26 Burst results for "International Astronomical Union"

"international astronomical union" Discussed on Car Talk

Car Talk

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on Car Talk

"Hello and welcome to card talk on national public radio with us click and collect the tappet brothers and with broadcasting this week from the fall foliage observation deck here at car talk Plaza. Speaking of the foliage deckers on the first floor this year. This is all the leaves I've already fallen, you know, it's a little late. I'm glad you brought up the subject of leaves. Yes. Because did you want me to leave? No, I wanted to ask you a question. Here's the question. Our plants really that stupid. I mean, everything most grateful philosophies are based on some illusion allusion to nature and the magnificence of nature. And I heard someone say the other day that because this has been a particularly warm autumn. Flowers are beginning to bloom when they were supposed to not bloom. They think it's spring again. And my question is, a plant that stupid? I thought plants were the ultimate in intelligence. Now, one with nature. They are nature. You mean nature isn't perfect and you can fool it by just throwing in a couple extra degrees and while it's come out? Sure, of course. Oh, okay, just fold you, huh? Actually, you want to read something funny? Not but I'd like to hear something. Here's an article sent to us by Bill Kent from Pennsylvania. He says, as NASA's Magellan probe, this is a, it looks like The Wall Street Journal. As NASA's Magellan probe approaches its 2500th orbit around Venus, it's spreading the interplanetary fame of female earthlings because the international astronomical union, the scientific group, which is charged with designated newly found heavenly places, has chosen to recognize distinguished women by giving their names to craters and other features now visible as Magellan's radar imaging device penetrates Venus's dense clouds. Interesting, huh? To help out a public nomination process for crater naming is being coordinated by the U.S. geological survey. And some names that get raised some women who have been nominated include the Dutch diarist and Frank. The American anthropologist Margaret Mead, and none other than Norwegian skater. Sonya. And Bill writes at the bottom. He says, dear brothers, I can see it all. Picture if you will, to concentric craters on Venus. The inner crater is named Sonja hennie and the other one is what? Her 2000. Three three two 9 two 8 7 hello, you're on cartoon. Hello, who says hello, this is Bill from Florida. Bill. Hi, Bill. What's up? Well, I've been having some problems with my 1987 Honda prelude. I take it out on a trip and about an hour into the trip, the air conditioner starts putting out mostly fog and a few minutes after that, it's not working anymore. Oh yeah. Not working. Meaning working at all, you know, it's just like not putting out any cold air at all and after you stop in the car shut down for, I don't know, 30 minutes to maybe an hour. And you started up again, it works again for a while. No kidding. Yeah. Okay, you say it's purple problems. Puts out fog, but the fog it puts out has no smell or taste or what are they called? He licks the dashboard. It's blowing in your face, right? Right. It had a somewhat of a taste of salty air, but I was driving along the beach at the time. And that's exactly what it was. Water vapor. Yeah. I mean, I don't think that has anything to do with the air conditioner itself. I mean, it may be that it was preceded the things not working. But the reason you got fog is that the air in the car was just so moisture laden that it was condensing when the cold air hit it. And that's what the fog is. You were making clouds in your car. We were like 30,000 feet. I could still see, you know, but barely. That's bad, huh? No, I mean, so I don't think that necessarily means that there was something wrong with the air conditioner or it means in fact that the air conditioner was working. And what was wrong was that you were in a very, very humid area. Right. But it did stop working after that. Maybe they're not related. Maybe they're not related. Okay, so when it stopped working, did air keep coming out of the vents, but it wasn't cold? Right, the fans still ran and there was air coming out the vents, but it was not cold. I did have it checked at a service station, and he said the ten to there said, they put it on a tester that they thought the high pressure switch was cutting out or something. I'm not that familiar with it, but that's something about the high pressure switch, but he recommended not bypassing that because it could cause other problems. Well, the precious which really means reads the amount of free on pressure that's in the system, and if it's not enough, it won't allow the compressor to kick in. Right. And they do that so that if you develop a system leak, you won't run the compressor dry and crook it. Right. Well, he was able to bypass that switch and get the compressor to run properly. And the cold air come out. No. Yes. Yes. Yes. And that's good. With a switch not bypassed. The compressor didn't run at that time at the time he checked it. And there was no cold air. Good for him. That sent me that's good because now you've narrowed it down, you know that the compressor does work because the other thing that it might have been was the compressor itself. It was in fact the other came out really cold or was it just colder than the haughty that had been coming out. It was a sufficiently cold. Do you feel it was working the way it had been?.

Bill Kent Bill NASA Sonja hennie international astronomical uni Margaret Mead Magellan The Wall Street Journal Sonya Pennsylvania prelude Frank Honda U.S. Florida
"international astronomical union" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

09:05 min | 7 months ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"On climate change between 2015 and 2019, their agreement that the earth is warming, mostly caused by human activity was 100%. So the most active researchers were at a 100%. And then but you could look across the board and there's a trend of the more scientifically active, the researcher is and the more the greater level of expertise, the more closely related their work is related to global warming, the greater the percentage of them that believe in global warming. So there was a positive relationship between expertise and accepting the consensus opinion. So that's pretty, you know, that's pretty convincing evidence that there is actually a consensus. Yeah, but they couldn't get higher than a 100%, huh? Yeah. The deniers are going to push back on this, they'll find some way to dismiss the paper because no study is perfect. No research is perfect. You can always find something to complain about if you want. If you don't like the findings and you want to dismiss it, that's sort of the difference between skepticism and denial. I'll skepticism. You have to put things into context and be reasonable and fair and try to come up with what we decision about. We actually can say with what confidence intervals and deniers will just find an excuse to deny what they don't want to accept, whatever, whether it's out of proportion or reasonable or not. So anyway, I want to that's the update on the John cook consensus study ten years later, this consensus on global warming is even stronger. All right, Evan, tell us about the recent efforts to pass dark skies ordnance. Yes. We're going to talk about Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, which is a pretty cool city, I think in its own right for many reasons. But it got even cooler. Because now it's the first major city in the United States to adopt a dark skies policy regarding public light illumination. Wait, are they going to do what they did for them with a matrix when they put the dark smoke throughout the earth so that all the robots die? I mean, that's crazy. Different kind of dark sky. Oh. All right, good, good. And yeah, and the robots aren't revolting at either. Okay. All right, never mind. We're all about to revolt. The Pittsburgh city council. Unlike what bob said, they passed a new dark sky ordinance for all of the city's parks, facilities and streetlights. The office of mobility and infrastructure prepared the ordinance with support from two Carnegie Mellon university dark sky experts. Diane turn check, who is a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon university's department of physics, along with Stephen quick, who is part of the faculty at their school of architecture, the two of them helped draft the ordinance. This is the first ordinance of its kind in the country. As far as major cities go. And it aims to replace the city's 35,000 streetlights and install up to 8000 new ones. We have talked before about dark skies, various projects, care. I know you've talked a lot about it. In the past. There is the international astronomical union dark and quiet skies project who raises awareness about the need to preserve dark skies and quiet skies. There's also the international dark skies association itself, who has a lot of helpful information about what are exactly dark and quiet skies. So we have a problem with what we've done to the night sky with all of our artificial light. And it has real world impacts on health on environment on energy consumption, so many different things. Nocturnal animals have to sleep during the day, they're active at night, but light pollution will radically alter their nighttime environment by turning night basically in today. So the ecosystems are all effective. It's a huge waste of energy when it comes right down to it. For example, in an average year in the United States alone, outdoor lighting uses about 120 terawatts, hours of energy, mostly to eliminate streets and parking lots. That's has much energy that New York City goes through over the course of two years. Wow. And they can measure this wastefulness at the tune of over $3 billion and the release of 21 million tons of carbon dioxide per year. That is not a trivial amount. Street lights for those who say that it prevents accidents and crimes. There's a lot of research into that and they're saying no, that does not prevent accidents and crime, in fact, in some ways it can be worse. Glare from nighttime lighting can create hazards. Ranging from discomfort to visual disability. So there's no argument to be made there. Artificial light and I can negatively affect human health. It increases risks of obesity, depression, sleep disorders, definitely diabetes, and breast cancer, although I didn't read specifically on that one, but they say that there are research into that, our circadian rhythm is governed by the day night cycle and that has been that is certainly taken a hit with all of the nighttime lighting that we've done. Melatonin production also become suppressed, as a result of all the lighting we have been doing. Plus, just the natural beauty of the night sky. We've lost it. I mean, think about the generations of people who are now being born who have recently been born, never known the night sky as so many generations of people before had known it. So all sorts of issues and reasons to try to prevent this artificial illumination of our night sky, so many practical and frankly beautiful reasons. So what Pittsburgh is going to do is they're going to implement technology to help. Motion sensors, dimmers and timers, cooler temperature bulbs, proper shielding, you know, which directs the light down instead of up all this reduces the light pollution. And still provides all of the need for the nighttime light that we do rely on. So they're going to get rid of their 5000 Kelvin glow, blue, white, glare bulbs, in all of the lamps. They're going with the new LED lights, which are, of course, the lower temperature. And they are conforming to the standards that the international dark sky association have outlined as to what Pittsburgh is doing and what other cities frankly should be doing to move us in this direction. So thank you, Pittsburgh for being the first one and hopefully you're the first of many more cities to adopt these measures. Yeah, it really is amazing. I mean, of course, I'm partly going on memory, but even just like in the part of Connecticut where we live and we were kids, you definitely could clearly see the Milky Way and the night sky was just completely different than what it is today. There is so much low light pollution. Even in the suburbs, like we're not in a big city, just you can you can see the stars, but you can't really see like the Milky Way anymore or the level of detail that we could even 20, 30 years ago. I also remember like when we were in Australia or Christchurch, New Zealand. Yeah, or in New Zealand, we were down under, we wanted to look at the southern sky. It was hard. It was hard we had to go out of our way to find some place where we could kind of see the nighttime sky. The light pollution was so bad from any near any large town or city, you couldn't see it. Yeah, we drove a half hour, 40 minutes away from where we were just to escape the light pollution enough to be able to see what was frankly the greatest guy I've ever seen in my life. Yeah. Yeah, here in LA, I drive to like a two hour drive in order to do any sort of observing most people in LA well most big stargazing fans kind of know this spot in Fraser park, which is like two hours. And it's really only because the mountain sort of block all the cities. But yet I know a lot of people, a lot of people, and I'd be interested, you know, I bet you if we were to survey our audience, how many of you have actually seen the Milky Way, the numbers would be pretty surprising? Depressingly low. Yeah, yeah. All right, thank you, Evan. Jay, it's who's that noisy time? All right guys, last week, I played this noisy. There's a lot going on there. All right, what is it, guys? Sounds like an alarm really far away. Not like, you know, like a building alarm, like something bad happened in a big industry. Yeah, like.

Carnegie Mellon university Pittsburgh city council office of mobility and infrast Stephen quick Pittsburgh international dark skies assoc John cook international astronomical uni department of physics school of architecture Evan United States Diane Pennsylvania international dark sky associa bob
"international astronomical union" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on KGO 810

"And I'm supposed, Tio Mark Thompson said to say hi to Andy, he said, because I said, Doctor, Fractal is going to be on. He said I call him Andy for my Thompson. Yes, indeed. S O, he said Say hi. And I said you call him and I'm gonna calm and like Like in AA, You know, Andy, the Andy Griffith Show, which you're probably not old enough to remember. So Andrew Frak Noi, professor of astronomy. The From Institute at U. C at USF. And at the only programme O l. L. Y program at SF State. Ascher Live kosher, Lifelong Learning Institute, a lolly. Okay. And what is this? A asteroid 4859 was named Asteroid Frak Noi by the International Astronomical Union in recognition of your work in explaining astronomical ideas in everyday language. Oh, that is so exciting. When did that happen? All that happened a couple of decades ago now, but, um, actually, there's what's exciting for me is that One of the things that the nominated nominated before. When I work on KGO for for years I've been I've been able to do this on kgo. And so that was one of the reasons I got an asteroid that always make me happy. You know, you make us happy any time you grace us with your presence. It's so exciting because you do have this knack. For being able to take these ideas that are complicated, but that we're all fascinated by and you're able to explain things in ways that we can understand. And so that said There's this thing going on in the sky. Right now. There's this common. I guess it's a comet and and so people are able to see this comet apparently tell us about this comet and why it's unique. And is it you know, Haley's comet, I think is the most famous comment, But I don't know why tells how it compares. All right, great. Well, so let's let's tell our listen. First of all, what A comet is OK, it goes back five billion years. When the sun and the planets were first forming on, there were chunks of material that gathered together to make The planets, the moons, everything that's in our neighborhood, and a lot of those talks of material were left over the rocky chunks of the leftover. We call the asteroids and the icy chunks that were left over recall. The comet and janitorial services were not that good at the beginning, so there's a lot of that debris still flying around. We have a whole belt of asteroids between Mars and Jupiter. We have a whole belt of comets way beyond Neptune, and so every once in a while one of these leftover chunks from the early days Comes near us and we can see it. And that's what's happening in this case. Comment Neo wise, which is a really dumb name for comment. That's the telescope that discovered it was the neo wise telescope. So any O w I s e. In case you want to Google it the neo rise comet. Is that one of these chunks of ice that rounded the sun went around the sun July 3rd and is now on its way out and coming close enough to the Earth so that we can actually just glimpse of with the naked eye and see it really well with binoculars. That's what people have been doing. They've been using binoculars and telescopes to get a good view. And the thing that makes the comet Halley you mentioned how before you before you get to that, OK, So what? What is the trajectory of the comet? So it comes off the sun, and it's heading out someplace else. And it passes us by. If it passes us by how can you see it more than once? Also there. That's that's always going to get through with Holly's coming how these Halley's comet is most famous because it comes back every 76 years. It was actually captured by the gravity of the outer planets like Jupiter as though it forced it into a new orbit. What comes back every 76 years, so we've got to know it over the years. This comet like also must have had some kind of accident or or nearby encounter that forced it into this orbit that comes into the inner solar system instead of staying way out there where most comets are, but they were able to calculate so far from its orbit that it's not coming back for 6800 years. Holy Well, can we still see it right now? So that's right for comments move pretty slowly compared to things like shooting stars, so you can still see it in the sky. And you will be able to see with telescopes for many weeks so we can follow these comments as they go from going around the sun back out, but come into sort of the the orbital neighborhood of the Earth. It was. So how do we see it? So? So here's the thing. The reason we're all talking about the comet. Now it was only visible in the early morning. You have to get up really early before the sun and few people were willing to do that, But now it's become much more democratic and have the evening sky was now visible in the evening just after the sun sets And here Here's what you need to do. You need to have a viewing place where you can see the Northwest horizon and that stop for people Because often people have a hill or star big building in the direction of Northwest. But if you can get to the top of a hill or to a place where you can see the ocean and and look Northwest You should be able about an hour after the sunset. So the sun these days is no setting later, because this is the summertime So sunset Arras is around 8 30 these days. So if you go on now, after that, if you go at 99 30 And get a good view of the Northwest horizon just under the Big Dipper. But close to the horizon. You should see a little smudge. And if you if you could grab a pair of binoculars or meet up with someone who has one socially distance, of course and share the binoculars you could see. Ah, ah, Long tail. What's happening with the comet is that by getting close to the.

Andy Griffith Tio Mark Thompson Andrew Frak Noi KGO International Astronomical Uni professor From Institute Ascher Live Google Lifelong Learning Institute Haley USF Holly U. C
First leap second added to UTC - June 30, 1972

This Day in History Class

04:05 min | 2 years ago

First leap second added to UTC - June 30, 1972

"Today June thirtieth twenty twenty. The Day was June thirtieth nineteen seventy-two. At eleven fifty nine PM. In sixty seconds, a leap second was added to coordinate universal time to synchronize clocks with earth decelerating rotation. The second has been defied many different ways over the years at one point, it was defined as one eighty, six, thousand, four, hundred of the mean, solar day, but more precise measurement was needed because the length of day varies depending on many factors like seasonal daily weather variations as well as. In atmosphere tides. By nineteen, sixty seven, the second was defined as and I quote the duration of nine, billion, one, hundred, ninety, two, million, six, hundred, thirty, one, thousand, seven, hundred and seventy periods of the radiation, corresponding to the transition between the two hyper fine levels of the ground state of the Caesium went thirty three atom. This was the measurement that the international system of units or as I used since thin. The wording of the official definition has been updated slightly. Atomic clocks keep time with. Precision on atomic clocks, a day is exactly eighty six thousand four hundred PSI seconds. International Atomic time is a timescale that is computed by taking the weighted average of more than four hundred atomic clocks around the world. It's not connected to any astronomical observations. Universal time on the other hand is a time standard that is based on earth, rotation and astronomical observations coordinated universal time or ut is under the umbrella of universal time, which also includes ut zero ut, wine, ut, when our and ut to unlike other versions of Universal Time Utd is determined by International Atomic time. Though the practice of ut was already being coordinated internationally. The International Astronomical Union didn't adopt the name coordinated universal time until nineteen sixty seven. Coordinated. Universal time is the primary standard by which the world regulates time. But Earth's rotation as measured by UT, one is gradually slowing so that the length of a rotational day is about two milliseconds longer than the eighty six thousand four hundred seconds. It was two centuries ago. That means that there's a discrepancy between ut. See in ut wine. Scientists determined that Ut. To count for the difference between the definition of the second Earth's rotation, this keeps ut in line with the apparent position of the Sun and Stars in other words, a second would need to be added to or removed from clocks to realign them with patient occasionally. Scientists specified that you TC shows deviate more than nine tenths of a second from ut one so on June thirtieth nineteen, seventy, two. The I league second was added to ut. The international earth rotation in reference. System Service decides went at a leap. Second one is typically added either on June, thirtieth or December thirty first. From nine hundred seventy to one thousand, nine hundred nine leap seconds per at it at a rate of about one per year after that they've been added less frequently, there have been twenty-seven leap seconds since nineteen seventy two, the most recent leaf second was added on December Thirty First Twenty sixteen. Many people have called for the elimination of leaks, seconds, and the replacement of ut see with a new system leap seconds have caused problems for some computer systems since they're not that predictable can't be anticipated far in advance. And they'll need to be added more frequently as Earth's rotation continues to slow down. Some people who support abolishing leap seconds argue that it doesn't matter whether our perception of time changes along with the rotation of earth since that would happen over a long time anyway.

UT International Astronomical Uni International Atomic Caesium Official UTD
How Does Saturn Work?

BrainStuff

07:37 min | 2 years ago

How Does Saturn Work?

"The Planet Saturn takes its name from a Roman God of agriculture and of all the planets revolve around our sun. It's cultivated if you will the greatest ring system by far shining rings filled with ice dust and rock orbit its equator. The whitest one called the phoebe ring has an outer edge. That's millions of miles away from Saturn itself. For comparison the average distance between Earth and our moon is a paltry two hundred thirty nine thousand miles or three hundred eighty four thousand kilometers once again. Astronomy PUTS THE HUMAN EGO IN CHECK. Saturn's rings get all the attention but we shouldn't ignore its other attributes the sixth planet in our solar system. It's also the biggest after Jupiter. Those two are in a league of their own. If you mushed every planet from Mercury to Neptune together Saturn and Jupiter would account for over ninety percent of the cumulative mass of that planetary mass but despite its immense size Saturn is the least dense planet in the sun's orbit and the spherical to. We'll need to look at. Its physical makeup to understand why research published in two thousand nineteen showed that a day on Saturday and lasts just ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds. It's spin rate helps explain one of the ring. World's stranger qualities is he. Saturn is ten percent wider than it is tall. A difference of over seven thousand miles or nearly twelve thousand kilometers. Astronomers call that kind of disparity an equatorial bulge every planet in the solar system has one but Saturn's is the most extreme saturn rotates around its axis at a very high speed. Hence the brevity stays. And here's where density comes into play like. Jupiter Saturn is a gas giant such worlds predominantly consists of hydrogen and helium and whereas Earth is solid on. The outside gas. Giants are not they may however have hard intercourse now. Saturn is downright huge in terms of volume. Some seven hundred sixty four earth sized objects could fit inside of it and the planet is ninety five times as massive as our home world and yet relative to its size. Earth is eight times more dense. In fact water yes. Plain water is denser them Saturn although that doesn't mean the planet would float. It's not cohesive enough so thanks to its low. Low density zippy rotational. Speed Saturn's been deformed into a oblong world that looks kind of squished in profile Jupiter's southern hemisphere famously has an ongoing storm called the great. Red Spot Saturn's answer to. This is the great white spots which are periodic tempests that arise every twenty thirty Earth Years I detected in eighteen seventy six. These weather events are colossal scale ness as Cassini spacecraft spent thirteen productive years hovering around Saturn on December fifth of two thousand ten. It witnessed the most recent iteration of the great white spot phenomenon. The storm was about eight hundred miles by sixteen hundred miles long when it first began. That's about thirteen hundred twenty five hundred kilometers but over the next six months. The spot expanded Longitudinal early until it had looped itself around the planet in a gigantic circle. Some researchers think the great white spots might be part of a cycle that sees the outer layer Saturn's atmosphere slowly lose heat allowing the warm air from lower levels to burst upward. Meanwhile Saturn's North Pole. There's a cloud pattern shaped like giant hexagon. This pleasantly symmetrical jet stream spins counterclockwise measures about twenty thousand miles or thirty two thousand kilometers across and includes a hurricane. That's been swirling right over the poll ever since it was discovered back in Nineteen eighty-eight. Of course it's not the hexagon earned Saturday. A place on. Chucky festers T. shirt you know from rugrats anyway. The gas giant is most famous for the spectacular ring system encircling it a planetary rings aren't rare per se Jupiter Uranus and Neptune. Have the well yet. In terms of sheer scale network around Saturn is totally unrivaled. Most of the primary rings come with letter names. The closest one to Saturn is called the D ring which has an inner radius of about forty two thousand miles or sixty seven thousand kilometers a lot closer than our moon. It's surrounded by these C B A F G and earrings in that order by the way. The rings aren't arranged Alphabetically. Because the naming system reflects the dates of their discovery Abmc recited before the rest when measured from its outside edge. The earring showcases an impressive. Three hundred thousand mile radius or four hundred and eighty thousand kilometers. Or at least that looks impressive until you get to know the big bad fearing that. We mentioned earlier. I spotted in two thousand nine. This one was named after one of Saturn's moons untold trillions of ice rock dust particles. Make up these rings. Some bits are the size of a sugar grain. Others could probably Dwarf Your House in any case. The ring material is stretched. Remarkably thin Saturn's rings may be as thick as two miles or kilometers wide. Found just thirty two feet or ten meters wide so proportionately. The gas giants iconic rings thinner than a typical sheet of writing paper as noted by Astronomer. Phil plait whereas Saturn itself is probably around four point five billion years old. The age of its rings isn't as clear. Some scientists think that they were formed ten million to a hundred million years ago when an icy comet or some ice covered moons came too close to the planet. The visitor or visitors would have met a grisly end. Getting ripped to pieces by Saturn's gravity as those fragments collided they grew smaller and multiplied giving rise to the skinny but brilliant system. We all know today on the other. Hand a twenty. Nineteen paper argued that the rings might have originated at an earlier stage in the history of our solar system. We'll have to see how the debate unfolds as new evidence arises. There's lots about this planet that we're still learning in October of two thousand. Nineteen the international astronomical. Union heralded the discovery of twenty newfound moons orbiting the gas giant with these bodies added to the mix. There are now eighty two verified. Saturn moons altogether no other planet in the solar system has that many natural satellites not even mighty Jupiter. You can find Saturn's moons in around and beyond the ring system before Cassini was retired in two thousand seventeen it revealed that some of them gather clumps of ice and dust. From the Rings Saturn's Moon Titan is especially well-named it's our solar system second-biggest moon overall and it's dotted with seas lakes and rivers of liquid methane and pain. There's only one other body within the Sun's orbit that has standing pools of liquid that we know about. And here's a hint. You're sitting on it right now. Tighten is also noteworthy for having an atmosphere and it's theorized that there could be ice volcanoes that spew water instead of lava like Earth Saturn gets auroras at its poles. They're invisible to the unaided human eye. But the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope have captured footage of them using infrared and ultraviolet

Astronomy Giants Cassini Phil Plait Chucky Festers Hubble Space Telescope North Pole Union Abmc
"international astronomical union" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on WTOP

"That ice is running searches on millions of driver's license photos without first getting permission from Maryland or court this is access far beyond what other states allow immigration activists say they're alarmed especially because Maryland allows special licenses for undocumented immigrants those activists say this amounts to hunting down the most vulnerable people ice says it will not discuss specific actions how many moons circling the earth international right measuring six to eleven feet across a strong numbers in Arizona spotted the asteroid earlier this month it's dubbed twenty twenty CD three apparently began its orbit around the earth three years ago but it's not here to stay the international astronomical union says it appears the asteroid is only temporarily bound to earth related story from the skies is a huge celestial explosion on the way a local expert is on a team that's tracking this messages is that red supergiants and this means that this star will soon or later explodes into a supernova the store is part of the constellation of Orion joy row is a research assistant professor of physics at Catholic University does not comment terror of eve what is a matter of when some thought that explosion would happen sooner rather than later because the star just underwent a historic dimming and now is step by step increasing is Brighton is the game that could mean a dust cloud is to blame and not an imminent explosion John Aaron WTOP news still ahead on WTO Pete was the second rockets democratic debate in a role what were the ratings from South Carolina we'll tell you coming up preparing for disaster requires knowledge and action here's Chris Reynolds dean and vice president of academic outreach and program development at American military university discussing cutting edge programs I think that it's important to remember that one is only as good as one's experience in one's education particularly on field such as diverse as emergency disaster management one of the things that separates American military university in our emergency management program is that we have what we call faculty practitioners and a factly practitioners essentially an individual who's got the boots on the ground experience who's managed to go on to get the education whether it be at the bachelor the master's and doctoral level because they have all of those they go all the way to that end they bring.

Maryland Arizona international astronomical uni research assistant professor Catholic University Brighton South Carolina Chris Reynolds vice president American military university John Aaron WTOP WTO rockets
Astronomers have discovered Earth has new 'mini-moon' in its orbit

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Astronomers have discovered Earth has new 'mini-moon' in its orbit

"A mini moon is circling the earth and of course it's not really a moon but it is an asteroid measuring six to eleven feet across astronomers in Arizona spotted it earlier this month and called it twenty twenty C. D. three apparently it started its orbit around earth about three years ago but it is not staying it's just on vacation the international astronomical union says it looks like the asteroid is only temporarily bound

Arizona
"international astronomical union" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on WTOP

"End of an era with eight thousand series trains the next ones set to come online starting in about four or five years yeah it's a constant cycle a green belt warily art mixed with the beat your opinions four thirty six would you believe that a mini moon is circling the earth it's actually an asteroid measuring six to eleven feet across astronomers in Arizona spotted it a little earlier this month it's being called twenty twenty C. D. three the asteroid apparently began its orbit around earth about three years ago but it is not here to stay the international astronomical union says it looks like the object is only temporarily bound to earth another story from the heavens is a huge celestial explosion on the way one local expertise on the team the tracking that possibility because it is is a red supergiants and this means that this star will soon or later explodes into a supernova the store is part of the cons relational Ryan joy row is a research assistant professor of physics at Catholic University does not comment terror of eve what is the matter of one some thought that explosion would happen sooner rather than later because the star just underwent a historic dimming and now is step by step increasing is Brighton is the game that could mean a dust cloud is to blame and not an imminent explosion John Aaron WTOP news keep it here after traffic and weather what the pope wants Catholics to give up for lent but you do want to hear the forecast we could have severe storms tonight four thirty seven in life there are talkers and there are doers sometimes it's not hard to tell the difference Mike Bloomberg has spent his life getting things done starting this.

Arizona international astronomical uni research assistant professor Catholic University Brighton Mike Bloomberg John Aaron WTOP
Rolling Stones Rock

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Rolling Stones Rock

"Four decades the music of the rolling stones had global reach here on earth. Now the band's influence extends all the way to Mars. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. NASA team has named Iraq on Mars Mars for music legend. The rolling stones a little larger than a golf ball. The Rock apparently rolled about three feet propelled by thrusters as insight touched down on Mars. The insight landers primary mission is to study the Red Planet's Interior but images of the surface taken the day after landing show where the rock rolled with the rolling stones about to perform nearby it made perfect sense for the JPL L. Team to name the Rock. The Rolling Stone Rock Robert Downey junior made the announcement at Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium just before the ban took took stage official names for objects throughout the solar system can only be designated by the International Astronomical Union however the informal informal nickname will appear on Nasr's working maps of Mars giving rock scientists rock musicians and rock bands something to celebrate great for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Rose Bowl Stadium National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Robert Downey Jpl L. Team Landers International Astronomical Uni Golf Pasadena Nasr Official Four Decades Three Feet
"international astronomical union" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:42 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One here ignition. The rocket in question was space. X's falcon nine rocket and the sixty satellites carried into low earth orbit are the first of more than twelve thousand that Elon Musk and his team looking to launch over the next five years with the aim of bringing high speed internet connectivity to some of the most remote corners of the globe. But at what cost, well, according to a number of the world's top astronomers, the world of science could be at risk from the sheer number of satellites that might soon be in orbit among those concerned are the international astronomical union, the American astronomical society and Britain's Royal astronomical society, the RS. Well, Dr Sheila Kanani from the RS joins me now. And welcome Dr Kanani nutshell. What's your with having more satellites in space? Well, good morning. It's I mean it's a very exciting technology demonstration and I do appreciate the. The fact that Elon Musk and others trying to widen in the globe by making internet Mobike available. However, even with just the sixty that he put into space recently, we could see them from from ground based observatories and also with the naked eye. Now imagine twelve thousand of those two thousand kilometer high. All they could really disrupt our pleasure viewing viewing the night sky they clot. So contaminate radio oxidation 's that could be collisions with space based observatories, and it's really difficult thing because obviously, I'll just faces increasing the available, but that needs to be some sort of a dialogue between astronomers between space industries between all the commercial organizations to make sure that space is still accessible to everybody is the nobody policing space at the moment. There have been a variety of sort of ways of policing space in the past, but I think everything is changing. Now, the kind of playing field has changed with these commercial organizations starting to do things and the issue is old is Asians likes face, lake, for example, is that they haven't read consulted with the astronomy astronomical society's at organizations on the earth and illness has said the having put the sixty testers into space. He will now, sort of think about talking to these in the American action on site in the six track. And we welcome those dialogues. It's just difficult. When things are already happening before thinking about the repercussions vision. Assume that everyone knows who Elon Musk is, is the American Californian entrepreneur, that has a big business stake, potentially in the future in space? His organization is space, x is it particularly bad is the worst defense. Under. I don't think so. I think there are other commercial organizations out that planning to do very similar things. I think he's just more media savvy, and he's done a few more kind of out projects, for example, sending his tests, Nicole into space. And you know, things that catch the catch the of the of the public little bit more doing, you could be just trying to hold back. The irreversible. You know, we tried to keep the sky's dark or some people did. But there's an awful lot of light pollution that's going to be hard to turn back. You know, people said there were too many cars on the roads. But, you know, it didn't stop the roads filling up even more and more roads being built, this just progress is progress, but they're still needs to be a dialogue, and they're still needs to be some kind of collaboration and compromise between all the different organizations to make the world, a better place in terms of technology for also still have that viewing pleasure. You've got quite strong views on this haven't you. I asia. I'm sorry. I'm just talking to our guest in the studio. Do. Stay with us though. Don't to canonic as we come back to you. I would say that. The commercial aspect of it. There are there are about. I mean, the data that I looked in there were about five thousand of Jackson space, outfit majority are controlled by commercial corporate of entities. Now, the point is that, you know, can the world not cooperate on technology in building knowledge. I mean, I appreciate the concern there of and dominating. I mean why carry on this raise maybe every country should get a quota of the number of satellites? They're allowed to launch into space in what you think. It seems to me the what you need is some kind of regulatory body to the looks at what private enterprise is doing and vans that against the needs of your the, the white a universe. If you like I mean, this is called a maker constellation. Ordinary people, which I think you'll making a stand for onto Sheila Kanani you're, you're, you're saying you want to preserve view of space for people on earth, generally. Yeah. Preserved the view on the enjoyment. Also, it's about the ground-based observe at trees on contamination that round based, astronomers will get from these satellites as well. Would you be would you like to be part of the policing effort? If one were set. I that's not really my failed to the oldest is not where things are interesting for me, but I do appreciate the need for better policing and because things are changing. We just need different systems. It's not that dissimilar, by the way. Thank you very much. Dr Sheila Kanani from the Royal astronomical society. I Asia it's not that dissimilar as I think you might have mentioned to the arms races. You know, everyone wants to be part of the big voice club. Here's a do one. Fortunately, but space think that, that kind that level of contamination should be avoided. I mean, I was just reminded off this conversation's reminded of this conversation with started off somewhere in the eighties about Star Wars. America Diller those times of Ron Reagan this conversation comes back and forth. Big countries wanting to dominate space and use it for military purposes. I mean, ultimately, that's what will boil down to you dominate and there will be this competition. It will start this is the BBC World Service..

Dr Sheila Kanani Elon Musk Royal astronomical society Dr Kanani international astronomical uni astronomy astronomical society American astronomical society BBC World Service Britain Ron Reagan America Jackson Nicole two thousand kilometer five years
"international astronomical union" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"So SpaceX has launched sixty communication, satellite so far. And these communications satellites, startling basically super high speed internet. Via satellite and strana members aren't really happy with what speaks us SpaceX has done so far because they can see Starling satellites when they look up in the sky with their naked, is my, what am I friends actually saw them he was in? I think was in Maine. Some somewhere on the east coast. Can remember he was traveling but he looked up in the sky. And he, he didn't realize that it was star lake satellites. He was like, what the heck is at thing. What are all these UFO's in their all in a lion? You know, they look like a caravan of satellites. So if a normal person can see them, not really caring about the nice guy, you know, like you just kinda glanced up, and he saw them had explained to him, you know, like hey Starlink is up there. Now, these astronomers they're very worried that their views of the nice guy are going to be clear anymore, especially if SpaceX gets their twelve thousand. Starlink said lights up there. So the international astronomical union, which is a key ruling body. When it comes to the night sky, they've actually released a statement that basically said, I'm gonna break this down for is easiest possible. Basically, we can't see the things that we want to see because they're satellites in our way. There needs to be regulations around the said lights, so astronomers can continue to do their jobs because they don't want to be interrupted by satellites. Basically, if you're looking at an object deep sky object deep space object in the night sky, and you're photographing at you're taking measurements of it in a budget said, lights fling by that are visible, you can't do your work, and it's just it's not cool. I mean, it's cool to see satellites, right? It's cool to look up. And he c satellites flying by. That's neat. But astronomy is super important. So these people at the international astronomical union put out a press release and said we don't like it. Let's figure out a way to manage all of these satellites that'll be coming because there's not just a Starlink. Right. There's other companies out there that want to do this, too, and they see a prophet in the future. And there has to be regulations, international regulations that stop or, you know, figure out a way to mitigate the damage that these satellites are doing to the nice guy, and it's not only visible these said, lights use radio frequencies to transmit data back and forth, from the satellites to the ground. And also, there's radio astronomy, which could possibly use the same frequencies as these satellites. So they're really worried about that as well. And these said lights could interfere with something like we just got an image of the. First black hole. Right. The first image of the black hole, and that might not have been possible, if there were internet constellation of satellites up there, so. That's what they're really worried about. They're worried about not being up to discover new things because they're going to be interrupted by radio signals and also visually in the

SpaceX Truman international astronomical uni Starlink Maine Starling willa Walden thirty percent
Starlink Upsets Astronomers

SPACE NEWS POD

03:36 min | 3 years ago

Starlink Upsets Astronomers

"So SpaceX has launched sixty communication, satellite so far. And these communications satellites, startling basically super high speed internet. Via satellite and strana members aren't really happy with what speaks us SpaceX has done so far because they can see Starling satellites when they look up in the sky with their naked, is my, what am I friends actually saw them he was in? I think was in Maine. Some somewhere on the east coast. Can remember he was traveling but he looked up in the sky. And he, he didn't realize that it was star lake satellites. He was like, what the heck is at thing. What are all these UFO's in their all in a lion? You know, they look like a caravan of satellites. So if a normal person can see them, not really caring about the nice guy, you know, like you just kinda glanced up, and he saw them had explained to him, you know, like hey Starlink is up there. Now, these astronomers they're very worried that their views of the nice guy are going to be clear anymore, especially if SpaceX gets their twelve thousand. Starlink said lights up there. So the international astronomical union, which is a key ruling body. When it comes to the night sky, they've actually released a statement that basically said, I'm gonna break this down for is easiest possible. Basically, we can't see the things that we want to see because they're satellites in our way. There needs to be regulations around the said lights, so astronomers can continue to do their jobs because they don't want to be interrupted by satellites. Basically, if you're looking at an object deep sky object deep space object in the night sky, and you're photographing at you're taking measurements of it in a budget said, lights fling by that are visible, you can't do your work, and it's just it's not cool. I mean, it's cool to see satellites, right? It's cool to look up. And he c satellites flying by. That's neat. But astronomy is super important. So these people at the international astronomical union put out a press release and said we don't like it. Let's figure out a way to manage all of these satellites that'll be coming because there's not just a Starlink. Right. There's other companies out there that want to do this, too, and they see a prophet in the future. And there has to be regulations, international regulations that stop or, you know, figure out a way to mitigate the damage that these satellites are doing to the nice guy, and it's not only visible these said, lights use radio frequencies to transmit data back and forth, from the satellites to the ground. And also, there's radio astronomy, which could possibly use the same frequencies as these satellites. So they're really worried about that as well. And these said lights could interfere with something like we just got an image of the. First black hole. Right. The first image of the black hole, and that might not have been possible, if there were internet constellation of satellites up there, so. That's what they're really worried about. They're worried about not being up to discover new things because they're going to be interrupted by radio signals and also visually in the

Spacex International Astronomical Uni Starlink Maine Starling
"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The clients password in from North Carolina, Broward County, judge keeping bond at one hundred and two thousand dollars for former school safety? Officer, Scott Peterson charged for failing to confront the gunman in the parkland shooting in court this morning. The judge also denied emotion from the defense, which would have allowed Scott Peterson to return to his home in North Carolina to get his passport as a condition of his release Elon Musk is getting a thumbs down from scientists? Thousands of astronomers condemning SpaceX founder Elon Musk plan to put thousands of satellites into orbit to provide high speed internet access for people in remote areas of the world, the more than thirteen thousand members of the international astronomical union say the network known as Starling will lead to light pollution. They can also disrupt large ground based astronomical telescopes a network of sixty communications satellites went into orbit last month there, the first of a plan to Ray of twelve thousand satellites, Lisa Carter NBC News Radio. The United States in the United Kingdom will be two of the country signing the d day proclamation to commemorate, the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day. Landings. Theresa May will host fifteen world leaders figures from every country that fought alongside the UK to honor the largest combined land air, and naval operation in history today, those countries have agreed to make a joint statement, pledging to ensure that the unimaginable horror of World War, Two is not repeated the d day proclamation, including signatures by the UK, and US commit to working together to resolve international tensions peacefully, assigning happens despite ties between the US and traditional European allies having become strained under President Trump, Mike Bauer NBC News Radio. The former British spy who compiled a dossier that claim Donald Trump had ties to Russia will be questioned by investigators Christopher. Steele is planning to meet with us officials in London in the coming weeks. The interview is expected to cover steals relationship with the FBI the NBA finals resumed tonight as the Toronto Raptors visit the Golden State Warriors in game three the best of seven series is tied at one each after the warriors earned a road win in game two on Sunday. Your next update at two thirty. I'm Karen her to stay. Connective news, anytime at eight fifty W T, L dot com. Joyce here, forgotten world of south Florida. You know, it's family owned and operated in that makes a big difference. It's a state.

Elon Musk Scott Peterson North Carolina President Trump United States Russia Golden State Warriors UK international astronomical uni NBC SpaceX Broward County Officer Karen Lisa Carter Joyce Ray London
"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Bond at one hundred two thousand dollars for former school safety officer, Scott Peterson charged for failing to confront the gunman in the parkland shooting in court this morning. The judge also denied emotion from the defense, which would have allowed Scott Peterson to return to his home in North Carolina to get his passport as a condition of his release Elon Musk is getting a thumbs down from scientists thousands of trainers condemning SpaceX Pounder along must plan to put thousands of satellites into orbit to provide high speed internet access for people in remote areas of the world, the more than thirteen thousand members of the international astronomical union say the network known as Starling will lead to light pollution. They say can also disrupt large ground based astronomical telescopes a network of sixty communications satellites went into orbit last month there, the first of a plan to Ray of twelve thousand satellites, Lisa Carter, NBC News Radio, the United States in the United Kingdom will be two of the country signing. D day proclamation to commemorate, the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day. Landings Theresa May will host fifteen world leaders figures from every country that fought alongside the UK to honor the largest combined land air, naval operation in history today, those countries have agreed to make joint statement, pledging to ensure that the unimaginable horror of World War, Two is not repeated the d day proclamation, including signatures by the UK, and US commit to working together to resolve international tensions. Peacefully, assigning happens despite ties between the US and its traditional European allies having become strained under President Trump, Mike Bauer NBC News Radio. The former British spy who compiled a dossier that claimed Donald Trump had ties to Russia will be questioned by investigators Christopher Steele is planning to meet with us officials in London in the coming weeks. The interview is expected to cover steals relationship with the FBI the NBA finals resumed tonight as the Toronto Raptors visit the Golden State Warriors in game three the best of seven series is tied at one each after. The warriors earned a road win in game two on Sunday. Next update the half hour. I'm Karen her to stay connected news, anytime at eight fifty W. F T, L dot com. Onto.

Scott Peterson President Trump Golden State Warriors United States Elon Musk international astronomical uni UK NBC officer North Carolina Russia Karen Pounder Starling Lisa Carter Toronto Raptors Mike Bauer
"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"O'clock update. I'm Karen Curtis. Former BSO deputy Scott Peterson appearing in court this morning for his first appearance after being arrested yesterday on seven counts of neglect of a child. Three counts of culpable negligence and one count of perjury. His attorneys told the judge that he would like to bond out, but one of the conditions is that he surrender his passport was conditions Abbad is that my client turn in his passport on the client resides North Carolina as result his passport is North Carolina. So Peterson will remain in custody until his passport is surrendered. His attorneys issuing a statement saying no police officer has ever been prosecuted for their actions in an active shooter incident United States, the United Kingdom will be two of the country signing the d day proclamation to commemorate, the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day. Landings Theresa May will host fifteen world leaders figures from every country that fought alongside the UK to honor the largest combined land air, and naval operation in history today, those countries have agreed to make joint statement, pledging to ensure that the unimaginable horror of World War, Two is not repeated the d day proclamation, including signatures by the UK and US commit to working together to resolve international. Tensions peacefully signing happens despite ties between the US and its traditional European allies having become strained under President Trump Mike Bauer. NBC News Radio taxes. Couple is dead after contracting a mysterious illness in Fiji. Michelle and David Paul died last month after becoming severely ill while vacationing. Here's Michelle's dad. Nobody even out of his nobody's me with plus the cost of the death, and that's very hard for me. The World Health Organization is investigating. Stocks are rising for a second straight day on Wall Street. Investors are keeping an eye out for the news from the Federal Reserve related to interest rates at the opening bell. The Dow Jones industrial average was up more than one hundred points officer, Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD cop accused of using chokehold on, Eric garner, will decide today, whether he'll take the stand in his disciplinary trial, Ponta Leo's lawyer plans to call two witnesses to testify in the officers defense today. One is a city medical examiner from Saint Louis who will argue that the show called had nothing to do with Eric Garner's death. The defense will also bring Ponta Leo's teacher from the police academy Ponta, Leo himself has never detailed in public. What took place that day back in twenty fourteen. No one Lleyton NBC News Radio, New York and thousands of. Sean, are condemning SpaceX founder Elon Musk's plan, but thousands of satellites into orbit to provide high speed internet access for people in remote areas on earth. The more than thirteen thousand members of the international astronomical union say the network known as Starlink will lead to light pollution. They say that it can also disrupt large ground based astronomical telescopes, a network of sixty communication satellites went into orbit last month to the first of a plan to Ray of twelve thousand satellites next update at ten thirty. I'm Karen Curtis. Stay connected news, anytime. Eight fifty wwl dot com..

Ponta Leo North Carolina Karen Curtis Scott Peterson Eric garner NBC Michelle United States officer perjury President Trump Mike Bauer World Health Organization international astronomical uni Federal Reserve Elon Musk UK Fiji Ray NYPD
International Astronomical Union, Elon Musk And Starlink discussed on Steve Cochran

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

International Astronomical Union, Elon Musk And Starlink discussed on Steve Cochran

"Thousands of astronomers are condemning SpaceX founder, Elon Musk's plan to put thousands of satellites into orbit to provide high speed internet access for people in remote areas on earth. More than thirteen thousand members of the international astronomical union say the network known as Starlink will lead to light pollution. They say it can also disrupt large ground based astronomical telescopes network of sixty communications satellites, went into orbit last month that the first of a plan to Ray of twelve thousand

International Astronomical Uni Elon Musk Starlink Founder RAY
Black hole's name a little fuzzy

AP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Black hole's name a little fuzzy

"Maneuver pictured supermassive black hole doesn't have an official name yet. And what happened? Next could because Mickley confusing. The team of astronomers who created the image of the black hole called MED seven. But the international group in charge of handing out astronaut names has never named a black hole, the international astronomical union usually takes care of names. But only for stuff inside our solar system and stars outside. It the last time there was a similar situation. Poor Pluto somehow got demoted to a dwarf planet leading to public

Mickley Official
A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

Astronomy Cast

05:39 min | 3 years ago

A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

"This sort of strong Makassar is sponsored by Magellan TV dot com. Check out this new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast now, this isn't a normal part of the ad, but I have to say the landing paid. They made for strong me. Cast is amazing. Once you get to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast, you can dive into a collection of documentary movies series and exclusive playlists designed by documentary filmmakers, this growing platform is adding new content weekly, and is already home to a who's who of the best productions from the overview of fact to the NSF funded seeing the beginning of time. There is an amazing selection of space astronomy related content watching four K from Roucou or on your computer or stream on. Any I o s or Android device? I lost track of a bunch of hours on Saturday afternoon diving through history, and you can explore the solar system traveled to distant stars and experienced the universe. Like never before. Once again, you can check out. This new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast. Hi, everyone producer Susie here. We apologize for the lower quality audio this week, Pamela, experienced power outage that affected the saved audio files. So this show is being created from the audio from our YouTube street. Trying to cast episode five twenty five one hundred years international astronomically. Caster weekly facts based journey the cosmos help you understand not only what we know how we know what we know I presume came publisher of university with me as always Dr Pamela, gays senior scientists for the planetary scientists end the director Cozma quest penalty doing I'm doing. Well. How are you? I am doing. Well, also, did you survive all the excitement yesterday? It was a great day for people who are not don't know. We're talking about literally everything happened yesterday. Rockets. Relaunched lunar orbits were arrived at. Asteroid was hit tank weapon, which was great. What a great use for anti tank weaponry. Take more of that plea. Yeah. Exactly. So. Solar system more of that coming. So you just stay in line. So yeah, no. It was a great day. And and now other stuff too. I just saw that the put down a date for the Knicks falcon heavy launched. It's going to be soon like within the week. So it's gonna be it's gonna be a crazy week. Actually. I'm utterly overwhelmed. Right now, people may have noticed haven't got simply newsletter out yet because I just have so busy. But it's it's it's almost ready. It'll go another like couple of hours. I was at my keyboard for sixteen hours yesterday as annuals that I took turns live streaming all of the events line on twins Catholic. Absolutely amazing, and I I have to brag a little bit. So I love so much working once again, a like rock solid. We do science organization. I I haven't done that since I worked at Harvard. I've been at places that focused and communications education and undergraduate education, and I'm back. And so there was a quiet little does anyone know how to do this thing and stuff at the command line to fix the formatting of a whole bunch of files. And I was like, yeah. You just need to write software to footy foodie FU and the person who was working on high a booster, and they needed to convert a whole bunch of files was like help. And so last night in real time while everything was happening. I got to help by just reading a stupid little snippet of of code, but people at high. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. To make a science people. I got to make us lions. So so you saying like, thanks to the planetary sciences toot for giving you a home that you get to do science on on an occasional basis. Yeah. That's amazing. And more to the point. I get to science with a whole bunch of other people instead of being like the person over here making science while everyone else is doing other things it was it's awesome. Here we go even though they might be scattered around our planet. Astronomers have a way to come together to work the issues that face their entire field of study, it's called the international astronomical union. And they're the ones who work out the new names for stars. And sometimes depleted beloved Kuyper built objects. Oh, man, people have that love hate blade ship with the I eight you which is the international stra nominal union.

Magellan Dr Pamela Makassar International Astronomical Uni Roucou Rockets NSF Knicks Harvard Kuyper Producer Susie Publisher Director Five Twenty Five One Hundred Y Sixteen Hours
"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

"The academy of Motion Picture Arts and scientists announces the winners of the first Academy Awards, it was a far cry from the suspense glamour and endless press coverage surrounding the Oscars today, the first ward recipients names were printed on the back page of the academy's newsletter. A few days later variety publicity information on page seven this week in one thousand nine hundred thirty Pluto, the ninth planet in our solar system is discovered at the Lowell observatory in flagstaff. Arizona by astronomer cliff w Tomba the existence of an unknown ninth planet was first proposed by Percival Lowell who theorized that wobbles in the orbits of Uranus Neptune were caused by the gravitational pull of an unknown planetary body in August two thousand six however, the international astronomical union announced a Pluto would no longer be considered a planet due to new rules. That said planets must clear the neighborhood around its orbit since Pluto's oblong orbit overlaps that of Neptune. It was disqualified sock. Sorry, Pluto this week in nineteen Eighty-six plans for the channel were announced attempts to dig a channel tunnel between Britain and France dated back to eighteen eighty three and Polian. Even drew blueprints for a tunnel in eighteen o two yet. Not until this week in nineteen Ninety-six where France and Britain able to announce that a tunnel would soon. Become a reality trains cars and buses would be able to speak through the tunnel and less than a half an hour construction began in December of nineteen eighty-seven and the channel was finally completed in nineteen ninety four and this week in two thousand ten professional golfer. Tiger Woods holds a televised news conference where he apologizes for his marital infidelities foolish behavior. It was a close conference with no questions and was the first time. He had spoken about the incident outside his home on November twenty seven th two thousand nine that's your look back at this week in history..

Tiger Woods Lowell observatory Academy Awards France Percival Lowell Britain Motion Picture Arts flagstaff international astronomical uni Arizona Polian
"international astronomical union" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Arizona by astronomer cliff w Tomba the existence of an unknown ninth planet was first proposed by Percival Lowell who theorized that wobbles in the orbits of Uranus and Neptune were caused by the gravitational pull of an unknown planetary body in August two thousand six however, the international astronomical union announced the poodle would no longer be considered a planet due to new rules. That said planets must clear the neighborhood around its orbit since Pluto's oblong Corbett overlaps that of Neptune. It was disqualified. Sorry, Pluto this week in nineteen hundred. Six plans for the channel were announced attempts to dig a channel tunnel between Britain and France dated back to eighteen eighty three and Polian. Even drew blueprints for a tunnel in eighteen o to get not until this week in nineteen six where France and Britain able to announce that a tunnel would soon become a reality trains cars and buses would be able to speed through the tunnel and less than a half an hour construction began in December of nineteen eighty-seven. And the channel was finally completed in nineteen Ninety-four and this week in two thousand ten professional golfer. Tiger Woods holds a televised news conference where he apologizes for his marital infidelities foolish behavior. It was a closed conference with no questions and was the first time. He had spoken about the incident outside his home on November twenty seven th two thousand nine that's your look back at this week in history. This week's top TV streams, here's what you've been watching on TV this week. We start off with the USA drama suits and the peas in a pod episode isn't number five MTV's the challenge of world's takes a fourth-place this week with the episode hellraiser.

Tiger Woods France Percival Lowell Britain international astronomical uni Arizona MTV USA Polian
"international astronomical union" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:48 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Coast to coast. We are with the physicist and astronomer David Weintraub, and we are talking about life on Mars and other things going on in the universe. How much water David might be on Mars? Plenty of water from our perspective of wanting water to drink and use for human purposes Mars does not have nearly as much water as the earth has and Mars has lost. Probably eighty five percent of the water at once had. When Mars was young several billion years ago, it probably had enough water to make the equivalent of an ocean covering. A third of the surface of Mars to a depth of two thirds of a mile. That's a lot of water. But most of that water is gone. What water is left now is frozen in the ice caps or locked into reservoirs below the surface? And what's the significance of being able to take that water out of the planet or the or to use it? If humans want to survive on Mars, we need water. Yeah. We do. And we can't bring the water we need with us unless we're only going to be there for a few days. If we want to actually live on Mars. We need the water we need to find enough water to allow us to grow crops to drink and bays and cook that's a good bit of water. There is that there is enough water for at least a a long time for a lot of people on Mars, but the water is not currently easily accessible. You know, the best chance of getting the Mars, of course, if we're going to send astronauts would be when the planet is closer to the earth. Will we ever get a better propulsion system to be able to get there in know instant time almost ever is a really long time, George. Yeah. So if we go back in human history two hundred years, we were riding horses, we had invented trains, and if we go back a hundred years, we just invented the car in the airplane the speed at which we travel now is so much faster than what we were able to do one hundred years ago or two hundred years ago, even rockets are faster. So I wouldn't even try to speculate as to how fast Iraq rocket might be able to go in a hundred years. Let alone a thousand years or ten thousand years, but in the foreseeable future for you and me and in my lifetime. In the rocket jot gonna get much faster so for the foreseeable future. It's still gonna take six to eight months to get to Mars and the closest Mars gets to us about thirty four million miles or something like that. Yeah. Okay. And and then off it goes and drifts. Well, that's fantastic work. It really is could there be life on other systems in our solar system moons of Jupiter, for example, Europa anything like that? There certainly could be there are two other places in the solar system that planetary. Scientists are especially interested in one is the one you mentioned Europa, which is a moon of Jupiter. The other is called Enceladus, which is a moon as Saturn and both of those moons. Have the same internal structure in which their surfaces are covered with water ice frozen water. But if you go beneath the surface eventually that ice gets warmer and warmer. And warmer until it becomes liquid water. So both of those moons. We think have globally encircling liquid water oceans, but those oceans are below the surface there ten to one hundred miles below the surface. But those are still large oceans, so you have a subsurface world of liquid water, which has heat, and it has all the minerals that you would possibly need in order to allow life to exist. So those are places where if you could inject certain kinds of. Rife from the earth into those environments. They probably could survive so places on earth where we have life at the deep sea vents, for example, or in many places a mile beneath the surface of the earth in Iraq, where we have life that does not depend on sunlight again as we mentioned before DNA based life, but it does not depend on sunlight gets its energy from inside the earth. And it finds enough water to survive. And in these moons Europa and Enceladus again, they've got the water. They've got the energy source. They've got heat. They've got the right minerals. Life could exist in us places. What are excellent planets Exo planet is a term used for a planet that is in orbit around another star an actual planet is simply a planet, but it's a planet. That's not worth it in the sun. It's a planet orbiting and other star simple as that. That's yeah. That's as simple as it gets planet is a term, which we struggle with and have struggled with for a long time. The controversy of ACLU is a good example of that. So the term Exo planet was coined to effectively avoid that problem because when Pluto was the subject of so much controversy twelve fifteen years ago. A definition was put forward by an organization called the international astronomical union to try to define what a planet is. And we could talk on night about that. I think it's a pretty flawed definition. But that definition actually says that the planet has to orbit the sun, which is from my perspective stupid because planet or other stars touch. Right. But if we follow that definition, then a planet orbiting and other star is not a planet. It's gotta have another name. So the term excellent. Do you think that there are these actual planets around every star? Not around every star. But probably around most stars. Some stars are very very different from the sign. They're much much bigger much much hotter. They might be the environment around those stars might be pretty harsh for allowing a planet to form. But there aren't very many of those planets MO the stars. Most stars are more like the sun or smaller than the sun. And almost certainly almost all of those stars have planets and has several plants if you have a planet that is relatively close to its star like earth or Mars is to our sun. What are the possibilities that that planet will have an atmosphere will have water, and we'll have every everything that is needed for some kind of life. If you'd asked me that question twenty years ago early in my career, I would have told you what? Virtually every other planetary scientist restraint number would have told you and that is planets at about the same distance as earth or Mars or Venus or mercury from the sun would be pretty similar objects and probably would have good chances of having atmospheres good chances of having liquid water on their surfaces. What we've learned however about planets around other stars has completely changed. What we think what we found is that many of the planets that are close to the stars are like Jupiter like your Nisar Neptune. They are giant planets. They're not Earthlife planet. We've also found some planets that are so close to their stars that they orbit in just a few days or even a few hours and those planets would be so incredibly hot they couldn't have atmospheres. So I think what we now know is that everything is possible. We don't know what is most common. But we know that. Given enough time we will find stars with hot giant planets close to the stars and small icy planets close to the stars every possibilities out there. But there's certainly lots of planetary systems where we would find planet similar to earth in the sense that they would be small. They would have solid surfaces. They almost certainly could have water on their surfaces and have atmospheres. There are many people with very strong religious overtones David who would say that. We are the only living beans in the universe. We are. If they'll cite the bible and everything else. I'm not here to knock religion, you aren't either. No, I'm not there are certainly those views, but I think they're actually much less prevalent. Then. I thought they were I did a lot of research into this change in years and. There are certain religions which have that point of view. But most of them don't David Weintrob is book life on Mars what to know before we go one day, we will go. So in your opinion. You know, we look at the Drake equation. For example, were they predict there could be you know, millions of civilizations out there. What do you think? I'm a bit of a skeptic. I think more skeptical than most of my professional colleagues. I think it's quite likely that life is out there. But I think advanced life is probably much much harder than simply finding life. You're not real excited by the bacteria that could. Whereas I am. I think the bacteria that could accept on Mars is probably a much more common form of life. If anything is out there, then klingons and walkies and more advanced forms of life. I think if we look at the history of life on earth, which is not a great thing to do because it's one example of life on the planet. We don't have anything to compare the earth too. But as best as we understand life on the earth. Life got started on the earth, very quickly the earth formed four and a half billion years ago. And I know as an astronomer, I tend to talk and billions of years and thinks that that's common and make sense, but that's a long time ago and your listeners, so we'll have a hard time thinking in terms of billions of years, but the earth formed four and a half billion years ago and by three and a half billion years ago, the earth had very primitive life on bacteria algae, but it took another two billion years before that life. Became multicellular. It took another three billion years before plants appeared on the rocks on the surface of the earth. It took four and a half billion years before intelligent life before we appeared on the surface of the earth. So I think getting life started on a planet using the earth as an example suggests that it's not that hard to get started. But again using life on earth as an example, having life evolve to the point at which is intelligent, and it can build computers and rockets and travels through interstellar space that looks like it's pretty hard. But he can't be that unusual. Unless there's another factor here that we haven't looked at. And that is whether we were seated by some extraterrestrial race, or whether that divine, creator got things going, well, it really just could be that hard. If it's the randomness of different processes, and again, we don't understand we don't even know why we're here, we're how life evolved. But the one example, we have suggests that getting life to the point at which it's intelligent is a very very long process and some stars don't live that long. So the planets around those stars wouldn't have enough time for life to become that advanced. I certainly don't know. We're just speculating and his fire speculate. But..

Mars Iraq David David Weintraub physicist ACLU international astronomical uni Nisar Neptune George David Weintrob scientist billion years two hundred years hundred years twelve fifteen years eighty five percent three billion years ten thousand years
"international astronomical union" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:44 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast. We are with the physicist and astronomer David Weintraub, and we are talking about life on Mars and other things going on in the universe. How much water David might be on Mars? Plenty of water from our perspective of wanting water to drink and use for human purposes Mars is not has nearly as much water as the earth has and Mars has lost. Probably eighty five percent of the water at once had. Wennemars was young several billion years ago. It probably had enough water to make the equivalent of an ocean covering. A third of the surface of Mars to a depth of two thirds of a mile. That's a lot of water. But most of that water is gone. What water is left now is frozen in the ice caps or locked into reservoirs below the surface? And what's the significance of being able to take that water off of the planet or the order use it? If humans want to survive on Mars, we need water. Yeah. We do. And we can't bring the water we need with us unless we're only going to be there for a few days. If we want to actually live on Mars. We need the water we need to find enough water to allow us to grow crops to drink and bathe and cook that's a good bit of water. There is that there is enough water for at least a a long time for a lot of people on Mars, but the water is not currently easily accessible. You know, the best chance of getting the Mars, of course, if we're going to send astronauts would be when the planet is closer to the earth. Will we ever get a better propulsion system to be able to get there in, you know, instant time almost? Ever is a really long time, George. Yeah. So if we go back in human history two hundred years we were riding horses. We had just invented trains, and if we go back a hundred years, we just invented the car in the airplane the speed at which we travel now is so much faster than what we're able to do one hundred years ago or two hundred years ago, even rockets are faster. So I wouldn't even try to speculate as to how fast Iraq, it might be able to go in a hundred years, let alone a thousand years or ten thousand years, but in the foreseeable future for you and me and in my lifetime. The rockets aren't going to get much faster. So for the foreseeable future. It's still gonna take six to eight months to get to Mars and the closest March gets to us about thirty four million miles or something like that. Yeah. Okay. And and then off it goes and drifts. Well, that's fantastic work. It really is could there be life on other systems in our solar system moons of Jupiter, for example, Europa? Anything like that? There certainly could be there are two other places in the solar system that planetary. Scientists are especially interested in one is the one you mentioned you rope. Oh, which is a moon of Jupiter. The other is called Enceladus which is a moon of Saturn and both of those moons. Have the same internal structure in which their surfaces are covered with water ice frozen water. But if you go beneath the surface eventually that ice gets warmer and warmer and warmer until it becomes liquid water. So both of those moons. We think have globally encircling liquid water oceans, but those oceans are below the surface there tend to a hundred miles below the surface. But those are still large oceans so you have a subsurface world of liquid water which has heat. And it has all the minerals that you would possibly need in order to allow life to exist. So those are places where if you could inject certain kinds of. Rife from the earth into those environments. They probably could survive places on earth where we have life at the deep sea vents, for example, or in many places a mile beneath the surface of the earth in Iraq, where we have life that does not depend on sunlight again as we mentioned before the DNA based life, but it does not depend on sunlight gets its energy from inside the earth. And it finds enough water to survive. And in these moons Europa and Enceladus again, they've got the water. They've got the energy source. They've got heat. They've got the right minerals. Life could exist in has places. What are excellent planets Exo planet is a term used for a planet in orbit around another star and actual planet is simply a planet, but it's a planet. That's not orbiting the sun. It's a planet orbiting and other star simple as that. That's yeah. That's a simple as it gets planet is a term which we struggle with and have struggled with for a long time. The controversy over Pluto is a good example of that. So the term Exo planet was coined to effectively avoid that problem because when Pluto was the subject of so much controversy twelve fifteen years ago. A definition was put forward by an organization called the international astronomical union to try to define what a planet is. And we could talk on night about that. I think it's a pretty flawed definition. But that definition actually says that the planet has to orbit the sun, which is from my perspective stupid because planet or other stars such right? But if we follow that definition, then a planet orbiting another star is not a planet. It's gotta have another name. So the term exit extra. Do you think that there are these planets around every star? Not around every star. But probably around most stars. Some stars are very very different from the sign. They're much much bigger much much hotter. They might be the environment around those stars might be pretty harsh for allowing a planet to form. But there aren't very many of those planets MO the stars. Most stars are more like the sun or smaller than the sun. And almost certainly almost all of those stars have plants and have several plants if you have a planet that is relatively close to its star like earth or Mars is to our sun. What are the possibilities that that planet will have an atmosphere will have water, and we'll have every everything that is needed for some kind of life. If you'd asked me that question twenty years ago early in my career, I would have told you what? Virtually every other planetary scientists restaurant or would have told you and that is planets at about the same distance as earth or Mars or Venus or mercury from the sun would be pretty similar object and probably would have good chances of having atmospheres good chances of having liquid water on their surfaces. What we've learned however about planets around other stars has completely changed. What we think what we found is that many of the planets that are close to the stars are like Jupiter like your answer Neptune. They are giant planets. They're not Earthlife planets. We've also found some planets that are so close to their stars that the orbit in just a few days or even a few hours and those planets would be so incredibly hot they couldn't have atmospheres. So I think what we now know is that everything is possible. We don't know what is most common. But we know that. Given enough time we will find stars with hot giant planets close to the stars and small icy planets close to the stars every possibilities out there. But there's certainly lots of planetary systems where we would find planets similar to earth in the sense that they would be small. They would have solid surfaces. They almost certainly could have water on their surfaces and have atmospheres. There are many people with very strong religious overtones David who would say that. We are the only living beings in the universe. We are. If they'll cite the bible and everything else. I'm not here to knock religion. You are either. No, I'm not there are certainly those views, but I think they're actually much less prevalent than. I thought they were I did a lot of research into this change in years and. There are certain religions which have that point of view. But most of them don't David Weintraub is book life on Mars what to know before we go one day, we will go. So in your opinion. You know, we look at the Drake equation, for example, where they predict there could be you know, millions of civilizations out there. What do you think? I'm a bit of a skeptic. I think more skeptical than most of my professional colleagues. I think it's quite likely that life is out there. But I think advanced life is probably much much harder than simply finding life. You're not real excited about the bacteria that could no Mars, whereas I think the bacteria that could exist on Mars is probably a much more common form of life. If anything is out there than klingons and working is and more advanced forms of life. I think if we look at the history of life on earth, which is a not a great thing to do because it's one example of life on a planet. We don't have anything to compare the earth too. But as best as we understand life on the earth. Life got started on the earth, very quickly the earth formed four and a half billion years ago. And I know as an astronomer, I tend to talk and billions of years and thinks that that's common and make sense. But that's a long time ago and your listeners we'll have a hard time thinking in terms of billions of years, but the earth formed four and a half billion years ago and by three and a half billion years ago, the earth had very. Limited life on bacteria algae, but it took another two billion years before that life became multicellular. It took another three billion years before plants appeared on the rocks on the surface of the earth. It took four and a half billion years before intelligent life before we appeared on the surface of years. So I think getting life started on a planet using the earth as an example suggests that it's not that hard to get started. But again using life on earth as an example, having evolved to the point at which is intelligent, and it can build computers and rockets and travel through interstellar space that looks like it's pretty hard. But he can't be that unusual. Unless there's another factor here that we haven't looked at in. That is whether we were seated by some extraterrestrial race, or whether that, you know, divine creator got things going, well, it really just could be that hard. If it's the randomness of different processes, and again, we don't understand we don't even know why we're here, we're how life evolved. But the one example, we have suggests that getting life to the point at which it's intelligent is a very very long process and some stars don't live that long. So the planets around stars wouldn't have enough time for life to become that advanced. I certainly don't know..

David Weintraub rockets Iraq physicist Wennemars international astronomical uni George billion years two hundred years hundred years twelve fifteen years eighty five percent three billion years ten thousand years one hundred years two billion years thousand years eight months
"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

"Our solar system discovered at the Lowell observatory in flagstaff, Arizona by astronomer cliff w Tombaugh the existence of an unknown ninth planet was first proposed by Percival Lowell who theorized that wobbles in the orbit of Uranus and Neptune were caused by the gravitational pull of an. Unknown planetary body in August two thousand six however, the international astronomical union announced the Pedo would no longer be considered a planet due to new rules. That said planets must clear the neighborhood around its orbit since Pluto's oblong orbit overlaps that of Neptune. It was disqualified. Sorry, Pluto this week in one thousand nine hundred six plans for the Kenilworth outs attempts to dig a channel tunnel between Britain and France dated back to eighteen eighty three and a Polian even drew blueprints for a tunnel in eighteen o two yet. Not until this week in one thousand nine hundred six where France and Britain able to announce that a tunnel would soon become a reality trains cars and buses would be able to speed through the tunnel and less than a half an hour construction began in December of nineteen eighty-seven. And the channel was finally completed in nineteen Ninety-four and this week in two thousand ten professional golfer. Tiger Woods holds a televised news conference where he apologizes for his marital infidelities and foolish behavior. It was a closed conference with no questions was the first time. He had spoken about the incident outside his home on November twenty seven th two thousand. Nine. That's your look back at this week in history. You can't think. Oklahoma's first news on NewsRadio one thousand K T O K Clayton Ramic is with us. He's with more public school foundation. Good morning.

Tiger Woods Percival Lowell Lowell observatory France Britain international astronomical uni flagstaff K T O K Clayton Ramic Arizona Oklahoma Polian one thousand K
"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

"Arizona by astronomer cliff w Tombaugh the existence of an unknown ninth planet was first proposed by Percival Lowell who theorized that wobbles orbits of Uranus Neptune were caused by the gravitational pull of an unknown planetary body in August two thousand six however, the international astronomical union announced that Pluto would no longer be considered a planet due to new rules. That said planets must clear the neighborhood around its orbit since Pluto's oblong Corbett overlaps that of Neptune. It was. Disqualified. Sorry, Pluto this week in one thousand nine hundred six plans for the channel were announced attempts to dig a channel tunnel between Britain and France dated back to eighteen eighty three and the Polian even drew blueprints for a tunnel in eighteen o two yet. Not until this week in one thousand nine hundred six where France and Britain able to announce that a tunnel would soon become a reality trains cars and buses would be able to speed through the tunnel and less than a half an hour construction began in December of nineteen eighty-seven and the channel was finally completed in nineteen ninety four and this week in two thousand ten professional golfer. Tiger Woods holds a televised news conference where he apologizes for his marital infidelities and foolish behavior. It was a close conference with no questions and was the first time. He had spoken about the incident outside his home on November twenty seven two thousand nine that's your look back at this week in history. He's here. Now broadcasting from the underground command post deep in the bowels of a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick and steel of a nondescript building, we've once again made contact with our leader, Mark. The big question, of course, is when they talked about the twenty fifth amendment was it just casual kit chat or just, you know, checking boxes off. That's all from the McCabe, sixty minutes interview, which will digest welcome.

Tiger Woods France Percival Lowell Britain international astronomical uni Arizona McCabe Mark Polian sixty minutes twenty fifth
"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"international astronomical union" Discussed on KTOK

"Arizona by astronomer cliff w Tombaugh the existence of an unknown ninth planet was first proposed by Percival Lowell who theorized that wobbles in the orbits of Uranus Neptune were caused by the gravitational pull of an unknown planetary body in August two thousand six however, the international astronomical union announced that Pluto would no longer be considered a planet due to new rules. That said planets must clear the neighborhood around its orbit since Pluto's oblong bit overlaps that of nip. Tune. It was disqualified. Sorry, Pluto this week in nineteen Eighty-six plans for the kennel where announced attempts to dig a channel tunnel between Britain and France dated back to eighteen eighty three and Polian. Even drew blueprints for a tunnel in eighteen o two yet. Not until this week in one thousand nine hundred six where France and Britain able to announce that a tunnel would soon. Become a reality trains cars and buses would be able to speed through the tunnel in less than a half an hour construction began in December of nineteen eighty-seven. And the channel was finally completed in nineteen Ninety-four and this week in two thousand ten professional golfer. Tiger Woods holds a televised news conference where he apologizes for his marital infidelities and food behavior. It was a close conference with no questions. It was the first time. He had spoken about the incident outside his home on November twenty seven th two thousand nine that's your look back at this week in history. This week's top TV streams, here's what you've been watching on TV this week. We start off with the USA dramas, suits. And the peas in pod episode is a number five MTV's the challenge war of world's takes a fourth place.

Tiger Woods France Britain Percival Lowell international astronomical uni Arizona MTV USA Polian
A new dwarf planet called Farout is the most distant we’ve ever seen

AM Tampa Bay

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

A new dwarf planet called Farout is the most distant we’ve ever seen

"A bear market. Astronomers say a newly discovered dwarf planet is the most distant object found in our solar system. Scientists have dubbed the object far out because it's more than one hundred times farther from the sun than the earth. The international astronomical Union's minor planet center says it's likely a dwarf planet. That's only three hundred ten miles in

International Astronomical Uni