you know, McDonalds keep your burgers, keep your fries. We're tired of your sexist lies. They met with a lot of sympathy. I'm gonna guess because so many women have experienced this. Now, the labor. Movement over the course of a century managed to confront raw economic power and create huge body of labor law to protect workers a lot of which has been dismantled. So there seemed to be to forces in play here one the systematic dismantling of labor protections. Verse is this burgeoning metoo movement. So who's going to prevail? Well, low-wage workers have realized that despite all the ways in which labor has lost power in the last thirty forty years there are advantages to the social media era when they conduct their actions, they want professional media to cover them. But they don't wait for that. They are to some extent creating their own record. Right. And they are being their own media. And as a result of that, there's a certain vulnerability even to these unbelievably powerful corporations like WalMart and McDonalds they have been forced to budge a.

rape International Labor Organizati McDonalds harassment McDonald international trade union fede Kalamazoo foreman Angelina Jolie Lin Farley Wendy WalMart Michigan Harvey Weinstein Moccoli Manhattan Hollywood
"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some role in this week strike. What was that? Well, I didn't really have a role in the week strike except that fight for fifteen contacted me just before the strike and said would you be willing to set it in historical and global context? And so that's what I've tried to do. Good. Let's do that right now. Okay. The earliest strike that I found which was in nineteen twelve corset makers strike in Kalamazoo, Michigan where the young women said, we know you're uncomfortable with this international. Ladies garment workers union, but we want to foreground that there's a foreman who is putting his hands on the girls whose asking for quid pro quo sex if you want to keep your job, and we've had it. And so they walked out. So they were really the first to make sexual harassment on the job a labor issue. The movement against gender-based violence in the workplace really started in two thousand eleven when the coalition of a Moccoli workers really innovative labor organization of mostly Central American migrants in Florida who are tomato pickers began what they called the fair food campaign. It was a campaign for worker lead safety inspections. It was a campaign for the right to unionize, but it was perhaps first and foremost a campaign against what they called rape in the fields as recently as this past March. There were women field workers holding a five day hunger strike in the middle of Manhattan front of the home of what a Wendy's executives and Wendy's corporate headquarters to protest that. And then the global peace. That I think is really important is the international trade union federation, which is the biggest union consortium in the world. That's got members in one hundred twelve countries what they're trying to get is the International Labor Organization to pass a new convention mandating zero tolerance for sexual harassment and sexual violence in the workplace, national governments ratify those conventions when that happens it becomes the law of the land in that country. I want to play you a piece of tape from the journalist and author Lin Farley who spoke to us almost a year ago. Nobody pays any tension with the kids at the places all across the country. How does Angelina Jolie being sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein or Gretchen Carlson at FOX? How do they help these kids at McDonald's? How does that help them? Nobody cares about them without question. The activism of famous and wealthy women. In hollywood. And in television media has made the country in the world pay attention. I think that it makes people realize how omnipresent this is. But there's a real anti poor bias in the popular culture of this country. And we tend to blame the poor particularly poor women of color for everything that happens to them. So that's one thing that I think's changed the climate for these low wage women workers, but they themselves have insisted on changing that climate the tomato pickers from Makali'i toured the country for twelve years talking about what was happening and the McDonald's workers are now doing the same. And I think those consumers who saw women in the streets is ten of our largest cities with signs that said, you know, McDonald's. Keep your burgers, keep your fries. We're tired of your sexist lies. They met with a lot of sympathy. I'm gonna guess because so many women have experienced this. Now, the labor move. Movement over the course of a century managed to confront raw economic power and create huge body of labor law to protect workers a lot of which has been dismantled. So there seemed to be to forces in play here one the systematic dismantling of labor protections. Verse is this burgeoning metoo movement. So who's going to prevail? Well, low-wage workers have realized that despite all the ways in which labor has lost power in the last thirty forty years there are advantages to the social media era when they conduct their actions, they want professional media to cover them. But they don't wait for that. They are to some extent creating their own record. Right. And they are being their own media. And as a result of that, there's a certain vulnerability even to these unbelievably powerful corporations like WalMart and McDonalds they have been forced to budge a little bit..

rape McDonald International Labor Organizati harassment international trade union fede Kalamazoo foreman Angelina Jolie Lin Farley Wendy WalMart Michigan Harvey Weinstein Moccoli Manhattan hollywood Gretchen Carlson McDonalds
"international labor organization" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"The parent in me, the mother in me needed to do more. I started talking to people about this and inevitably I was surprised because the conversation would turn from curiosity. Really? This happens here to empathy. Wow, we've got to do something about that to blame. You're not telling me that every prostitute is a victim. Are you? I mean, don't they know what they're getting into? I get it. I understand why people are confused. So to be clear, the people that I'm talking about do not choose this life, they're forced to frauded or coerced. That's actually the legal definition for human trafficking under federal law for adults. No. When it comes to kids in e minor under eighteen that's transported facilitated or used for commercial sex is automatically a victim regardless of whether force fraud or coercion is used this. Crime knows no age gender or socioeconomic barrier. I'm talking about the sixteen year old girl that I met in Washington DC. She had been trafficked from the time. She was fourteen until she was sixteen. She was a victim of the foster care system and she told me she'd been sold up to five times a day. She didn't even know the term human trafficking. She thought that it was just a part of her life as a foster care kid. Sex trafficking also shows up in a fluent areas and gated communities and men. Lure young girls into sex trafficking situations with promises of modeling contracts, cell phones. Sometimes they're just kidnapped right off the street. In the US an estimated two hundred to three hundred thousand girls and boys are anticipated to be used for commercial sex trafficking every year. You heard that right? Girls and boys worldwide, the International Labor Organization estimates that up to one million children a year are vulnerable for sex trafficking. Those numbers are huge. And so all the billboards are great for raising awareness generally. They're just not enough to put it into this problem. I believe that if we're going to be serious about sex trafficking, we can't legislate or arrest our way out of modern day slavery. If we really want to end sex trafficking in the US we have to systematically educate and target demand, and I think the business community is in the perfect position to do just. That. So sex trafficking is big business, and I'm proposing a business plan that starts with the customer and in the sex trade, the customer is referred to as John. He is the man that feels the demand for sex trafficking. John's do not fit into neat stereotypes, but there is one universal truth, no, John, no buyer, no victim. So if we want to start to put a dent in sex trafficking, we have to get to John and businesses can do that while he's at work, there's an organization called businesses, ending slavery and trafficking or best for short. And when they launched in two thousand twelve, they did a study of Seattle based Johns and he knew what they found out. John's are every day guys employed at local businesses. They range in age from eighteen to eighty four..

John US International Labor Organizati Washington DC fraud Seattle Johns sixteen year
"international labor organization" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"The parent in me, the mother in me needed to do more. I started talking to people about this and inevitably I was surprised because the conversation would turn from curiosity. Really? This happens here to empathy. Wow, we've got to do something about that to blame. You're not telling me that every prostitute is a victim. Are you? I mean, don't they know what they're getting into? I get it. I understand why people are confused. So to be clear, the people that I'm talking about do not choose this life, they're forced to frauded or coerced. That's actually the legal definition for human trafficking under federal law for adults. No. When it comes to kids in e minor under eighteen that's transported facilitated or used for commercial sex is automatically a victim regardless of whether force fraud or coercion is used this. Crime knows no age gender or socioeconomic barrier. I'm talking about the sixteen year old girl that I met in Washington DC. She had been trafficked from the time. She was fourteen until she was sixteen. She was a victim of the foster care system and she told me she'd been sold up to five times a day. She didn't even know the term human trafficking. She thought that it was just a part of her life as a foster care kid. Sex trafficking also shows up in a fluent areas and gated communities and men. Lure young girls into sex trafficking situations with promises of modeling contracts, cell phones. Sometimes they're just kidnapped right off the street. In the US an estimated two hundred to three hundred thousand girls and boys are anticipated to be used for commercial sex trafficking every year. You heard that right? Girls and boys worldwide, the International Labor Organization estimates that up to one million children a year are vulnerable for sex trafficking. Those numbers are huge. And so all the billboards are great for raising awareness generally. They're just not enough to put it into this problem. I believe that if we're going to be serious about sex trafficking, we can't legislate or arrest our way out of modern day slavery. If we really want to end sex trafficking in the US we have to systematically educate and target demand, and I think the business community is in the perfect position to do just. That. So sex trafficking is big business, and I'm proposing a business plan that starts with the customer and in the sex trade, the customer is referred to as John. He is the man that feels the demand for sex trafficking. John's do not fit into neat stereotypes, but there is one universal truth, no, John, no buyer, no victim. So if we want to start to put a dent in sex trafficking, we have to get to John and businesses can do that while he's at work, there's an organization called businesses, ending slavery and trafficking or best for short. And when they launched in two thousand twelve, they did a study of Seattle based Johns and he knew what they found out. John's are every day guys employed at local businesses. They range in age from eighteen to eighty four..

John US International Labor Organizati Washington DC fraud Seattle Johns sixteen year
"international labor organization" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"You know, prevented from being interfered with by democratic states more than anything. What you're describing, I think is indeed an expression of that. But I think this is a hugely important caveat, especially at our present moment is I think that the idea of, let's say, producing a third party tribunal whereby the United States could. You know, sue, a Chinese company at third court. The politics inherent in that are not predetermined, right? Like I think you could actually have progressive outcomes from things like supranational treaties, even third party trade agreements, right? I mean, you could be using those. You could be using something like the WTO more like the International Labor Organization to say. This thing is created to protect labor standards, environmental standards, right? Of course. But it bears repeating because I feel like a lot of this sort of critique right now of supranational institutions like shading towards this thing of of sort of dismissing all of them as neoliberal plot, which leaves us kind of stuck with just nations, right. So I think it's important to sort of see these things as open to reclamation and reengineering reinvention and not simply just, you know, various plot designed to like strip us of our sovereignty or whatever, but ultimately, right. The point. It is is that a Neil liberals are not looking they? They would agree with the idea that there's really the market doesn't exist on its own because they are looking for governmental if not governmental quasi-governmental entities that will make sure that the market functions in the way they think it should function and the fact that these entities could make the market function in a different way is indication at this is these are all just political choices. Absolutely. Yeah. I mean the the way that since the nineteen twenties, many of these people that we're talking about have described what their goal is, what they called de-politicize -ation. Right? That's the word that was been used since the thirties to describe what the goal was, and that's a way to protect the economy. If you can de-politicize trade. Obvious. It doesn't even pointed out to politicize something itself a political choice. But I think that what we're seeing now is this moment where people are kind of wising up to de politicize. Unfortunately, from my perspective, I assume from yours to the people who are most effectively challenging politicize -ation right now, we're doing it from the right. So I think what we're finding now is like to point out deep politicize essential, but it's only the beginning because once you've pointed it out and you need to have argument about what kind of politics you want to replace that deep vision. Citation and interesting is that you also write about how there is not a such a chasm between native ISM and that being like a right wing. Populist movements and this Neo liberal thought. For me like the idea of de-politicisation about a what is clearly a political choice to maintain a system that just coincidentally also is beneficial to the spouse IRS of this system. Like it's just, you know, just happens to be where we are. And so that's what the natural thing is is very much reminiscent of and he's been on my mind too much lately. So I apologize. But like Jordan, Peterson saying that anything that deviates from his experiences, a white male is the is political, or is identity identity or whatever it is that the baseline is white male hood. And anything else is politicize Asian or is an active, is something active as opposed to sort of the comfortable stasis where. We are where it just so happens. We're on top. Yeah, no, I think that, of course, that is part of the story which is just this like false universalism, which is actually just a different kind of particularity particular ISM. But I think I mean, the way that someone like high purchase it I think is a little bit more self-aware actually, which is to say, I don't think he's just sort of self reflexively writing apologies for capitalism and not realizing it. I think that I mean, he, he sees politics can have the have the tendency to spring everywhere. I mean, anyone who had been in Vienna in the nineteen twenties with no that intimately right. And so because they have the capacity to spring of everywhere, what you need is a system that is doing the allocation and distribution of wealth and producing life chances for all of us that is as faceless as possible. Right? I mean, this is actually the the miracle of the market from hikes point of view. Alternately is it provides no enemy, no identifiable..

United States WTO International Labor Organizati Vienna Neil IRS Jordan Peterson
"international labor organization" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

Biden's Briefing

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

"Face fines of fifty thousand kronor or four hundred seventy dollars a day Iceland's previous cabinet of seven men and four women pass the Bill last year just as workplace. Sexism was thrust into the global spotlight by the metoo movement worldwide, at least four hundred seventeen high profile. Men have been outed for sexually harassing female colleagues. According to one study, other countries are already studying Iceland's new, pay parody rules to see if they can replicate them, including Nordic nations, Germany, Switzerland, and governor. As far away as South Korea and Panama according to the International Labor Organization yet even in Iceland ranked first on the world, economic forums, gender gap index for nine years, it's largely a man's world. It's been a legal to pay women less than men for decades, but I Slavic men still earn ten to twelve percent more than women for similar work according to findings of BSI Iceland, the main consultancy policing the equal pay law BSI performed audits on one hundred companies that voluntarily tackled their pay gaps in the last six years. In most cases, the discrimination is unconscious said BSI general manager r e Christensen who explained part of the issue is men tend to oversell their skills in interviews while women are more modest, the new law puts the onus on employers to ensure this doesn't happen after taking office in two thousand seventeen. Prime minister Catrine Jacob's daughter a forty two year old mother of three young boys vowed to a.

Iceland BSI Iceland BSI Catrine Jacob Christensen Bill Prime minister South Korea International Labor Organizati Panama general manager Switzerland Germany four hundred seventy dollars forty two year twelve percent nine years six years
"international labor organization" Discussed on The Tip Off

The Tip Off

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on The Tip Off

"But there was one thing he found a recently published report from the UN's International Labor Organization, a dense pretty academic time, and it was called something like human trafficking and foreign migration, a human rights perspective from South Asia, and it was series of sort of academic papers about the state in all the countries that were feeder countries for. Sort of the birth of modern day slavery and international human trafficking. And there was a chapter on the poll that had been written by a guy who headed a migration think take income and do. So we had to lead or at least a name of someone who might be able to tell him if people are indeed being trafficked from the pool to the Middle East. And if they were, could those twelve men been victims of some kind of international slave trade Cam new. I had to. And I found him started phoning in market and interviewing him from Washington's twelve eleven hour and fifteen minute time difference. They've a weird way that they said the clocks and. I just started doing these at length interviews with him just trying to figure out what was going on in how these men might have connected in this bigger picture. What was happening world. Also looking into the contracts behind the Iraq, reconstruction effort. You know, realizing that. Fighting wars had been contracted out in America that it was all these with the largest wartime contracts in history. They were the largest government services contracts in history, and there was they will completely shrouded in secrecy the postwar rebuilding Iraq was a massive project. People are being flown in from all over the world military personnel. Of course, they lived in Sperling bases like come liberty, but there were others. Someone had cleaned the sheets fully soldiers make that food loan to that cloves, and that took an army of workers of its own and come found that there was one company that snapped up many of the lucrative contracts for supplying such labor force. The main company, the company that the biggest contract is called Howard Burton and its main subsidiaries called caviar which was for Kellogg, Brown and root. But all that had been kept secret under the bail of national security, but it was massive. I mean, they brand litter. Really. Everything on then the killing and the military, like the fighting operations in the Doug the ditches. They built all the bases. Everything had been privatized, sort of without anybody realizing that it actually happened and they needed tens of thousands of men to come and do the Scud work and the schlep work of the war. The come knows that these companies shipping people to Iraq as fast as it can get him in and out there. There are some whispered concerns about trafficking from the poll, but could the two things be connected? Well, there was one more clue shortly after the deaths of the twelve Nepalese, policemen, the Associated Press published a short article for the Middle East News, an article that included quotes from a so-called labor broker, a guy called e Ataman saw who based in Jordan and you said he'd been involved in setting up the work for the twelve Napoleon. Men who died well, Cam new, I had to do next somehow. He had to get to Jordan and find this..

Iraq Jordan International Labor Organizati Middle East UN South Asia Washington Associated Press Howard Burton Sperling America Kellogg e Ataman twelve eleven hour fifteen minute
"international labor organization" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"international labor organization" Discussed on AP News

"The un's international labour organisation a survey of working conditions in the country's industry is found new regulations have resulted in progress in some areas including less physical violence but problems such as unfair pay and deception and contracting persist in twice an unprecedented lagging europe's electricity grids slowed down some clocks on wednesday the problems caused by a political dispute between serbia and kosovo the sapping a small amount of energy from the local grid it's part of a broader dispute that goes back almost twins two years since the warring kosevo ended in 1999 the serbdominated north of kosovo the remains loyal to belgrade hasn't paid the kosevo government for the energy they consume it's causing a domino effect across the 25 nation network spanning the continent from portugal to poland and greece to germany the deviation from europe stand at fifty hurts frequency has been enough to cause electric clocks that keep time by the power systems frequency to fall behind by about six minutes since midjanuary the problem mostly affects radio alarms oven clock so crocs used to program heating systems the brusselsbased organisation and so e said it's working on a technical solution that could bring the system back to normal within a few weeks however it urged european authorities and national governments to it trust the political problem at the heart of the issue for the ap i'm studios from the river will desk charles phone a former congressman who helped investigate the assassinations of president john f kennedy and martin luther king junior who is also a former nebraska governor has died throne known as charlie to friends and family died of natural causes wednesday at his home in lincoln according to longtime friend and law partner mark shore as a republican found representative rascasse first congressional district from 1971 to 1979 he serve one term as governor from 1979 to 1983 in congress thrown served on the house select committee on assassinations that looked into the deaths of kennedy and king he concluded there was no evidence kennedy's death was part of a conspiracy sure said as governor thrown was particularly proud of his efforts to fund the university of nebraska which he viewed as one of the state's greatest assets and he was a university of nebraska law school alumnus graduating in 1950 he also served as an officer in the.

portugal nebraska law school university of nebraska representative partner nebraska martin luther john f kennedy e germany greece poland un belgrade kosovo officer kennedy congress