37 Burst results for "International International International International"

Fresh update on "international " discussed on Bloomberg Wall Street Week

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

02:10 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international " discussed on Bloomberg Wall Street Week

"Is Bloomberg. I'm Ed Baxter and under these helium. And you're listening to a special edition of Bloomberg best focused on equality. And of course, Ed marriage equality is a very important part of all this. Yeah, not only here, but across the world, including in Hong Kong. And we had a chance to hear about this from Jerome Yao, cofounder Hong Kong marriage equity. And now tells Bloomberg man and Rashad salama, the changing political backdrop in Hong Kong is not central to what his group is striving for. Well, I think obviously we need to take into account the new legal requirements when we do our work. But deep down the fundamental point about marsh equality. It's about human. It is a social issue. It's nothing really political about it. So I believe, as long as we do things within the boundaries of the law, then things should be okay. Sure, this is the problem. I mean, how has society society changed with regards to this issue and its views on it compared to perhaps the administration and people that power in power? I mean, is there now a growing rift? What's the deal? It's nothing really unusual. I mean, if you look back at the history of how different places, advance there, ecommerce in their places. I think most of the time, governments were really behind society all the time. I'm even talking about western democratic countries. We could have a situation where the government of the day could be with a liberal, political background, but they were not quite ready until really, for example, people in that place demonstrated a strong support or maybe food court action. So in that regard, I think it's nothing really new. There's been a lot of talk of Michael fiddler, one of the human rights lawyers leaving Hong Kong. I'm moving to the UK. Is there a sense now of a threat that potentially all these banks and companies that basically have been quite forthcoming and supporting LGBTQ rights that this whole crackdown on common prosperity in China is going to have a chilling effect on where business is going to view this or support rights in the future? Well, all I can speak is for the situation Hong Kong which I'm seeing right now. It's obviously things happening across the border to a certain extent, have an impact here in Hong Kong. But does it mean that it's all doom and gloom? I just don't think so. I think Hong Kong is Hong Kong. We are still at international financial center. The government here actually it's good to make it clear that it's on its official website. It does say that it supports equal opportunities for people of different security and gender identities. So there's a fundamental difference. But there's also a rub, of course, Chinese culture, however, however it's perceived right now and what we have here. Iran's illusion, how far are rights being at the moment advanced by business rather than perhaps administrators. I think the role of the business community is very important. Now, obviously, the fact of the matter is in Hong Kong when it comes to LGBT plus equality. I think a lot of the progress that we have seen really have to thanks to the courts, but at the same time, the voice of the business community is very, very important because at the end of the day, we're talking about international financial assembly that has to attract best talent from around the world and obviously there is an impetus for businesses to make their workplace inclusive. In order to attract people from all around the world. So enough of that perspective, I would say over the years, the role of the business community has been very important and especially here in Hong Kong obviously, multinationals have been playing a leading role. But now that I'm seeing, actually, local companies are picking it up. And I think that's a good story. I asked this question to a guest previously about what the model is. Obviously Taiwan is the only area in Asia where they recognize same sex marriage. Can Hong Kong ever achieve that? Possibly, I had never seen an effort to begin with. I think it's still a long row. I would say it's not something that happened within the next two or three years I think that that's it some time, but I think one thing is if we look at the sentiment here in society, according to a huge case of way back in 2020, 49% of the people were supportive. 23 people, 23% were they opposed. And then basically 28% said neutral. I think if we take that fine days, I think the numbers were encouraging and still encouraging today and I guess to brought up the situation in Taiwan. According to my recollection, before time, just before Taiwan legalized same sex marriage. The support level among the population. It was not more than 50%. I think 40 something. But now that it's got up to about 60%. The thing is, how do we get there? That's the fundamental point, isn't it? We could talk about what's going on. But how did we actually get there? Well, I think more people have to talk about it. I think visibility is key. More people talk about it. Business community can speak louder. I mean, obviously, I mentioned earlier on companies are taking notice and doing something and I think especially with a new leader coming in here. Anyway, I will say, you know, local companies can take a more visible lead telling the government dialog, you know, times have changed. And we need all these policies to make our place more funny. And at the end of the day, it makes Hong Kong looks good. And that was Jerome Yao. Cofounder of Hong Kong marriage equity, with Bloomberg 7

Hong Kong Ed Baxter Jerome Yao Hong Kong Marriage Equity Rashad Salama Bloomberg Michael Fiddler International Financial Center International Financial Assemb ED Taiwan China UK Iran
 UN chief warns of 'catastrophe' from global food shortage

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 13 hrs ago

UN chief warns of 'catastrophe' from global food shortage

"The UN's chief warns the world faces catastrophe because of the growing shortage of food around the globe UN secretary general Antonio Guterres says the war in Ukraine has added to the disruptions caused by climate change the coronavirus pandemic and inequality to produce an unprecedented global hunger crisis already affecting hundreds of millions of people in a video message to officials from dozens of rich and developing countries gathered in Berlin Guterres says there's

Antonio Guterres UN Ukraine Guterres Berlin
Fresh update on "international " discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:10 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international " discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"For home Bloomberg world, Hank watters I'm Charlie pelle the international military fund says the U.S. economy is likely to slow in 2022 and 2023, but will narrowly avoid a recession as the Federal Reserve implements its rate tightening plan to curb inflation. Stocks came roaring back for the week, the S&P was up 6.45% this week. Nez stack up 7 and a half percent this week today, stocks rallied with the S&P 500 Index advancing 116 points buying into the close, higher today by 3.1% the Dow was up 823 points up 2.7% NASDAQ up 375 up by 3.3%. Tender down 1230 seconds, ten year yield 3.13% spot gold up two tenths of 1%, 1825, the ounce and West Texas and immediate crew today are 3.2% one O 7 61 a barrel. So again, worth repeating S&P up more than 3% today the most since May of 2020. I'm Charlie Palatin, that is a Bloomberg business flash. All right, try the

Hank Watters Charlie Pelle International Military Fund Bloomberg Federal Reserve U.S. S West Texas Charlie Palatin
 Death toll from Afghanistan's quake rises to 1,150 people

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 17 hrs ago

Death toll from Afghanistan's quake rises to 1,150 people

"The death toll from a devastating earthquake in Afghanistan has continued to climb days after it turned brick and stone homes into rubble Afghan state media says the quake has killed 1150 and injured some 3000 while the UN has put the number of dead at around 7 70 people either toll makes this the deadliest quake to hit Afghanistan in two decades despite some international aid flowing to the impacted villages in the east to provide people with food and tents villages are mostly on their own digging by hound for survivors the country of 38 million people is in the midst of a spiraling economic

Afghanistan Earthquake UN
 Russians focus firepower to seize 2 villages in east Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 d ago

Russians focus firepower to seize 2 villages in east Ukraine

"Russia is focusing firepower to seize two villages in east Ukraine Britain and Ukrainian military officials say Russia has expanded its grab of territory in the east capturing two villages and vying for control of a key highway in an offensive that could cut supply lines and encircle some frontline Ukrainian forces in addition Russian forces are trying to capture areas outside severo Donetsk the administrative center of the Luhansk region now with draining forces have withdrawn from some of the areas near the city of lysa chunks to avoid the possibility of being encircled I'm Charles De

Ukraine Britain Luhansk Donetsk Charles De
At Least 1,000 Killed in Afghanistan Earthquake, Officials Say

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

At Least 1,000 Killed in Afghanistan Earthquake, Officials Say

"Local people throughout eastern Afghanistan are digging graves in villages reduced to rubble by a powerful earthquake that killed at least 1000 people One villager interviewed by the state run news agency says in pashtu 35 members of his family died in the quake including his sons and grandchildren meanwhile survivors are digging many by hand through hard to reach villages in the east which had been reduced to rubble the agency adds an estimated 1500 others are reported injured the quake is Afghanistan's deadliest in two decades and officials say the toll could rise I'm Charles De

Pashtu Afghanistan Earthquake Charles De
South China floods force tens of thousands to evacuate - The Associated Press

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

South China floods force tens of thousands to evacuate - The Associated Press

"Major flooding has forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people in southern China Floodwaters from heavy rainfall have collapsed roads submerged houses and factories and swept away Carson crops in the manufacturing hub of Guangdong China regularly sees flooding in the summer months but this year is considered the worst in decades officials have suspended school office work in public transportation in the South China province amid rising waters Chinese state TV showed city streets waste deep in water In neighboring junkie rescue crews and inflatable boats evacuated residents trapped in their homes in inundated villages storm warnings have been issued with more rain expected in eastern provinces including the capital Beijing I'm Jennifer King

China Guangdong Carson South China Beijing Jennifer King
 Afghanistan earthquake kills at least 920 people

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Afghanistan earthquake kills at least 920 people

"A powerful earthquake in eastern Afghanistan has damaged buildings and killed hundreds of people Cell phone video provided by Afghanistan state news agency shows victims hurt in a magnitude 6.1 earthquake early Wednesday being treated outside of a clinic in a remote village near the border with Pakistan The narrator describes a rush of injuries and asks for emergency measures to be taken The earthquake could be felt at least 300 miles away in Pakistan and India images circulating online from Paktika province showed destroyed stone houses with residents picking through clay bricks and other rubble and people being carried into helicopters to be evacuated An emergency official puts the death toll over 900 and likely to rise The UN resident coordinator in Afghanistan says the response is on its way Many international aid agencies left the country last year after the Taliban took over complicating rescue and aid efforts I'm

Afghanistan Earthquake Paktika Pakistan India UN Taliban
Gordon Chang Describes China's View of the Russia-Ukraine War

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | 3 d ago

Gordon Chang Describes China's View of the Russia-Ukraine War

"Heard two different interpretations of how Putin's latest military action affects Beijing. One is it would be used as cover. It would be used to distract from a move against Taiwan and second I'm hearing that the international reaction to Russia, the arming of Ukraine has given strategic pause to Xi Jinping. Can we tell which of those is more accurate? Are they are they happy that Putin did what he did or are they annoyed at how sloppy he's been in the execution of the invasion. I think that Beijing looks at the Ukraine and they take away a number of lessons some which encourage them to be more aggressive. Some of them inhibit inhibit them. But I think that on balance, they've been emboldened. And the reason is that first of all, and this is the most important lesson. There was the greatest breakdown in deterrence since the start of the Second World War. Although the United States, the 27 nations of the European Union and Great Britain had an economy 25.1 times bigger than Russia's in 2021. We failed to stop that invasion. So you have a far weaker party. Basically defy the world. And they got away with it so far. And I think China looks at that and says that we would similarly fail to deter China that we don't have the willingness to use our power. The other thing is that although there have been sanctions on Russia, those sanctions have not been as effective as people had hoped. Russia's ruble is doing okay. They're selling a lot of loyal. By the way, to China. And so I think that the Chinese believe that, look, the west can't enforce sanctions. And by the way, the Chinese are so arrogant these days. They think that we wouldn't impose sanctions on them in the first place or that they would be able to skate by them. So I think that the only thing that they look at at Putin and our irritated is that Putin may have delayed their plans for attacking a neighbor,

Putin Russia Beijing Taiwan China Great Britain European Union United States
What Made America an Economic Powerhouse in the First Place?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 3 d ago

What Made America an Economic Powerhouse in the First Place?

"When you reduce it all down, a wealthy society is only as wealthy as your ability to deter invasion to protect your people and the way that the global American empire has been built built on neoliberalism, by the way, international trade, cheap products, tons of plastic coming from China. Invade the world invite the world kind of the premise of neoliberalism, has also been on if necessary we can crush you. Now, neoliberalism is a flawed ideology. It's a flawed philosophy. It involves open borders. Very questionable social the lack of social values, I guess you could say, seeping into the country, the most amount of cheap stuff you could possibly import imaginable, GDP is your God who cares about church attendance, youth suicide, marriage rates, or the ability to create families, no neoliberalism cares about the stock market. Cares about GDP. They're not even good at managing those things anymore. Neoliberalism believes not in protecting or conserving a society but opening it up to the rest of the world for anyone to enjoy to devour or to take advantage of. But the one thing that the neoliberals used to get right, the one thing that they understood is that this entire project of quote unquote an open society, it can only work, you can only use your currency, people will only take you seriously if you're the strongest participant at the table. By strongest not just economically strong, but it's most importantly militarily strong. That if you are not able to crush your opponents, kill your enemies in a quick fashion, then why should someone use your currency? Like, why are we using this again? I'm stronger than you or this country stronger than you. Why do I have to be using your currency as the world reserve?

China
FINA Votes to Restrict Transgender Women From Competitions

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:40 min | 3 d ago

FINA Votes to Restrict Transgender Women From Competitions

"Some common sense at last, the world's governing body and swimming. It's called Athena. Has effectively banned transgender women from competing in women's events. The female members voted 71% in favor of a policy, basically it only permits swimmers who have transitioned before the age of 12 to compete in women's events. So the way this worked is that, well, the controversy was kind of driven by Leah Thomas, the University of Pennsylvania swimmer, biological male, a trans, who entered the transgender NCAA championship. Basically destroyed the competition, and people are going to say, wait a minute. So fina created a working group. This is an international body, by the way, a working group, and the working group was made up of medical experts, legal experts, sports figures to review all this. And they decided, you know what? We can't have it. And so at the Olympics and an international events, it's very simple. They use the key kind of marker of what they call Tanner stage two or before age 12. Whichever is later. So if you haven't transitioned by then, you can't do it. And now obviously they don't care the other way if you're a female to male transgender athlete. In other words, if you are transgender male, you are able to compete, but the idea is that if you are a biological man, lose transition to female, then you then you have

Leah Thomas University Of Pennsylvania Swimming Fina Ncaa Olympics Tanner
What Is FINA's New Ruling on Transgender Swimmers?

The Trish Regan Show

01:29 min | 3 d ago

What Is FINA's New Ruling on Transgender Swimmers?

"How is this fair? How is this right? Why should a girl who's been working her entire career? To get to this spot, be surpassed by somebody who just, you know, Johnny come lately decided he was a girl a few weeks ago. It's not right. And so at least somebody is speaking up again, the Europeans. They voted 71.5% in favor of this new measure. And then they also announced that they're going to put together a new category. It's called an open category. This was actually a suggestion I had months ago on this program. I said, you know what? The girls, the women, should just refuse to compete. A little unionization, if you would in there, we can use some of those democratic principles, right? Let's unionize gals and say, we're not going to compete against someone who just recently transitioned to becoming a female, like Leah Thomas. We're not going to compete. It's that simple. And if Leo wants to compete, then Leah can compete in a different lane with other people like Leah. I mean, that, again, seems to be just in the interest of fairness, something that would work. Well, this is exactly what this international body has come up with. They are creating, they said they're doing a 6 month study to create an open competition where anybody can compete. Okay, male female, you know, transitioning whatever it is you can compete in that. That seems to be a more equitable way to manage it. And then you can still have male and female swimming

Leah Thomas Johnny Leah LEO Swimming
International Swimming Association, FINA, Is Laying Down the Law

The Trish Regan Show

01:20 min | 3 d ago

International Swimming Association, FINA, Is Laying Down the Law

"Here on this Leah Thomas thing. And what we just saw out of FI and a, fina, this is the organization that represents swimmers. It's recognized by the Olympic Committee recognizes swimmers all around the world. And they have finally put their foot down and they're like, okay, this isn't really working, right? It's not really fair. And so they've got a solution, they have issued a 24 page report, which basically says, if you have not transitioned to being a woman by the time you're 12 years old, then you gotta compete with the men or maybe this new open category that they're working on. I'm gonna get to that in a second. But first of all, here are the rules. Again, you have to be actually a woman and have transitioned and have started all that therapy by the time you're 12 years old or you can't compete with the girls. And the reason being is that even and science shows this, even as somebody who has taken all the appropriate testosterone blockers and all the appropriate hormones to transition to becoming female, if they haven't done that and they've been as a teenager a male, well, they've been able to build up muscle tone, right? That you wouldn't actually have as a female. I

Leah Thomas Olympic Committee
U.K. Hobbled By Largest Railway Strike in Three Decades

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 d ago

U.K. Hobbled By Largest Railway Strike in Three Decades

"Union rail workers in Britain say they will go on strike tomorrow It could mean a messy commute in London and across Britain It is disastrous Secretary of State for transport grant shapps says the union has been planning this Back in April they called the strike on the false pretense with their members of taking themselves off the pay fees which of course the whole of the public services had for the past couple of years At that pay for ease was coming to an end anyway the strikes are completely unnecessary Union secretary general Mick lynch says the strike in Britain is an attempt to save jobs We're faced with thousands of job cuts despite what grant shap says there's been no guarantee that these redundancies won't be compulsory We've seen four or 5000 jobs already go From the railway they've told our maintenance staff network

Britain Grant Shapps Mick Lynch London Grant Shap
 'It's just hell there': Russia still pounds eastern Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

'It's just hell there': Russia still pounds eastern Ukraine

"Russia's military machine pounds eastern Ukraine Fierce fighting continues in the Donbass region of Ukraine President volodymyr zelensky says the Russian army is concentrating artillery aerial attacks and offensive forces Battles have been raging in villages in eastern Luhansk and local governor Sergei Hadi tells The Associated Press the situation and severo Donetsk is very difficult He says Ukrainian forces hold just one area the azot chemical plant where a number of fighters and hundreds of civilians are taking shelter It's just how there he writes everything is engulfed in fire the shelling doesn't stop even

Russia Donbass Volodymyr Zelensky Luhansk Sergei Hadi Russian Army Donetsk The Associated Press
Boris Johnson Defends Britain’s Plan to Electronically Monitor Refugees

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Boris Johnson Defends Britain’s Plan to Electronically Monitor Refugees

"British prime minister Boris Johnson met with Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky in Kyiv Thank you People were in the streets of the Ukrainian capital to great Johnson who says British support remains strong I want to say thank you to your incredible incredible resistance Johnson says Britain would lead a program that could train up to 10,000 Ukrainian soldiers I have to tell you that all the evidence is that Putin's troops are under acute pressure themselves

Volodymyr Zelensky Boris Johnson Kyiv Johnson Britain Putin
Title IX creating opportunities for international athletes

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Title IX creating opportunities for international athletes

"Maria bonanova from Russia was recruited for the bowling team at Vanderbilt university on the golf course Alain Crowder from Stuttgart Germany had no opportunity to play in Europe College sports is not a thing in Europe at all So I think the U.S. really has a unique opportunity there and then obviously title and I'm just tough set off and make sure we're better Crowder is at Stanford University Heather Lynn was a top player in Taiwan Luckily I play a lot of junior tournaments growing up from like 14 to 18 years old and play a bunch of AJ Jerry tournaments USGA and that's how coach D found me She's talking about coach Derek Bradley at the university of Oregon There are several agencies set up to help foreign female athletes by putting them in contact with various coaches and universities I'm Ed

Maria Bonanova Alain Crowder Heather Lynn Vanderbilt University Europe Stuttgart Bowling Russia Aj Jerry Crowder Germany Golf Stanford University Derek Bradley U.S. Taiwan Usga University Of Oregon
Draghi, Scholz and Macron face varying challenges on their Ukraine visit.

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Draghi, Scholz and Macron face varying challenges on their Ukraine visit.

"European leaders pledge arms in a path to the EU for Ukraine It is nightly video address Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky thanked the leaders of France Germany Italy and Romania who during their visit to Kyiv yesterday vowed to back his country's candidacy to join the European Union and offered more weapons to help fend off Russia's invasion Zelensky described it as a truly historic day saying Ukraine has felt the support of four powerful European states at once He also said it was important for him to hear that European leaders agree the

Volodymyr Zelensky Ukraine European Union Zelensky Kyiv Romania Italy France Germany
 McDonald's to pay France $1.3 billion in tax fraud case

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

McDonald's to pay France $1.3 billion in tax fraud case

"McDonald's France and related companies have agreed to pay over $1.3 billion to the French state to settle a case in which the fast food giant was accused of years of tax evasion The French national financial prosecutor's office says a Paris court has approved the settlement McDonald's says the settlement was the result of productive discussions with French tax authorities The decision means a tax for investigation targeting the company opened after a legal complaint by unions in 2016 will be closed The prosecutor's office says McDonald's France McDonald's system of France MC Luxembourg real estate and other related companies agreed to pay a total of $1.29 billion in fines penalties and back taxes to settle the case of the years of negotiations

Mcdonald French National Financial Pros Paris Court France France Mcdonald Luxembourg
Kevin Spacey, Accused of Sexual Assault, Appears in British Court

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Kevin Spacey, Accused of Sexual Assault, Appears in British Court

"Oscar winning actor Kevin Spacey has left a London court where he faced charges of committing sexual offenses against three men Photographers and television cameras are thrown Spacey as he left London's Westminster magistrate's court after a preliminary hearing The former House of Cards star is accused of four counts of sexual assault and one count of causing a person to engage in penetrative sexual activity without consent His lawyer says it's strenuously denies allegations of sexual assault The ledge incidents took place in London between March 2005 and August 2008 and one in western England in April 2013 The victims are now in the 30s and 40s Syria

Kevin Spacey London Oscar Spacey House Of Cards Westminster England Syria
"international  " Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"People. It's all over now case closed. It's getting harder and harder to pretend there isn't a serial killer on the loose especially when the same fingerprints are found at ten different crime scenes and multiple witnesses. Keep seeing the same person. A tall stocky woman with short hair dressed like a nurse. This suspect has got to be out there somewhere. And the pressure is mounting. In the years since the investigation started there have been seventeen more murders and by two thousand five newspapers or reporting that the grand total has reached forty nine unsolved murders in seven years. So the whole city is freaking out. Elderly people are afraid to leave the house alone and my summer of two thousand five. Something happens that turns this from a local problem into a nationwide scandal. Mayor lopez obrador announces. He's running for president immediately. His opponents latch onto the little old lady killer as a fear mongering tactic they blame the mayor for the wave of crime and the moral collapse of his city in august. The opposing party the p. a. n. actually launches a program to deliver door chain locks to the elderly. This is becoming way too big of a problem to ignore so in august of two thousand five after nearly two years of denying it. The chief prosecutor finally comes out and says okay. Okay you're right. There is a serial killer after that. The department of justice launches a whole new effort called parks and gardens since all the victims live near parks and gardens. They assumed that's where the killer was finding them. The police set up surveillance patrols in all the areas where the little old lady killer has been active. They make multiple composite sketches based on eyewitness accounts and seventy thousand copies are distributed all over the city the even commission of three d. clay sculpture of the suspects head of course despite with eyewitnesses said the police are still claiming that the suspect is disguised as a woman and this is what leads to an embarrassing low point of the entire investigation by october of two thousand and five the chief prosecutor decides maybe were wrong. Maybe the killer is actually transgender. So taking a complete shot in the dark the police go out and arrest somewhere between thirty eight and forty nine trans sex workers pretty much random. None of them look anything like the composite sketches and none of their fingerprints matched. The prince found at the crime scenes. The worst part is after this massive failure. The investigators don't rethink their tactics. The chief prosecutor continues to insist. We are certain. The suspect is a transgender by november. The investigations lack of progress is becoming a serious political problem officials from the pin or calling on the chief prosecutor to resign lopez. Oberdorf party is denouncing them. For trying to politicize murder the controversy gets so bad that the city assembly passes a resolution that basically says stop arguing and let the prosecutor do his job all right and they had a point. All of this drama was taking attention away from the little manhunt hunt or woman hunt. If the investigators had just turned off the news and switched the channel. Two tv azteca. They would have seen the little old lady killer giving an interview on national television. I hope you enjoy this exclusive look at international infamy. Ready to find out what happens next. You can finish this episode and hear more by following international infamy with ashley flowers. Free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Catch a new episode weekly every tuesday..

november spotify seven years seventy thousand copies two thousand seventeen more murders august lopez ten different crime scenes thirty eight forty nine unsolved murders Oberdorf party tuesday Mayor lopez obrador october of two thousand five newspapers two years forty nine Two tv
"international  " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"Maybe reflecting on this important day that's become unfortunately co opted by businesses and government bodies here and across the world. I know. I know. I shouldn't be so glum bit when you think about how. International woman's day got started to where we are. Now you'd be a little set to all right so i'm going to give you a quick history of international women's day so this goes as far back as the twentieth century government. Work is in new york city. Who were fed up with poor. Working conditions and low wages went on strike so soon after the socialist party of america picked much eighth in memory of the garment workers. But it wasn't until nineteen seventy seven that it became officially recognized by the un. Bob like with all good things. It became mad with capitalism corporations who are notorious for underpaying exploiting workers celebrating national women's day with no irony year in and year out. So the next time you see. A corporation wheeling out there international woman's day. Badgers we want you to reflect on how this corporation behaves the rest of the year to mark international women's day torres strait islander woman. Leyla dr spook to serious me cat about her love of acting how she got started and racism in australia's creative industries as well as the inspiration. She drills from her non before we jump to this interview habit..

Leyla International woman's day international woman's day twentieth century Bob australia international women's day new york city nineteen seventy seven eighth national women's day torres strait islander america
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"When you come back i forgot. I never had culture shock until i came all every kept culture shock. You're going to have culture shock. The only place. I've ever truly bent culture. Shock is coming home after being gone for an extended period of time absolutely and a lot of the things that i learned things like i'm endanger. I have to get out of this. You ride over curbs you right over sidewalks you ride through best yard you right. Just go where you need to go you go. You need to go get in trouble. You would never do that in the united states. You could just do that in the united states if you don't get a ticket to the police then another driver will enforce their belief of what you get. Definitely the attitude here i. So let's let's do a quick review because we heard covered oughta ground on this and we talked about. Let's see the first thing we talked about was was it triggering training. Yep yep we're talking about training we talk vision and how to use not just putting it out there but changing how you it and being aware of what's going on you talked about well really the weightless writer you talked about land rabble and getting comfortable knees really loose major deep loose situations again. I talk about a attitude matters smile while you ride and every time. I say that. I think about deep sand mud. Heavy rock is. This is where writers sometimes forgetting that we did this on purpose. And we're actually having fun. So we experienced tiling and i think the thing holes jumping up and then understanding the culture right i just a local yeah ride waco woeckel except what what the local culture is enjoy it. I even with food. I've discovered that don't eat what you recognize. Eat what the locals are eating because they know how to prepare it and it's probably fresh so Let me yeah. I can't wait to see when you find some time. Maybe the golden lining on this whole world pandemic is having the downtime few to sort through all of.

united states
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"That's my profession of doing this for twenty four years now as a professional motorcycle instructor. That's what pays my bills. And that's why when people go. Wow you're really good at this. You should think about doing this for a living. It's the other way around it is. I'm sharing what the world what i've learned him. It's for me. It's just been incredibly inspiring when i travel. It's about the culture. I just wanna see beautiful scenery and have challenging roads. I can stay here in the us. Where i live and can do that. I could trump through canada. I can go someplace like that to me. It's that cultural experience and next year will was supposed to go this november bit covid. Kind of put a stop on the borders. As you know in much more than i do. i mean you were. You were in lauderdale months. I've been here six months long time to be stuck in the country but february. I'm going to if all goes despite. I'm going to nepal and taking a group of riders with me if they go to my website read tax com. Which of course most people listening to this already know that. But i'm taking them there because what we mentioned which is how do you get across the border. The first time how do you get that first international experience where you can really feel the culture. But you're not just hanging out there on your own where somebody's helped put together a things together. So there's some safety in and i've talked every single say do an interview before people sign up to go with me and i go all right. I'm not so worried about the writing. I'm worried about the attitude because of the if they're expecting to have a hotel with flushing toilet until the paper every night if they need.

lauderdale canada nepal us
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"It's you should be looking to the land to figure out. Well if i write up on that bank. How will the bike react when i ride into deep. What's going to happen and you start using the land. Is you nancy partner instead of something that you feel. You have to conquer and tell people smile while you're right 'cause attitude matters when you're driving through brock and sand and greeting your teeth and hollering and screaming and yelling or even saying i'm going to conquer you. That's not positive it doesn't know help. Yeah the mental. The i'm going to do this. I'm going there. You'll go there if you think. No i don't think got to make this. You're not gonna make it. You've got to have that thing. Tell you about another thing. I learned in africa. That i thought i would never use. But i've used it a million times part of the training. They brought us out. There was a large hole in the ground is open field was probably diameter. Six feet maybe eight inches to a foot deep large enough that the bike would go inside the hole and the instructors that we're going to jump over this whole owned my. There's no way. I'm jumping over this whole. It's bigger than the motorcycle. If you miss it it's gonna be bad so the instructors that will show how it works and he zipped around got enough speed blip throughout all did all all basically the stuff that we learned for jumping over logs and clearing obstacles all that stuff same kind of principles and then boom right over this whole like. I can't believe this guy did this with a twelve hundred. He's like okay. Your turn all right so zip around right over the whole no problem like that was a blast. I wanna do that again. And it was sort of the end of the workshops so everybody's like jumping this gym. And i thought okay that's fun. I'll never do that in real life until i got to africa siberia south..

brock nancy africa siberia
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"How you're going to feel like the videos. You see on youtube of a cat or a dog walking on snow for the.

"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"And the deal is she had a write up on this thing and then right all the way across in back down. If you don't look at the end of the law you're going to go off. You're going to fall off few look down you're going off and so it was. It was terrifying it first. We had to do this over and over and over. And i thought okay. That was fun. But i'm never gonna use that in africa zipping along the dirt roads the way that they maintain those they'll take tractors and they'll plow them just like a field and so you have about eight inches of flat. Ground in the rest is all tilled soil. And you don't know and it's coming. So i'm zipping along it's the same as the log. I have to watch and think. I'm going over there or i'm gonna bite it in this dirt and so yeah those exercises the they mean something so do it okay. And that's and that goes back division. It's the same knowing just a again this sort of evolution of vision. You talk about seeing what you want to see you. You have to look at the end of the log at one of the concepts. I teach in the adventure camps. And and when i do the the training is only see what you wanna see. Meaning you have a road. That's ten fifteen twenty five feet wide. Whatever it is and it's all till but yet you have an aden strip of hard pat dirt all you. That's all you need to see the ideas at once. You identify something that you're not interested in a non possibility that needs to be blocked from your vision and i want to do this. On the trails. Looking for predictable rocks or little vs you'll gaps. Were the rocks in the together. So i know machar's exactly and so being able to block out certain things becomes important as well. It's not something we do naturally. Naturally if there's a a threat nature tells us track the threat..

africa machar
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"The way that i learned how to do that. Is i went to horizons. Unlimited bulletin boards of the hub. I got a lot of information to their website absolutely. There's so many people that that are doing. What you and. I are doing like my family when i said i'm going to ride around the world on a motorcycle or like. Oh my god. That's insane. i'm like well there's probably five thousand people doing it right now. There's i mean there's people all over the world doing this from all different countries. It's not that complicated. And the great thing is people share. That's how i got across the border. The other thing that i did my first border crossing on the bike was into mexico is really easy from arizona. So that's it's pretty simple to get into mexico but getting into malla and through central america. You're getting into some dangerous places. There are fixers. there's some corruption. There are some tips to be paid to officials getting through those countries that it was something i had to learn just by grit and understanding the first time you go through border you figure out okay. Here's the system. I have to do these three things then you do it again exiting then you do it again entering the next country and then you do it again. So over fifty countries now i've gone through so that's entering exiting borders. It's over one hundred borders that have crossed on the bike almost the same. Every single time. I found in in central america. Central america was still possibly the most challenging voice. Have been i was you need in. Its own way but central america is is so condensed and there is so narrow of a border. And there's so many. North americans. America you know americans canadians going through that. It's it's quite polluted as far as the the money. That's brought down the overpayments that people have and the expectation that everybody's gonna use a fixer and listening when you travel through borders that are complicated or there's foreign language these fixers are people who make their living helping foreigners get across the border and in some places it's really quite useful is voices in in russia or in africa where this is and these people are relatively legitimate. They're just trying to make a living site to america. they really there are few. But they're also people who really target americans and take huge advantage of him. But but that's gonna fixer. Is somebody that tries to help you. Get across the border and it's not let's face it. I i don't know about you mark. But i find that especially in central america. They prey on north americans and our culture. We value our money. We value our privacy. We value our time. We want to get through fast. We want to be treated like an american. And they scare people into pain fees that they shouldn't be paying it's not the officials it's the fixtures that get you. Yeah it's the fixtures. And i i have videos of me. Crossing all of the central american borders and i used fixers and all of those border crossings think except maybe nicaragua. I'm not i. don't remember but the videos. You can watch those there on my youtube channel mark and i'm like dot com..

america mexico central america arizona Central america russia africa nicaragua youtube
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"To learn the physical stuff the body position the site the vision those types of things if you're going online watching brett tax videos those guys and you're not getting any training what happens is you tend to create bad habits that you don't know about so there are things that you know that you don't know maybe you don't know how to control the rear wheel to slide around a corner or something you maybe work on that but then the dangerous things are the things that you don't know that you don't know that's why you need to go to a training session with a physical person so that they can look and say you're too far back on the motorcycle. Your body's had a position your needs to be next to the tank. You need to open up to the corner. You need to sit up straight. You're handlebars are too low. You're too much on the throttle. Feathered the clutch. Those things if you don't get the proper and appropriate training for the type of journey that you're doing you can get into trouble number one. You're in most essential skill to kind of jump on with the bandwagon with this. I often learn the most from other trainers not they give me information. I don't know like you said there's there's some great videos out there. There's some great books out there. I could talk to people. I can watch people but to have somebody. Watch me somebody with a trained. I because what i found is many writers that i train think they're doing something and they're not and exactly the same thing back in a tip for those that are listening one of the ways to get around this because not everybody has the ability to to come and see a trainer like me or to get into a school. Is i use a lot of video. there's so available now even cell phones are just having a friend. Hold it and video myself. And i do this. I'm not just telling other people. Do i do this to myself. Because i'm the most critical coach. I can think of when it comes to my writing a have somebody else video me. And that's a lot of how some of the videos is started making came about is i was just doing videos anyways and then critiquing how i was doing and finding out. I didn't always look the way i was supposed to look. I was telling other people do. I can coach them. But i wasn't doing it. So yeah you've got a great point there. Yeah it's funny. I have some videos on youtube of me. Writing and specifically of videos of me at training in lima. I think of me doing my first real off road..

brett youtube lima
"international  " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"international " Discussed on Around the Wheel with Bret Tkacs

"Welcome to the second episode of around the will with tax and tonight mark wallace marquis's a guest. He is a world traveler. he's been travelling since two thousand fourteen and two years into his trip. He realized that he had missed. The market was traveling with trains planes and automobiles decided to switch over to motorcycles exclusively. He's over fifty countries into his travels. And what makes mark special besides being stuck in quarantine in argentina for the whole covid thing. That's going on in the world right now. Is he's a photographer. And he's also a blogger on youtube and he's got some magnificent photos. I've been looking at your website. Mark it's incredible so it's mark on a bike dot com. You guys need to check this out after you..

mark wallace marquis argentina youtube
"international  " Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on Why It Matters

"And. . We've been planning to do an episode on national students visas and the education system for the past few months. . It seems like an underreported topic that people should know more about, , but then it became part of the news. . Students. . Who the schools plan to online only classes in the fall, , we'll have to transfer or leave the country or face possible deportation several prestigious American universities are now suing the trump administration the trump administration back down but I don't think it's the end for what we might save from this administration. . You could be forgiven for thinking that student visas classic partisan issue in American politics liberals pushing for cultural diversity in a more open society while conservatives warn of dangerous to national security American jobs. . But the real story is quite different for decades Republicans and Democrats agreed that a steady pipeline of the world's best minds into American. . Universities is essential for our economy innovation and competitive advantage. . But the rest of the world it was a system that largely worked. . The trump administration has taken a different perspective and the pipeline of international students in into American businesses, , hospitals and research facilities has begun to constrict as this happens other nations have begun picking up the slack. . I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today international students and American competitiveness under threat. . All right. . So I'm a student in another country. . Why do I want to come to school in the United States? ? I mean if you look at the list of the world's one, , hundred best universities more than half of those are in the United States you know if you come here and you graduate with a degree from top American University, , that's worth a tremendous amount throughout your life. . My name is Edward Alden. . I'm a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations I'm also the Ross distinguished visiting professor at western Washington University in Bellingham Washington. . All is a leading voice on immigration innovation and US competitiveness. . He spends a lot of time studying the contributions of immigrants to the US economy. . secondarily, , even if you're not coming to the best institutions in the United, , states has a global reputation as a dynamic innovative place, , and if you were a talented ambitious foreign students, , it's a place you wanna be mean finally education is in English and English remains the universal language of business. . So. . To the extent that you come out from an American education with a strong grass with the English language. That's . something also going to be very helpful in your life. . There are liberal arts colleges, , their research institutions, , institutions, , large and small that can cater to many different types of learning and covering many different styles. . My name is extra Brenner. . Director and CEO OF NAFTA THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS So, , bright soon around the world know they can come here and get a great education, , and perhaps the most exciting things is the dynamism of the American classroom. . That is very rare that idea of having an interactive classroom where students and professors are talking to each other where the learning is shared it's not just the professor lecturing I'll tell you as someone who is a former professor I, , love that environment and indeed it something where we even put out a publication on introduction to the American classroom to help students get used to the idea that they will have to defend their ideas. . Okay. . so you decide you want to come to school in the US how does the system actually work? ? What are the options for getting a visa? ? Well you need to be admitted to the university that you wish to attend. . So that's the same thing in American student would face. . You have to apply to the university and right your admissions essay all the things that American students do when they want to attend a university. . So if you are admitted than you need to apply for what's called an F. One student visa, , the visa does not allow you to remain in the United States permanently does not allow you to work for income with some exceptions while you're in the United States temporary visa that permits you to come here and study. . Alongside the F one, , there are also J. One visas and a few other lesser known options together they account for roughly one point, , one, , million foreign students in the US for anyone who's done it or help someone do it? ? You know that apply to college is not easy even with some assistance from family or a guidance counselor. . For an international student, , it also means traveling to an embassy or consulate in their home country and going through a meticulous and costly process to get a visa. . And, , it isn't as though they get to breathe a sigh of relief once they're accepted or even after they arrive. . For many students may be their first time out of their home country. . Maybe their family has all saved up their money to send the bright child to the US that's a big commitment by the child in the family when they get to the United States, , their institutions, , of course, , comply with the law and some people may not realize but every international student is actually in effect tracked by institution and there is an official. . At each institution that has to know where that student is and be able to file documentation on them. . So unlike any other visitor to the United States business travelers only international students are actually recorded and tracked with that level of detail. . So the student has a lot of obligations a lot of costs and their institutions have additional obligations as well. . It's a big commitment of very big commitment, , but it's a life changing

United States trump American University Ross Gabrielle Sierra Council on Foreign Relations Edward Alden Republicans western Washington University distinguished visiting profess senior fellow United Bellingham Washington
"international  " Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on I Run Because

"Yeah. And that was just such a huge. To three years in the making of Just being able to go from running on my own to running with guides running in this community that supported me. And Helped me achieve. That that feeling that we all get when we crossed that finish line that was back. In that moment apart. Welcomes the I run because podcast. We'll have a reason why we run. Each person has unique purpose to answer their y. You're Y moves. You and your wife gets you across finish line you're Y can motivate others. I run because seeks to inspire others exploring the why of athletes who run for charitable organizations and causes. I'm your host job chart and I'm joined by my lovely co host, my wife Christie. On this season of iron, because we are highlighting the running club Achilles International. A running club that partners guides with runs of different abilities.

Achilles International Christie
"international  " Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

13:47 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on PRI's The World

"The culmination of literally decades of work to try to bring autonomy and self determination to the people southern Sudan. Steinberg remembers that day vividly because it was too hot to forget. We were fighting over the shade. That was there. The New South Sudanese army stood in front of us and as the got hotter and hotter soldiers would faint and people would pick them up and take them to the back and then bring up a new soldier to take his place then. Osama theon remembers that day to. He's a south Sudanese artist. Who was standing in the crowd? He says people weren't collapsing because it was too hot they were collapsing because they were too. Or we felt that Finally we feel like we. We have a country where we belong but that new country where people now belonged quickly split apart in two thousand thirteen. Just two years after independence. President Salva Kiir fired Vice President Reagan Shar soon. The country erupted into a bloody civil war. Alan Boswell is a senior analyst at the International Crisis Group those leaders as soon as they got independence they basically a power struggle over who lead the country of south Sudan and really who would capture this oil revenue. South Sudan's oil reserves are key to its economy. There is a sort of scramble. King of the hill scrambled to see who would get on top and sort of get that oil revenue and everyone kind of got sucked into this. This civil war has displaced more than a million people in the country and more than two million other citizens have fled to neighboring countries. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed. The international community has tried to end the war multiple times but the last attempt at peace ended with rebel leader. Rake MR fleeing the country by foot. That's when Manasseh math young. The South Sudanese artist decided to become an activist. He formed the Youth Movement. Anatomy Bonn which an Arabic means. We are tired on the Toubon by itself. With a protest of the unnecessary suffering that the citadel subsidize had been subjected to the United States which has helped steer the country into independence has grown more and more frustrated over the past decade the US has donated billions of dollars in humanitarian aid. The analyst Alan Boswell is in south Sudan and he says it's hard to see where the money has gone. I was at a I was in a town called Raja which you know it. It looks like ninety percent of the town is basically been emptied. Most of the town is destroyed. there's just brick homes with roofs. It looks post apocalyptic last year the. Us said it may have to reevaluate. The relationship with South Sudan. If political leads can't get their act together and in recent months the. Us Treasury Department has announced back to back sanctions on south Sudanese officials. Who they've called peace process? Spoilers Regional African leaders have been brokering meetings between opposing signs and even the Vatican has gotten involved last year. Pope Francis Kissed the feet of the president and the rebel leader pleading for them to make peace this week. The two leaders had a breakthrough and agreed to share power yoga to pour a south Sudanese researcher at Human Rights Watch. She says that the leaders agreed to share. Power is only the beginning. Human Rights needs to be at the center of the peace process. The our children. Who are you know five years old now and the only thing they know is the corners of a tent in a US base and nothing outside that so the incoming unity government has a lot issued address. Both sides have been accused of committing potential war crimes including the kidnapping and mass rape of women and girls. Despite the fact that this an over focus on power-sharing in the peace agrements the are numerous human rights issues that need to be addressed one of. Which is you know ensuring abducted women and girls. I released from armed groups the same day that these two leaders agreed to share power. The United Nations released a report showing that both sides were starving the population and embezzling funds meant for humanitarian relief for the world. I'm Halima Condie. Iranian voters went to the polls today to elect a new parliament or Mosley's many moderates were blocked from running by election authorities. Meanwhile Iran has been officially blacklisted by international body the Financial Action Task Force decided to Ron failing to comply with anti-terrorism Financing Guidelines Barbara. Slaven is director of the future of a run initiative at the Atlantic Council Barbara Start with that news from the financial task force in Paris. How significant is it? And what does it actually mean for Ron well? It is significant although the Iranian economy has been so isolated primarily by US sanctions that the impact may not be that great. There had been hoped for several years that Iran would enact anti terrorism legislation anti money laundering legislation and it actually passed through the parliament a couple of times but then was blocked by something called. The Guardian Council Which also figures in the elections? It has enormous powers to block legislation to that candidates. So it didn't go through in time to meet a deadline and after three years of having your on on a so-called grey list. They are back on the blacklist that they were on before two thousand sixteen. What do you think this is happening now? Well there's been a lot of pressure from the trump administration to put Iran on this blacklist as part of the so-called maximum pressure campaign that we've been seeing against Iran This is an effort to make Iran pay and hurt as much as possible allegedly to get your own to return to the negotiating table for negotiations but frankly lately it is look mostly just like punishment without any particular strategy or goal in mind did the US assassination of Qassem Suleimani kind of reprise the concern of Iran's proxy battles outside Iran led by Sulejmani. Well you know. I think one of the arguments by those who did not want to put in place these financial transparency laws is that it would be used as a way to prevent Iran from continuing to support these various proxy movements. I'm not sure if that's true. I think most of this kind of assistance takes place in cash. It doesn't go through banks But there has been a general hardening anti-western sentiment in Iran since the US assassinated Sullivan and the thought that Iran would do the west of favor by proving these measures. I think that became less and less popular My impression has been that much of the rest of the world has been trying to distance itself from the. Us's maximum pressure campaign. How significant is it that the international community is getting together behind these measures against Iran? Well again I think Europeans in particular fought this for a long time But they're in a difficult situation situation. how much time can you give Iran to pass these measures? Plus you know. The Iranians have been moving out of the Iran nuclear deal. They're no longer in full compliance with it and I think there's frustration. Meanwhile Arabians were out voting in parliamentary elections today. What have you heard about turn on? It looks like it's pretty low. Which is what everybody expected. The Guardian Council again disqualified many of the so-called reformist candidates including many of the incumbent members of parliament. The mood in Iran is extremely hopeless and depressed and the usual exhortations that would get people out to the polls. Don't seem to be working. So what will these elections actually change in Iran? Well the parliament is not exactly the most important body in Iran but it does have some influence and I think everyone sees this as a kind of run up to a complete takeover of all of the elected institutions by conservative forces in the country. You get a sense that Iran is really hunkering down under pressure from the United States and any move toward liberalization toward reform. Just not going to happen. That's Barbara Slaven at the Atlantic Council. Always good to chop are thank you. You're welcome Iranian writers. Iwo Fatty raised her kids in the US and realized they were hearing a lot of negative messages about their country so eventually she took things into her own hands. By writing to new children's books celebrating Persian history and culture. Missoula tells me they were very personal projects. My kids are teenagers now. Were having some identity crisis when they were much younger. My Son Change His name to Jack when he was eight years. Old and I felt that there was something that I don wrong that I have messed up things for them. Their identity crisis was partly because they were hearing so many negative things about Iran in two thousand twelve. Two thousand thirteen. We drove to school every morning. And my kids were hearing what was on the news about Iran. This was a time that Iran and the US were almost in full confrontation over. Iran's nuclear program and they started feeling that Iran was a country that featured one have anything to do with. They wanted to distance themselves. And this was painful for me so I started telling them stories about Iran Iranian figures who had contributed to human civilization. Who had done something great? They soclean an effort to remind them. There were many positive things about their culture And you and your family you were living in the states. When all this kind of occurred to you what did you think you had done wrong as a parent as a parent? I felt that I failed to introduce the Persian culture to my kids in a proper way. I wanted them to feel what Iran had been. Once upon a time to feel what Iranian figures had contributed to science to politics to mathematics? And so I started telling them stories about prominent figures like I've seen Cyrus like the riots. And what they had done right so the first book he wrote is about Cyrus the founder of the Persian Empire and then this book about China the father of modern medicine. Why did you choose these particular stories to tell well first of all? I don't think you can talk to Iranian without mentioning Cyrus from Iranians Cyrus is what Moses is to the Jews basically two Iranians their liberator the founder of their civilization. The man who made them proud so definitely. Cyrus was going to be among the first books that I wrote But obviously no was even more than a physician more than a doctor. He was also a philosopher. There's an interesting little passages. I'm just GonNa read from in your book. I've seen a known as Iban Sina or Abu Ali. Sina in the Middle East studied and worked so hard that became the best doctor in the city of Bukhara when he was just a teenager so in Bihar is ruler fell ill and no doctrine town could treat them they sent for Sina. Your Majesty said a fifteen year old. I've seen a confidently. You are suffering from lead poisoning. He gave the rule medicine and within days he recovered. So I read this pages because they do. Telegraph a sense of pride for this man. Where you consciously telling these stories with the son of intent definitely. I came across a lot of Iranian kids. Who are my children's friends? And they were named like Abbie Sina Cyrus Orion and I used to ask them. Do you know what your name means? I knew those were very meaningful names for their parents when they had chosen them. But a lot of these kids didn't know anything about the people they were named after so I mean that was my intention. I WANNA write stories. That would tell kids who are growing up here very far away from their motherland. That everything is not dark and negative about Iran. How old are your kids now? And what do they think of the books My kids are fourteen and fifteen and a half They've read the books many times as I was writing them. They were my editors and You know the feel much more confident about who they are now. Well I'm imagining all of your books on the shelves of the kids section in the library for Non Iranian kids. What kind of impact do you want these stories to have? Oh definitely absolutely no stories convey values beliefs attitudes and. I don't want these stories just to be for Iranian kids. I think we live at a time that we are exposed to a lot of negative narrative about immigrants of certain background and so I think the need for children to read global stories more than ever not just about Iran about other cultures as well also. I really hope that American kids would read this books. Just so that we will have a better understanding of different cultures. Missoula fatty author of the Children's books. My name's Cyrus and the father of modern medicine. Great to speak with you. Thank you thank you marco. Children's literature may have changed over the years but kids themselves. Nah they're basically still the same. How do we know? Look at the British Library's new children's literature website. One of the gems now online. There is a manners book for Children. Dating back to fourteen eighty. It's written in middle English..

Iran United States Abbie Sina Cyrus Orion South Sudan Sudan Alan Boswell Guardian Council Missoula Barbara Slaven President Salva Kiir Atlantic Council Osama theon International Crisis Group Steinberg British Library United Nations
"international  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm songwriter. Charlie harding and I'm musicologists needs Sloan where the host of switched on pop a podcast about the making and meaning of popular music. Every week. Charlie I break down the most interesting hits trends ends in artists to understand what they're doing what they're saying and why the songs are so infectious. We've recently broken down. Billy eyelashes music with her brother and collaborator operator. phineas dissecting chance the rapper with super producer felder and covered everything from Dolly. Parton to Scott if you love music you're going to discover something. The era opening in switched on pop. So join US search for switched on pop in your favorite podcast APP and listen to episode about your favorite artists and subscribe for free on Apple podcasts. spotify or ever you're listening to get new music explainers every week and after listening you might want to check out. Our new book switched on Pop. How Popular Music Works and why it matters at your favorite bookseller? Thanks know I'm just in his something like this ever happened before Country accidentally shooting down a plane. Full live civilians yeah. Unfortunately it's happened several times in nineteen eighty eight in the Iran Iraq war Thir- were immense tensions nations in the region. There was a huge threat to international shipping industry of WHO's incredibly credibly vital shipping lane so the US Navy dispatched several ships to patrol the waters and sort of make sure that both estates were respecting international shipping at one point in early July nineteen eighty ace and Iranian Airlines flight took off from from a southern port port city and the US naval ship nearby mistook it for an F.. Fourteen fighter jet and fired two missiles and down the flight killing killing everybody on board mostly around citizens and evaluating information available from the Persian Gulf. We believe that the cruiser USS been sands while actively engaged with threatening running surface units protecting itself from what was concluded to be hostile aircraft shot down and Iranian NEOM airliner over the Straits of her Moose. Government deeply regrets the sensible in that moment. A lot of those fears about what happens when a military military sort of overreacts came alive all over again the US military express their dismay immediately but they didn't take responsibility information that is available to us that the commanding commanding officer operator or other conducted himself with circumspection and considering information that was available to him followed his thirties and acted with good judgement and other Berry crying period of time the US military very similar way to what the Iranians did just this month. They sort of making excuses for the aircraft was not in the air corridor that would normally be in the air quarters. Orders a limited amount of airspace and he was outside of that whether that is Started saying you'll wealth. The flight was operating under military frequency. The flight started descending quite rapidly in an aggressive maneuver and they started goes trying to set up justification for the shootdown now in the months that followed a lot of the other intelligence and Radio Communications radar imagery showed with that in fact the flight was transmitting on a civilian frequency as well that it was quite obvious. It was a commercial airliner that in fact the flight was ascending not descending and that a lot of the claims that were being made may have been well believed in the moment but we're ultimately wrong. It sounds like there is an established playbook for this and that playbook is whenever you shoot shoot down a plane accidentally. The first thing you do is lie about it not even necessarily lie but you kind of weaponize information you have in front of you to sort of skirt responsibility right so you know. I don't really have any doubt that those on the ship did believe that an F. Fourteen was heading their way with the intentive sinking ship. That being said obviously there was more checks that they need to do to confirm that it was an F. Fourteen and not a civilian aircraft. How does the U the US deal with its accidental downing of a civilian aircraft it starts proceedings at the UN and in Court of Justice Government the Republic of Iran considers this a pe- meditated active aggression and a premeditated cold blooded murderer hairdo and they go to court? Basically saying America needs to be held responsible for this America all the while is expressing sympathy. It sort of acknowledges when you know that this was done in air but never actually apologizes and it never really takes responsibility for its happened. Ultimately that process begins is a full investigation as a real investigation instigation that sort of lays bare a lot of the facts of this case but when it gets to court America basically says we're looking to settle the United States and Iran have settled Iran's claims against the United States which were filed before the International Court of Justice concern and that sort of begins setting the stage for what the case law will be going forward and I think also reinforces to the world that there needs to be rules in these situations. They can't really be ad hoc basis where mayor countries are allowed to sort of accept responsibility or deny responsibility based on how they're feeling that day. So how much does the. US end up paying. So ultimately the settlement nineteen ninety six to about one hundred thirty one million dollars. It's not a huge sum of money. But I think from both sides it was a relatively fair settlement Recognition of the damage. That had done those families. Of course we never really replace those who died but it was a substantial of money and did it create some sort of legal legal precedents even though it was I guess up to these two countries. How much money was issued? Its sort of created a benchmark for what a reasonable settlement looks like American never accepted responsibility. Never apologized and that was something. Iran on always demanded years later when the captain of the ship that was responsible for the downing was kind of celebrated and recognized as a hero and in the US military Iran was was absolutely livid all over again so there there's always been this retention where America has never quite owned up to what happened in its entirety and in Iran has has always been sort of sore about that but it sort of sets rules on what happens when a military down two civilian airliner and sort sort of lays the groundwork for investigations. Look like when that happens. You know who's responsible meal is the kind of sets the legal framework to actually bring someone what did bring a foreign nation to court in an instance like this and now ironically Iran's in the position of being the aggressor who might might need to pay out to countries like Canada Ukraine and its own citizens. Yeah that's right and I it sort of turns the tables. It's why it's so difficult. Take credibly a lot of attempts by Tehran to sort of throw this back in America's face because they were the ones clamoring for this credible process that features a serious investigation A real court process and a real penalties and ownership and recognition of what had happened up something that basically kind of uncomfortable with doing now. Who's going to be in the position more so here to ensure that Iran is held? Held accountable is in Ukraine Canada. We saw conversation begin around. What a legal process should look like when win a military downs a civilian airliner? There's something called the Chicago Convention and the Chicago Convention Governs how commercial airliners are supposed to operate from one country to another. It's supposed to be international standard for how planes take off and land and fly through other countries airspace. So under the Chicago oh convention it's sort of recognizes different parties for different responsibilities so as part of the investigation. The manufacturer of the aircraft has sort of special status in terms of you'll leading the investigation though that is sort of designed more for mechanical failures. The country the flight was destined for has has standing to run the investigation. But it's also not totally defined. I mean Canada has insisted on sending investigators already sent. I'm a couple. It's likely to send me more. There was some reticence by Iran seemingly give them visas They've now been award of those visas and the likely in Aron right now and and more likely to show up but I think Canada has to sort of force itself into this. I mean I don't think Ukraine is necessarily incredibly invested vested in in the region. You know it has its own sort of concern story but right now the majority of the victims from from abroad where Canadian so I think it really puts the onus on Canada to step in here. What's more Canada has long pressed to the Iranian regime for for changes around human rights the round democratic processes to sort of try to press it to stop funding terrorist organizations in the region so I think Canada has already exercised? Is the fair bit of pressure on the Iranian state. It has been supportive. Do not a party to the nuclear deal with European Union and the US which I think again puts it into a good spot to actually use what leverage it has to go after Tehran to to do this properly Canada had substantial sanctions in place against Iran? Up until the last couple of years it removed those sanctions and I can imagine that putting them back on. We'll be on the table now. So I think candidate is really the best-placed here. Of course America may see itself being party to the eventual legal process but obviously given the hostility between those two countries and Iran's assistance that America's America's somewhat to blame for the downing. I it puts them in to awkward as a spot to really inject themselves into this process in a major way house. The Canadian Indian public reacting..

Iran US America Canada Charlie harding US Navy Tehran Persian Gulf Ukraine F. Fourteen International Court of Justice Billy Sloan Parton felder producer Iranian Airlines Chicago European Union Radio Communications
"international  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm songwriter. Charlie harding and I'm musicologists needs Sloan where the host of switched on pop a podcast about the making and meaning of popular music. Every week. Charlie I break down the most interesting hits trends ends in artists to understand what they're doing what they're saying and why the songs are so infectious. We've recently broken down. Billy eyelashes music with her brother and collaborator operator. phineas dissecting chance the rapper with super producer felder and covered everything from Dolly. Parton to Scott if you love music you're going to discover something. The era opening in switched on pop. So join US search for switched on pop in your favorite podcast APP and listen to episode about your favorite artists and subscribe for free on Apple podcasts. spotify or ever you're listening to get new music explainers every week and after listening you might want to check out. Our new book switched on Pop. How Popular Music Works and why it matters at your favorite bookseller? Thanks know I'm just in his something like this ever happened before Country accidentally shooting down a plane. Full live civilians yeah. Unfortunately it's happened several times in nineteen eighty eight in the Iran Iraq war Thir- were immense tensions nations in the region. There was a huge threat to international shipping industry of WHO's incredibly credibly vital shipping lane so the US Navy dispatched several ships to patrol the waters and sort of make sure that both estates were respecting international shipping at one point in early July nineteen eighty ace and Iranian Airlines flight took off from from a southern port port city and the US naval ship nearby mistook it for an F.. Fourteen fighter jet and fired two missiles and down the flight killing killing everybody on board mostly around citizens and evaluating information available from the Persian Gulf. We believe that the cruiser USS been sands while actively engaged with threatening running surface units protecting itself from what was concluded to be hostile aircraft shot down and Iranian NEOM airliner over the Straits of her Moose. Government deeply regrets the sensible in that moment. A lot of those fears about what happens when a military military sort of overreacts came alive all over again the US military express their dismay immediately but they didn't take responsibility information that is available to us that the commanding commanding officer operator or other conducted himself with circumspection and considering information that was available to him followed his thirties and acted with good judgement and other Berry crying period of time the US military very similar way to what the Iranians did just this month. They sort of making excuses for the aircraft was not in the air corridor that would normally be in the air quarters. Orders a limited amount of airspace and he was outside of that whether that is Started saying you'll wealth. The flight was operating under military frequency. The flight started descending quite rapidly in an aggressive maneuver and they started goes trying to set up justification for the shootdown now in the months that followed a lot of the other intelligence and Radio Communications radar imagery showed with that in fact the flight was transmitting on a civilian frequency as well that it was quite obvious. It was a commercial airliner that in fact the flight was ascending not descending and that a lot of the claims that were being made may have been well believed in the moment but we're ultimately wrong. It sounds like there is an established playbook for this and that playbook is whenever you shoot shoot down a plane accidentally. The first thing you do is lie about it not even necessarily lie but you kind of weaponize information you have in front of you to sort of skirt responsibility right so you know. I don't really have any doubt that those on the ship did believe that an F. Fourteen was heading their way with the intentive sinking ship. That being said obviously there was more checks that they need to do to confirm that it was an F. Fourteen and not a civilian aircraft. How does the U the US deal with its accidental downing of a civilian aircraft it starts proceedings at the UN and in Court of Justice Government the Republic of Iran considers this a pe- meditated active aggression and a premeditated cold blooded murderer hairdo and they go to court? Basically saying America needs to be held responsible for this America all the while is expressing sympathy. It sort of acknowledges when you know that this was done in air but never actually apologizes and it never really takes responsibility for its happened. Ultimately that process begins is a full investigation as a real investigation instigation that sort of lays bare a lot of the facts of this case but when it gets to court America basically says we're looking to settle the United States and Iran have settled Iran's claims against the United States which were filed before the International Court of Justice concern and that sort of begins setting the stage for what the case law will be going forward and I think also reinforces to the world that there needs to be rules in these situations. They can't really be ad hoc basis where mayor countries are allowed to sort of accept responsibility or deny responsibility based on how they're feeling that day. So how much does the. US end up paying. So ultimately the settlement nineteen ninety six to about one hundred thirty one million dollars. It's not a huge sum of money. But I think from both sides it was a relatively fair settlement Recognition of the damage. That had done those families. Of course we never really replace those who died but it was a substantial of money and did it create some sort of legal legal precedents even though it was I guess up to these two countries. How much money was issued? Its sort of created a benchmark for what a reasonable settlement looks like American never accepted responsibility. Never apologized and that was something. Iran on always demanded years later when the captain of the ship that was responsible for the downing was kind of celebrated and recognized as a hero and in the US military Iran was was absolutely livid all over again so there there's always been this retention where America has never quite owned up to what happened in its entirety and in Iran has has always been sort of sore about that but it sort of sets rules on what happens when a military down two civilian airliner and sort sort of lays the groundwork for investigations. Look like when that happens. You know who's responsible meal is the kind of sets the legal framework to actually bring someone what did bring a foreign nation to court in an instance like this and now ironically Iran's in the position of being the aggressor who might might need to pay out to countries like Canada Ukraine and its own citizens. Yeah that's right and I it sort of turns the tables. It's why it's so difficult. Take credibly a lot of attempts by Tehran to sort of throw this back in America's face because they were the ones clamoring for this credible process that features a serious investigation A real court process and a real penalties and ownership and recognition of what had happened up something that basically kind of uncomfortable with doing now. Who's going to be in the position more so here to ensure that Iran is held? Held accountable is in Ukraine Canada. We saw conversation begin around. What a legal process should look like when win a military downs a civilian airliner? There's something called the Chicago Convention and the Chicago Convention Governs how commercial airliners are supposed to operate from one country to another. It's supposed to be international standard for how planes take off and land and fly through other countries airspace. So under the Chicago oh convention it's sort of recognizes different parties for different responsibilities so as part of the investigation. The manufacturer of the aircraft has sort of special status in terms of you'll leading the investigation though that is sort of designed more for mechanical failures. The country the flight was destined for has has standing to run the investigation. But it's also not totally defined. I mean Canada has insisted on sending investigators already sent. I'm a couple. It's likely to send me more. There was some reticence by Iran seemingly give them visas They've now been award of those visas and the likely in Aron right now and and more likely to show up but I think Canada has to sort of force itself into this. I mean I don't think Ukraine is necessarily incredibly invested vested in in the region. You know it has its own sort of concern story but right now the majority of the victims from from abroad where Canadian so I think it really puts the onus on Canada to step in here. What's more Canada has long pressed to the Iranian regime for for changes around human rights the round democratic processes to sort of try to press it to stop funding terrorist organizations in the region so I think Canada has already exercised? Is the fair bit of pressure on the Iranian state. It has been supportive. Do not a party to the nuclear deal with European Union and the US which I think again puts it into a good spot to actually use what leverage it has to go after Tehran to to do this properly Canada had substantial sanctions in place against Iran? Up until the last couple of years it removed those sanctions and I can imagine that putting them back on. We'll be on the table now. So I think candidate is really the best-placed here. Of course America may see itself being party to the eventual legal process but obviously given the hostility between those two countries and Iran's assistance that America's America's somewhat to blame for the downing. I it puts them in to awkward as a spot to really inject themselves into this process in a major way house. The Canadian Indian public reacting..

Iran US America Canada Charlie harding US Navy Tehran Persian Gulf Ukraine F. Fourteen International Court of Justice Billy Sloan Parton felder producer Iranian Airlines Chicago European Union Radio Communications
"international  " Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"international " Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"The head of the Federal Reserve Fellow who turns up and down the heat on the. US economy is testifying in Congress for a second day on day. One yesterday there was a teachable. Moment about the Fed's dual role keeping the job market strong while keeping inflation down following this closely as Diane swonk chief economist at the tax advisory Firm Grant Grant Thornton and a frequent voice here on Thursdays. Good Morning Good Morning. There's a really interesting question. That was posed to the Fed chief yesterday today. That caught your attention. It was about how inflation affects poorer people. Exactly one of the questions was the gap inflation between how low income households in the cost they face face versus higher income households which are has been some research on this and it's really important and understanding how the economic aggregates at the Fed targets are not necessarily surly representative of what the what many Americans are experiencing low income. Households have to pay higher costs on things than many higher income households and the things Tabei are more limited in their ability. You have to pay certain amount for shelter. They have to pay a certain amount for medical care. Many of them are worried about not even being able to afford their prescription drug so their experience with inflation is very different than the reality. The Fed chairman is trying to target. What's also important is that this particular declerk fed chairman has sort of stepped out of the traditional comfort zone of the Fed and said we'd like to reach more people and reach more of the public with this expansion by running this marathon? I'm expansion longer and engaging more people on the sidelines one of the hard things. The Fed faces if they were to raise the inflation target to get a little heat in the economy. I mean with more people in the economy. Extra he could burn those at the lowest end of the income strata. So there's that tension almost that terrible irony but just so we understand the principle here lower income people would have higher fixed costs less discretionary spending. You just gotTa have a roof over your head. You have to buy the food that you need and what you may not be able to find the lower prices by driving further to a cheaper costco or something are you may not have a credit card to be able to get access to cheaper. Cheaper Costs Online. That many wealthy people can get access to you also may not be able in some rural areas. We saw a major shift in inflation once Walmart hit a critical mass because it lowered inflation for people in rural areas. The problem is they're still few and far between and many of these even inner cities they don't have access to cheaper less less expensive goods in one of these big box retailers that they could if they were living closer to that and I think that's another issue it's a double whammy for many lower income household the corner retail store. Maybe a cute and lovely thing of the past and something they're still dealing with and they know the person who owns that but the cost of toothpaste that stores a lot more than produce somewhere else. Yeah it can be well. It always makes us uncomfortable whenever we say inflation is so low. It's not so low for everybody. So Diane Swonk at Grant Thornton. Thank you so much for the briefing. Thank you this marketplace. PODCAST is supported by bear when we challenged what hasn't been done we discover the science behind. What's yet to come? That's what drives bear to find even better answers to today's best agriculture solutions. They're working with farmers to shape. What's next farms? were all life goes together crops that can help raise communities out of poverty tools that help plants and farmers use less water air science for a better life there are about a million foreign students in. US colleges yet. The student. VISA system is a cumbersome them one. It's estimated that approvals for student visas have fallen six percent since two thousand fourteen. WBZ You are in Boston. Produce this report by by Carey Young when Laura Villa graduated from Boston University last May she wanted to get a few years of professional experience in the computer science field old before returning home to Spain so she applied for a work permit under her student. Visa called Optional Practical Training and got a job lined up for midsummer VIDELA idealises. The process was not easy. It was so stressful. Because he's always like that. What if it took almost four months for the application to be approved which is about a month longer longer than she was told to expect that meant she had to ask her new employer to push back her start date without knowing if she'd be approved the understood so they wait wait? Eight and Has Made my star live with more hectic as I didn't have time to like repair before going to decline side for this consulting company Anthony. US Customs and immigration services said in an e mail that delays like Videla's were due to an unexpected increase in applications. They've since devoted more resources to the issue. Still University leaders in Massachusetts say the delays are coming from all parts of the system whether it's for the F. One student visa or that early work training permit gene. Kelly is with Boston. University's international student office. We're seeing larger numbers of visa applicants taking longer now today. More than ten thousand six hundred students from one hundred thirty countries attend the school. We're concerned that if it continues to be more difficult it could end up impacting enrollment in the future richer. The State Department which handles F one visas says application times can vary and that national security is its top priority Rachel banks with the Association Association of International Educators says foreign students bring a lot of different resources to an area including money. There's definitely an impact that international Ashley students have on local economies. Her organization estimates that nationwide international students contribute about thirty nine billion dollars to the economy. Emme by spending money on things like tuition rent and entertainment but bank says there's growing competition for that money while we're increasing Ding hoops that immigrants and visitors. This country are having to jump through. We're watching Our competitors namely Australia Canada and the United in Kingdom change their policies to be more attractive the Institute of International Education estimates that last year new foreign student enrollment fell by six percent in Boston. I'm Kerry young for marketplace checking the markets in early trading. Here we have the Dow Jones industrial average down. And what's his does she turned positives. Five points for what that's worth in New York. I'm David Brancaccio. This is marketplace morning report from A._P._M.. American public media..

Fed Boston US Diane Swonk Grant Grant Thornton chairman Walmart David Brancaccio chief economist Grant Thornton Congress US Customs New York Massachusetts Institute of International Edu Kerry representative
"international  " Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"international " Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"International right now there's a child living in extreme poverty with no future and no hope but you can bring hope when you become a compassion international sponsor just text the word child two eight three three nine three and sponsor a child right now. breaking tonight story as if you were there for most. where we learned just moments ago the questions you you think it's the role of athletes to stand for socialization and context you tonight we see in for the first time here. what I'm settling warning about. we don't get much higher NBC nightly news. evening on NBC check your local listings. our twenty ninety nine heart radio music festival is getting close in the I heart radio app as something you can't get anywhere else he'll join us in Vegas to experience the festival plus wait for it you get to meet any and as many of the festival artists as you choose. Def Leppard and any others you want so easy with the free I heart radio after tap play on the I heart radio music festival stations on your radio your music your stations and number one for broadcast. why should you volunteer with meals on wheels I never thought that five minutes can make so much difference in the lives of two people but it has dropped off a warm meal and get more than you expect volunteer in America let's dot org. cancel. the fusion. entertainment and enlightenment. please had an exciting announcement this week that Dave Rubin is going to be joining our lineup.

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