35 Burst results for "International Energy Agency"

"international energy agency" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

02:38 min | 2 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"Did a new supercycle begin in May 2020. If we are, it's different from other commodities bull markets. The previous bull market, as I mentioned, was driven by massive demand from China. China had this huge appetite for oil and industrial metals, and there wasn't sufficient supply. And it took a decade to build up the supply to where there was over capacity, and then commodity prices fell. In this case, if there is a new commodity super cycle, it will be driven by constrained supply in the face of uncertain demand, as the global economy continues on an energy transition away from carbon sources. There's been a lack of investment due to shareholder demand and ESG mandates. At the same time, there is demand for commodities as part of decarbonization. I was recently visiting with one of our neighbors who works for a mining company. His company owns a copper mine in Brazil. He says demand is huge. Because of electric vehicle production. There's a chart that Christians shared with me from Strata gas, where they did an analysis. If 30% of motor vehicle production was electric vehicles, that's about 18 million vehicles. They went through different metals to see how much producing those 18 million vehicles would take of the production of those particular metals in 2019. For example, graphite. It would take about a million tons of graphite to produce 18 million electric vehicles. That's about 84% of the current graphite production. Lithium, we had 18 million EVs produced. That would take a 150% of the current production levels or the production levels in 2019 at lithium. Cobalt, 18 million EVs would take up about 50% of cobalt production. Now, copper would take 1.6 million tons of copper. That's only about 8% of copper production. But the point is, it will take industrial metals as transportation moves over to more electric vehicles. What we don't know is how quickly that transition will occur. The international energy agency estimates that $80 trillion will be invested over the next 20 years in decarbonization strategies within the global economy..

China Brazil international energy agency
IEA member nations agree to release 60 million barrels of oil

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

IEA member nations agree to release 60 million barrels of oil

"The United States is releasing thirty million barrels of oil to ensure that supply meets demand following the Russian invasion of Ukraine the U. S. total is half of the sixty million barrels of oil the international energy agency's thirty one member countries are releasing from their strategic reserves the IAEA board made the decision at a meeting of energy ministers Russia is the third largest oil producer it exports five million barrels of crude a day amounting to about twelve percent of global oil trade the invasion is because the cost of oil to store U. S. benchmark crude is now more than one hundred dollars a barrel the highest price since twenty fourteen I'm

International Energy Agency U. Ukraine United States Iaea Russia
"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:34 min | 6 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In terms of equity market price action today we drifted lower a bit of anxiety I'll move up in long-term interest rates in front of the fed decision with a ten year treasury at the end of New York trading around 1.44% We're now one 43 in the Tokyo session We saw a particular slump in mega cap Internet and information tech Obviously when you get a move up in rates valuations become a greater concern Today we have the S&P 500 information tech index down about 1.6% and where the S&P was concerned a loss of about 7 tenths of 1% Also a lot of weakness among semiconductor stocks after some negative commentary coming out of JPMorgan as an example we had Microsoft today down by more than 3% The international energy agency today saying crude oil the market will return to a surplus with curbing international travel so we had a little bit of weakness in WTI right now we're trading 70 34 in the electronic session We'll take another look at market action for you in about 15 minutes Juliet And let's get back to that expectation of China's data dump 10 a.m. Beijing time 9 p.m. Wall Street time Bloomberg's and a current tells us what to expect We will see it out in the fixed asset investment side of things where it's being dragged by a slowdown in the real estate sector We will see ongoing pressure under retail side of things That's even though it is expected to be a lift from the singles day the online shopping bonanza Overall consumer confidence is continuing to be weighed by fear of the virus And of course the aggressive control of the virus On the bright side though industrial production expected to rise 3.7% from a year earlier this thanks to stronger exports driven by global demand Overall though today's readings will likely confirm a slowing but stabilizing economy Yeah largely the result of that weak property market in China will be talking more about that as we continue I mentioned the fed meeting tomorrow right Let's get a preview now from Bloomberg's Michael McKee That officials have two goals of this meeting They want to show investors there are taking the threat of higher extended inflation seriously but they don't want to promise they're going to raise interest rates while inflation is at a four decade high the rapid spread of the omicron COVID variant creates a lot of uncertainty about the course of the economy We'll get their latest forecasts for prices growth and rates look for policymakers to speed up the wide down of their QE bond buying to give themselves an option to raise rates if the economy and inflation stay strong Michael McKee Bloomberg day break Asia It is four and a half minutes past the hour time for global news.

S fed international energy agency JPMorgan Bloomberg Tokyo Michael McKee China New York Beijing Microsoft Asia
"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Pathway towards the net zero ambition Okay so sort of financing the transition is what you're talking about The Chancellor speaking to bring back today he's also announcing at fun as their cop 26 in Glasgow The UK's plans to try to become what he terms the world's first net zero aligned financial center He's talking about getting financial institutions to publish at least they have pathway plans towards net zero environmentalists say that this is a bit of a cop out that there aren't any legally binding targets that actually really to go a lot further I wonder what your view is on that It's important I mean even the international energy agency realizes that the majority of clean energy investment is going to be required for the private market I mean they anticipate 70% at least being at the private market level Mobilization of private capital incentivizing by the capital to be attracted to do that is important And of course people getting up the curve of knowledge and they measuring that data in order to make sure that that pathway commitments are being met is still in its infancy And that is a critical path being able to actually measure and have a culture of having setting the goals and then subsequently measuring it as part of the process is an important aspect of this And all of that is in its infancy at the moment We see some disappointing results for investors this morning which Tony which I thought was interesting given the context of this being such a hot sector wind power But they are subject to supply chain issues just as many other business businesses have been leaving the specifics around fest as to one side Where do you see the best opportunities for investments around green because we also heard from one money manager this morning from our colleagues in Glasgow in conversation with him saying he does see it bubbling green assets broadly So where do you not see bubbles where do you see good investment opportunities There's no question that the growth in asset allocation to this area continues And with the cost of capital so lower at the moment with interest global interest rate and so low you can see why assets are being attracted to anything where there may be a yield and you can get that in so many of these asset classes renewables battery storage as a stable infrastructure social housing And importantly though you need to recognize this as part of a diversified portfolio typically whilst that's at allocation to these things is growing towards 2030 40% from effectively zero 20 or 30 years ago They do provide characteristics like the diversification light inflation linkage And so those are the sites of aspects people should be considering when they're looking at their portfolio not just in isolation but this is a single area they should be focused on It should be across the portfolio Okay Just specifically on the UK's net zero target Again again there's been some concern that the big picture isn't much at the moment by clear pathway of how the UK can reach the net zero goal by 2050 Is that something that concerns you or do you think that policy is developing quickly enough Well there's no question it's ramped up in terms of the energy behind these ambitions I mean look a little bit of a global leader that comes to Glasgow Look at the fact that it's now topical probably number one topical and all this in the media newspapers all sorts of communication So it's clearly a forefront of people's mind And it has to be in order to achieve the right results so that at the moment the right results are still under debate and how we get there So if you look at the forest trees mentioned very attractive asset class in terms of the result the returns it's generated over the last ten to 20 years and we continue to generate an anticipated a real return going forward However the ability to be able to just plant trees to sequestrate some of this carbon is not easy and you can see that in some of the government initiatives over the last two years where they've actually tried to encourage the planting of trees It's not easy just to buy land plant trees It is a real big industry So a lot of these things sound very good on paper and in rhetoric but actually implementation is important And that's where people like Gresham house come along and hopefully manage that process Tony thanks so much for joining us Question how CEO Tony dalwood Now coming up next zombie Berg daybreak Europe so taper tend to hooks a reduction in bond purchases by the fed is pretty much all but certain today we're going to discuss the expectations for the meeting with our markets live.

Glasgow international energy agency UK Tony Gresham house Tony dalwood Europe fed
"international energy agency" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:21 min | 8 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"In fast company that many building leases have clauses in them that stipulate the hvac systems have to run no matter what the occupancy levels and so that some executives in organizations trying to negotiate their way out of that and what came to my mind. Was these new technologies and new systems. That really kind of make those clauses obsolete because they're those new technologies are designed to do the opposite to manage the electricity in the energy in the water usage in these buildings or any facility so that you can maintain this the the building and the system is running properly. Because you can't just turn everything off while also using less when you don't need so much right so that's really interesting. I also heard. David turk before at a hearing in congress before he was head of the international energy agency. Say that the pandemic was the biggest hit to the energy sector since world war. Two and you kind of alluded to that when you said it was the largest decline in seventy five years so it sounds like there are lessons that they're absorbing but that coupled with you mentioned the espn investors. You've got the climate activists you know at exxon who just pushed for more climate related people on the board and a faster more aggressive pivot to clean energy. So you're getting it from all sides right. You're getting the push from the investors in. You're getting frankly push from the economy and the technologies kyw never there so they don't really have that as an excuse. Where do they see their role. I mean are they being pushed by their employees also on these issues. Talk about some of the other stakeholders in this. Es g. picture is so. I think an stakeholders as it relates to their employees talent model is an interesting thing to discuss. And so what we would say. Is that the komen situation. The pandemic change the narrative it relates to employment. And so there has been you know is a sector oil and gas has been very cyclical a history of being very cyclical. This really motivated in deloitte. Actually calls it the great compression coveted nineteen in what we quaint. As the great depression actually accentuated some of these hiring challenges and then accelerated. I think the focus on the future of energy and you know where where they are going to drive not only from a product standpoint right but from a solution for a partnership standpoint from an ecosystem standpoint just to keep on the talent thing for moment and then i can make some of the others. It is interesting because working from home opened the door for new opportunities for talent. And i would say there's a recruiting dimension to this and there is a retention dimension to this all hindle them narrative Into the industry was dealing with a looming works for a shortage challenge. Right which is the anticipated retirements on. The horizon were released significant and at the same time. It was an industry right. That was really looking for ways. To recruit the millennials into the industry. And so i think what automation did to change the nature of the opportunity within the industry and to recruit from new markets had a really interesting impact. And so what we're seeing as they did Markets in los angeles and chicago in philadelphia opened up through the remote work through the operations are the automation through the opportunities to drive through analytics and digital. And say you lost the pressure. Right in weight hit traditionally been cities that hit released source the talent for oil gas and energy overall i touched on this with analytics that the pandemic really accelerated this need for itchy. You advanced knows around that. I think it also probably the just interject for a second and probably also to be. Frank changed the branding because now it's not just about oil and gas..

David turk international energy agency exxon espn congress deloitte depression philadelphia los angeles chicago Frank
"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:02 min | 9 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Liquid gas as I mentioned all going to China but also the second factor that people often don't mention much is that domestic supply in Europe of gas is down 10% year on year because we've stopped investing in hydrocarbons And just output is falling And this feels declined quickly If you don't put money into them David Well I'm glad you raised that because it takes us back to cop 26 I think because it feels like the bottom administration and others particularly in Europe are sort of going in two directions at the same time They want to have fewer hydrocarbons used They were going to take it down to zero At the same time they need a lot more natural gas and yes even oil to make sure their homes are heated and that their vehicles can move I mean how do we balance those two things It's a tough one right Because I think one of the bigger challenges with the net zero plans that we have for 2050 and I think the international energy agency has been very vocal about it is that we don't have all the technological tools to make this happen We are counting on technology that will probably not be available until 2030 2040 to decarbonize by 2050 And we are taking very big steps So if you're an energy producer at this point David you're producing oil and gas You look back at the last 6 7 years returns haven't been great Everyone knows this right The stock market has been led by technology It hasn't been led by energy And it's using the worst performing sector of the SMB So that's your history And then when you look forward you're like well I don't know if my energy demand in ten years for oil is going to be a 110 million barrels a hundred or 90 or 80 Because I don't know how many electric vehicles are going to be sold Natural gas has a very similar problem Depending on which path we choose to carbonize gas is either a really bad hydrocarbon or a transitional fuel that's really going to help and remain integral to the supply the energy supply of the world for the next door three decades So that's where we are For instance this is such a great point As an investor and I mean either investor in stocks of energy companies or if you're an energy company yourself determining investment in terms of capital investment how do you make long-term decisions Because as you've pointed out a lot of these things really require long-term investments How do you make a long-term investments where it could be zero it could be a hundred I think we just need a little more clarity from top 26 and I fear David's going in with this very high carbon prices in Europe because remember it's not just natural gas The price of CO2 allowances has also spiked above $70 per ton or €60 per ton of CO2 European companies are complaining The negative margins that Europeans are facing are not just the result of high natural gas prices They don't result of high CO2 prices It is cheaper to produce a broad and bring into Europe And so either we start putting climate tariffs in place which I think would probably do more damage than good to global trade or we come up with some solution on top 26 but we don't have a lot of time And that's I think the bigger issue if cup 26 cents are being a failure I think you can see a big re rating of energy forwards potentially here Because the world will realize that maybe we can't be covering this fast and just we just need a lot more investment and maybe that leads to more investment But we have a very very tight straight jacket around the world energy economy right now And the solutions are not easy as you point out you can't decarbonize and keep consuming oil and gas You can't be carbonized and boost your thermal fuel generation like China has by 14% this year to meet the 30% searching global trade that we've seen in the past few months because we just print all this money and gave it to people and people are spending it and the economy is booming And so I think energy conservation has to play a bigger role in the discussion on the organization Francisco this was so terribly helpful As it always is I must say Francisco blond he's Bank of America head of global commodities and derivatives research Coming up bank earnings season.

Europe David international energy agency China Francisco Bank of America
"international energy agency" Discussed on #hottakeoftheday

#hottakeoftheday

05:24 min | 10 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on #hottakeoftheday

"You know again. There's supposed to be the international energy agency in. They're totally pooh-poohing on fossil fuels but they said the energy transition is dependent on technologies that do not yet exist and and it's amazing to me that we continue to forget that there are technological barriers. And when you think of how far humanity has come since one thousand nine hundred ten and yes things have doubled in things and we figured things out but there are physical limits to what solar panel can do. There's physical limits to what a wind turbine can do. There's physical limits would. Batteries can actually store in from where we get supply chain and being living in canada for as long as they did with the oil sands. And i think about lithium mining. And when you think about the resistance to oil sands mining and then you think about what we have to do to get that much lithium it. Just the intellectual can inconsistency is is really hard to to go and so in all your journeys in with your movie and with your books with your talks. Have you found anything resonating with people more or less around like. Is this really what we want to be going down the disembarking down this this electrify everything. Get rid of fossil fuels like if like religion in. It doesn't matter what data you say. You can't get it some curious if you've seen anything resonate i'm more so than less so let me come back to the resonating idea but let me just hit you with this thing about the this idea of innovation the oh the technologies we need haven't been invented yet. Okay well let's do you. You know you look back in history mentioned nine hundred ten okay well. Let's go back to spindle top. Let's go back to the entire age of oil. The global energy sector is roughly a five trillion dollar a year. Business five trillion. When you just count the amount of energy consumed you price at forty fifty dollars a barrel you dissemble multiplication you get five trillion dollar..

international energy agency canada
"international energy agency" Discussed on The AI Podcast

The AI Podcast

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on The AI Podcast

"So there's two things that need to happen in the next thirty years. We need to decarbonised as much of that electricity as we can and we need to make things that today use fuel or fossil based resources electrified so that they can also then use some of that decarbonised energy so the goal that the international energy agency has set is to reach this net zero energy sector by two thousand fifty. It means that we're going to have to have about eighty eight percent of our electricity from renewables and that means wind for example would have to be about forty percent of that today. Wind is about eight percent of that not only. Is it going to have to go from eight to forty percent. The total amount of electricity is going to be increasing. Some would say between fifty and one hundred percent just manage all those other sectors that are coming in to become electrified so we'll need more electricity to manage more sectors going electric. Yes yeah although overall the total energy will come down slightly because things are so much more efficient when you move them to electric rates. And that's to put you on the spot. But i would be remiss not to ask because there's so much that i think people don't understand it's easy for somebody like me who i mentioned you know bragging about my solar panels and what night and to say you know you need to get solar to your house and you should give up your car and get an electric car. Do all these things. How much of it is individuals. How much of it is you know. Large organizations or corporations how much of it is the world governments. You know what do we need to do. Or which which bodies need to act to get us to where we need to go. Yeah so it's pretty clear now. That technology is not the hurdle we have the technology we need to move forward decades into this transition It's a lot of policy not to make it financially accessible. it already is the cheapest energy on the planet. That's good news but to increase the rate of permitting and to reduce the policy hurdles to get more of this at the country scale so in terms of individual versus big corporate or country or government level influence. It's definitely the latter. We can't make the progress that we need to make on an individual level. We've gotta make decisions as a society about where we want to have our energy come from got it. Well i will continue to pat myself on the back for having solar panel job. Yes all right. So let's get into the podcast after all let's get into what. Ge renewable is is doing or how you're using ai to make your products and your services better throughout the.

international energy agency
"international energy agency" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:34 min | 11 months ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Worst scenarios of climate change. That is the stark warning from hundreds of climate scientists this week. But what does that change actually. Look like. that's what we dig into this week on the big fix teams. Can we turn this around. We have no adoption. What we do now will profoundly affect the next few housing year. The new report from scientists working with the un says it is still possible to minimize the worst impacts of climate change to keep global warming to a degree and to have celsius. The world's environment correspondent carolyn. Billers been looking at how to do that carolyn. What needs to happen to keep targeting play well. Scientists who wrote this report laid out these five different emissions scenarios. They're basically five different future worlds that we can choose from based on how much or how little we omit of carbon dioxide and things like methane and found that from a pure physical science perspective. It is still possible to limit global warming to a degree to have celsius by the end of the century. Now it would require getting down to net zero carbon dioxide emissions by twenty fifty which means anything that's emitted is then basically offset by planting trees or using carbon capture technology. And then after that we actually have to start removing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Then we put into it before we get to the. How carolyn what happens. If we do meet that target it means the world is a lot more habitable in a lot of ways associate levels are only one to two feet. Higher compared to the worst case scenario of more than six feet extraordinary heatwaves are only about twice as likely as they are today rather than ten times more likely one of the scientists who worked on these scenarios john done from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration told me that even the mid range scenario is not something we want to entertain the message. A three degrees it has got to be avoided all costs because it's just too to staying at higher amounts of warming things like the collapse of the antarctic ice sheet or math diop's forests. Do get more likely many countries and companies. I know have these net zero by twenty fifty goals. What would it look like to actually achieve. It is hard to overstate. Just how big of a change this would require. The first step is that the entire world needs to electrify everything possible and then switch over to renewable energy the international energy agency laid out this roadmap to net zero.

carolyn un national oceanic and atmospher john international energy agency
"international energy agency" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

Frank Macchiarola International Energy Agency 2030 Africa South Africa 60% 90% 2090 Today 2050 three people Petroleum Institute 60 person Susie less than 5% two Middle East last year More than 80% over. 400 measures
The International Energy Agency’s Bizarre Roadmap for Global Decarbonization

Climate One

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The International Energy Agency’s Bizarre Roadmap for Global Decarbonization

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Aligns. Forecasting a tightening global crude market on a promise to increase output next month. They do this every month. Meanwhile, meanwhile, also got the International energy Agency, the E. A. Warning of a looming gap of between rising demand. Rising demand out there and, indeed, also the same time stagnant supply. And they're saying that this is the position the second half of the year and that would put up with pressure on prices. But let's together Look at what's going on with the oil price itself. Just church you're gonna be just checking in with Wt. I croup and moving to the upside is I said to heights not seen for well a couple of years thereabouts. No, it doesn't Does it. Global stock investors. They're looking for fresh catalyst as they hover at record highs. We got concerns out there, lingering that the post covert economic recovery will stoke off inflation and prompt center banks to pare back policy support earlier than they were envisaging as a consequence of seeing a 10 year yield just to move slightly to the upside. We got traders, of course, awaiting that key U. S payrolls data on Friday for a steer on the outlook. The agent stops looking like a steady open of this Wednesday, U. S equities indeed inched lower. All right, well, let's find out what's going on out there with regards to some of that global news. Baxter. All right, Thank you very much Wish China's President Xi Jinping's stole party leaders to work on showing the world more trustworthy, lovable and respectable image. China, Signing back sign of aka by on Tak vaccine has received the W H O clearance to roll out the controversial shot and countries scrambling for supply. Bloomberg News is reporting that even with 20 million covert shots a day Beijing more than 80%, with one shot, at least China being very careful about re opening borders. New York City's covert positivity rate continues to drop Mayor Bill de Blasio saying the power of vaccines Germany is cutting its covert risk level toe high from very high, it says a fewer ICU patients after days of saying things were coming together, it does not look as if the world powers will reach a final agreement of the current round of talks to revive the 2015 nuclear deal. New Stanford study shows. There's a great appetite for partial working home over 70% wanna form of hybrid and President Joe Biden to Tulsa to help remember and tell the story of the massacre 100 years ago in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Rish. All right. Thanks that let's get back to our guest of the half our great mark this managing director ups private wealth management, Greg. Thanks for sticking around. This is the talk a little about evaluations with that's what the subject was when we went to break last time, But you know how much of the moat really reflective of God, What's going on? And you know what should we look at the P or the E? That's a great question. I think you have to look it probably both and probably highlight more on the even the tea. You know, I think the trade that was Christ sales got Very much disrupted over the last 46 weeks because the market wants dusty companies that have earnings over the and now I think they're really looking for companies that have a A good valuation with really good earnings forecasted for the future. Well, it depends also what we get in the earnings. For instance, zoom video today came out with some pretty solid earnings and actually, the shares were down. And then it was pointed out that the company actually suggested that it had the ability to retain Large customers and even to add large customers, even as people go back to work, so some of these companies will will perhaps be able to sustain some of the earnings that we thought might go away. I guess it just depends. Company to company. You know, I think there's going to be, um, a period of time over the next 3 to 6 months where you've got the pre pandemic. Um you know, companies that did extremely well and now we've got the regional putting called me from the going shoots from the well and there's gonna be some some point of overlap between both of those companies. And you saw that today. You know, with that name in general. Okay, lets just move abroad. Now I'm gonna get a look at what's been going on in Japan because we saw this first quarter earnings season. They're absolutely blowing away estimates before forecast normally, which everyone looks up again, much better than expected, renowned, of course, for being rather conservative, so that's already been factored in. But does this make you more attractive to the Japanese market? Yeah, We're very, very interested in the Japanese market. You know, if you look it now, you know, the Cuban earning season started with more upgrades and downgrades. The net earnings revisions are still very much improving, so we're very bullish on the on the Japanese market. Yeah, I mentioned that emerging markets fared very well. In fact, they have been making up for a lot of lost ground with developing markets. Emerging markets obviously very different story than Europe and Japan, which are recovering and we talked about some of the valuations are already pretty high in Europe, for instance. Do you look at emerging markets and how selective are you there? We are definitely bullish on the margin markets. You know, they started out fairly strong in the beginning of the year, then were sold off. We now see them a zone, nice valuation and a great place to add. During volatility, such as Well, we like China like Singapore. Um We like again another one that we're focused on Malaysia in the you know some of the larger ones as well. All right. You look at China. Where do you go? I think you're investing in that intelligent infrastructure segment five g X accepted, which is arguably leading the world In many ways. How does that figure in your portfolio? Well, you know, China's China's already the world's largest eat commerce market, and it's set to become the first large economy. I think to introduce a visual currency, so we really do retain upon it of yuan, China's leading Internet platform certain things. And certainly global sent Tech winners. Okay. Well, thanks very much. Greg. Appreciate your taking the time to be with us this morning. Great. Marcus, Managing Director at U. B s private Wealth management. Well, we mentioned that energy did quite well. And Exxon Mobil was one up 3.6% Thea. Exhale he actually put on gains of about 3.9% rich you absolutely and that just looking at the currencies because yesterday was notable by how strong sterling was just come off these three year highs for the pound against the village, waiting on $1.41 49 looking in the euro steady the.

Ed Baxter Exxon Mobil San Francisco Greg Japan Marcus Bloomberg Friday International energy Agency 3.6% today 2015 10 year Bloomberg News New York City Europe Mayor one shot yesterday first
Bank of America Will Raise Its Minimum Wage to $25 by 2025

The World

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Bank of America Will Raise Its Minimum Wage to $25 by 2025

"$25 an hour. It's the latest wage increase announcement by industry giant at a time. Other financial firms are also coming under pressure from outside groups to address wealth. Inequality in the U. S. Would be the highest minimum wage paid by Big bank would likely put pressure on rivals to take similar steps. International Energy Agency says the world still has a chance to

Big Bank U. International Energy Agency
Stop New Oil Investments to Hit Net-Zero Emissions, IEA Says

1A

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Stop New Oil Investments to Hit Net-Zero Emissions, IEA Says

"A report by the International Energy Agency says immediate action is needed if the world aims to me climate goals. By the year 2050 more on this from NPR's Rob Schmitz. The reports suggest ending investments in new coal mines, oil and gas wells as part of an overall reshaping of the global energy sector in order to meet ambitious carbon emissions reduction goals. Paris based agency has determined there is a narrow but viable pathway for building a global energy sector with net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Several countries, including the U. S and the European Union, have pledged to achieve net zero emissions by mid century. The IAEA report laid out 400 steps needed to transform L energies produced, transported and used, including seizing investments in new fossil fuel supply projects and ended the sale of internal combustion engine cars by 2035. A four fold increase in the deployment of solar and wind power. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin

Rob Schmitz International Energy Agency NPR Paris U. European Union Iaea Berlin
Hot Air: Emissions Reduction

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Hot Air: Emissions Reduction

"The world. Is it a climate crisis addressing it will require coordinated action by governments around the world to avoid the worst effects of climate change. It's necessary to limit global warming to well below two degrees celsius and ideally one and a half degree celsius relative to preindustrial temperatures in two thousand fifteen hundred and ninety seven countries signed the paris climate agreement and agreed to do just that central to that plan is for the world to reach net zero emissions by the middle of the century. It's a pledge that many world leaders have now signed up to. Let's make it our collective commitment to get to net zero by two thousand fifty hundred renewable energy by twenty fifty asia oca- they'll do think on our journey to net zero twenty five zero emissions by no later in twenty-fifty today the international energy agency the world's energy watchdog published report. It gave its verdict on what it would take to meet that twenty fifty target so the ira have laid out one of the first ever road maps to how wealth might get to net zero emissions by twenty fifty. She's looking at the kind of policies that would have to underpin countries climate change pledges ritual. Jobs writes about climate change for the economist is a very very ambitious path. They say that is achieved. Wu is narrow but it is theoretically possible but it would have to take absolutely everything from all countries in the world starting right now and what does it mean to throw everything at the problem. So the is advocating for a massive shift towards renewable energy by comparison twenty twenty record year for renewable energy being added to the mix two hundred and eighty extra gigawatts. You would have to do four times that amount every year between now and twenty thirty events chance of getting towards net zero emissions by twenty fifty dot is roughly the equivalent of installing the world's largest park every day

International Energy Agency Th Paris Asia IRA WU Jobs
Net Zero - Impossible Dream?

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Net Zero - Impossible Dream?

"It's really interesting that we were talking almost exactly a year ago tenth of my last year and you will co-signatory to another lesser with a gang with Wolfgang studies when you're talking about a statement from fatty. All who is the general secretary of president off the international energy agency. He was talking about a building green. And you were saying well if we actually maintain the reduced levels of carbon emissions that we've seen during lockdown and make any difference at all because relatively small. Okay then we'll be out all discussion you talking about carbon capture and storage and particularly about which is bio energy with carbon. Capture storage restriction. Yup and how that could be a negative technology and actually if we captured the common from the combustion process than the trees would absorb carbon and therefore we would have a net reduction in combination the street with sound a great idea but now he come forward and there's another letter that yoko signatory to and one of the things in that is the you believe that becks is not going to solve the solve. The problem probably not know. Where do we go from here. I guess you've got gotta stop burning fossil fuels. That's where we've got. That's what we've always had to be. Yes yes yes but it's going to be so difficult as it. I mean i've been talking to people who say oh. We're going to have to get rid of all petrol cars from two thousand nine hundred thirty. Actually the rule ruling at the moment is we're going to have to stop selling. Petrol caused people be allowed as things stand to continue to run them of for as long as trump. But i think the truth is if we're going to achieve net zero. We are actually going to have to eliminate the use of fossil fuel cars amongst other things. Paul is at least twenty thirty

International Energy Agency Wolfgang Yoko Paul
Report: World demand for gasoline may never recover

the NewsWorthy

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Report: World demand for gasoline may never recover

"Demand for gasoline may never recover from the pandemic. at least. That's what a new report from. The watchdog international energy agency says has we've mentioned before gas usage has tanked in the last year mostly because people are working from home and many cities around the world have largely shut down but even when things get back to normal gas usage may stay low. The agency says there's a few reasons for this. There's a growing shift to electric vehicles. Manufacturers are improving fuel efficiency and the work from home model is likely here to stay for a lot of major companies. On top of all of that. Airlines have been using less is well. The report predicts the jet fuel demand probably will not get back to twenty and nineteen levels before the year. Two thousand twenty four even though air travel has been rising

Watchdog International Energy Airlines
Report: World demand for gasoline may never recover

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Report: World demand for gasoline may never recover

"We may have seen the last of those occasional wild swings up in gasoline prices. The world's once insatiable demand for gasoline is unlikely to recover to where it was before the pandemic, says a report from the International Energy Agency. Gasoline use crater during the pandemic as city shut down and many people began working from home, the report says. That trend will likely continue as normalcy returns also a factor. Many governments have been pushing for low carbon alternatives and the Developing countries will use more oil and gasoline that will be offset by consumers and automakers shifting to electric

International Energy Agency
Global carbon emissions already over pre-pandemic lockdown levels

BBC World Service

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Global carbon emissions already over pre-pandemic lockdown levels

"There's a warning the global greenhouse gas emissions, which plummeted for much of last year because of the Corona virus, pandemic are climbing above pre covert levels. The International Energy Agency says economic recovery is fueling the rise. Bones. The government's must move quickly to put clean energy at the heart of stimulus plans to avoid throwing away the chance to make 2019 the definitive peeking global emissions. Brazil, China and India. Also emissions exceed pre pandemic levels by the end of last

International Energy Agency Government Brazil China India
Iran starts producing uranium metal

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Iran starts producing uranium metal

"Has started producing uranium metal despite being warned by world powers that it reaches the two thousand and fifteen nuclear deal. International energy agency inspectors have verified the existence of the substance as a facility in isfahan last week. Uranium metal can be used to build the core of a nuclear weapon.

Isfahan
"international energy agency" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Demand for the new five G iPhones that will be announcing today, the Nikkei News Agency reports. The iPhone suppliers Foxconn and Pegatron. We're running at full production capacity. Throughout the recent holiday period in China, the report says. Initial production started around the middle of last month, then ramped up in early October. Delta Airlines says it's planned expansion in Miami is being delayed because of the pandemics impact on demand, But the carrier emphasizes its plans Air just on hold there, not canceled. Global demand for oil is not likely to rebound anytime soon, according to the International Energy Agency. The III A says the Corona virus has dealt a long lasting blow to the oil market. The organisation sees global oil consumption returning to pre pandemic levels in 2023. That's on ly if Corona 19 has brought under control. Next year. Willy by choice. Hotels lodges globally in hotels, serving up double points for every qualifying stay book a choice hotels dot com. Now, here's the man who's been recognized its radio's best recipient of not one but two prestigious Marconi Awards for his broadcast Texas. The one and only bill coming in about 30 minutes or I'm gonna put a call into Danish D'Souza to talk about.

Nikkei News Agency Foxconn International Energy Agency Delta Airlines China Willy Miami Texas
Spread of Electric Cars Sparks Fights for Control Over Charging

John and Ken on Demand

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Spread of Electric Cars Sparks Fights for Control Over Charging

"Talk about the electric vehicle tax credit he proposes because people think electric cars are the ultimate panacea this. Yeah I mean and and you know you live in California. They've just decided they're gonNA fight all the fires with with electric cars in two, thousand, thirty, five, the reality of course. Yes. Electric cars are good I mean if you own a tesla and if you can afford one actually a fun beagle drive, it also cuts some few too but you need to get a sense of proportion. So he's proposing to at least get back seven, thousand, five, hundred dollars per vehicle, and of course, California throws in another two, thousand, five, hundred dollars and there are many other. tidbits fundamentally spending that much money on a vehicle that over its lifetime will cut ten tons of to. You could've bought that reduction in the north east of trading system for sixty bucks spending ten thousand dollars for something you could have bought for sixty bucks but the bad deal why do electric cars only save a little bit of carbon dioxide? So. It's do things partly, you think that each vehicle emit lots and lots of carbon dioxide over its lifetime it'll probably emit somewhere between twenty and thirty tons. So you can't save more than twenty or thirty times. Now, a lot of people then also believe that electric cars essentially serum mission vehicle. That's true when they're driving. But of course, when you charge them, you will typically charge them with electronics. At least partly from fossil fuels, also the battery is not much more energy consumption of it takes a lot more energy to produce. That's why most electric cars actually do not. A break even in their carbon emissions before they've run somewhere between. Fifty and one hundred thousand miles. I've heard the reality game that you'd have to keep your electric car for quite a few years before you hey, off the carbon. Debt of just. Building the battery. Yes and that, and that's true and again we're going to do this better and of course, we'll be to produce these with less intensive energy use and so on. We'll get better this but the fundamental point is this is not what's GonNa solve warming and certainly paying an enormous. For almost no benefit is a really bad idea. The International Energy Agency head told us a couple of years ago. People think electric ours are going to save the planet. They're wrong they. They just sent that that was the quote and the point is, yes, it's GonNa be a tiny bit not very much. Can

California International Energy Agency
What Is The Future Of The Oil Industry?

Environment: NPR

03:54 min | 1 year ago

What Is The Future Of The Oil Industry?

"Oil, and gas powered a century of economic growth and damaged the planet's climate in the process which leaves the oil and gas industry in an existential panic in the short term, demand is down because of the pandemic in the long term. Well, there are two new reports out offering very different visions of the future NPR's Cumulus Domino ski covers energy and joins us now hi Camilla. Tell us about these two new reports where are they coming from? Yes, so they offer very divergent perspectives and let's start with the idea that oil will come roaring back. This is assuming that once the pandemic is over, someday, it will be over and the economy will recover oil will come back a demand will be there. The developing world is GONNA guzzle more and more of it back to business as usual. This is the view that was laid out by OPEC, cartel of oil exporting countries in their annual report called the Wu. then. Yeah the WOO WOO oil. Then there's different version of the future that was laid out by the International Energy Agency which a very influential group they said maybe that happens, but maybe the world takes action on climate change and if appropriate action is taken, oil demand could start going down and might even have peaked already. So is the main divergence in these two reports the assumptions about whether the world will take climate change seriously and to to slow it down. Yeah. That's the fundamental disagreement in this debate has been around for a long time while the World Act aggressively when will that happen? When will oil peak but right now this pandemic, which is you know we use the word unprecedented so much but something unprecedented has happened. There's a dramatic drop in demand for oil massive job losses across the sector, and that has made some people wonder could something else unprecedented happened? Could this unusual moment lead to an unusual level of action from world? Governments Arrive Faster or are you OPEC and you look at this and say the pandemic is just a blip and we'll be back to normal once it's over I'll note to there's there's one thing that both sides and pretty much everybody agrees on which is that the current pledges, the policies that are in place from world governments now are not enough to keep global warming at the two degrees Celsius that was committed to Paris or to shift the world meaningfully away from relying primarily on oil. So. That would require a huge transition from from what's currently happening or oil companies making those kinds of transitions i? Mean they have to make decisions today based on which one of these two futures they think is the most likely, right? Yeah. Absolutely, and you can see that split playing out a company's just to take two examples Exxon is doubling down on fossil. Fuels predicting a future in which there is still robust demand for gas and they. They'll be there to meet it meanwhile BP formerly British Petroleum they're they're projecting the world might be moving really aggressively and in they want to be there pivoting renewables trying to figure out how to make money money on a world that's transitioning away from their core product Some investors Nicole about so companies right now are placing their bets betting everything on which version of the world they think is more likely. It's hard to imagine any higher stakes here not only the future of those massive companies but like the future of the planet potentially literally I mean Exxon is right on the future is a lot like the present we're. Burning lots of oil which has had the disastrous climate consequences that we see unfolding and if BP and a lot of European super majors are correct. Then governments around the world might penalize carbon emissions, promote renewables. It would mean huge shifts in the energy industry, but it would help prevent the worst impacts for the planet like you said, NPR's Domino Ski. Thank

Opec NPR Exxon British Petroleum International Energy Agency Camilla Domino Ski Paris WU. Nicole
Coronavirus pandemic to cost Americans $16 trillion, study finds

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:05 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus pandemic to cost Americans $16 trillion, study finds

"It's time to talk business financial analyst and broadcaster Louise Cooper Welcome back new. He's good morning. Every time I talked to you there is another enormous. Enormous, figure that sort of boggles the mind to degree that it didn't boggle the mind last week It's getting worse than the reason why I say this is it's covert again and the cost to everybody's economies the united. States that the number is once again extraordinary and the trump with these numbers are so large you think will, what does that truly mean because I just say large I can't comprehend it. So this is the former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers coming out with a Harvard. Harvard professor coming out with a number as to what they think. It will cost covid nineteen will cost the US economy and it sixteen trillion dollars as you said, a number so fast, it's incomprehensible. So let's put it into context. So sixteen trillion dollars by the way, it is kind of a guess and hopefully we'll get a vaccine and that will that will put it all behind a sixteen trillion dollars that's almost an entire year. GDP if the economy tire years output of the American economy is almost sixteen trillion dollars, I mean the numbers huge. It's more double more than double what the US suspend on wars since nine eleven, servings, Afghanistan Iraq Syria wherever. So it's a huge number. I guess the number I liked put it into context is it's four times more costly in the global financial crisis. It. Okay. So that's the best number half of it is lost to GDP half of health, and it really does give a sense as to how cataclysmic this event is four times more costly than the global financial crisis and what does this mean as the number gets bigger and bigger and bigger? What does this mean in terms of the longevity of this crisis in coveted coming back round again, it's not going away anytime but the effect that it's having on jobs and lives and employment. Yes, and this is this is. A huge number. What relevance is that the relevant that is to you is that you may lose your job. Your income will go down. The value of your house may go down in my end up in negative equity where your mortgage is larger than than the the the. The the value of your house, it means your children and your grandchildren will be repaying the debt for decades to come it just means. Less wealth less, holidays support. Less going out to eat or even losing your home depending where you are on the income scale I mean it's quite interesting. This morning, we've also had something from the International Energy Agency warning about the the the damage kroner to the oil industry taking dimond taking years to recover years to recover oil domon down about eight percent this year, and by the way again, a bit like Larry. Summers that assumes we get a fax saying the world goes back to normal relative normal next year. So I mean these are still quite optimistic best-case scenarios giving we've heard today there's been another pause from another vaccine I think this was the Johnson and Johnson coronavirus vaccine.

United States Larry Summers Financial Analyst Louise Cooper Harvard Johnson International Energy Agency Dimond Afghanistan Professor
Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

Climate Cast

06:48 min | 1 year ago

Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

"You, see them everywhere nearly fifty percent of all vehicles sold in the US, our sport utility vehicles the International Energy Agency reports SUV's are second only to electric power for the increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the last decade. But there are a new wave of all electric SUV's and trucks is coming and these new vehicles may be more powerful and boasted longer driving range than many of today's gas-powered SUV's trucks. So, how quickly will high tech these take hold in the next decade Chelsea Sexton is an electric car advocate and consultant hi. Chelsea their quick. Sketch here, how close are we to the next wave of electric vehicles and what will their capabilities be? We're going to start to see more of them in the next year or two obviously things are slightly influx with the pandemic but most of the automakers are still trying to be within a few months of their original targets and we're seeing everything from plug in hybrid jeep wrangler with thirty miles of electric range for around town driving and. Gasoline after that, all the way up to f one, fifty and riven with a few hundred miles of expected range and I'm interested in that F one fifty story because that Ford truck is the top selling truck in America I think there were nine hundred thousand f-series trucks sold last year and I see that they're retooling a factory in Michigan to build the first all electric f one fifty. What do we know about that role? Not very much. We're expecting it late twenty, twenty, one, early twenty, twenty, two something to that effect and they've not released really any specs other than videos of hauling trains and things to try to prove that electric vehicles really do have as much more performance than gasoline trucks, what other electric pickups SUV's Few years I'm watching all of them. There still are some open questions about everyone of them in that most vs today of any model have been sold only in California or the carb states owens have mandates requiring evt's there's not that many vehicles that are available across the country, and that will be a huge thing to prove what the trucks regarding who's serious, and WHO's not. That's an open question for folks like Ford, will they make these things in volume and sell them nationwide and really get behind them with the marketing and dealer support or is this going to be more of what we refer to as a compliance car which is basically Will sell as many as we have to in the places we have to, but not really in it with their hearts well, and part of the answer to that might be consumer attitudes. Right? I mean you helped launch an electric vehicle for GM back in the nineties. Have you seen consumer attitudes change in that time and if they changed enough to bring in the truck SUV drivers ironically that generation in the nineties had more trucks than SUV's in it than than small cars everyone knows the ev one that was the one I was involved in but Chevy and Ford made pickups at the time and Honda and Toyota made small SUV's so it's Sort of feels like we're yanking the automakers back toward where they started. There's still a lot of education that's needed. There are lots of people that are not even aware of electric vehicles, but in part that's because they've never seen one and they've never been available and so people can't buy what they don't know as even possible. So there's a lot of education required on that front but the interesting thing about electric vehicles in general is that it is the only example in the history of the automotive industry in which the industry itself has required demand to predate and continually exceeds supply. What. That sounds like is every time you hear it automaker executive say when we see demand for electric cars will start to build them. So it's always been the market polling for from the automakers versus the automakers trying to build their own market for something. So it's a parallel. Yes. Of course, we need to do more education, but we also need to start building things that people can see our else. They're never going to be aware of them in want to buy one. What about the politics of this? How much do you see that playing into the success of the next generation of truckin SUV models I mean we'll some people just not wanNA drive one because of their political beliefs it's possible however. The irony is that there has always been a fair amount of right wing support for electric vehicles because they use domestic energy, they keep more money in the local economy. We're not sending money overseas before an oil, and so it doesn't always get talked about in this administration because the politics kind of ebb and flow depending on the administration but there is a fair amount of conservative support and they're not just sort of this liberal technology that they're made out to be. So all politics tend to be kind of transient and. I've watched it shift back and forth over the years. So I don't expect the current politics will be permanent But at the same time, this has always been if not politically driven certainly policy driven it is those external incentives and mandates that have helped compel with the advocates and market asking for them electric vehicles for twenty five years, and it will probably remain. So for the next several at least are there any other barriers you see to electric truck an SUV sales? The single biggest barrier today is lack of product. The second biggest is lack of marketing and awareness and education and people not being able to buy what they don't know about and the third biggest dealerships across the board with any EV model if dealers aren't comfortable and wanting to sell vs they're not going to be successful at it, and so we can put billions of dollars into those first two things. But at the end of the day, if someone walks into a Ford dealer in his told well now, you'd really rather have the gasoline f one, fifty, not the electric one that one's Kinda goofy. All of that money and effort is wasted what about the pace of change and I know we're focused on electric vehicles today on the transportation emissions but overall with climate emissions I mean you you live in California you've been watching this for decades. We've got these terrible fires in California and Oregon this week are we moving fast enough now? We're not and that is not a widespread enough opinion yet. But regardless of why they come to the table, the best thing we can do is make more options available and attractive. So it doesn't matter if someone is coming to an AV because of climate change or air pollution or any other reason if they're coming for Torque and horsepower I'm fine with that. The goal is to build more of the table as we have more seats at it not be so concerned about why people come and sit down I'm all about the Torque and horsepower Chelsea, Sexton electric-car advocate and consultant. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thank you for crash your party

Chelsea Sexton Ford California Consultant United States International Energy Agency Ford Truck Wrangler GM Chevy America Executive Owens Honda Michigan Toyota Oregon
Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

Climate Cast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

"You, see them everywhere nearly fifty percent of all vehicles sold in the US, our sport utility vehicles the International Energy Agency reports SUV's are second only to electric power for the increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the last decade. But there are a new wave of all electric SUV's and trucks is coming and these new vehicles may be more powerful and boasted longer driving range than many of today's gas-powered SUV's trucks. So, how quickly will high tech these take hold in the next decade Chelsea Sexton is an electric car advocate and consultant hi. Chelsea their quick. Sketch here, how close are we to the next wave of electric vehicles and what will their capabilities be? We're going to start to see more of them in the next year or two obviously things are slightly influx with the pandemic but most of the automakers are still trying to be within a few months of their original targets and we're seeing everything from plug in hybrid jeep wrangler with thirty miles of electric range for around town driving and. Gasoline after that, all the way up to f one, fifty and riven with a few hundred miles of expected range and I'm interested in that F one fifty story because that Ford truck is the top selling truck in America I think there were nine hundred thousand f-series trucks sold last year and I see that they're retooling a factory in Michigan to build the first all electric f one fifty. What do we know about that role? Not very much. We're expecting it late twenty, twenty, one, early twenty, twenty, two something to that effect and they've not released really any specs other than videos of hauling trains and things to try to prove that electric vehicles really do have as much more performance than gasoline trucks, what other electric pickups SUV's Few years I'm watching all of them. There still are some open questions about everyone of them in that most vs today of any model have been sold only in California or the carb states owens have mandates requiring evt's there's not that many vehicles that are available across the country, and that will be a huge thing to prove what the trucks regarding who's serious, and WHO's not. That's an open question for folks like Ford, will they make these things in volume and sell them nationwide and really get behind them with the marketing and dealer support or is this going to be more of what we refer to as a compliance car which is basically Will sell as many as we have to in the places we have to, but not really in it with their hearts well, and part of the answer to that might be consumer attitudes. Right? I mean you helped launch an electric vehicle for GM back in the nineties. Have you seen consumer attitudes change in that time and if they changed enough to bring in the truck SUV drivers ironically that generation in the nineties had more trucks than SUV's in it than than small cars everyone knows the ev one that was the one I was involved in but Chevy and Ford made pickups at the time and Honda and Toyota made small SUV's so it's Sort of feels like we're yanking the automakers back toward where they started. There's still a lot of education that's needed. There are lots of people that are not even aware of electric vehicles, but in part that's because they've never seen one and they've never been available and so people can't buy what they don't know as even possible. So there's a lot of education required on that front but the interesting thing about electric vehicles in general is that it is the only example in the history of the automotive industry in which the industry itself has required demand to predate and continually exceeds supply. What. That sounds like is every time you hear it automaker executive say when we see demand for electric cars will start to build them. So it's always been the market polling for from the automakers versus the automakers trying to build their own market for something. So it's a parallel. Yes. Of course, we need to do more education, but we also need to start building things that people can see our else. They're never going to be aware of them in want to buy one. What about the politics of this? How much do you see that playing into the success of the next generation of truckin SUV models I mean we'll some people just not wanNA drive one because of their political beliefs it's possible however. The irony is that there has always been a fair amount of right wing support for electric vehicles because they use domestic energy, they keep more money in the local economy. We're not sending money overseas before an oil, and so it doesn't always get talked about in this administration because the politics kind of ebb and flow depending on the administration but there is a fair amount of conservative support and they're not just sort of this liberal technology that they're made out to be. So all politics tend to be kind of transient and. I've watched it shift back and forth over the years. So I don't expect the current politics will be permanent But at the same time, this has always been if not politically driven certainly policy driven it is those external incentives and mandates that have helped compel with the advocates and market asking for them electric vehicles for twenty five years, and it will probably remain. So for the next several at least are there any other barriers you see to electric truck an SUV sales? The single biggest barrier today is lack of product. The second biggest is lack of marketing and awareness and education and people not being able to buy what they don't know about and the third biggest dealerships across the board with any EV model if dealers aren't comfortable and wanting to sell vs they're not going to be successful at it, and so we can put billions of dollars into those first two things. But at the end of the day, if someone walks into a Ford dealer in his told well now, you'd really rather have the gasoline f one, fifty, not the electric one that one's Kinda goofy. All of that money and effort is wasted

Ford Chelsea Sexton Ford Truck United States International Energy Agency Wrangler Consultant GM Chevy America California Owens Executive Honda Michigan Toyota
"international energy agency" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Dot com or Triple A Triple eight. That's it. Sierra Pacific. Triple A Triple 8 11 72 Andrew and todd dot com. Triple A triple 8 11 72 You're on. Blomberg is a serious thinker. And he has written a false alarm. He acknowledges that the world is getting warmer. He believes Or he is convinced that it is human induced. Nevertheless, he is an opponent. Of the panic that has taken place and why it is hurting the billions. Around the world. I I added billions. Maybe I'll just say many people around the world. I don't know. It's like something he didn't say how climate change panic cost us. Trillions hurts the porn fails to fix the planet. So I did not realize this was Ah, learning moment for me. I'm a big out of a kid of nuclear power. So you're saying it's one downside is it remains expensive. In other words, Visa VI. Fossil fuel. It's more expensive. Yes. So you really nuclear power plants are very, very costly, typically because and it's not because we don't know why it's because they have vast cost overrun. And because there's security measures over security measure, and they keep changing the planning's so it's very hard takes a long time and they run way over budget. So again. This is why, and I think your intuition is absolutely great. You could very well be the solution to climate change, so Bill Gates and many others have invested dramatically in fourth generation nuclear power. Which is a new, very, very simple way to do nuclear power plants You knew basically producing on assembly lying shunned like Legos. They're very safe, and they promise to be incredibly too. The point is not that that would be wonderful. The point is, we don't have that today. There problems that it will be very cheap. But of course, they also promised that about the last Nations of nuclear power, and that didn't quite work out that way forward. We don't know. No, that's okay. It's okay. Go on. So if you innovation is not about you know which innovation you focus on a lot of the technology you spend money on. Most of my grant failed, but that's fine because innovation is very, very cheap compared to actually producing stuff. So you innovate in a lot of different technologies, and we really just need one or a few technologies And those are the ones that power why invest anything than in wind and solar So you should invest in next generations within Seoul because we need also those technologies to become better. But what we do right now is, of course, putting up luck of existing inefficient wind and solar that we know is inefficient that we have to subsidize. Which basically produces no extra benefits were simply doing it because it feels good that gets politicians to show. See, I'm doing something about climate change, but the reality, of course, is right now. The International Energy Agency estimates that the world gets just a little over 1% of its energy. From solar and wind. So remember, although we've spent so many years we've spent something truly is a volatile truck city. We're still not anywhere close to having that makes me so that so so on. All right, so I want to understand when What people like. The the left on Democratic Party. Tell us wind and solar wind and solar wind and solar are the are they fooling themselves? It's hard to know what they're telling us is that I think they're telling us to think we need to cut carbon emissions and we like solar and wind, Beth, But surely that shouldn't be about what, like it should be about what has cost effective an unfortunate mostly I'm still not so learned. When do you think Angela Merkel the idea? Let me interrupt for a moment. I'm sorry. Do you think Angela Merkel? A regret or decision to shut down nuclear plants in Germany. Well, she should. I'm not sure she does, because remember, a politician's job is not actually to do what's best for the nation. It is to win the next election, and there's people sufficiently worried about nuclear It probably makes people want to vote for miracle. But of course, the reality as you're alluding to is she basically shut down a lot of cheap. Then quit because it has already been built right? So a lot of cheap nuclear power that admit it knows you, too, And it's mostly been replaced by fossil fuels that have more, which is one of the reasons why Germany has spent about half a trillion dollars. And reduce their emissions. Surprisingly legal. Okay, let's go to the part, which really touches by heart. In your subtitle hurts the poor. Go ahead. How does all of this hurt the poor? So if you make energy more expensive that hurts everyone but the people who used the larger part of their budget. The energy of the poor. If you're rich, you don't really notice whether gasoline goes up a little, but But if you're poor, it can really make the difference between you being able to go drive to trouble for no..

Blomberg Angela Merkel Germany Sierra Pacific Andrew International Energy Agency Seoul Bill Gates Democratic Party Beth
Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

"The corona virus pandemic is delivering the biggest shock to the global energy system in seven decades according to the international energy agency NPR's Jeff Brady reports plunging demand for energy is hitting fossil fuels especially hard global energy demand will fall by six percent this year seven times the decline after the financial crisis ten years ago I E. a projection show oil and gas hit hard but demand for coal falls by an extraordinary eight percent the largest decline since World War two the agency says renewable energy fair as well while among grows much as in the past the IEA projects electricity generation from wind solar and hydro power will increase five percent the agency says all this will reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change by almost eight percent the largest annual decrease ever recorded though emissions will rebound in an economic recovery unless countries focus relief packages on boosting clean energy Jeff Brady

NPR Jeff Brady IEA
Where Do I Start?

The Sustainable Futures Report

09:27 min | 2 years ago

Where Do I Start?

"Why do I stopped announced New Day? Welcome to the sustainable futures report for Friday. The twentieth of March against that saying that the big issue is still covered. Nineteen the corona virus. The International Energy Agency the expects the economic fallout to wipe out the world's oil demand growth for the year ahead which should cap the fossil fuel emissions that contribute to the climate crisis but Fawzi Barrel I e as executive director as worn. The outbreak could spell a slowdown in the world's clean energy transition unless governments use green investments to help support economic growth through the global slowdown. There was nothing to celebrate in a likely decline in emissions of my economic crisis because in the absence of the right policies and structural measures. This decline will not be sustainable. He said I'm no expert. All I know is this will govern everything we do for the next weeks months and probably years. The situation is changing by the day. If not by the hour so I'm not going to comment further except to say that I think we will gain valuable lessons. Which will inform our approach to the climate emergency? I'm working on a new presentation on that theme to be Thailand for the individual clients and presented as a live interactive video. The working title is lessons from covered. Nineteen staying in business staying in Prophet and staying. I'll let you know in the trailer is ready. And they will be special tells of patrons who want to use it in that an organization's for the day I'm falling back on cliches. Okay cliches. But the fact that they've survived suggests there might be some truth in them first of all always look on the bright side. There is a bright side. All over the moment dockside is seriously predominant. It'll gradually get brighter because we can be competent that this too will pass but the climate will still be an issue as always the question with the sustainable futures report is where do I saw with so much information. Coming in all quarters. It's difficult to know how to prioritize what to do or to say start with the end in mind is a well known piece of advice. My Aunt my objective is to make people aware of the seriousness of the climate situation. So that we can all urge governments and leaders to take the international action which is the only way to conquer the climate crisis. The same time I bring you. News work being done to meet the challenge on. I also attempt to look at areas where I'm much more action is needed this time. Then the topics. I'm covering into good news and positive climate messages from the mining industry from the EU from the UK's Financial Conduct Authority. Maybe even from Boris Johnson. There's good news to about geothermal energy cutting pollution is a possible end to the throwaway culture list of bodies is even longer commutes committed to their cause. Why trees not the answer threats to sue. The government continued use of fossil fuels. Accelerating ice melt on why wearing clothes can be bad for the environment. Let's start with the bad news. So you've got something to Fullerton. Kaas off a major source of pollution both in terms of emissions of greenhouse gases and all particulars which reduce quality in the UK alone bad air quality causes some fifty thousand premature deaths each year. It's disappointing to learn from a report by the European Court of Auditors that Europeans are reluctant to give up the private. They say Ovo cities are put in place range of initiatives to expand the quality and quantity of transport. There has been no significant reduction in private car usage. This is unsurprising. Given that they found that in many cases it was always quicker to get to the city centre. Calm in the immediate to him. It is going to be even more difficult to persuade people to use public transport while there is a risk of infection in crowded spaces much better to stay locked away in one's own private vehicle. People probably prefer that even if it takes longer to complete the journey through the European structural and investment fund the EU has provided sixteen point three billion euro between two thousand fourteen and twenty twenty to change the way people move in cities but the auditions complained that the money was taken but there was limited. Take up on European Commission guns on how to spend it. Money was being wasted on infected projects. While city plans often lacked coherence for example in Poland the report found parking penalties were lower than finds a not paying public transport fans in also caused rebound from the side of the road but it was still possible to park on the pavement. A senior auditor said congestion. Custody you around. Two hundred. Seventy billion euro per year and that funds provided by Brussels should be more hiking to plans to shift people out of there. 'cause so I'm going to be easy urged to plant trees and it is by far the best way to take co two from the atmosphere of the carbon. At least in theory in reality there are programs in a wide ranging report through the RSP Bay the World Society for the protection of buds by Elliott Crane entitled. Woodland's for five minutes and nature. She describes the complexity of the issue. And I do recommend you go to the link on the blog I look at the report is very complex. Very detail very well. Written trees are a store of carbon but they take many years to grow and require careful management throughout that time trees plotted on peatland degrade that land as a carbon store and released much of the condom in fact removing trees from peatland can have a positive effect on common storage bunning woods energy it releases college. The atmosphere she says unlike burning fossil fuels. This does not increase the amount of atmospheric carbon in the long term however forest-based bioenergy count be considered column neutral because the payback time until the carbon is reabsorbed. Can we very long particularly when living trees are felled for biomass replacing coal or gas with biomass eligibility generation is likely to significantly increase emissions per unit of electricity generated and yet drax power station claims to be one of the greenest sites in Britain and receives massive government? Subsidies on that basis harvested would pronounce can be a continuing store of carbon after they'd been moved from the forest but how dot com says locked up depends on what the proce- used for the British government has pledged to plant thirty million trees per year raising the. Uk's forest cover from thirteen percent to seventeen percent skilled tree planters. Mainly Australians and Canadians are already at work. I'm compliant one sapling every four seconds to four thousand per day. That's the first some twenty-five percent likely to die in the early years on the forest has to be Catholic managed and thinned so the trees can reach their full potential. They not only absorb outside but they also release it through respiration until trees reach maturity the amount they abso- exceeds the amount they emit but once they mature they stole the carbon but they don't add to forest continue to need management because if as simply allowed to decay the trees will die rot on the COB and we'll be released again into the atmosphere. If the timber is harvested the use. That's made it determines how long it continues as a carbon stole see to persists in the atmosphere for up to one hundred years said to be effective. Trays need to lock carbon away for that length of time. Talking to the BBC Professor Ralph McKenzie of the University of Birmingham. Says it will be a disaster. If governments and companies rely on forests to clear a massive carbon pollution. An article in the journal Nature Warns that the rate at which carbon is absorbed by the Amazon forest is in decline at the rate in. The African forest is stable but there are signs up to will decline in the longer term. It's too tempting for people to believe that buying a few trees can make up for flying away on holding things just at work like that. The government's thirty million trees are no substitute for cutting carbon emissions outsource increasing fuel duty which also decided not to do allows weeks. Uk budget would have had any major defect as it happens. Of course the dramatic drop off in flying and all forms of travel having a much greater effect without the need for a scourge

UK EU International Energy Agency European Court Of Auditors Boris Johnson Executive Director Brussels Thailand Financial Conduct Authority University Of Birmingham OVO COB Fullerton
The promise of  renewables in remote Central Africa

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:09 min | 2 years ago

The promise of renewables in remote Central Africa

"Than half the population of Africa can can rely on just flicking on a switch light or heat or cooking and that also limits technological advances in banking education and healthcare a recent International Energy Agency report says skipping over the fossil fuel heavy grids the most of the rest of the world relies on and turning straight to solar and micro grids or even wind power has real potential for accelerating development particularly in Central African countries. Michael at the University of Pittsburgh Researches Energy Policy Policy and he says that renewable I approach can work with some caveats. I've seen myself attempts to almost helicopter. Drops solar panels in rural areas. And without any kind of local button. This doesn't work very well. Because one challenge for instance is that many people would like like ideally to have access to the great and feel that the smaller systems do not quite provide kind of services. They were hoping for. I think think what really needs to happen is a lot of bottom up involvement from these local communities to tell other people what their needs exactly are so that these can be met met the best and most effective way as possible in your experience. What is an effective installation on maybe a household or village or town level? Just exactly what would that look like. So these needs very quite a bit across very different settings and I think that's precisely why renewable off great technologies are potentially so powerful is we can really use them tailor them to match what people really can use them for. That's the big difference to the grids because the grid rid is one size fits all type of approach right every house here in the US. For instance once you're connected you have about the same type of services that you can use. They're in somebody's countries. It's going to be very helpful to be able to adapt the kind of technology to their financial means and as a result you can really make the best use use of that without having to go through the high costs imposed by extending the grid so obviously some countries like China that makes solar panels see a potential new mark here but other other global economic gains that we could see by the transition to a different type of electrical infrastructure. This has really serious consequences says on how these families these villages how much they can really produce think about any kind of business if you have a small grocery and you WanNa Fridge Ginny power you need artificial lighting to be able to operate after nightfall so I think what is really going to be. The more and more transformative effect of these technologies can come from allowing places that would otherwise be fairly unproductive from an economic standpoint to suddenly really be able to use their potential and they become much more productive. That way Michael. At Clinton University of Pittsburgh the report says the continent of Africa could by twenty forty meet the energy demands of of an economy. That's grown to four times larger than today's but used just fifty percent more energy and now some related links. The report is worth reading. It says Africa is going to become increasingly influential in shaping global energy trends over the next six two decades. And that's because it's undergoing the largest process of urbanization the world's ever seen the number of people. Living in Africa's cities will grow by six hundred with million. That's more than the increase we've seen in China so the energy demand will grow. Brookings also has incredible visuals and a report on Energy Africa which which are worth clicking through to. For example one graph highlights the cost burden of powering a refrigerator for a year as a percentage of GDP per capita in the US like France UK and other developed countries. It's basically zero in Liberia it's forty-nine percent and really it's all those central African African countries at the expensive end of that chart and we just talked about micro grids on marketplace tech earlier this month

Africa Michael International Energy Agency United States China University Of Pittsburgh Brookings Liberia Clinton University Of Pittsbur France Uk Forty-Nine Percent Six Two Decades Fifty Percent
"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Report from the international energy agency for that we bring in Bloomberg oil trading reporter Alex Longley he joins us now from our London studios good morning Alex at first glance it looks like this is a pretty tame assessment from the I. E. A. that global crude markets will likely remain calm heading into twenty twenty what sketching your eye from the I a report well there's an interesting contrast between the out I ETS assessment of a calm oil markets IT next year and then the way they talk about supply and demand because they also go on to say that supply from outside of a pack is going to rise by about two point three million barrels a day next year that's more than double oil demand growth say on the one hand you're saying then talk about com this of supply and calmness of sort of the market itself which I think when we compare to the sort of the op tech attacks in Saudi Arabia early this year you can see what I coming from but on the other hand clearly that is and that sort of dark clouds and growing over the market for sort early twenty twentieth as all these non OPEC supplies come online particularly from the US but also outside of the region yeah I mean that's sort of stands in contrast doesn't it to some of what we've heard from suppliers in the U. S. saying that the shale boom may be running a bit out of steam that they may be running out of places to frack yeah it seems like the world sound on its head ready because we hearing her cell produces saying that tree that barracks you have sellout and then we have the energy information administration this week raising it to you high so how about that for costs that those two it slightly tricky to Squibb clearly the idea is backing a significant increase in U. S. shale production and and I think will vary and US produces kind of talking about a potential slow down and and that may be something that's happening what you have to bear in mind is the levels with coming from the scene exceptionally strong U. S. oil output growth in recent years the U. S. shifting towards being an NSX sports there on a weekly basis I'm sorry although we hearing kind of perhaps more down beat times in terms of the amount of production coming out of the U. S. I think there's still a significant increase is not like anyone talking about low a U. S. production it's just a smaller increase the meeting before right so where does this leave pack now their meeting and what about three weeks to discuss their output plans yeah in that meeting and coming up on horizon and and we kind of seen the first socks of stocks of posturing going on and there was talk of D. for output cuts that's kind of been quashed now and it seems as though you that set for an extension probably into into the kind of this the first half of next year and the cuts run so much it's likely you see that kind of move down the line and in terms of whether we're going to get deeper cuts that remains to be seen the group's own report this week suggests that the markets are supplied in the start of next year which again suggests that I picked needs to cut further and we've seen in in recent days the I. A. again saying that it's Russian is benefiting the most from these output cuts that their profits arising the most and obviously the Saudis have been cutting a bit more so that that's where that getting hit but it seems like the my slightly out likely outcome for the time being is that AIPAC will just kind of kick the can down the line and stick with the current regime into next year thank you mention the Arab cake attack earlier is the I AEA factoring that in and not off his is risk premium is still an issue it it's an interesting question it's clearly an issue for the market and we had a a commodities conference here last week it bring back and headphones are saying that actually if you look at oil prices at the moment that probably fairly valued him was on the value does that premium because that the market can move two ways one a lot of a pet supply suddenly comes online because they change course in which case prices plummet or we get another up cake in which case prices move sharply higher and the idea is obviously very focused on him in trees and and they would probably use of cake to point out that I see the market was very quickly replenished from not from that will supply say that kind of that but the system is working I guess that's why you don't see them talk about it quite as much but when he sought to oil trade is clearly that that risk premium seems to be what people feel the the mis pricing is going on in the market at the moment so in the last thirty seconds here where do you see volatility going for oil as we head through the rest of the year and into the early part of next year well that probably depends primarily on two things I think you have the APEC meeting where any surprise outcome could probably give a list of all and then also and as we mentioned kind of any other geopolitical risks for the time being though it seems as though the way it with with trending lower on the volatility front and I think as long as you kind of have this kind of structural head wind of the trade war in the market that's that's the way it's going to stay in sunny talking to some of the bike is that that planning that way too all right thanks for this as always Alex good talking with you that's Alex Longley Bloomberg oil trading reporter just looking at crude right now West Texas intermediate is down four tenths percent or twenty three cents at fifty six dollars fifty five cents a barrel Karen hi Nathan thank you it is five fifty three on Wall Street time to the Bloomberg law report let's get to the legal stories were watching this morning from Bloomberg's Jeff Ballenger White House lawyer Stephen not she has been confirmed to the New York based U. S. court of appeals for the second circuit court now has a majority of judges appointed by Republican presidents Forest Service officials say they will consider input from the public in deciding whether to walk when Alaska's Tongass National Forest to logging the trump administration wants to open more than nine million acres to block development new Jersey's labor department says Hooper owes the state about six hundred fifty million dollars in taxes because the company.

Alex Longley reporter London six hundred fifty million doll three million barrels nine million acres fifty six dollars thirty seconds three weeks one hand
"international energy agency" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Nine percent since nineteen twenties. There's just no evidence that, that life is getting more hazardous for people because of the weather and they keep saying this. But there's there is no evidence. I think we see that people don't actually believe in the way that they act they don't act like they the world's going to end in twelve years because they know what's really not well, right. And in addition to that, I mean, it seems like people that are actually practitioners in the space. They know it to they're not paying attention to so much. The political dribble. The International Energy Agency energy demand. This is them reporting on twenty thousand energy demand worldwide twenty by its fastest pace. This decade driven by a robust global Connie with fossil fuels meeting, seventy percent of the growth for the second year running because, you know, win solar batteries are expensive too expensive. And so, how is that going to be turned around in these artificial time horizons that are set by politicians looking to make an aim for themselves, whether it's a OC or Michael Bloomberg? It's not. I mean, you have huge growing economies across the world and more to come and those people don't wanna live in poverty, and they want air conditioning. They want cars and they want things that make life better for them. We never really measure, what car, you know, what social fuels do for us in our contemporary debates. But it allows us to live lives that are just looking back, fifty years just incredible. So all those things are just embedded in our lives. They don't think about it every day. We might talk scam scaremonger about climate change. But we know there's very little, we could actually do about this sort of growth, and there, just isn't an answer for it. There is. No. I mean it's funny that the, the green new deal eliminated nuclear energy, which actually might help to extent, were, you know, fracking, which helps, you know, lower carbon emissions as well to gas. But in the big picture, our efficiency might help, but overall, it's going to be fossil fuels for the foreseeable future. There's nothing anyone's going to be. Able to do about it. There's a meteorologist Joe started had an interesting piece to talking about some of the red herrings that are promulgated by the dean dust, realization set the green deal people, the whole it settled science, the debate is over. If it is starting then why is there a continuous flow of money to research it, if it's all done wiser, continuous money to research it, and why as all the modeling of the last twenty years, including from Nobel prize winner, Al Gore wise? It been wrong. People always ask me, and they probably y you hate science. Knuckle dragging troglodyte can't look at a chart and just accept it. Well, they're furious. I hate science sciences, because they're terribly wrong. When predicting things all the time, I don't hate. I don't even dismiss that things are getting dismissed that man has something to do with it. I just don't think it's the only thing you think about their economic factors. We have to include their moral factors, we have to include and then we also have to think about how wrong side, just always been about the future. If we were listening to the mouth, Susan's nineteen seventy we would have thought that the world would end by two thousand and we would have acted accordingly, which would have destroyed our society in many ways. So I don't hate science, but I do hate people only think about science. And and you know honestly they're just they're frauds. They're pretending to care about science, and they do sometimes. And sometimes they don't, but there's a lot more to the equation. I mean, are we situation, maybe this is an argument that needs to be made more repeatedly rather than getting into the details of? Interpreting graphs or reminding people with the actual data is, you know what our record is on the environment versus all those Paris, accord signatories, for example, but Michael Crichton I mean, fifteen years ago, sixteen years ago now, the great author taking on environmentalism. He's just talked about it. Look, it's a religion for the left and so everything is taken on faith. So there's no arguing because the evidence is dismissed because everything I believe about the the environment. It's for Jili climate change is an article faith. Absolutely. I mean it has an apocalypse that has all sorts of, you know, parts that are, you know, are that religion propels religion and people react accordingly. I definitely think that's part of it. But also just to go back at the scientists, I, I don't know. I don't know that there's probably a consensus of scientists to agree that there's warming. I highly doubt there's a consensus scientists who think the world's going to end twelve years. And, you know, I know people hate when you. Say this, but whether we can predict what's going to happen next week. I just don't trust that anyone can predict what's going to happen. Twelve years from now coming, Senator Jillette, brand of New York has something to say, I think it's very instructive to hear the condescending.

International Energy Agency Michael Bloomberg Nobel prize Senator Jillette Connie Al Gore Michael Crichton Joe Jili Susan Paris New York twelve years seventy percent fifteen years sixteen years
"international energy agency" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

09:34 min | 3 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Claire broadcasting you one of the great journalists of our time is James Rosen local guy New York Times bestselling author historian and kind enough to call us his early in the morning, James always great to have you on the show, my friend that you doing this morning. Thank you. Joe? I can do. It was a good one. Do you insulting you buy patronizing? You're pretty Beatles. Music will bring you to the airwaves. Pretty for the king. You are a believer. John James, all good all good in your life games. All good. I missed I missed. I went to somebody said we you had James Rosen and you didn't get a deniro oppression. And you, you know, there's a lot of people that do that the origin. You really nail it. And all I keep thinking about James James Rosen. I go back and forth when it's raging bull. And he's training and is give me a little bit. When they when he has to doesn't want to take any food because you don't want to gain weight as Jalen. All right. You got to get the nose breathing. I. Smart. Yo you very. James rose. It is the man. Gene. We could do a whole hour. As Terek prejudice abou-, ladies and gentlemen, gig. We're living this general this very great general from Israel that the apparently in the Israeli elections. Benny Benny Ganz catskill comic, though, doesn't it? You know? The comedy stylings of any Ganz going up. Well, forgive me election. It was with profound importance for all little east, of course, for the United States. And there Trump was very close allies that you're well said was James Rosen Jj, what was the response to you debut on Cheryl accusations show last weekend, sir. Great response. We did a story about a thousand page book that was written by Stuart is this was Jimmy Carter's chief dimensional under President Bill Clinton's about to the European Union has a very different take on the quota presidency asserting that it was actually a conservative adversity successful than people. Remember? Very well review army conservative outlets possible review support. So we took a fresh look Jimmy Carter on this update on full measure show, which you can feel all your civic later stations. You do stir on Loku or need to watch. It. Easter Sunday forty three billion households watchful pressure which. Got me. I really investigative long-form. He's for the same court last week with a crowd of it gets hawks about we will we will explore a previously undisclosed Iran nuclear facility. Of the Super Bowl. President Trump got into it with his own intelligence chiefs. They testified before congress and the director h universal set technically we believe that a role in complaints with gluteal deliver the night. You're right. Yes. Yes. Yes. Alright. Allies with states in the world covers except United States presidents. Don't walk out of the year of the question was raised are they still complying with it? Because all the Europeans the Russians the Chinese. They're still the deal director Tina. Khloe? Technically was left unstated. Visit me look violates spirit of the deal the running but living up to technical weather. That would've stated the President Trump little SuperBowl. Interview on CBS report repenting sets grease. Four minutes. Disagree with you. Tell us chief from said that we have that Arana's compliant. Because I have had a deligence people. We don't have to agree with them. A lot of people were contented. Cock it up to that was good. That was good James was Donald Trump right there. Like that. Look that it right on the money was well done very well. We'll sue wait. You can't you. So I think they love. So the question was. Into complaining. And now that the Israelis have captured a burnt archive of documents relating to do program. Money into settles. We've been able to discover the inside of a Milton either a huge toll blocks that according to all those blueprints and contracts for the best and that was to build the course for you learning disclosed this facility built inside of a Melton the EA the International Energy Agency, which be. Whether this. If you keeping the secret documents on more with us, which these railings rated twenty thirty two words of documents about your nuclear program. What you feel for the trip should be? Only keeping secret. But you have never disclosed to the to the Duke inspectors that you have this. Facility built inside of a Belgian only purpose could have been to the uranium cores for weapons are you complying with the deal was President Trump. Right. You'll explore this in real detail. Pictures taken by themselves or full veget- with Cheryl how today. Well, Sunday morning at ten this. Why was he one of the Democrats after this James, you know, one of them watching go into this the president mentions it maybe that you'd be investigated. You you're the guy that's got to step up for this. It's a little frustrating for us as regular citizens. God bless you for doing this, by the way, but this is a real danger. And how did you find out about this now? To think things here in Washington prepared very detailed ovation for the defensive park. Was he called the good ISIS? The institute's study. David Albright, a renowned clear sorta taste the individual surveys such park is all. He was. Was full. The International Energy Agency. These people who've been to visited Saddam Hussein's nuclear sites who've been visit Kim Jong UN's nuclear sites. They know what they're talking about and working with the Israelis after that rate of all those dog prepare the study of this new running nucleus site has never been disclosed called the air project located at thirteen which is military complex about thirty miles south of Tehran. Where he wanting to fort like crazy to keep the reinspect himself. Wow. This is great James Rosen investigative reporter for Saint Clair. Speaking of which we have a lot on another issue, James. We heard a lot about the response from the Saudi government to the murder of Jamal. The Shoghi has the Saudi government actually paid off to show these families that what you telling us. Well, because you guys I don't tell me show me where wrong, although Riley. What are you telling me because he don't I'm looking at? I don't find. I'm finding all this information from you James money going anywhere else men. And is that is that. And then when I see something on the internet. I always say to produce a Frankie five boroughs say it become I believe this. I don't know what to believe you is that what you that's a good question. There's never been Eddie your accent? Information. Whether you're ratio. Bill, all curfew. I can't confer Saudi. Paying okay Shoghi fail after they looked less off the Hoover of show either Saudi president. Six. We will. Wash your kashogi was of this just never visited the Saudi consulate in a little over. Outcrop was raised about this and the United States intelligence community. Would it be concluded that dominant in Saudi Arabia? Principal. FBI after. For the at and you're about to arrest in Saudi Arabia. Very high ranking. Chills. Security people have been for barley Dhabi lately. I made it games. You gotta think you're breaking up on us leukaemia, man. Hey, James goo fleet. I got you right now, man and. Apologies about this. It's okay. No, listen. We appreciate it gives. Thanks for joining us. And yeah, we'll call back and we'll get a landline. But then investigative reporter for Sinclair broadcasting historian, New York Times bestselling author, and the gotta check out the full measure with Cheryl Atkinson that is Sunday a tendency Claire a broadcasting James when the great reporters of our time, and we'll try to get a a phone that works next time. That would be great. Hey Suzy's on.

James James Rosen President Trump John James James president United States Cheryl Atkinson President Bill Clinton James rose New York Times James Rosen Jj Saudi Arabia Saudi government International Energy Agency Benny Benny Ganz investigative reporter Claire director Jimmy Carter
"international energy agency" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The International Energy Agency projects Anita of up to thirty million public chargers globally right now. There are a little more than six hundred thousand around the world with about. Half of those in China. I'm Steve Potisk, Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's newsradio. It's twelve forty violence is taking a toll at Venezuela's borders with Brazil and Colombia this as a US-backed drive to deliver foreign aid to Venezuela is met with fierce resistance from President Nicolas Maduro, an international summit on the crisis is set for Monday. Here's ABC's. Julia MacFarlane with details on that the US back to opposition leader Hongo his declared himself. Interim president is preparing for a gathering of the Lima group in the Colombian capital Bogota. The group is made of a dozen Latin American countries who have his support and vice President Mike Pence will fly to Bogota to join them in crisis. Talks troops loyal to Madero blocked. The convoys carrying aid at the border and fired tear gas on protesters two people were killed in the clashes. Another three hundred were injured last night opposition leader, one Guido refrain from asking supporters to continue risking their lives. Instead. And he said that he would meet vice President Mike Pence Monday in Bogota North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN is on a train headed to be at non for his second summit with president. Trump two are set to meet in Hanoi later this week to continue work on a deal aimed at getting Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons. Some are concerned though, that the meeting could result in a deal that allows North Korea to get everything it wants while giving up very little, but on CNN's state of the union this morning secretary of state, Mike Pompeo said full denuclearization is the goal in. Sanctions will remain until that's reach four sectors the core. UN Security Council resolution sanctions we've said consistently full verified denuclearization. That's the standard for relieving. Those sanctions that policies. Not changed since I think since the tape President Trump took office at their first summit. The president reached a vaguely worded commitment from North Korea to dismantle its nuclear weapons program heading into their second sit down the president says that North Korea has not. Tested, any nuclear weapons in months and that as long as testing his seized. He's in no rush. It's twelve forty two and time to check sports baseball has begun Red Sox with their second exhibition game today after they disposed of the AKIs in their opener square off with the twins JD Martinez in his second season. Now in Boston fit a lot more comfortable this spring family now..

Interim president vice President President Trump North Korea Bogota Mike Pence President Boston International Energy Agency Kim Jong UN UN Security Council Venezuela Mike Pompeo China JD Martinez Nicolas Maduro Julia MacFarlane ABC Steve Potisk
"international energy agency" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"international energy agency" Discussed on KTRH

"David blackman. David welcome to the show. It's another beautiful day in. I couldn't agree with you more. The weather is just superb beautiful beautiful day. Let's jump in to our questions for you. Because there are some pretty interesting questions that have come in as of lately, and I want to jump into that. But I, you know, we had an interesting report from the International Energy Agency this week. So despite reports from the global economy slowing down the International Energy Agency projects that crude oil demand will be even stronger this year than it was last year. So tell me how this works. I don't quite understand. How does this work? Well, you know today interesting projection by these guys are they're usually very very conservative with their growth projections the person of the year, and generally they a mid-year revision in that video revision of last five years has always been upwards because they always have underestimated gross. So the fact that this particular agency, which is at the United Nations. Is is issuing such a strong demand. Demand forecast for two thousand nineteen despite you know, what most observers thing. Is slowing global economy is it says a lot about the relative strength of ongoing week, right? Demand for crude oil, not just the United States, but all over the.

David blackman International Energy Agency United Nations United States five years