40 Burst results for "Intern"

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Winning Retirement Radio with Greg Taylor

Winning Retirement Radio with Greg Taylor

00:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Winning Retirement Radio with Greg Taylor

"Are perfectly happy to work with anyone thinking about retiring. I'm honored to work with the men and women who lay their life on the line. And you know Greg Taylor hardly ever post on social media. But after that, he was fired up. He was so oh, my goodness, but But I have to say, I put a well thought out message. That you know, we need to always stand for what's right. We need to punish those who do wrong, but we should not. Turn our backs on those who have laid their lives on the line. Day after day to protect us and our families with the men and women who are police officers and men and women who serve as firefighters, the men and women who serve in our armed forces and our military. All those, you know, I salute you. And I'm happy to pay taxes. Kristen said to support that necessity, yes, because without law and order, there is chaos but going back to the taxes. I don't want to see you in a place where When you get to retirement, you're caught off guard. And you know there are crazy taxes. Kentucky has a horse tax and Minnesota has a fur coat tax and Utah has that birthday suit attacks That was about earlier and all those kinds of things. Social Security is something that affects nearly all of us. So there's a way to plan you can put money aside in your traditional fora. One k your traditional IRA your regular retirement accounts and you get a deduction now. Later on, when you make withdrawal that income counts towards whether or not your social Security is taxed. If you put it in a Roth IRA or a Roth for one K Or other tax free instruments. You have the potential of not paying tax on your social security. So I just wonder how many people actually have even thought about that. You know, ahead of time before they get to retirement. So that not caught off guard and maybe you should be having some sort of plan or strategy. Or some solution to just paying taxes that maybe you weren't even planning on paying when it gets time for you to retire as part of a portfolio X Ray, no matter what your profession is, when your inner near retirement, Greg and Kristen do a before and after tax analysis to make sure your portfolio is set up to be tax efficient and Ready for our M D's. If you would like to take advantage of that portfolio X ray to make sure that none of these sneak attack taxes get to your retirement. It's one of the biggest threats to your financial future taxes in general. And yes, they're likely to go up because of so many reasons, But there are ways you can be efficient about it and still make sure that you are paying your fair share. Call for a portfolio X ray. No Charge If your intern ear retirement you've save for the future, 6143367660614336 76 60 Connect any time at Legacy retirement group dot com and stay here because it's not often that I learned something new, but I did this week..

Greg Taylor Legacy Retirement RAY Kristen Intern Kentucky Utah Minnesota
Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Savvy Realtor

Savvy Realtor

00:58 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Savvy Realtor

"For you this week. What's the worst text or email? That you've ever accidentally sent. Gosh, that that is safe for radio. Okay? Yeah. So it hasn't been necessarily where I was like going to send an email actually actually have two stories I had before I meant to send a text to my husband and talking about a personal situation and instead The text went to someone else. And but it was the person that I was talking about you. Yeah, so that wasn't good said that happened and then I have in the past. I've also sent an email Tio, another agent. But you know how quickly just a change of like a letter or word can really just completely changed the whole sentence. So because we're on the radio, I won't go into detail on what that exact Senate stated, But just to change one word really completely just changed. You know, just what I was trying to share Just how is trying to respond? And it was a little bit embarrassing, but luckily you know, personal knobs aside, he lasted off. I last it off. And then he knew that was not the word that I intended to send over my email. That is pretty funny. I I have to One. It was pretty innocent. But every year in the company, we do this fun thing because, you know, we interview people all across the country, and you know, whatever. It's something funny happens in an interview. We clip it out and put it in and out, Takes folder and al. Admit Angie. There's a few out takes of you, probably from guys that we've gathered, you know, got to share this a tienda. The year we are, our team goes through and we pick our top five and then we create a little mixed down of the top five out takes from the year and we've played at the Christmas Party and You know, we vote on our our favorite basically, and I sent the email out this year with all of the all of the candidates on their and accidentally copied the wrong, Kelly. I'm the email and it went to one of our clients thiss email. Not like I mean, it's very innocent. You know, we're just poking fun. Get a kick out of it, then. Yeah, she got a kick out of it, and luckily, she wasn't one of the featured People, either. That would have made it worse. If that had been the king's right. I still felt bad about picking on people. You are you are you doing? This is about a special She was She was laughing. She she kind of got it. You know what I mean? We're just we haven't fun with it. So anyway, that was good. But then the other one was when I was Ah, ah, boss And at a previous place of employment and one of my interns who was in high school at the time, so that you can kind of see what was going on. Was trying to text my wife. Connie and I texted I was texting her. And I thought I was texting her. Love You baby. Can't wait to see you later. But I accidentally sent it to the intern. I have been the same thing with with my husband, David Padilla. And then a lender in our nonmarket David Colgan and something saying things like that. He just got he cracked up. Luckily was again It was just in the said, but yeah, he was like I love you. You know, whatever love you back whenever ever, Waas. So I was like, Oh, man. Luckily, she was in like the next room, and I realised it immediately. So I like ran over there like hysterically laughing and was like, you know, And as soon as I came around the corner, she was losing it. And she was laughing because she knew that you know, it totally would not meant that for her and so right, and everybody in the office was watching this all play out and they say, then everyone had to hear the story and you know it's a That helped defuse it very quickly just to make sure that was like, you know, there's nothing inappropriate here. Just so everybody does. Yeah, yeah, I love it. It's all on record, but it was pretty. It was pretty funny moment. I just that that moment of panic, like Yeah, I like to do.

Kelly Intern David Colgan Connie David Padilla TIO Senate Angie
Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:47 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

"15 times for sports. Here is Jeff lesson. Starting pitching again. The problem. Tigers lose their 18 straight to Cleveland Final score 10 to 5 of America Park Friday night. How about Ivanova? Tiger started give up eight earned runs in three and 1/3 innings that include two long homeruns. Nico Goodman. Cameron Maybin went deep for Detroit, but that wasn't enough. 6 10 The first pitch tonight from Comerica Park here it at 97 12 ticket. A couple of aces going Spencer Turnbull, the best starting pitcher for Detroit, and chain Bieber for Cleveland. As Cincinnati Reds player testing Positive or co. With 19 yesterday that jeopardizes today's game with Pittsburgh. Meanwhile, former Pistons gentle manager Joe Dumars, who led the team to a world championship in 2000 for will temporarily run the Sacramento Kings. Now Dumars, who had been any and in term consultant, will be the intern executive vice president there and lead the search for a new GM. This after Vladi Divac stepped down The Michigan High School Athletic Association voting yesterday to postpone the fall football season and make it in spring instead. Stanley Cup playoff results Last night, Colorado edging Arizona 32 to Montreal shuts out the Flyers five to nothing in overtime was Vancouver for ST Louis. Three. Alan is beating Washington 52 to 1. It's Caligari over Dallas two to nothing. I'm Jeff Lesson.

Jeff Lesson Detroit Joe Dumars Comerica Park Tigers Nico Goodman Cameron Maybin Cincinnati Reds Spencer Turnbull Ivanova Vladi Divac Michigan High School Athletic Sacramento Kings America Park Dallas Tiger Cleveland Bieber Pistons
Fresh update on "intern" discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:56 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

"Pick your time t g retirement dot com You can always call the team 7 to 0931 65 67 to 0931 65. 60. So now when you think about interest rates, and we're thinking about how to do, you know, Because really besides, you know, retirees that the intern low interest rates caused a challenge, too, Or we can't just put money in the CD. I mean, I saw I think it was a one year was. I don't know of 1.2% at a bank and then the three year was like 1.4% and a five year was like 1.5% of Southern is crazy numbers, so I can't really do that. But it also is a challenge for those that maybe working in her saving money and they want to put it in safe places, but it will grow. They don't need the 10 12% but they want some return on their money. There's not really a lot of options, either. For the savers of the working class, I suppose. No, there's not at all. And that's kind of the point right to see that the market or where do you go for return and you have to understand these things now? I know Gold's been doing very well. But again, you know, not everybody is going to run out. Just invest in gold. But there's also but I will tell you man from watching, you know, I'm now at the every other week. I work at home, so I have the TV on typically watching golf. Sometimes I'll put it on the news channels just to see what's going on. If I care about it. Usually I don't I go to golf, but that's more fun for me. But there are gold and silver commercials. Darling of the time. Why do you think fear, Right and C So what starts to happen is his again you can look at. But the reason why gold running up is because the negative interest rates I mean, because the reality is if you can't get yield on a safe asset, or you're getting a negative, nominal yield on those safe assets, people then rotate out of those and buy gold. It is just what happens, right? And so you know, the bottom line is this before you rush out and do anything you have to understand why it is important to me inside. My portfolio arm side of my financial plan or my retirement plan. What should I be doing? Of course everybody hears those commercials and says, Gosh, I wish I would have done that. Taken into fear missing out. They start to run towards that Bitcoins. Exactly. I've got more questions on Bitcoin lately, And that's because all of a sudden people are going okay. What should I be doing? But here's my point to the luncheon. Learn before you do anything like that, Remember? It's not a zero sum game in the marketing machine of Wall Street will focus on fear to drive you take your money, separate you for money and invested in what they say is the best thing to dio. That's way the marketing thing works right? And the point to it is, as you get this opportunity to do a virtual lunch and learn customize. We can talk about whether or not that makes sense for you. What is the advantages or disadvantages? And then talk about all the other things you could be doing and say, or doesn't make sense for you? Those are the questions we answer. So again, Mark, you know, what can they be doing with interest rates down so low savers and those type of things? That's my mean It's tough. It's tough sledding out there and, you know, knowing all your choices is probably the best thing you could do..

Golf Gold Bitcoins Intern Mark
Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

00:46 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "intern" discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"Breathe it in and you can do it now again, reach reach up or recharges Eilly just a it starts by just. Moving, and so if perhaps again, you're not familiar with this way of life introduced these stretches and poses in increments until it, it becomes something that you really really want to do. I look forward to it. And eventually, you'll feel this joy. That definitely comes with the exercise and so. I say it's a great way to love yourself and a great way to. Really Care for ourselves and Thomas Edison even said, the doctor of the future will give no medicine but will involve the patient in the proper use of food fresh air I, love fresh air and exercise so. Let's incorporate them all into that beautiful field of love with the beautiful cheese beautiful want universal global love I'm sending it out now because when we do that it right back and it's that like the breath breathe it in. And breathe it out. And it's full circle. And so here's to loving ourselves with this exercise. And then loving intern because when we love ourselves were better equipped to love others, and of course, we teach our children how important this is and it becomes part of their repertoire and their way of life my daughters off to college and earned her choices to also incorporate exercise into. Her. College experience. So I loved it. That's her choice and by the knee coming on and saying you know you need she she just knows because she it's inherent in her very makeup because she's been raised that way and she knows that this is the smart thing to do. and May I add here that she's exceedingly smart. So I get to Brag a little bit. Because she's a great kid and I love her and I love. I. Love that choice that she made there on her own to that. It's not just academia. It's so much more in life too, and it only makes you better at what you do and so so beautiful world out there. Let's be smart. Let's show ourselves respect and in turn our children who are watching and. What's great is you can do this was your kids starting at a very early age because I began by taking my daughter outdoors regularly I took her for walks, and of course when she was in her stroller and then as soon as she learned to walk of course outdoors and Introduce her to all the different forms of exercise and I just found out what she liked and and so we to this day play all kinds of sports and I gave her the swimming lessons and I, think, it's important. The kids the wherewithal to have the karate and the dance and all kinds of dance isn't that great and let them make up their mind and I made sure she knew..

Thomas Edison Intern
The Rigor Of Transmedia Production

Topgold Audio Clips

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

The Rigor Of Transmedia Production

"Hey. It's topcoats clips five, three four. Block on a busy July twenty, nine, twenty, twenty they about the rigor up producing contents. For creative media, students, Detroit animators, Enga- mark designers. Work Inside the Creative Campus Nick Glendale Ireland and I want to see if it's possible to set up lanes of academic depth. As well as to produce content on the fly with career students follow a rigor. Of expression. So. I start my rigor with words a word document that they can see that students can see in the form of a brief or mission objector. I use an Amazon model of not having more than two pages of my brace with hyper links. That goto examples of how the content might be done but start with tax, and actually that's how I started the blog post to with tex what you're hearing right now. Can Be, done text. Using transcription programs such as archer. Were audio. Bursts. The auditor Osher by product is always better than ninety percent for me when a use an external mic. I'm using the Mike Right. Now of the Samsung note nine and I'm not sure it'll be high enough quality to produces a transcript from the first go but you know this. It starts with words. In text form. Normally I have my students take those words and try to imagine how they might be presented as short clips of text information. Headlines titles. Key words, phrases, things that can be pushed out on twitter. Or on facebook or on Lincoln. And I tried to do that with all my semi compelling content. That could try to do that with every blog posts that I make on inside viewed I e. The. Point is this. Very few things you do. We'll get noticed if you don't offer them in places where people are already used. To read. Or to here to see. So, in today's world of socially connected people. Twitter facebook instagram linked in. Youtube. Those are all places that are common watering holes for for folks who are in my thought space. And most importantly. Most students have at least two those watering holes as places a look to see the spray Spiratou from folks that want to work with for jobs, they may want to get as creative interns or paid employees in the near future. So my goal is To get some form of process. which believe reaches the rigor of production. To put all this content in different media formats in different places. That's the rigor. And what I know is if I have students write some things down or sketch some notes out that they're gonNA end up with some really high quality learning on the back of it all. Is The kinesthetic to mention that seems to evolve. In other parts of my speaker content or on my blog, I've talked about offering people for different lanes of access to educational material starting with the techs. Access. Making sure. There are images or video clips. Allowing some of that stuff to occur live in HD format while also ensuring that there's an asynchronous method to rewind and play it back as slow or as fast as they want to. It's all part of the rigor of doing it right. You WanNa, follow my educational adventure using the Hashtag. Dig. PED- digital pedagogy. The PD you can check it out. I. Handle Top gold. That's me on all good social networks.

Twitter Osher Creative Campus Facebook Nick Glendale Ireland Detroit Samsung Enga Youtube Auditor Spiratou Point Lincoln
Master P

The Nod

04:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Master P

"Massive P welcome to the show is so how can welcome? No, I'm definitely lead to be. Thank you guys for having me. Our pleasure are plan. Let's get right into it. At the beginning of your career. You famously turned out a one million dollar deal from record executive Jimmy I of. What made you decide to turn down? That money were bank. Education I went to college. Even live together on. Thank being able to read read. These contracts are seen that. When I bet that deal? I wasn't going to be able to use my name for seven years. It was a lot of other things. We just a million dollars, but only have five dollars in my pocket time. I realized that. that wasn't gonna be able to do. With, my name on my brand for seven years, and it was owning control it. Okay. You own your masters all the music. You're basically pain. uh-huh, a twenty percent fees. To get into record, stores. And you have to do everything else marketing promotions. I think he had the best deal at the time of any black owned. Record Company in history interning. Money now, probably the best thing I ever did it my life. Story would have been different if you had taken that deal. Just been audience like everybody else. I DIDN'T WANNA. Be Audience from day one I wanted to be a one to be own of a company, so I realized. I, would you say to artists nowadays were still kind of struggling to get compensated fairly for for their music, I feel like These are of putting the wrong people around, because if you have a manager you have. A visor. Lit You sign those bills or attorney in. You need to get rid of those people. You have to start with him because none of these. Guys are going audit. These companies in nobody is exposing. Bad deals and these companies used to doing it, and so nobody ever win in the ninety s new. Orleans hip hop hand really been. On, the map, how challenging was it for you to kind of breakthrough witness sound at that time we talk about southern the music too close to this thing we had was a ghetto boys, but they newsy head and cross other markets yet, but once we got in. I feel like doors open. I got ending cash money came. All this talk of getting they just. Sound has been on the rise every since I. Remember Seeing your MTV cribs episode when I was like Middle School. One of the most expensive roles in. This room right here. Is probably about three million dollars. I mean honestly you in the episode was the first time I had understanding of credit points, certain things and you were like I paid for this cash paid for that in cash. Why has ownership always been so important to you? Ownership beauty control. They can't really you can't tell you. What do we have off figuring out? What can we do to own some things that we want to change the narrative, and even like doing doing this injustice that we have? We are blocked down right now. My thing is. This vitamin blocked back. Because now we have the control is we will have ingested the. We have the control so best. What ownership? DOCU series, coming out, no limit chronicles, and it charts the rise in success of no limit records, and also you know your career in the music industry. What something that you revealed in the Docu series that people will be surprised to know about you think people be surprised that no, that outboard I went to a Catholic school. I had to fight when I got back to the project. I mean I've been dealing with bullies all my life. And this was a student. So what I love about this documentary? You'RE GONNA be able to talk to all the all the people around me to millionaires I created the grateful people to Ungrateful People I. Want Everything Being I want. To be you know, but you have no idea

Jimmy I Record Company Executive MTV Catholic School Attorney Middle School
Alone, Together

Israel Story

03:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Alone, Together

"So you'll high, what was working on this piece like for you, what? Did you learn first of all I learned how difficult it is for community that so knit to separate itself all of a sudden like what valiant effort. They did to actually do that once they realize what was going on. And the price is heavy prices. They paid I learned how lockdown affects people very differently lockdown, not the same for a young couple with the one kid or a bachelor living alone or with some roommates, as it is for a mother of you know six seven thirteen kids. Another thing I learned. Is You know these people are very positive? Even when I talked to them, and I talked to remember, I talked to people who had very strong complaints. That's that's how I reached them. Even those people at the end. All of them felt it was very important to end with a positive message. Hopeful message that we can all learn to get along better and. They'll never complain. They'll say you know. It's very very hard, but So. That was really inspiring for me. Being myself stuck with three kids at home and much. Full of. Self pity. That story was produced by High May. Together with our amazing production intern Marie Huda. Ari Jacob wrote and performed the original music. We don't usually think the interviewees in our stories, but this times different since for many of them, talking to the media, especially to non Hundred d media isn't a trivial matter. So. Thank you willy. Dick Mantova Henny Judy near Hyme Teitelbaum. You the elite Menachem Tokyo Shag leak and many others who preferred to remain anonymous, a special thanks to a wicked Zana the national anti-racism coordinator for the Department of Justice, who was incredibly helpful throughout the process of putting this piece together. Before we sign off. Let's check back in with sergeant. Alex Smith the Home Front Command squad leader patrolling the streets of. His assignment like that of many other soldiers was really a bit strange. After all the deem, don't buy large. Go into the army. In fact, some of them are quite hostile towards the arm. So Alex wasn't sure how it would all go down I. Thought I would be getting things thrown at me or like getting shouted from the other side of the street stuff. Like what is the army doing? Hugh, get out of place. I can tell you that as soon as they see us coming there like and they put on the face mask or go to another place. So what do you do you go and knock on people's doors or where? How'd you? How'd you convey this information? No, we do not going to people's homes. We are going close to supermarkets to hospitals. Two clinics in how the hundred received the soldiers so far so good. We have not had any problems set. Like what are you doing you or what? Why is your army coming into a neighborhood? Not all. You're not the right I. Am not I am a secular you I I would say. And is this the first time that you've had significant interaction with with him? Yes, and say that it's nothing like I would have expected I. Not all the like for real are taking us the way we are and leading. Do what we are intending to do, which is to help them and they're cooperating. Also which I think is fantastic

Alex Smith Hugh Menachem Tokyo Shag Department Of Justice Home Front Command Ari Jacob Hyme Teitelbaum Marie Huda Dick Mantova Intern Henny Judy Coordinator
Robotics: An Overview

Learn to Code with Me

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Robotics: An Overview

"Just explain a bit about like what the field of robotics looks like an is yeah, so a lot of the popular robots that you probably have seen in the news. They're based off of being able to have a robot. That's walking. We're very intelligent robots, not their robots are mechanical pieces. You know of junk. Put something into. Right and so yeah, you'll see walking robot to see dog robots. You'll see the facial expression robots you know that are supposed to women in some way, and those are yes, they definitely hardware involved in back can be very complicated, but what drives those is a I am the programming the software behind it and so in order for us to even get to that point. We're GONNA need a lot more about we're really not there yet. Yes, we have some degree of walking robots, but it's not a ubiquitous technology that you can just plug in play from being in some of my robotics internships. I definitely got the feel that understanding the field robotics is also looking at. At where what it's not doing what people are trying to do and you'll see some articles here there about ooh. Does this robot really what the company that made? It says it does he know like is it? Is it real and that's true for a lot of a more advanced robot, so you might be thinking of so you have to start small. If you were a robotics, intern added company. They most likely would have a narrow field for you so for me. When I was Zuma, robotics internships I always had very narrow fields where it was like maybe just mapping, Gimme a robot to be able to understand its location and navigate on its own or it's. Just being able to see and being identify objects like there's usually a barrier build when you go into robotics, and so you think bishen perception, you think of autonomy so being able to navigate on itself, and that doesn't have to be on legs. It can be on wheels, and then also just some of the use cases so not all robots are meant to do the same things. Some just look pretty and. Some. Just look you know they just walk in. That's all they do. And there is no real application, and then there are other areas of interest where it's like. How do we create an office about the delivers prince to you, so you don't have to get up. Or How do you tell presence robot so that someone can come into an office remotely, but they can't get through the. The door. How do they get to the door on their own? They always need. Someone opened the door for them. So those are some of the branches that you can go on and what anybody who's interested in robotics as a idea, just start going on the list of. How would they do this holiday that end in? You'll come to see how much further we have to go.

Zuma Intern
Building Power Among Youth

Nonprofit Luminaries

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Building Power Among Youth

"Thank you for joining me today? How are you doing? Great good good, so tell me about. What is all girls? Everything ultimate frisbee about. Why do you guys do? We are a leadership program and we have been brought together through ultimate Frisbee. That's how we use the together. We play Frisbee there, but we also learned there. Yeah, age up is not only really about like social justice. Education I feel like the people who work for Asia or that are in the age of community invest in the young people of Color in the key in the South Seattle community, and is really rooted around ultimate Frisbee, but we're also all have like a connected passion for social justice, wanting to make a change. In providing for our community, ultimate Frisbee, amusing to be honest with you, you know when I hear ultimate Frisbee. I don't think social justice education. A matter of fact with a lot of sports I don't think social justice says a case. I know that there's athletes who will take a stand and say something, but you know I don't i. don't naturally think ultimate Frisbee and social justice education. So how do those two combine for a job? Well I think when you think of most forts you're not. That's social justice as narrow really the first thing that comes to mind I'm pretty sure like no one ever combines like anything of the sorts of sports. But with ultimate Frisbee, since it's kind of a new sport, it's kind of like there's room to test around in like. Build new kind of community I think and that's kind of what happened the South End. There is like coaches all around the south Seattle that kind of came together to build. What age of is like Sam? Terry and Hannah Kawhi at least uneven. It came from it being such a tight knit community with those people with those players that they. They felt safe to talk about those types of topics like racism sexism, and so it started with a small group of people I think it was like tennis people and they had their like initial program of coming together and talking about social justice, and it kind of evolved into something more where everybody was willing to learn and grow together also play Frisbee together. Yeah, right? Hey, we're we're. We're here to have fun and play Frisbee than these other bigger issues that. Are Impacting us, or we care about if I'm understanding you correctly and you guys. The folks who started this felt comfortable enough with each other to be able to have this dialogue. And how how long ago when did this start? Two thousand nine at. It's even late, two, thousand, nine or early twenty ten, because we're GONNA have our ten year like Oh, yeah, two thousand nine. Yeah, doesn't you about the have your ten year anniversary? Okay? Amy was mentioning his early before we started recording that. There's there's different program elements that you guys have within eight up. What are those programs in? Can you describe them a little bit for me? We have a girls program that happens. December January, and then right after that ends the boys, program starts because we use Jefferson, community center. And will have an office upstairs, and then we use the big room in the middle, so we have to have the different programs right after each other, so then like we don't meet other programs different from you. Have your girls programming your voice program other than the gender? What's the difference in having to rather than having a combined group? I think the only difference is the ideas that we would come up with so last year. I was a girls program intern. That program was mostly about mental health for. That whole program year. And then. My other intern. Together Dion we came up with a different workshop at the end. So you have maybe different focuses. Do they come up naturally from what the group is asking for kind of what they're all talking about or do you guys have a curriculum for lack of a better word were year directing? You know what each group is is focusing during that timeframe. It used to be like. Every week was a different topic like went to his into sexism, but then we felt like one day is not enough to cover that topic. Then along the program years we would talk together and be like Oh. Should we just do one? So then? We can actually cover it, and so people can learn from. It were from now on. We're doing one topic or each year,

Seattle Intern Dion AMY South End Tennis Asia SAM Jefferson Terry Hannah Kawhi
Mo'Kelly responds to former Trump adviser Roger Stone calling him a racial slur during interview

Mo'Kelly

09:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Mo'Kelly responds to former Trump adviser Roger Stone calling him a racial slur during interview

"And you have questions. In fact, I have questions during the program. During one of the breaks. I was told Eric if he could get the What Roger Stone allegedly said and want to get to that in just a moment. What would you do an interview like that? I have certain responsibilities. And if you watch any good reporter and I'm not saying I'm a good reporter, but there's a technique you watch report like during a White House press briefing. And the president may say something personal may make a personal insult. Notice. They don't respond to that Their job is to get their questions asked and get an answer. My job as I see it. Was to keep Roger Stone on the phone. And regardless of what may have transpired, regardless of what person that may have felt about what he was saying, my job was to keep him talking. For your benefit as the audience and my benefit to have that conversation. And it's not always comfortable. And since I'm processing, quite sure different people heard different things or wanted to know different things. I'm going to turn this over now to to all his sharp producer wallet. Take it from here. No, uh, first of all, fantastic job That was quite possibly one of the best interviews that has ever been on the Mo Kelly show. Hands down. Great questions. Fantastic. I okay? Maybe I heard wrong. I need to go back and hear the audio. I swear this man Off the cuff said. I cannot believe I am arguing with this Negro on the air. Okay. If you did not hear that portion of the conversation, I was pressing Roger Stone as faras his commutation. That his relationship in proximity to the president probably had something to do with the president showing him favor and he he was just talking about how unfair the justice system was. Well, that's the likely follow up question. How can you talk about an unfair justice system when you are benefiting from that same justice system? If you're not the friend of the president, then You probably don't get the commutation. I think he took exception to it. And Eric, are you Are you queued up on your end? Yeah, I got it. Okay. This is where everything went. Left, everyone pay attention. Let's all listen to this together. Hit it. I do believe that certain people are treated differently in the federal justice system. I do absolutely believe that. But I also believe that your friendship and relationship in history with Donald Trump weighed more heavily than him. Just wanted to make sure that justice was done by AH person in the justice system that you were treated so unfairly. There are thousands of people treated unfairly daily. How your number just happened to come up in the lottery. I'm guessing it was more than just look. Roger, right? Rose, You're arguing with me. I'm sorry. What is that? Roger. Roger. I'm sorry. What did you say? I'm sorry. You you argue with him. I thought we were having just a very spirited conversation. What happened? Would you not like to continue the conversation, sir? I hear that the line is not dead. You're back. I don't know what that is. Well, Yeah, I was, uh, I was talking and you said something about Negro, so I wasn't exactly sure. Our did not Okay. You know your mind your mind? I okay. Well, we'll let the listeners decide. Let me go to the next question. Then why? Whatever the next question No. Do you literally have ice in your veins? Well, let me put it on for you. How were you able to keep that going and keep your composure? How do you do that? I'm sitting over here losing my mind. I didn't know it first. I need to figure out this is what's going through my mind. I had to figure out whether he was going to each yet. And then when I had chest really think about it during the break, this is something I noticed if he honestly couldn't hear me, what is it? Someone says, if they can't hear you and in the middle of a conversation. Hello there. He didn't say that. It's just silence. And he obviously wasn't talking any exhale. I heard what I heard. And the audio is what the audio is, But let me tell you swallow what I felt about it. And this kind of I'm loath to talk about race on the Mo Kelly show. I'm loath because by and large people don't respect the conversation. They don't respect it at all. They want to hear what they already believe. They don't want information. They want confirmation. They want affirmation. And a lot of times. I always say I can show you better than I can tell you. I've had seven pressed to my count seven presidential candidates on this program either while they were running or sometime later in their professional history. Seven. We've had any number of senators, you have any number of Congress people. I've been in radio 20 years I have been a BBC political commentator for 10 years have been published in The New York Times. L A Times Chicago Sun Times and been on. Good Morning America. CNN MSNBC H L In MSNBC, NBC it just about any alphabet, Fox 11. I say all that to say not as a boast. But the only thing that I felt was true, honest and sincere. That Roger Stone said was in that moment that he thought I was not listening and all of my professional Crit accolades. All my professional bony feet days went out the window because as far as he was concerned, he was talking and arguing with a Negro. It didn't matter that I went to Georgetown University. It didn't matter that I did my interns on internship on Capitol Hill. It didn't matter that I've interviewed the best of the best in All walks of life. It did not matter because in that moment he was flustered. He obviously was angry and He? It was almost like, If you want to know how a person actually is. Well, get them when they think that the cameras aren't rolling. The microphone is off. And no one else was around. That moment was the closest thing we'll ever get to that with Roger Stone. He didn't think that I could hear him. And he seemingly turned to another person in that room and says something unintelligible in said something like I can't believe I'm argument this Negro. Can we isolate that, Eric? Do you have that isolated anyways? We can listen to just that. What was she like arguing with me? One more time. What was she like arguing with me? Well, I don't know what the first few words but this Negro is clear as day. I don't care what precedes it. It is what it is. But But 12 here's my main point. That's why I'm low to discuss race on this program, not because Because I think it's a silly conversation, and people don't actually want to have a sincere conversation. Because not a day goes by which someone says to me on some love with my email and you see the twat posted all the time. You're not on Ko Phi, but four or you didn't get into Georgetown but four Or you don't deserve to or you're only there because of every single day. It's a perpetual audition to prove myself having nothing to do with my actual professional accomplishments. And I can say that, but in that moment it is demonstrated for everyone to see and everyone to hear. So going back to how did I keep my cool? That's Tuesday in America for me, that's every single day, but my job was to keep him talking because people wanted to know. Was he going to get a trump tattoo? See, We don't get that question if I reject or I chase him down this warm hole of Negro He denied it. In that moment, he lied about it. What is there to discuss? I know him on the radio. I know that there's going to be a podcast. I don't need to chase after that. Because I knew

Roger Stone Eric President Trump Reporter Donald Trump Ko Phi White House Georgetown University Congress Producer America Georgetown Rose The New York Times Msnbc NBC CNN BBC
July 2020 Book News

Books and Boba

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

July 2020 Book News

"We're here to let everyone know upheld holly books that you're about to add to your TB are list because. Even though the world seems to have slowed down, due the Cova, the publishing industry has not. and there's there's a there's a ton of book deals in never stops. So. Let's get started. A rewrite wants you tell us about the first book deal all right in a six figure deal. Salaam breeds acquired Hana coughs. Why a novel Queen of the Tiles! When cryptic messages begin appearing on a dead girl, social media account during an international scrabble championship in Malaysia. A girl must investigate the mysterious circumstances of her best friend's death, and uncovered the truth before a would be killer strikes again. Publication is scheduled for Spring Twenty twenty two. This feels like a like a thriller. Yeah. This definitely sounds. Like. It's going to be my jam because it has. Well why? Apple. Grapple murder because of the scrabble, yes. We so well Marvin. Like it sounds really really cool. It reminds me of called God there is this one really bad horror slash thriller movie I watched like a a long time ago. It was about like. This one girl who befriends like this antisocial girl, and then the antisocial girl. she kills herself at, but her social media account is still going, and she's like I. Guess like the Ghost of her is attacking like the girls, other friends and stuff. It was really bad breed, but it kind of reminds me of that. Is that the one where it all takes on the computer screen? Yes. I think unfunded. Right Oh my God. Yeah, you're right. Yeah, what's bad movie? I had a great time. Next up in another six figure deal Thomas and Mercer acquired world. English rights to choose me a standalone novel by bestselling authors, Test Garretson and Gary Braver. The Thriller Follows Boston Detective Francis Frankie Loomis as she unravels the cost of the death of a student intern. More Lewis's investigation uncovers a dark sight of relationships including obsessive. Affair with her professor and mentor. Gets in is the author of twenty nine suspense novels including the Resilient House series, which was adapted for TV BY A T and T. Another murder buck yeah yeah. Also. I don't know Hana's book is about a college student, so I don't know if it's both. Murder Mysteries about college students at Yeah Yeah. I mean this is definitely like if anyone has followed our booklet podcast for any period of time, you should know that we are definitely down for the detective story I think a good half of our book picks out been detected. Fiction earlier feels like it so definitely right up our alley. It's been like maybe a quarter I. Try my best to diversify hard Chandra's at the very least. NEXT UP ABRAHAMS SPOT world rights to Little Red Riding Hood and the Dragon by Ying Chang. Compass Stein illustrated by joy. Hang the picture book. retelling relocates. Fairy Tale in China where it was really the WHO ate little red, not the wolf and read his Account Foo fighter, who doesn't need rescuing publication slated for Spring Twenty twenty three. What do you feel about these like retailing's of? Fairy Tales. I mean, is there. Is there a fairy tale that similar to little red, riding Hood and Chinese culture, there is actually It's a lot darker. which I guess. Fairytales are in general. The versions that we are used to in. I guess. American culture are via highs, version of a lot of these fairy tales right? I remember there is a version of the story Chinese fable. Where there's I think two kids. Who Go visit their grandmothers in the grammar has been replaced by. A wolf or some SORTA creature. And they actually end up eating one of the kids, and I remember because they made the younger brother or sister into like little critters or something. I remember being really really. creeped out what I listen to the story Oh back when I was a kid 'cause he came on the Book fables that came with a a cassette tape, and it would be in Chinese I listen stories, and like this one was extra gruesome, and I remember I. Don't remember the details, but I remember. Like one of the kids got literally chopped up in eight so Yeah, that's not something that's not something. A child should see and yet and yet and yet.

Murder Spring Twenty Marvin Spring Twenty Twenty Cova Thomas Apple Garretson Hana Resilient House Ying Chang Compass Stein Boston Gary Braver China Malaysia Lewis Chandra Professor
Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

This Week in Photo

06:51 min | Last month

Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

"Jesse welcome to the show man. How's it going? Unanimous really excited. Excited to you're looking at your website is we were talking before I started recording. We're talking a little bit about some. Stuff and I brought your website up on the screen. Your work is fantastic man I've I've got lots of questions I? Know we're going to target this. We're GONNA. Talk a little bit about the social distance to photography all that, but I want to go off the rails and talk about your work as well because it's. Cool. All saw the man I'm here. I'm here to answer questions. I love it I love it, so give it give us the Jesse. ditmars sort of the origin story. You know what brought you into this crazy world of photography? And what what? What's the gravity that keeps you in orbit around it? Loaded question right. That's a long. We have. To keep us sure. Yeah exactly. I. Mean I've. I don't remember going. I've always. I've always been into arden and music and we're going to barnes and noble. Go to the book section of Shark from section, dislike pulling open some of these books by. Any LIEBOWITZ avenue iron earning Penn. Nigel Perry in the beginning was a huge. He has some great photo books and just being enamored with all the faces in. Just. The idea that I had a book in front of me that I knew was of people who are famous, and I had no idea how it was compiled by one person or purpose I just thought the images were selling interesting and I had to spend gravitating towards photography at that time of my life, my early teens and I. Just was the moment where. The rest of my life figuring that out How how do I do this thing? and that was that was really the springboard in. It's all been one kind of pretty much straight path since then to here I ended up. Working for a lot of those people for for any Liebowitz soon, the best photographers in the world is there assistance and that's how I learned to. How and Every step along the way man from college into interning into assisting into shooting and a struggle between us ASEAN shooting, and in the beginning of my career. It's all has been A. Reinforcement of kiss is something that I love to do so. That's the origin story, and now I'm here. It's been about about five years six years since I started being a fulltime freelance, photographer and I'm still still loving it. You know I get to meet the coolest people and I get to photograph people that are really accomplished end really are changing world in. Highly influential ways in the ability to stand in front of then, and and have a couple of minutes of their time, and really kind of be able to put that experience and transforming into art is deputy I do it. I love that man. What a great answer and you! You hit it right on the head. A lot of people say that the the. One of the the benefits of being a photographer is the camera and a lot of ways access your passport into situations that ordinarily wouldn't have any access to or access to people you know at the same time, which is which is really cool. I'm one of the. There's a million things to talk to you about so I'm going to try to I'm GONNA try to keep it focused. But you mentioned any Liebowitz we here. We are name all the time you know mostly in the contract fully. Yeah mostly in the context of accomplished photographer kind of the gold standard for you know if you get up to the Anti Lebron Woods level. Now you're real photography. Well, pass your science your Rockstar at that point. So how is it? How is it working for somebody with that much talent? That you know what? What does the day in the life? Look like for an assistant. That's assisting for someone like Ami. Well there's different levels right of. Sutri, for someone like anti. She has her full-time people who are on salary or their day in and day out, and then she has any number level of prevents assistance that are coming in on a needed basis in all the way down through interns who are also there for a short period of time, but day in and day out, and so it depends on where you are in. That tree is a freelance assistant I got to Canada's coming in come out of a couple of shoots and. You know for me. It was A. It was a fantastic experience. I think that. I was the best photo system I was going to be by the time I got to work with Anne which was very good for me, because I was one of six assistance on on set, and I was the. Fourth or third on the hierarchy, so I was getting asked do stuff that was not super complicated like setting up stands like setting up lights. Things that were very easy to me because I had done them thousands of times before so I was able to do that job very well without putting a ton of my brain power into a per. Se So I was able to at the time. Really kind of visualize taken everything that was happening on set. An. That was a that was awesome for me. I really enjoyed my experience You know I think it's different. It's different. Bene- first assistant as well as not to any and I. Set of experience because experiences because there's so much more. Weight on your shoulders and so much more responsibility on your shoulders to your part of the team on a day to day. Basis on, and you learn a ton doing matt to. I mean if I ever was the for going to become the first assistant Liebowitz. I probably would still be there now. I would be here so I would have a different path. so I'm really happy with what I ended up doing. There I ended up learning so much. I learned what it takes to. Have the quality that she has and the quantity of output that she has which is unrivalled in industry. I mean people. People have their qualms about her work on some people love it. Some people dislike it. I, consistently say no one else in the world is putting out the cover of vogue. The cut the cover of Vanity Fair and a Nike campaign all in a three week period it just she's the only person that can do it on because of the because of the infrastructure that she's built, and that was the biggest thing. I walked away with I I when I stopped to six Randy I said to myself right then and there. I'm not any LIEBOWITZ right now, but I'm GONNA I'M GONNA make my operation. Move as if I were and it might it might be only a tenth of the size, but I'm going to operate using the same structures and the same kind of

Liebowitz Randy I Jesse Asean Jesse. Ditmars Nike Nigel Perry Vanity Fair Lebron Woods Canada Barnes Sutri Bene Anne Matt
Honeybees Need Your Help

Short Wave

10:36 min | Last month

Honeybees Need Your Help

"Today, a non coronavirus. You about honeybees from a guy who knows all about. Them Sami Ramsey Aka Dr Bugs. First of all can i. just ask you how you got that nickname, so actually got that title Doctor. Bugs while working at the Supreme Court of the United States I work with the Supreme Court in. I know, I know I was the only intern some measure and the deputy clerk of the court referred to me as bugs, and then told him that I was going for my doctor. He's like Oh, Dr Bugs so honestly, the Supreme Court just did not know how to handle your entomologist and all they could do was just yell but. They really did not know what to do with that. And of course, nickname stuck, which is perfect for savvy. A honeybee researcher at the US Department of Agriculture also props to the Supreme Court for taking an entomology and turn the best science. Yeah, I, said it. Okay. So how is play an important role in our ecosystem and for our economy, but the cells as you might have heard are not doing so hot. we lost. About forty percent of our honeybee colonies left with deeply concerning and unfortunately, as continued a trend over the past decade, or so of US losing close to thirty percent of our bees every year. And that could have huge consequences for all of us. So today the show what's killing the Bees Sammy Ramsey tells us what's driving these die-offs including a wild critter straight out of a horror movie. And he tells us what we can do to help the base. Two semi your friends, the honeybees. They're not doing well. Can you give us a quick snapshot of Why that matters Honeybees are dramatically importance to the environment in a number of different ways We could survive without them. We would just be really really bummed out because we would lose things like coffee. Avocados lemons limes oranges. Fruits and vegetables are pollinated by Honeybees, and while they wouldn't disappear entirely the huge amounts that we produce them in with simply be unsustainable, and they will become incredibly expensive prohibitively, so honeybees are worth more than eighteen billion dollars to the US economy every single year, primarily because of their pollination services in the night off that you mentioned earlier. Is this at all related to you know news reports that came out a few years back about bees kind of vanishing. Is that related to this dollars that a different thing? Who Okay here we go, so? We were talking about the colony collapse disorder. The defining quality was really that would open a colony that had been fairly productive, and just days before, and there would be pretty much nobis there. We have not seen that particular set of issues in more than half a decade now. We don't know whether it was a virus. Weather is a novel parasite whether it was just the confluence of. Of all of these different issues all coming together that the bees been dealing with stress climate change because it disappeared so sharply that we still haven't had the time to fully flesh out what occurred there. Okay, so so that is not what's going on now. That has subsided. We're not exactly sure what caused it. We're not exactly sure what ended it, but we're glad it's gone. So let's talk about the actual issues. That's making it hard for the bees to survive now so there's a triangle. Factors called the three piece, and that stands for parasites, pesticides and poor nutrition. These are the three main issues currently impacting honeybees now while colony collapse disorder is not still e problem. It did open our eyes to the fact that our bees are really unhealthy. What is? Is potentially the case. Is that colony collapse disorder isn't the issue. The bees were dealing with, but just sort of the punctuation mark at the end of a very long and very concerning sentenced about the state of honeybees around the world, so let's talk about the I p. the parasites you study that one that sounds like honestly to me a transformer. Tell me about that one. Varroa destructor does sound like a transformer, and while you might think that name is melodramatic, it's not I mean this parasite is off the wall wacky this parasite small about one point two millimeters long it climbs onto a be, and it will actually wedge itself between the exoskeletal plates that make up the bee's body so pretty much the be skin. It wedges itself under their. Their kinda levers one of the plates up and breaks through the skin under that with this mouse parts, and it releases this cocktail of digestive enzymes that break down the tissue in that region into a slurry, is literally turning the beasant cream of honeybees soup, and then sucking that out of their body so deeply concerned. You didn't have to say that with the Soup Yeah Sorry I you. It's a very good metaphor, but you didn't have to do. Well I. Want People to understand the horror story that honeybees are living through on a regular basis. It gives us more of a respect for them. You know. Yeah, okay, so let me get this right so this particular parasite this in. Might you know the way that it acts on the bees is extremely destructive in an also kind of them up suffer even more from poor nutrition exactly so let's talk about poor nutrition. What does food for a be look like in in? Why aren't they having much access to it? As they need great question so honeybees, the visit tons and tons of. Of Flowers, and they drink the nectar from these flowers. They transported back to the colony They regurgitate it into the cells. at they dehydrate it and turned it into honey they also collect pollen from these flowers, and all that pollen is used as a source of protein to then rear their offspring. So when these BS don't have a lot of pollen or nectar, they begin to starve, and they go into this stressed out sort of crisis mode. There's a lot of stress that they deal with as a result of that, and unfortunately, it's not just the matter of starvation. Them having a diet that is not. That can be really problematic. An individual, who is constantly eating French fries isn't starving, but they don't have the full complement of nutrition that they need in order to be healthy, and that's sort of the scenario that we have the bees in at this point and that doesn't allow the bees the sort of diversity that they need when they're feeding. Of Our land has been turned over for of course, the development for. So. There's a lot of monocultures out there of plants producing the exact same nutritive in their pollen. Okay, so final P. Pesticides. What are we talking about exactly? And what's kind of the problem? pesticides win used responsibly can be very effective at reducing the numbers of destructive insects that are destroying crops and keeping the cost of producing these crops down Now we have a lot of pesticides that are systemic there absorbed by the seed, and they ended up in different parts of the plant, such as the pollen or the nectar that has been collected by the bees and brought back. Back to the colony, and it moves all through the colony in addition to that there are chemicals like my decides mixed in with the herbicides and weed killers. People sprayed on their lawn, mixed with the Agricultural Insecticides while those chemicals may be used responsibly. We actually don't know what the interacting impact is for all of those different chemicals together. We've found that colonies on average have between three and four different chemicals in the colony anyone point and upwards of fourteen times, which can be really concerning, because we just can't account for all of the different effects that can have Gotcha Gotcha. So Okay Sammy if we as humans don't take actions to intervene. What. Do People that study? These think is going to happen. ooh, okay. We don't take action to intervene. I can tell you very clearly. There's going to be a dramatic economic impact without the bees. To produce those plants and native pollinators would take up some of the slack, but we would not be able to produce them nearly the large amounts that we produce them in. But I do want to say. Very clearly that this is being blown out of proportion by the magic of the Internet, people think that everyone will die if the B.'s disappear, but there are plenty of wind pollinated plants, corn rice, that cultures have lived off of for ages, and they've been fine. The problem is we will lose so much diversity in our diet and food would be a lot more expensive because there would be a massive drop in supply. Gotcha, so okay, what kind of solutions or things you know that we can do as a society would have the most impact in helping the Honeybee. Wonderful that Anyone can do. leave those dandelions alone. Don't mow the lawn in a way that is getting rid of all of the the difference Dandelions and things that we typically considered to be weeds, the wildflowers that spring up in your lawn. Bees love them. Leave them alone nowhere. We killer on those. And if you really want to be a huge help, plant tons of flowers and your front and backyard make a be sanctuary out of your living space. If more people did that, the issues that the bees deal with in terms of poor nutrition would be mitigated in a number of different ways, because bees are capable of self medicating if they can get a lot of resin and different kinds of nectar and pollen from flowers, able to medicate themselves, but they can't do that when they only have the offerings of that one plant. Okay Sammy I appreciate you and I appreciate the bees hall. That, warms my heart to hear I think. B.'s actually really love being appreciated. Well. Don't we? All I'm going to go home and not kill any dandelions implant some flowers. My Work here is done. Sammy Ramsey Aka Dr. Bucks and Tamala just with the US Department

Sammy Ramsey Supreme Court United States Bees Hall Us Department Of Agriculture Sami Ramsey Intern Dr Bugs Researcher B. Us Department Tamala Dr. Bucks
Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

The Bio Report

05:09 min | Last month

Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

"Ronin thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me on. We're GonNa talk about regulatory compliance, which may be an area that's not well understood a outside of the folks who directly are involved with it. I thought that the work I Cuba is. Interesting because it gets at the way, artificial intelligence and machine learning systems have the potential to transform all aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. We we hear a lot about how data silos impede research, but. I. Don't think people tend to think of this problem as it exists within a company on the regulatory side of the business, how big a problem is the creation of data silos in terms of regulatory compliance? Daniels a great question and it's. The one that we have been wrestling with tens of solutions because it, it is a growing problem I think it has always been an issue at. A healthcare and pharmaceutical companies, but I'm with the huge increase in regulatory requirements, changing regulations additional regulations. It is a growing problem and. In. Most companies have set up systems. Very they're very point solution base. The safety group will have their system regulating teams have. This is have multiple systems whether it's a publishing system. Tracking system. Validation systems can be different, and then the quality systems are also independent. It's an one of them and act. And so that? There's a lot of Ju- -plication interns of cross-referencing. Duplicate entry of data. And it makes it very hard and the administration regulation compliance reporting. A lot of work goes into. Trying to ensure that the data is connected and clean so that the submission timely end of good quality. As you think broadly about the the range of challenges. Companies face with regards to compliance and keeping up with changing regulations and. All of the high volume data they touch. What are some of the other challenges? I think the key one really is around into the evolving regulatory requirements. I mean if you think about Marketing of product in one hundred fifty countries, and each country has a different set of requirements when it comes to frequency and data that they require either on safety real of a product or something as simple as manufacturing chain, sure label change and having to do that across multiple products. That are on the market multiple. Those levels is a huge burden on companies I mean. The larger pharmaceutical companies have teens of over two thousand people looking in this space and a lot of what they do is a. Regular operations is collecting information sifting it from various different sources validating that to make sure that is accurate, and then understanding what the requirements are for the submissions that every country. As I think about the types of data that a regulatory department might touch. I think a lot of unstructured data. Things that don't lend themselves to automation. How labor intensive is this area working? And what's the opportunity to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve efficiencies and reduced time and cost? So. That's a really good question and I think you know one thing that is quite surprising to many people. Is that even in a clinical trial setting nowadays seventy percent of the data? Doesn't come through the traditional case ripple. Scans. It direct lab feeds. It's connected devices increasingly as we started to use them in clinical studies, so there's a huge amount of unstructured data. And, this is where machine learning and. Becomes really important because. Certainly NLP can be used to extract information. From these unstructured data's. Catalog it and then put it in a full that can be used in traditional safety, regulatory systems and I think that is where we see huge benefits from the use of. The more

Cuba Daniels JU
Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

The Bio Report

04:49 min | Last month

Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

"Ronin thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me on. We're GonNa talk about regulatory compliance, which may be an area that's not well understood a outside of the folks who directly are involved with it. I thought that the work I Cuba is. Interesting because it gets at the way, artificial intelligence and machine learning systems have the potential to transform all aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. We we hear a lot about how data silos impede research, but. I. Don't think people tend to think of this problem as it exists within a company on the regulatory side of the business, how big a problem is the creation of data silos in terms of regulatory compliance? Daniels a great question and it's. The one that we have been wrestling with tens of solutions because it, it is a growing problem I think it has always been an issue at. A healthcare and pharmaceutical companies, but I'm with the huge increase in regulatory requirements, changing regulations additional regulations. It is a growing problem and. In. Most companies have set up systems. Very they're very point solution base. The safety group will have their system regulating teams have. This is have multiple systems whether it's a publishing system. Tracking system. Validation systems can be different, and then the quality systems are also independent. It's an one of them and act. And so that? There's a lot of Ju- -plication interns of cross-referencing. Duplicate entry of data. And it makes it very hard and the administration regulation compliance reporting. A lot of work goes into. Trying to ensure that the data is connected and clean so that the submission timely end of good quality. As you think broadly about the the range of challenges. Companies face with regards to compliance and keeping up with changing regulations and. All of the high volume data they touch. What are some of the other challenges? I think the key one really is around into the evolving regulatory requirements. I mean if you think about Marketing of product in one hundred fifty countries, and each country has a different set of requirements when it comes to frequency and data that they require either on safety real of a product or something as simple as manufacturing chain, sure label change and having to do that across multiple products. That are on the market multiple. Those levels is a huge burden on companies I mean. The larger pharmaceutical companies have teens of over two thousand people looking in this space and a lot of what they do is a. Regular operations is collecting information sifting it from various different sources validating that to make sure that is accurate, and then understanding what the requirements are for the submissions that every country. As I think about the types of data that a regulatory department might touch. I think a lot of unstructured data. Things that don't lend themselves to automation. How labor intensive is this area working? And what's the opportunity to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve efficiencies and reduced time and cost? So. That's a really good question and I think you know one thing that is quite surprising to many people. Is that even in a clinical trial setting nowadays seventy percent of the data? Doesn't come through the traditional case ripple. Scans. It direct lab feeds. It's connected devices increasingly as we started to use them in clinical studies, so there's a huge amount of unstructured data. And, this is where machine learning and. Becomes really important because. Certainly NLP

Cuba Daniels JU
White House says Trump was not briefed on Russian bounty intelligence

Up First

03:48 min | Last month

White House says Trump was not briefed on Russian bounty intelligence

"Okay, so, what did President Trump? No, and what should he have known about allegations that? Russia offered bounties to kill US troops in Afghanistan House. Democrats are going to the White House to ask today the New York. Times first reported on the bounties. The Times said intelligence about the Russian offers. A payment made it into president trump's daily brief months ago now the presidential daily brief is. Is almost like a classified newspaper for one very important reader NPR another reported over the years that this president does not usually read it. Despite various news reports about when the president was told, the White House said the information did not reach him NPR congressional reporter cloudy Gra has been following this one. Hey, Claudia, hi, there! What's going to happen at today's meeting at the White House? This will be led by House majority leader. Steny hoyer the white. House says they requested this meeting with Democrats and Democrats. Interns say they have a lot of questions related to these intelligence reports the group joining Hoyer at this meeting includes the chairs and members of several congressional committees with jurisdiction over this matter that includes House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff. He's raised a series of concerns including if the president. President wasn't briefed to. Was it a result of his relationship with Russian president. Vladimir Putin. I spoke to him yesterday about this. Let's take a listen watch. Concern that there's a unwillingness to confront the president with the evidence of Russia's Melania activity because he doesn't here. And this was a running theme. When it came to most Democrats, I spoke to yesterday. who were headed to the White House today. The White House briefed some congressional Republicans yesterday. Why was there meeting the Republican meeting a day earlier and what happened in that meeting? You know it's unclear why it was organized. This way in terms of just Republicans going in yesterday. However, they quickly followed that meeting. Saying Democrats are invited to. They're just coming tomorrow. Of the Republicans, who did go? They echoed the White House's narrative that the intelligence community is conflicted on what actually happened and they didn't think necessarily the trump should have been briefed, but they also expressed concerns. If the reports turn out to be true, I spoke to representative Adam. King's Inger of Illinois. He's a combat veteran. Let's take a listen. I think as we get more answers Then we'll know what the response needs to be, but I don't think built up to any kind of internal scandal, but it is definitely concerned by way of you know what role. Role is Russia Planning Afghantistan NPR also spoke with Michael McCall another house. Republican, who attended yesterday's meeting? He's the ranking member on the House Foreign Affairs Committee and he said these allegations are very serious, and if true, he thinks the US needs to take swift and severe action against Putin and his mercenaries, another Senate member Senator Ben Sasse, said he's been hearing from military families this weekend. They're livid and right to be livid. They're looking for people in the city to be looking out for their kids safety because quote, they're on the frontlines of freedom fighting for us. Are there people who have been left out of today's briefing that surprise you that you would expect to have been invited most definitely. This includes members of the Senate Armed Services Committee. This includes congressional leaders among them House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. She's called for the full House to be briefed and she and Hoyer say these briefings at the White House fall short of what's demanded here. They want the director of National Intelligence, the CIA to personally brief all house. Members at the Capitol and the story continues to evolve for example last night. The DNA and C. Director said they'll to investigate, and they'll brief the president and congressional members at the appropriate

White House President Trump Vladimir Putin Afghanistan House Russia Steny Hoyer NPR Adam Schiff House Foreign Affairs Committe King Senate Armed Services Committe Nancy Pelosi The Times New York Claudia National Intelligence
"intern" Discussed on Topgold Audio Clips

Topgold Audio Clips

04:15 min | Last month

"intern" Discussed on Topgold Audio Clips

"Hey is Sabrina Goldbach Guy am a virtual intern advisor. Trait? A making a topcoat audio clip episode five to nine, sharing this into the audio collective. It's a group of voices, probably thirty different voices during the month of June twenty twenty for the last ten years. Different voices have come together and shared experiences so I've picked up experiences about workflow and how to pitch for projects, and what kind of to read from different people who take time out of their day to offer suggestions. And bought some of his books and I've improved. Some of my workflow is going down going down some rabbit holes of better nutrition and Diet thank you for the audio commentary today I wanNa share something that has pivoted on the back of suggestions about workflow that people like Phil Sorrow and K Truitt. To Brits on. The autumn audio collective shared how they've done work so I've gone down. A pathway of a virtual spreadsheet caught air table with two interns, doing virtual internships with another person who's on the audio collective Joshua. Farrell Hurley and the bunch of us are taking content Josh made podcast, and we're using air table as a framework scaffolding to kind of track the section of old audio that Joshua's made into short audio Graham suitable for. And twitter. So the NOB- of what I'm saying, is this. Collaboration is essential, but to make sure. Don't get confused as of what you're doing to make. Sure all pulling in the same direction. It's really important to be on the same project tracking. Or to have updates at sometimes can occur eight synchronous league, which is what an online spreadsheet or online project manager will do for you. Now are flavor of the month. Is Air table because? Well. It's got the legs to do the stuff in templates that. Make sure you don't make mistakes that previous creatives might have made. Her table provides templates, templates, videographers cinema- cinematography cinematographers. We're just modifying it I simple simple audio production, and the result well probably show up if Corey and ORLA the. Two students involved do a good job that will probably show up in their Lincoln status updates when they kind of say, here's how I'm doing this with this particular piece of software, and maybe they'll get a thumbs up or a recommendation from the company spur line that they're making the content for, or maybe they'll just learn how to do it better, and over the course of the summer, a become better and more efficient than in the production of creative media products. I work on the climate digital campus. We train students to do this quite frankly. The workum asking them to do during the virtual internship is not as complex as what they'd have to do in a time studio environment when there slicing and dicing in correcting video content or approving the audio. Content for work. Could they've done in the field? But it is time pressurized and the emphasis on being able to adapt the workflow. To future projects they would have on academics. Academic programs are. In mixers they go pitch for an actual jobs. Air! Table is these define on many social networks. It was daylight gambler. For some insider information and <HES> I'm top goal over lots of different places to follow how this thing unfold them sure within a week or so. If you listen to quote audio clips, I'll give you an update otherwise inside viewed. I E is a website that I maintain irregularly. Put something about air table over there because I like the software by pay to use it and I hope to have students learn. How to do things better. With good tracking and good attention to detail,

Joshua Sabrina Goldbach twitter Farrell Hurley intern Phil Sorrow project manager Corey advisor K Truitt Josh Graham
Airtable And Virtual Interns

Topgold Audio Clips

04:15 min | Last month

Airtable And Virtual Interns

"Hey is Sabrina Goldbach Guy am a virtual intern advisor. Trait? A making a topcoat audio clip episode five to nine, sharing this into the audio collective. It's a group of voices, probably thirty different voices during the month of June twenty twenty for the last ten years. Different voices have come together and shared experiences so I've picked up experiences about workflow and how to pitch for projects, and what kind of to read from different people who take time out of their day to offer suggestions. And bought some of his books and I've improved. Some of my workflow is going down going down some rabbit holes of better nutrition and Diet thank you for the audio commentary today I wanNa share something that has pivoted on the back of suggestions about workflow that people like Phil Sorrow and K Truitt. To Brits on. The autumn audio collective shared how they've done work so I've gone down. A pathway of a virtual spreadsheet caught air table with two interns, doing virtual internships with another person who's on the audio collective Joshua. Farrell Hurley and the bunch of us are taking content Josh made podcast, and we're using air table as a framework scaffolding to kind of track the section of old audio that Joshua's made into short audio Graham suitable for. And twitter. So the NOB- of what I'm saying, is this. Collaboration is essential, but to make sure. Don't get confused as of what you're doing to make. Sure all pulling in the same direction. It's really important to be on the same project tracking. Or to have updates at sometimes can occur eight synchronous league, which is what an online spreadsheet or online project manager will do for you. Now are flavor of the month. Is Air table because? Well. It's got the legs to do the stuff in templates that. Make sure you don't make mistakes that previous creatives might have made. Her table provides templates, templates, videographers cinema- cinematography cinematographers. We're just modifying it I simple simple audio production, and the result well probably show up if Corey and ORLA the. Two students involved do a good job that will probably show up in their Lincoln status updates when they kind of say, here's how I'm doing this with this particular piece of software, and maybe they'll get a thumbs up or a recommendation from the company spur line that they're making the content for, or maybe they'll just learn how to do it better, and over the course of the summer, a become better and more efficient than in the production of creative media products. I work on the climate digital campus. We train students to do this quite frankly. The workum asking them to do during the virtual internship is not as complex as what they'd have to do in a time studio environment when there slicing and dicing in correcting video content or approving the audio. Content for work. Could they've done in the field? But it is time pressurized and the emphasis on being able to adapt the workflow. To future projects they would have on academics. Academic programs are. In mixers they go pitch for an actual jobs. Air! Table is these define on many social networks. It was daylight gambler. For some insider information and I'm top goal over lots of different places to follow how this thing unfold them sure within a week or so. If you listen to quote audio clips, I'll give you an update otherwise inside viewed. I E is a website that I maintain irregularly. Put something about air table over there because I like the software by pay to use it and I hope to have students learn. How to do things better. With good tracking and good attention to detail,

Joshua Sabrina Goldbach Twitter Farrell Hurley Intern Phil Sorrow Project Manager Corey Advisor K Truitt Josh Graham
Airtable And Virtual Interns

Topgold Audio Clips

04:15 min | Last month

Airtable And Virtual Interns

"Hey is Sabrina Goldbach Guy am a virtual intern advisor. Trait? A making a topcoat audio clip episode five to nine, sharing this into the audio collective. It's a group of voices, probably thirty different voices during the month of June twenty twenty for the last ten years. Different voices have come together and shared experiences so I've picked up experiences about workflow and how to pitch for projects, and what kind of to read from different people who take time out of their day to offer suggestions. And bought some of his books and I've improved. Some of my workflow is going down going down some rabbit holes of better nutrition and Diet thank you for the audio commentary today I wanNa share something that has pivoted on the back of suggestions about workflow that people like Phil Sorrow and K Truitt. To Brits on. The autumn audio collective shared how they've done work so I've gone down. A pathway of a virtual spreadsheet caught air table with two interns, doing virtual internships with another person who's on the audio collective Joshua. Farrell Hurley and the bunch of us are taking content Josh made podcast, and we're using air table as a framework scaffolding to kind of track the section of old audio that Joshua's made into short audio Graham suitable for. And twitter. So the NOB- of what I'm saying, is this. Collaboration is essential, but to make sure. Don't get confused as of what you're doing to make. Sure all pulling in the same direction. It's really important to be on the same project tracking. Or to have updates at sometimes can occur eight synchronous league, which is what an online spreadsheet or online project manager will do for you. Now are flavor of the month. Is Air table because? Well. It's got the legs to do the stuff in templates that. Make sure you don't make mistakes that previous creatives might have made. Her table provides templates, templates, videographers cinema- cinematography cinematographers. We're just modifying it I simple simple audio production, and the result well probably show up if Corey and ORLA the. Two students involved do a good job that will probably show up in their Lincoln status updates when they kind of say, here's how I'm doing this with this particular piece of software, and maybe they'll get a thumbs up or a recommendation from the company spur line that they're making the content for, or maybe they'll just learn how to do it better, and over the course of the summer, a become better and more efficient than in the production of creative media products. I work on the climate digital campus. We train students to do this quite frankly. The workum asking them to do during the virtual internship is not as complex as what they'd have to do in a time studio environment when there slicing and dicing in correcting video content or approving the audio. Content for work. Could they've done in the field? But it is time pressurized and the emphasis on being able to adapt the workflow. To future projects they would have on academics. Academic programs are. In mixers they go pitch for an actual jobs. Air! Table is these define on many social networks. It was daylight gambler. For some insider information and I'm top goal over lots of different places to follow how this thing unfold them sure within a week or so. If you listen to quote audio clips, I'll give you an update otherwise inside viewed. I E is a website that I maintain irregularly. Put something about air table over there because I like the software by pay to use it and I hope to have students learn. How to do things better. With good tracking and good attention to detail,

Joshua Sabrina Goldbach Twitter Farrell Hurley Intern Phil Sorrow Project Manager Corey Advisor K Truitt Josh Graham
THERE IS A SOLUTION

Big Book Podcast

05:13 min | Last month

THERE IS A SOLUTION

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard. And I'm an alcoholic sober since January nineteen eighty eight one day at a time. In this the Thirty Eighth Episode Chapter Two there is a solution from the second edition of alcoholics anonymous originally published in nineteen fifty, five. There were only a handful of edits to this chapter from the first edition, but one of them is most significant as it referred to a celebrated physician who treated the American businessman Roland H. The second edition named that Docker as the world famous psychoanalyst Dr Carl Young. WHO PRESCRIBED FOR ROLAND? In Zurich, in the Early Nineteen Thirties? As recounted on page twenty, six of the second edition Dr Young told Roland H that his alcoholism was incurable by psychoanalysis, and that the only thing that might help was a spiritual experience. That suggestion along with membership in the Oxford Group lifted rowlands compulsion to drink, and later helped him bring abby t to sobriety. EBI INTERN HELP SOBER UP. Bill Wilson Co founder of a in a nineteen sixty one letter of gratitude to Dr Young Bill acknowledged that Rowland's conversation with Dr Young was the first link in the chain of events that led to the founding of alcoholics anonymous. And Now? From the second edition of the book chapter, Two, there is a solution. We of alcoholics anonymous, no thousands of men and women who were once just as hopeless as bill. Nearly all have recovered. They have solved the drink problem. We are average Americans. All sections of this country and many of its occupations are represented as well as many political, economic, social and religious backgrounds. We are. Who Normally would not mix? But there exists among us a fellowship, a friendliness and an understanding, which is indescribably wonderful. We are like the passengers of a great line. Her the moment after rescued from shipwreck, when Camaraderie Joyous nece and democracy pervade the vessel from steerage to captain's table, unlike the feelings of the ship's passengers, however, our joy in escape from disaster does not subside as we go our individual ways. But feeling of having shared in a common peril is one element in the powerful cement which binds us. But that in itself would never have held us together as we are now joined. The tremendous fact for every one of us is that we discovered a common solution. We have a way out on which we can absolutely agree, and upon which we can join in brotherly and harmonious action. This is the great news. This book carries to those who suffer alcoholism. And illness of this sort, and we have come to believe it. An illness involves those about us in a way, no other human sickness can. If a person has cancer. All are sorry for him, and no one is angry or hurt. But not so with the alcoholic illness for with it there goes annihilation of all the things worthwhile in life it engulfs all whose lives touched the sufferers. It brings misunderstanding fierce resentment, financial insecurity, disgusted friends and employers warped lives a blameless children, sad wives and parents. Anyone can increase the list. We hope this volume will inform and comfort those who are or who may be affected. They are many. Highly. Competent psychiatrists who have dealt with US found it sometimes impossible to persuade an alcoholic to discuss his situation without reserve, strangely enough wives, parents and intimate friends usually find us even more unapproachable, then do the psychiatrist and the doctor, but the X. problem drinker who has found the solution who is properly armed with facts about himself can generally win the entire competence of another alcoholic in a few hours. Until such an understanding is reached, little or nothing can be accomplished. Until such an understanding is reached, little or nothing can be accomplished. That, the man who is making the approach has had the same difficulty that he obviously knows what he is talking about that. His whole deportment shouts at the new prospect that he is a man with a real answer that he has no attitude of holier than thou nothing, whatever except the sincere desire to be helpful, there are no fees to pay no axes to grind no people to please no lectures to be endured. These are the conditions. We found most effective. After such an approach many take up their beds and walk again.

Dr Carl Young Dr Young Bill Roland H. Early Nineteen Thirties United States Howard Bill Wilson Co Zurich Oxford Group Docker Intern Founder Abby T Rowland
Making Earworms

Topgold Audio Clips

03:34 min | 2 months ago

Making Earworms

"It's Bernie Goldbach its top audio clip five to three in the background. You might be able to hear on sound as you're familiar with from autumn. Oh. Mono tribe by SEMI TUNA SM to split in the background in the morning nine o'clock in the morning. June twenty twenty. I've lost the concept of date and time might be the seventeenth or eighteenth. And Anyway the point is I want to update on some things that some creative interns are doing with me? Go back I happen to work as a creative media lecturer I'd met the author of the background piece Simon. Online more than ten years ago, doing audio, an annual collected of people sharing snippets of life the audio. And I thought it'd be interesting to know that the word ear were. Is Synonymous with audio Mo. if you have an Amazon Smart Speaker so today I just asked Amazon. My Smart Speaker. The a word. I'm not going to use some of you. Listening may have that a word sitting in your local audible reach. I asked my Amazon Speaker to enable the speaker's skill, and then I asked my Amazon speaker. To. Ask Speaker to play earworm. This is what came up. A long process well, it's a simple process. It's long if it's meant to be an archive of all the audio work done during the month of June twenty twenty. On twitter tagged as audio. Now. We're GONNA get some cross pollination because some of the audience. Hashtag content with clips include people talking about twitter making the IOS twitter APP able for some to produce audio on the fly. But if you've got a smart speaker, has made by Amazon, and you ask for the. SPREAKER APP to be enabled. You ask your smart speaker to play ear worms. You might be treated to a cacophony of. Audible. During the month of June. And July and August September, because once there. They will always play as at your worm as a side note I know now that. Should have named the directly directory in which these audio clips are posted. I should've named audio, but I had a legacy directory running. Just, use that. It may affiliate to the word audio. Mo- when using. Voice Search. On Google PODCASTS and may affiliate to audio when using the apple podcasts player in three weeks time time will tell I'm learning I do it. If your. Voice isn't. In the audio collection that's on speaker, let me know, and I'll add it. And I've tried to go around and talk to everybody voice. We have used to make sure they don't mind being there. The Internet archive the way back machine's GonNa, grab all the stuff recorded as important audio snippets while the world recovered from the first major lockdown that it has endured. In, the last one hundred years.

Amazon Twitter Bernie Goldbach Voice Lecturer MO Google Simon Internet Apple
Is Powdered Milk Bad For You?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:17 min | 2 months ago

Is Powdered Milk Bad For You?

"Recently a listener posted a question about powdered milk on my facebook page. She was wondering whether it's okay to use dried or powdered milk in place a fresh milk. Powdered milk, of course less expensive than fresh milk. It's relatively nonperishable. It's lightweight and portable, and for those reasons, many people include powdered milk in their emergency food stores. In terms of nutrients like. Protein and potassium dried. Milk is comparable to fresh milk, and like fresh milk dried milk powder is usually fortified with vitamins, a and d. you can add dried milk to breads and other baked goods, soups, sauces, smoothies, or other recipes in order to add extra protein and other nutrients. But if you research this question on the Internet, you will quickly come across some sources, claiming that powdered milk is extremely bad for you because it contains oxidized cholesterol, allegedly the most dangerous type of cholesterol. Some of these websites also claimed that powdered milk is added to all low fat and fat free milk in order to give it more body, and they say that there's no way for you to tell whether or not your milk contains added dry milk, because the passengers are not required to list powdered milk in the ingredient list. I mean pretty scary stuff, right? Well as is typical of the nutrition information that you find online, the claims about powdered milk are a jumble of fact, half truths and outright fallacies, so let's take a closer look at the properties and the potential dangers of powdered milk in order to make dried milk pasteurized milk is I concentrated through evaporation, and then it's usually sprayed into a heated tank, and that causes the remaining water to quickly evaporate leaving behind dried milk solids. Milk can also be freeze dried, and because of the lower processing temperatures freeze dried may actually taste more like fresh milk when it's reconstituted, but this much more expensive process, and therefore it's a lot less common. It is true that packager could add dried milk to fresh milk, and because of the way the FDA labeling regulations define milk. They would not be required to list powdered milk in the ingredient list. However, it is absolutely not true that all skim and low fat milk has dried milk added to it. In fact, you might have to work pretty hard to find some that does have dried milk attitude. I spoke with representatives for half a dozen different brands of milk, including national brands like stony field farms and horizon as well as my local store brand, both the organic as well as the conventional and none of them. Add any dried milk to their fresh milk products. There is a brand that you may have seen called. Skim plus it's marketed as being creamier than regular skim milk, and they create that creamy texture by adding dried milk powder to the fresh milk and sure enough. The dried milk is not listed separately in the ingredient list. However when you add dried milk to fresh milk, it also increases the protein content, so you could always just take a quick look at the nutrition facts label, and if you see milk that contains more than nine grams of protein per one cup serving, they may indeed have added dry milk powder to it and if it doesn't, you can be pretty sure that they didn't. Now while you're checking those nutrition facts labels, you may come across fair life milk. This is a brand of milk that is fifty percent higher in protein than normal milk. However, in this case, it's not because they've added dried milk. Instead Fair life is made by passing fresh milk through a series of specialized filters that remove some of the lactose and then and up concentrating the protein. Okay. So, what's all this about? oxidized cholesterol. oxidized cholesterol is cholesterol that's been sort of roughed up around the edges, and that makes it particularly irritating to your blood vessels to make a long story short that irritation is what triggers the formation of plaques, and that is the beginning of heart disease, and what's worse, oxidized cholesterol molecules can intern oxidizer other cholesterol molecules setting off a sort of chain reaction. And it is also true that in the process of turning fresh milk into a powder, the cholesterol in the milk is likely to get oxidized, but nonfat dried milk is not going to be a significant source of oxidized cholesterol, because nonfat milk contains almost no cholesterol to begin with so i. don't think that you need to go out of your way to avoid nonfat dry milk or products that are made with it. Whole milk is somewhat higher in cholesterol so powdered whole milk would pose more of a concern, but perhaps the biggest concern with

Facebook Heart Disease FDA Intern
How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

04:37 min | 2 months ago

How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? We know that eating together connect people and we. We know that that has been to forever. L. At Fischbach is professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago and she's been studying different ways in which eating together affects us as we're doing it. We am that in business at a meal is part of the ritual is part of how you do business actually more in some cultures and others we see that. In order to start partnership in order to reach agreement. Food is volved often. We get together to to Sharon meal. We connect to other people so a meal. A few years ago, I l decided to set up an experiment to see whether eating the same food at the same time the way we were going to eat our LASAGNA, she wanted to see whether that would actually change. Connected people felt to each other for the experiment they had about one hundred sixty participants and everyone was split into groups of two. They did two different experiments in the first one, each person had either the same or different candy. The options were butter. Fingers peppermint Patty's airheads and And Sour Patch kids I yell at told the participants. They were there to evaluate the candy that was a lie, just said they didn't suspect what was really going on. And then after each pair eight, their sugary treats. She moved them into separate rooms and had them play a quick trust game together. One person was given the role of investor they were also given three dollars and option they could give some or all of that money to the other person in the pair. That person was playing a fund manager.

Ashley Belanger Samir Threat L. At Fischbach Instagram Los Angeles Intern Professor Of Behavioral Scienc Fund Manager Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM
"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"That you are exposed to Fox. You sound like you love and you are happy the expect everybody may say WanNa talk to you when he came out to a friend and they told me Oh I knew that already from your voice that was like a punch to the stomach. I wondered why someone would say something like that. What do we gain from that common other than me regretting coming out to them? You know from our culture. I think we are moving living in a progressive way where it's like these stereotypes and these assumptions people make about each other based off these essentially superficial qualities. Your voices the superficial quality. It's not something that defining who you are as a person just as Michelle said isn't a sexuality type in his Ali said being gay isn't a personality type whether you're gay straight Bi Trans or however you identify your you and that's what's important and just like on that ship. People try is defined me determine. Stop acting like a fag or that MC talented being gay and when I hear all these things being said regardless of it being a joke or not I remember going against the rail laying my head on the cold would and looking down at the water below. Would they even notice the truth. They would people notice because all being called a fag hurts. Marketing told my voice sounds as painful. It's part of me. And when he stepped off that ship and returned to bright works and began to talk I discovered that being clear as part of my identity and as they slowly talk with more and more people came out first to my teachers and then to my parents and now to my whole school I can truly get rid of any inner critic that was my. They had told me not to wear that shirt or not express myself in fear of being labeled because embraced myself. I can be myself. This is Josh. Ask Gross the Queer Kid with a completely normal voice signing off the F. Word produced by Josh Gross for a podcast he created needed for his high school project. You've been listening to the kitchen sisters present produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Hill as the year turns we take this moment to thank all of the interns for their beautiful work their mighty spirit. They're free thinking and the many talents they've shared with the kitchen. Sisters across twenty years place would be Dulles dirt without them many of the kitchen sisters stories. You've heard across else. The years have their names in the credits from the hidden kitchen series. Nobody can soldier without coffee. We produce that. In collaboration with Samuel Shelton Robinson the romance and sex life of the date was a collaboration with our former intern. Lisa morehouse and coming in just a few weeks. Six the Astra Gates keeping the southside a collaboration with the kitchen sisters current intern Leah Renee. Yates so many of you. Listeners have contributed to the kitchen sisters across the year and your contributions have gone to help support this internship and training program. We thank thank you for making this program possible special thanks to Tom and Tommy Mark and the tr a foundation for their generous contribution to the kitchen sisters internship Japan training programs. The kitchen sisters present is part of Radio Tokyo from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary ordinary cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers..

Josh Gross Ali intern Fox Samuel Shelton Robinson Leah Renee Astra Gates Michelle Yates Lisa morehouse Dulles Tokyo Nathan Dalton Tom Tommy Mark Brandy Hill
"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

11:31 min | 8 months ago

"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"My name is Agnes van and French director and artist. I am doing a a series of stories for NPR called the keepers. Keep US keep this is about keeping I keep nothing. I'm not they would visit for your subject it. 'cause I lose a lot. My first film was twenty six one dollars. She Super uh-huh from my birth to twenty five. I'd seen less than ten films. I'd never go I sup- Snow White and the seven. When he came out didn't make it too much? Oh stupid me. I was with films and when a laughing they did the editing on my first film says you should go to the cinematic. We had one in Paris and was was said that he had seen the mess of pieces of film that I later maybe I would not have started. I Dare L. to make it fun without knowing about him. I met down here and there is an inventor is inventive French cinematic. He invented the idea that we should keep. As as you keep we should keep including the film. We don't like that was his point. Not only the so called masterpieces basis. The film made by famous Besson. He also said whatever films that we dont like when we see them maybe they make sense may be the tell something. Think of the society about the way people here we should try to keep what have been in an as you know in the states. This very late skull says it wasn't incredible champion about think we have to keep films and the miracle of cinema is that it gives us that common image of who we are and who we been and who we're becoming in time and motion so how could you not preserve cinema. We are fishing. Rules is about to die. But I kept because I received that Caref- roses for the Oscar that I got in the states two three weeks ago in in the little time I have to throw them away and forget about SCA if I cannot keep my memories because I'm losing them. I remember remember we spin. Well say that one forget about commemoration. Vive hell forgetting so. We should says that sometimes come model keenum out. Mitt Romney Spider keep the faith in art was produced in collaboration with Selene. Ross US right. Now I'm GonNa cruise ship that started in New Zealand and ten hours will be getting enough in Australia. The ship is carrying over four thousand people and I needed to get away from all of them. I found a spot on the eighteenth deck. It is outside away from everyone else. It's getting late into the afternoon as the sun begins to turn the skylight pink and now it's just me and the sound of the waves slapping up against the ship as we north. The reason here is about thirty minutes ago after being asked for the past ten days. Are you gay. I was told come on Josh. You can't not be gay. And when asked what made them think that they said it was my voice. That's not the first time I've heard that and when I do get told that my voice soundscape hurts a lot more than that on and I wonder if I talked less but he stopped being immediately labeled as gay sexuality was first questioned by a boy named Jeremy on the second day of the cruise. I told them I was straight surrounded by ten other teens means craft is at the hallway. I didn't want to risk myself getting hurt or being avoided because of my sexuality and also because I don't know yet and since being straight is dozens of the normal it's safe. There's no one way to be gay appears to be a certain way. You don't have to dress a certain way. You don't have to act a certain certainly if it's just like it's that simple being straight isn't a personality trait if you're a straight woman. You're not automatically a suburban mom or is sure straight outta medically boy frat guy just like if you're gay you're not automatically Rappel. That's my best friend Ali. I came mattress by sexual in two thousand seventeen and ever since that moment when I came out to her it's meter relationship stronger. Alleanza very supportive family which she lives with but her filming. The South aren't as accepting. Don't pretend to be straight because part of me likes guys so when I go visit my grandma grandma. I don't have to worry about being told that I a fag or that. I shouldn't exist because I'm I'm like this because I can take hit and that sucks but I've never. I've been really lucky to live in a place to live with people and to be surrounded by people who are really accepting accepting and honestly don't really care everyone comes out of the closet at different times in their lives for some people. It's learning to accept yourself. Others might be when it safe from my friends over here. It's a whole mess of reasons. I'm still not out to my parents at this moment I'm very much ultimately. If teachers my school the parents I took a really long time for me to accept that and I feel like I add to learn how to love myself and understand that. That's me me that's who I am and I can't really change even if I try which I did. I definitely Detroit too. That's the that's like the worst. Because so much internal homophobia being enforced on around me and my religion and like I convince myself like I'm straight lie. Ideas like three girls just to like convince myself then Astro Visitor. What might happen if he did come out to his parents? Don't why would be kicked out more. It would be too much of our most of the rollercoaster for me because I need the allegation from my mom especially because she is my role model. She's not only role model in my life. I never really grew up with like a dodd. My only continuous support systems like my mom. She supports me eloquent. Anyone else says I'll be fine. I'll be great I would would not I would not get that support. Family is important and so social interaction between our peers but through my teenage years I found the most pain comes from the words my classmates and friends us as we. I'm trying to find ourselves. In terms of brain development. Students are really starting to identify their sense of self and also their sense of other. I think that process really starts starts happening around Middle School. This is Amanda. She was my freshman year teacher but has worked all over the country with students of all ages and I feel so cruel because in in that sense of other students are ushering the other people in their classroom in one way to other someone is to call the means jeans or make them feel separate which is very hurtful. Even if it's playful name that news painfully than it's very hurtful. Aw Not is used to cut down and entire Paul said when students begin to discover themselves. Don't realized the words they use as we're thrown around the land differently with each person for my friends EP. The word bothers him because of how directly relates to identity identity. Because it's like a pretty big part of who I am and like a core part of my identity I think and and it's something that I have struggled Louis Thompson now. I'm like kind of proud of myself. I'm I'm very comfortable with that part of me. Be Like talked about as a negative thing like a used as an insult. Like just seen as a bad thing. I think that's what's really bothers me about it for the past two years I mean knowing I was not straight I never really felt like being named as part of my identity on the ship when people use the word games joker negative way made me realize that it really was a big part of my identity and my values his and they're out there constant use of the word gay house being torn at the seams. One half of me wants to speak on to stop using the word gay as a joke but the other half just run to pretend it didn't matter in fear that they would hurt me anyway wasn't a street. I never felt so alone even though I was constantly surrounded by four thousand people. Luca a guy in the ship did use the word gave a joke and he approached me separately at the end of the cruise and came out with sexual to me. Talk to him about his thoughts. People are gain job negative way. Nothing's things really gone too far because there's nothing like oh I want to kill every gave us when I see that as oh like with taste like ironically hearing Luca seemingly unbothered by the word gay being used as a joke shocked me. I hate when people call someone gay in a negative way because it makes me feel less than like I'm GonNa lower-tier not than those who are straight. But when I heard the word faggot on the ship it just felt empty inside. It's such a hurtful word and asked another key. Conrad if he hears often living in New Zealand island younger brother Actually So he's what's skater right. And it's like this rivalry between scares scooters. So he's coming to get the scoop bags. Taken out of the sky hot bird faggot. Across the world is a slur. Sometimes it'll US meaning and people don't care as much but for me it's a hundred percent not okay. I talked with Michelle a friend of mine. WHO's an avid supporter of the Lgbtq community in her high school in us toward what her reaction when she hears the word Faggot? I mean obviously there's initial because I think part of it is just start reevaluating. What I think this person's leg on what I think their I guess their core values are and I? I kind of reevaluate how I WANNA approach situation for Queer and questioning teams. It can be scary to stand up especially if we feel and safe. But that's where ally step in and by calling others out in giving a voice we don't have one asked Michelle she's ever called for using the word gain the negative way. It's happened really recently. One of my friends was like saying something like someone like she to the like this law like. Oh that's so gay or something and me several of my friends. We literally were just like. Don't say that it's like stop. Why did you say that? And they're like oh I didn't mean game like you know what I'm not like Alabama. I'm like why would you associate bad with gay. We would call her Alpha and I think we did make her feel bad adversary. Not but I do think it's important that you become part of this conversation where you're able to call people and also this goes back to school. I run their emails. Then like make a pledge like call out homophobe when you hear and stuff like that. That's like you know stereotypical high school like guidance. Counselor type stuff but it's like I think it's important because it's something I'm not people kind of let fade away because either you're afraid to confront someone which I feel like there is nothing to be afraid about because what they're doing is wrong and you're in the right in the situation mation. I think if you asked virtually anyone about it like they'd be on your side. I guess calling homophobia is important but when it was on the ship all I really needed was someone to talk to and be there for struggling Frankfurt someone who is a figuring out there and is starting to feel comfortable talking about it. The the biggest support thought you could do as a friend not percent is just know.

Michelle Luca NPR Mitt Romney Agnes van Paris director Detroit Besson Louis Thompson US Australia Middle School Caref Alabama Oscar Josh Jeremy New Zealand Ali
"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:51 min | 8 months ago

"intern" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Israeli artist archivist Haddassah goal was residents this past year at the Oakland Museum and we interviewed her for the keepers project? It was Josh Josh Gross. Who took the tape and crafted for this piece in the Pacific world? There is ritual when boys turns three and he goes to school for the first time time he's asked lick honey of the Hebrew letters so his first experience of the language would be sweet and I thought what if I could go back to the beginning of language within my body. It's actually only a ritual for boys but I thought what if I could take back all the words and all the letters I've ever said go back to the point where language was just a taste east and I redid this ritual myself. Where Lake the honey off the letters and I began to do this ritual every year? It's just kind of taking it all back so maybe I would say better the second time around I kind of think of honey as the essence in my body when I was doing this work honey seem to be coming out everywhere so I started building this plumbing system filled with honey showers and faucets with honey coming out of them and in the beginning people could taste the honey but then slowly the honey filled the room until no one can come in anymore. My Name is Dr Goldman. I'm a video installation artist. I make work that has to do with original and I make very personal works and also make works with communities and Institutions Chai or the the lonely pines and the sleep be world has gone to. I lie dreaming. Um My thoughts are skiing and music so enchanting thousand. I made a piece together with a friend of mine line. That's called Lullaby and it's a piece where I interviewed hundreds of people working in Israel Museum everyone from the directors curator's jurors cleaning crew guards. And I asked them all to sing a lullaby remember from their childhood. And it's kind of like a very sweet piece. You kind of fall asleep sleep when you listen to it. And it's people singing and dozens and dozens of languages new Golden Fe. Gully not say Gordon Keen de la La la La. It was a piece of film for about two years. And when you start looking at it you realize that the the directors and the curator's are singing English in in European languages and when you kind of start going down the hierarchy of the museum than you get Russian and Arabic and America in different languages of immigrants. You're both street.

Josh Josh Gross La la La Oakland Museum Dr Goldman Israel Museum Institutions Chai Haddassah Gordon Keen Lake the Golden Fe America
"intern" Discussed on The Invisible Network

The Invisible Network

03:10 min | 11 months ago

"intern" Discussed on The Invisible Network

"Should be. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> As the summer comes to <Speech_Female> a close students <Speech_Female> returned to the universities <Speech_Female> with technical Michael <Speech_Female> and professional <Speech_Music_Female> skills under their belts <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> more importantly <Speech_Female> they leave knowing they've <Speech_Female> had a positive impact <Speech_Female> on the agency's <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Mission <Speech_Male> on July <Speech_Male> Twentieth Twenty Nineteen <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nasa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Celebrated The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Fiftieth Anniversary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the moon landing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Male> Apollo missions <Speech_Male> many <Speech_Male> of the interns mentors <Speech_Male> were apart <Speech_Male> of the Apollo generation. Ration- <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> those <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> inspired <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by trail-blazing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Americans soaring <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> through space and Neil Armstrong's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> immortal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> words <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> all corrupt <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> oil <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> group. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Music_Female> intern class has seen <Speech_Music_Female> the Apollo footage unheard <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Armstrong's <Speech_Music_Female> words. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> They understand <Speech_Music_Female> the importance of the Apollo <Speech_Music_Female> missions to Nafta's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> history <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but fifty years <Speech_Music_Female> have come and gone. <Speech_Music_Female> They look forward to <Speech_Music_Female> the future. So <Speech_Music_Female> these insurance <Speech_Female> will no Artemis <Speech_Female> Nasr's next <Speech_Female> generation missions <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to the moon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Female> Orion capsule <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> which will carry <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> astronauts to <Speech_Music_Female> and from the Moon Moon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> looks much like <Speech_Music_Female> Apollo Command <Speech_Music_Female> Service module <Speech_Music_Female> which served a similar <Speech_Music_Female> purpose in nineteen. <Speech_Music_Female> sixty-nine <Speech_Music_Female> its destination <Speech_Music_Female> and appearance however <Speech_Music_Female> are where the <Speech_Music_Female> similarities end. And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> when NASA returns <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to the lunar surface <Speech_Music_Female> we will leave more <Speech_Music_Female> than flags and footprints. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> The agency <Speech_Music_Female> will create a sustainable <Speech_Music_Female> human presence <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> there using the <Speech_Music_Female> moon as a stepping-stone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> towards Mars <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and beyond <Speech_Music_Female> expanding <Speech_Music_Female> humanities reach <Speech_Female> into space NASA <Speech_Music_Female> overturn with new <Speech_Female> knowledge and opportunities <Speech_Female> compared <Speech_Female> to Apollo <Speech_Female> The science <Speech_Female> will be more advanced. <Speech_Female> The technology <Speech_Female> cutting edge <Speech_Female> that data richer <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the artis <Speech_Female> generation <Speech_Female> will know a different moon than <Speech_Female> Apollo far. Far <Speech_Female> from Greenie analog <Speech_Female> footage shown on <Speech_Music_Female> televisions. <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> will know a moon. Delivered <Speech_Female> in high definition <Speech_Female> digital video. <Speech_Female> Live <Speech_Female> to their televisions <Speech_Female> tablets <SpeakerChange> and phones phones <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and who knows <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> scan. Intern might <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just be the one <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> focusing <SpeakerChange> the camera. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> The invisible network network <Speech_Male> is a NASA podcast <Speech_Male> presented <Speech_Male> by the space communications <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and navigation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or scam <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> program. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> special edition of <Speech_Male> the podcast was written <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> produced and recorded <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by NASA <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> interns. Emily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cavanaugh <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Victoria would burn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Danny Baird. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> episode was released <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in October of Twenty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> nineteen at at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the close of International <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Space Week <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> editorial <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support provided <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Matthew Peters <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> are public <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> affairs officer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Is Peter Jacobs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks to scan the <Speech_Music_Male> policy and strategic <Speech_Music_Male> communications lead <Speech_Music_Male> far Audi <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as well as intern <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> coordinators. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Jimmy Osservato <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Tim Gallagher. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The next season <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of this podcast. We'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> begin released <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the coming months. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be sure to subscribe <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and reconnect <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the invisible <Speech_Music_Male> network <Speech_Music_Male> for the <Speech_Male> full text of this episode <Speech_Music_Male> and related images <Speech_Male> visit that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> NASA dot Gov <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> slash invisible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to apply <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to scan internship <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> project opportunities <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> make <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a profile on intern <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot NASA Dot Gov <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and keep <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> an eye out for projects objects <Speech_Music_Male> that interest you. <Speech_Music_Male> We hope <Speech_Male> to work <SpeakerChange> with you soon. <Music>

"intern" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

10:52 min | 11 months ago

"intern" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges. Goldman Sachs where we discussed developments curly shaping markets industries in the Global Economy Jake siewert global head of corporate communications at the firm today. We're talking about what it's like to be Goldman Sachs in turn and how employers are trying to keep up with what younger generations want from a work environment to do that. We're talking to college. Seniors who Internet Goldman Sachs's Sachs's past summer and we'll be returning fulltime analysts next year as well as owner very own head of human capital management Dane Homes Catherine Rebecca Ending deign welcome to the program so much so this is for everyone briefly introduce yourselves where you from. Where do you go to school or did you go to school Tom. In what part of the bank will you interning in this past summer dangerous. Give us a quick. Take on your role here at Goldman. Sachs so my name is Catherine Doar VIZSLA. I'm from about an hour north of the city in Putnam County. I'm a student at Brew College here in the city and I had the opportunity to intern in the Securities Division this summer rotating on a few different teams within prime services. My name is Rebecca Scheiner. I am a super senior issuing university which is here New York City where I'm double majoring in accounting and finance but I am from Chicago and this past summer I was interning on the Jess Bank Alyce team and the Control Division here at the firm. I'm dain homes as was mentioned a head of HR. I guess in the small world connections I was born in Chicago. I went to University of Columbia Columbia New York so I don't know we're all all connected one way or another and I'm responsible for over activities around people at the firm leadership development okay just to set some context. We collect a lot of insights from our interns when they're here of the summer. Why do we do that. And what did we get out of that experience of listening to our interns over the course of the summer when they're here yeah so obviously we use the old adage that you don't know what you don't know and I think in a people driven business. It's very normal to fall into the trap of saying Oh. I know what it was like. I was an intern. You might have been a long time ago. When you're using an abacus. It is really true that you don't. I don't know what you don't know so part of it is getting the information and what's Great. I think about the generation that we're seeing today and a lot of the people that were recruiting to the French the firm open and honest and very frank about how they're feeling about things and how they're looking at the world so it's all about being informed unfortunately if they're happy to share it with us the intern class it's the summer was the most diverse to date talk a little bit about how that classes a reflection of what we're thinking and how we're thinking around diversity inclusion here at the firm we think about diversity inclusion through a bunch of lenses one is just if you think about it from a pure where business had serves clients and whatever problem issue usually solving some problem for one of our clients dance with our we want we want a diverse set of us in the room as we try and tackle whatever that problem is and so some of that is a reflection of frankly just wanting to provide the best solutions to our clients. Another part is is that in our surveys with our interns we hear that they want a diverse population around them so part of it is reflecting the desire of what the most talented people out during the marketplace that type of environment that they wanna work in and then frankly we have a core principle that we think about which is mirrored crecy and it's hard to argue that you fully sled meritocracy talk rec- if you don't have diversity in the group of people that you're bringing in because we've obviously proven time and time again talent knows no boundary whether be gender race ethnicity sexual orientation tation so having a diverse class of me makes me feel very confident that meritocracy is alive and well one of the things we did learn from the surveys that eighty two percent of our entrance that it was important and to develop managers that foster that kind of inclusive work environment so how are we thinking about the forward strategy for diversity inclusion particularly comes to training managers. All of this starts with one caring about developing our people which means investing in them investing your time. You're knowledgeable energy. Were looking for our managers to do that. The other part is understanding understanding them and so we started this question with why do we survey. It's a little bit to understand what drives them what they're looking for and in a lot of ways that's prepare managers to deliver that to them as well so managers play play a critical role in developing people in attaching them to the firm and making them effective and the diverse population would you need to do you need to make sure that you understand all the diverse perspectives that the people have in where they come in and you frankly have to care care about what matters to them care about what they're looking to achieve and addressing that and so you know it's resulted in a lot of education. We've put a lot of investment into our learning activities to make sure people understand the different perspectives that are out there but we give people the base knowledge and then we got to make sure that they care and engage H. and invest in our people Catherine when you came here to work over the summer. Does it feel more less diverse than your schools. And what do you expect for managers in terms of how they can do a better job of making people like yourselves comfortable. Baru at least for me is a very diverse school but I would say that the difference here wasn't huge Goldman's. There's definitely making big strides in that direction and I think something interesting just to think about in terms of managers kind of enforcing or implementing more of that diversity within their team team kind of what Dana mentioned a little bit about different perspectives kind of coming in from those diverse experiences. I think is important to think about so when I think about diversity. I don't just think of race ethnicity the city religion. Maybe I'm thinking more about kind of what have those experiences taught a person. What skill sets have they brought from. There and I think that's an interesting thing to think about in the workplace given that different experiences will transfer into different skills in different ways that a person can add value at team so my experience with diversity at the firm is that the firm is much more diverse than my my school or university but that said I think that within the firm managers can best encourage and foster diversity and inclusion by using it as an invitation to conversation because I've always thought of diversity as something so much larger than simply checking off boxes like Catherine said I think you have something to learn from everybody around you and while may be easier or more natural to start that conversation with someone who seems more similar to you at the outset. I think it's equally if not more important to start those same conversations nations with the people who seemed different than you are because in my experience the more you speak to the people who seem to be different than you the more you realize that you have a lot in common and I find that you come away having learned something and I think there's something really really valuable not so both of US studying finance as you're thinking about how to choose the next step of your career after school over the things that led you to Goldman and what were the attributes you looking for in a future employer. I think for me it was really the people that was the first thing and then I was looking at so I had a wonderful experience with all of my interviewers and that was kind of the initial stop that made me realize that golden was going to be a fantastic place to work and I actually had the unique opportunity many of turning here for two summers in a row and that's exactly what I've experienced. The people are incredible overwhelmingly supportive and helpful. I've always found that there's something you can learn from from everyone sitting on either side of you and I think there's definitely something to be said about. Never being the smartest person in the room. There's always something you can learn from every single person Golden Sachs for sure in addition to studying finance. I'm also studying accounting so last summer interns in a public accounting firm and it just wasn't for me so coming into this past summer. I want want to try something a little new which is what led me to controllers actually long story how. I ended up here but I guess in some. I'm really here due to the alumni I from my school who really stopped off and became interest me and guided me this way and I'm so thankful to them but how I ended up Goldman Sachs I mean I think the name really speaks. Thanks for itself because it truly is synonymous with excellence and that was my experience over the summer. When ever I was asked come experience was going. I would explain that I felt challenged. Challenge all around challenge that I was applying the things that I learned in school to my work on a daily basis which is rewarding in and of itself challenged and that I was furthering during the things that I learned and realized how much more I had to learn and challenge because I was surrounded by the most impressive people and as incredible as has my team is at what they do they were equally as incredible as a welcoming me as part of the team and of teaching me about my role and what I needed to do in order to succeed and they really thought to it that I was successful and to me that meant a huge amount so dean when we talk about work life balance means different things to different people and this is one of the questions questions we asked the interns is interesting sixty two percent of the entrance associated with spending time with friends and family only seventeen percent associate with disconnecting at the end of the day when I was that age that's what I was connected so it's different. It's unique for each person can meet flexibility can time always helpful to understand it. What does it mean to you so I'm not surprised. Now I found the pure synergy between me and most interns for me. It's family and friends allowed to but what's interesting stain. I think for me when I think about flexibility around life. It's having the space to live your life intentionally around the things that matter to you and I know there's this this whole debate. Oh can you have an odd habit. All say to people who have a problem with saying oh you can have it on like what you're just not creative enough because there's a lot of things in the word all a- and so to me you know work like balance starts with my family. I'm a obviously a husband and father and my wife. I guess semi chose me my kids. It didn't so I have an obligation on. Yes unfair to them a burden. I have to live up to and I care a lot around my community particular ticket around African American boys. I also care a lot about a lot of the friends that I've had growing up and you know people go through challenges in your life so being able to be there when that matters an an investment. Those things is really really important and the part. That's been interesting for me. It'd been at the firm I've been able to intertwine some of that together where some of those investments with with my family or whether it being so my charitable activities have been amplified as a result of being the farm and so that's actually created a unique synergy we sometimes it can these things is one or the other but a lot of times. There's a little inter twining of the Tube but for me if I can look at architecture and design books. That's that was my made in college. I I can spend time with my kids teasing them as much as possible. Make my wife think I'm a major intelligent brilliant funny good looking delete that one takes the most work of all then then. I'm pretty good so how about for you what is work life balance mean when you think about entering the workforce full-time and and what could employers be doing better to support healthy lifestyles. I think for me I'm one of that seventeen percents I would definitely put a focus on being able to disconnect from worked just because I don't think it can be fully present with friends and family and kind of pursuing your different passions. If your mind is always at work and in order to make sure you're not burning out and you can kind of come into work the next day really add value.

intern Goldman Sachs Internet Goldman Sachs Golden Sachs Goldman Catherine Rebecca Scheiner Catherine Rebecca Chicago global head of corporate commu Putnam County New York City Catherine Doar US University of Columbia Columbi Brew College Dana Securities Division
"intern" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"intern" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

"Listen to the chorus thing and hey we've we've asked the interns they've been grinding for eight weeks and they're graduating this week and the opportunity sit down on the podcast and to to ask any question they want on business leadership training personal growth career tracks whatever it is that's on their mind. They have a chance to ask the question today day. So let's go down the line real quick introduce yourself and a little bit of background and we'll dive right in. Hey guys I'm Julia. I'm currently going into my second year <hes> Fairfield University diversity which is in Connecticut. If you don't know I play volleyball there I've been training fitness quests per four years now and <hes> super fired up for this podcast <hes> and I've learned a lot out of this internship just seeing how much of an impact I could be to other girl training four years at ten and going in and in to what what year now airfield second year second year second year just a sophomore check it out guys. My My name is not. I am going to be a junior Washington University in a couple of weeks. Go cougs yeah there. I'm studying sport management. <hes> I WANNA get into to some sort of like sports business profession <hes> once I graduate but his internship here is helped me personally and physically on getting to know more people coming out of my shell that I've been in although I was finished quest client first time back in two thousand eight when I was about nine years old only so even living on the other side I've seen the impact I've seen the way of <hes> coming out and you know kind of finding your true self and getting along with people better and I've also in the physical side as well like learning about more like P- rehabbing rehab south. I'll take back to me that I didn't know beforehand interesting fact you had a class last semester with Mike Leach coach football coach Insurgent Warfare Football Strategies is a nice ninety minutes seminar <hes> for the month of April where we talked about war and the VAL football and not how they're the same because they're not the kind of how their little more similar. What was the one thing that you learned from coach. Leach either what he said how he carried himself. What what is it <hes>? It's more about his saying about swinging your sword about how your body's sort many. Don't want your store to be dull. Dull sword soared y'all can be able to take down your opponent but if you sharpen your sword if you know if you're in the weight room if you're training consistent love it you're gonna be able to take down your opponent and if you swing your sort of into nasty and your violent and you're aggressive. You're better off being passive love aggressive fantastic. Hey guys on Alex costs. I got my bachelor's in Kinesiology at San Diego state in two thousand seventeen currently have one semester left at San Diego State and I'm working on a master's in exercise physiology not nutrition science. This engine ships been great really diversified. Training South had a lot of fun here and it's really made me realize that there's not one way to train anyone. Athlete thebeat lot of cross training involves learning from the trainers and <hes> really excited for today. I really just want to go and see what's inside that brain those gears turning into the mind right maniac man and what what's your goal. What do you WANNA do Sunday. I WANNA work with professional athletes. Which is why I took this internship. I didn't do for college credits or anything I've just heard so many great things about it and I know some people who've been through it and so I wanted to do it mainly for the experience and I know that you train a lot of high quality athletes and even the average joes but they're all treated the same way I also have aspirations of owning my own facility at some point and everything I've learned this internship has just catapulted me into doing exactly that awesome awesome Nice Job Alex. Thank you Chevy. Hello hello everybody. Thank you for having us here. I'm so super excited for being here to to be able to talk to you. I am actually a fan of Melanie Durkin. Yes he's my professor to meet this <hes> I won't I'll say better half. Let's say this meet this. I'm super excited. I had no idea she's so modest about who her husband is so I'm just happy to actually be in the room with todd today and be able to talk to him. <hes> you know a little more one on one and <hes> have his attention rather than be watching him from the distance train which he is so great at <hes> so. I am alive learner and I go to southwestern college again with Melanie your wife and when and she gave us the opportunity to come here. I just knew that it had to be done and again. I had no idea what I was walking into but we came here for <hes>. I'm just to walk around before the internship started and soon as I walk through the door so much love and I said Oh yeah I need to be low so I'm very happy that I had the opportunity and much more excited to be able to talk to you. One on one like I get to do with Melanie more often also Chevy. If you guys haven't listened to the previous episode with with my wife Melanie definitely tuned and she talks about her experience as a teacher and professor at southwestern college and <hes> Chevy done a great job here the internship so congratulations. I think some semblance of Garett what's up on Garrett Garrett. I'm currently a student at UCSD going into my third year <hes> <hes> longtime client of fitness quest through both my family. My sister has gone here for multiple years. <hes> I'm actually going on seven years as a client. I'm here now and I intern last year and this is actually my second year interning finished quest and the main reason behind that is just the community. It's such an uplifting feeling being here with all the other interns and all the other coaches an environment of just motivation and optimism. That's just <hes> something I wanted in my life. It's something good to have so second time intern. Did you pass the first time I think the past because they brought me back nice good guys. You're looking at five and listen to five great interns on this end today. All we're doing is opening up for questions of who wants to go first and whatever you have question wise. Let's rock and roll tune in go ahead all right. Td I got a I got a question that I was thinking of. It's been on my mind for a while. While since I was in deficit training as a high schooler so your success and with the success of fitness has a gym the two different brands how come there was never are bigger expansion because there's forty two forty two forty one staff Yup Yup and if you look at the space when I walk in you're kind of like wait seriously you kind of you know. Take a step back and then you kinda grow to appreciate it more but how come there was never a bigger expansion into like a more of a warehouse type facility or more of a conventional right. That's it's a common question. I get actually is you know why why don't you have this twenty or thirty thousand square foot warehouse and people come in expecting that and they walk in and we have eight thousand square feet an eight thousand square feet is distributed between three thousand square feet upstairs in the roots and then five thousand square feet down here but two thousand square feet of this down here is absolutely massage therapy physical physical therapy locker room and everything else and <hes> you know believe it or not when when I was growing the business I always wanted to be the best. I never wanted to be the biggest. I always want to be the best and I remember wing cotton asking me about <hes> you. WanNa have won five hundred. I said I want to have one. I want the best one and I WANNA make sure people fly in from all over the world and come train with me and one thing I've realized over the last nineteen years is that it's not the size of the business that makes you successful well. It's the culture that you create in the community that you create your business. One of the secret sauce is that we have offended question is that we're not twenty thousand square feet. It's because the culture culture here is contained in a space that you can get this energy electric. You guys have felt that this summer with Alex and the training in that and that's part of the the secret sauce and I it took me a while they realized that because my mic growth mindset so I was like yeah we gotta get bigger and bigger and bigger but I've learned that bigger is better better better. Bigger isn't better better is better so my ego sometimes like man we should have that big space but Mike we will know because my love and my passion isn't and managing brick and mortar. It's not in growing in really changing lives and one thing of the last let's say five years especially the last two years. I realized as we've grown our our our brand with social show media and digital is that we don't need more or bigger brick and mortar to impact more lives right so what we have done now and I made a strategic decision when we expanded expanded down here in two thousand six took on the extra five thousand square feet is much of my growth in the last few years has been outside of the brick and mortar. It's been with growing my mastermind group. We have now one hundred eighty seven fire breathing dragons where I could digitally literally coach trainers worldwide we actually have a coaching program that just launched to every day high-performers MOMS and Dads grandmas GRANDPA's who want the most out of life in training and mindset and all that so what I realized is there's so many ways to grow and it's not always defined by having brick and mortar matter of fact unless you know you on brick and mortar. I would suggest maybe not having brick and mortar unless you know you wanna be really like doc here all the time so for me. That's the reason why we haven't grown to more quote space. It's been more. I want to grow in different areas. I want to write my books and speak more and and grow the mastermind group in the coaching groups in all of that as well right I'll say or I'll add one thing onto. What I've experienced has client is at you. You you meet people yummy different. You're not sure anyway just because you're so closing share the same space and I'll go for a while although you although you may never be in a training session with them you come to grow a a <hes> relationship bond some sort of friendship between the two that's part of the it's part of the tactic tripping over each others. You have to get to know each other right when when you have let's say eight ten twelve trainings actually going on some of those are small groups one of the things. I've always said since day one or two thousand is I won't ever trainer introducing their a client to another client always introducing why because.

Melanie Durkin Chevy Mike Leach Alex professor Fairfield University San Diego Connecticut intern Garrett Garrett Washington University WanNa UCSD P Football todd four years nineteen years
"intern" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

Journey to $100 Million

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"intern" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

"And I was usually involved incision wanted to hire someone that was at least mid level to senior level. We almost never wanted to bring someone in that was junior level. Now going back to previous fifteen years or so I was in software development. So as a software development company, we just didn't really want to deal with someone that didn't know what they were doing. And if a lot of time and effort to bring them up to speed, and it was just a gamble. And so my hiring up to maybe like the last year or two has always been hiring mid to senior level people. Well, since we refocus to digital marketing, one of the things we realize is that there are at ton of marketing students in local colleges around here who are eager to do work as interns now we struggled with whether we should pay them or not in the end, we decided to pay. Ah them because we expect deliverables outta them. What we've found is that it's a great value. And these students are super eager to jump into the workplace and get real work done since we're doing digital marketing exclusively these days. It's a great fit because he students come in with a lifetime of experience dealing with digital marketing. Now, they're not experts by stretch of the imagination, but they know the basics of things like social media advertising and websites. We don't need to teach them that. Right. All we need to do is teach them the best way to do it. And if they come in with a good attitude, it's a great fit. So we experimented with this over the last two years. And at this point our process is really set we hire interns for a set amount of money all interns, get the same amount of money when they come in here. They work by the hour. It's roughly fifteen to twenty hours per week. They get amazing experience. They really do. It's a good thing for them to come in here and work for us and learn from us because we we are definitely way ahead of our competitors. And a leave with a wealth of experience. We also ensure that they get certifications while they're here part of the requirement is you have to get one or two certifications and things like Google or Facebook while you're here on the job. So it's great for them. They get amazing experience get money. They get certifications. It's a resume builder is great for us because they're enthusiastic they're relatively cheap. Actually, scratched the relative there really cheap when it comes to wages compared to a full-time person. You don't need to pay them benefits. It's a win win win for everybody. We love it. And the amazing thing is we have converted several of them to full time employees. So again young. Eager not very high wage requirements. They do really good work. They come in. And knowing a lot about the business already. And it's so good that we've converted them to full time employs. So check out your local colleges. See if they have an intern program get to know, the professors in your particular industry at that, college and see if interns a right for you. Definitely right for us. Thank you for

Eric Olsen intern Google Facebook one hundred million dollars fifteen years twenty hours two years
"intern" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"intern" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Interns. The Mark Levin show. Comeback kid is the Mark Levin show. Ben Ferguson, filling in for the great one. He will be back with you. I am excited to announce he will be back with you. On monday. So make sure that year round for that. In the meantime, I'll be holding down the fort for you. We've got so much to talk about today. Don't worry. Some of you've already tweet at me saying I want your comments on the seven year old Guatemalan girl who died in border patrol custody. The Washington Post came out with a disgusting headline trying to blame our border patrol agents. Who actually did everything they could have saved this little girl's life. She was already in bad shape because of the actions of her parents who put her life in danger by trying to break into this country before she ever got there. But apparently that doesn't matter you got the seven year old Guatemalan girl died in border patrol custody. That's how they want it to play like they killed her. Like, they threw her in a cage and didn't feed her and didn't give her water for days, which is not what happened at all. We'll deal with that coming up in just a little bit. All right now back to this other story, which is you've got Michael Cohen Accu like I was. Loyal to Donald Trump. And that's why I did thanks for him. And that's why I went to. That's why I'm going to prison. No, that's not why you're going to prison. The reason why you're going to prisoners because you and your family did a lot of really shady stuff with your businesses that had nothing to do with Trump. That is the exact reason why you've gone to prison you've gone to you're going to prison because you lied on your taxes you're going to prison because you defraud of the American people. You're going to prison because you're you're a Turney who thought you could get away with it. And then you got busted. And now you're trying to say somehow, this is all Donald Trump's fault. No, it's not. It's your fault. Take responsibility for your actions. And no, I don't feel sorry for you going to jail for three years, in fact to after hearing this ridiculous interview, George Stephanopoulos,.

Donald Trump Ben Ferguson Mark Levin George Stephanopoulos Washington Post Michael Cohen Turney seven year three years
"intern" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"intern" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Intern and hitting that first step. I would hope that that would wake you up enough from your little drunk and super could go. This is a right police asked her what happened have you had anything to drink. She said I had too much for how little sleep. Days ten to eleven AM and two to three PM on NewsRadio KLBJ. Over team. You had better be prepared to be robbed and shock for Rush Limbaugh. Damn right. I'm tracking them down the investigator. It's going to infuriate you rush. I have been on your side singularly focused unfair all of this out. Weekdays eleven to two because you have no idea. What's coming? Wait till you hear this on NewsRadio KLBJ. Marc and Melinda. Illegal immigration people with mental health issues, the police they're all wrapped up in. This story story covers it all. This is a twenty one year old woman who's been living here at Austin if she is an illegal immigrant jeez facing deportation. And the sheriff is holding her at the request of ice the family says that she has mental health issues and should be in a mental hospital. According to the police they were calling around so different a local hospitals in and they decided to go ahead and handcuffed her because she has been known to have Greta behavior, and when they did that she attacked about the critics are saying just ignore the attack on.

Rush Limbaugh Intern Greta investigator Austin Marc Melinda twenty one year
"intern" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The interns. these police officers shot in South Carolina and one incident. Doors the outpouring here. I'm quite wears the outpoint. Countries changed dramatically. It's truly changed dramatically. You know, you never know what you're going to read when you wake up in the morning. Particularly when you're a public figure, and there was a piece in the Washington compost pay somebody named Michael or D E B O NIS. I want to read this to you. The longest serving US Senator found himself under sudden attack from President Trump on Tuesday night and hours later, Patrick j Lahey remained bewildered by the whole thing. Now lay he has been a a hitman for the left. For decades. A smear merchant. But the Washington Post feels it needs to come to his defense and figure out why would Donald Trump be criticizing him? At a campaign rally and south haven, Mississippi, Trump suggested that lay he had a drinking problem while riffing about the democratic chairman who might be in charge, come January. If Republicans lose the Senate majority a guy like Bernie Sanders would be in charge of the budget committee Patrick lay. Oh, he's never had a drink in his life. Trump said check it out look under Patrick layhee slash drink. Patrick layhee. Dash drink will be in charge of the appropriations committee in a brief interview Wednesday Lahey called the attack bogus baloney. Well, that's kinda here a bogus baloney, Mr. producer and said, he had no idea where Trump had gotten the notion. He was a drinker he attacks everybody except Ladimir. Putin e said everyone knows it's bogus. We do lay Hugh seventy eight and has served by the way. I thought the accused is presumed guilty. So Patrick layhee you're presumed to be drunk by your own standards. It's a job interview. It's not a it's not a court of law. Has it feel dummy? In a brief interview Wednesday Lahey called the attack bogus baloney now. Lahey was seventy eight and has served in the Senate since nineteen seventy five holy mackerel is known for a number of things on Capitol Hill among them, his Batman movie. Cameos look how the post there's a new story writes this stuff his fondness for the Grateful Dead and his love affair typography and scuba diving and is nasty vicious smear tactics. I added that but tippling is not one three longtime. Congressional aides of both parties consulted about Trump's claims a democrat in two Republicans all said, the wild Lahey is certainly not known as a teetotaler. He's also not known to drink in excess. Well, how do we know that we check his high school yearbook? How do we know that have we talked to anybody who went to school with them? How do we know that? By Wednesday morning and internet search for Patrick layhee. Drink turned up mainly coverage of Trump's remarks, notably the attack came as Trump supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh is under weathering scrutiny, ladies and gentlemen, for his high school and college drinking and notice the reporter didn't go back to look at les. He's high school and college drinking. Lahey is among the Senate Judiciary committee members who questioned Kavanagh on the subject on September twenty seven. But there is a clue where Trump might have gotten fodder for his attacks. You have the audio Mr. producer. In twenty ten conservative talk radio host, Mark Levin. Twenty ten. Conservative host, Mark Levin. Well, that's an improvement of a right wing conspiracy. Theorist Aaron extended hold on computers bonking outta me here. Aired an extensive what did I hear aired an extended a bit on a speech late. He gave on the Senate floor at nine forty one AM on January twenty eight twenty ten tell it's almost nine years ago. Criticizing the citizens United vs FCC supreme court decision and sound effects of a beer pouring in a Cup in accused lay of slurring his speech quote. I think we have a Senator with beer breath. I could be wrong. I leave it to you decide. Honestly. He sounds drunk to me. There's one problem with Vince, accusation Lahey, just happens to sound like that C span video of other than what you think about I did a bit on Lahey. I did a bit on lady this idiot with the Washington compost is going digging deep why we check with three congressional. And now we went back to C span, although they never did go back to high school or college would Lahey. And we all know, Washington compost, and Mike whatever your name is we all know guilty as accused Powell, that's your standard Lahey speeches around that time show him speaking in a similar manner. And in a hallway interview Wednesday, he sounded much the same. What he sounded drunk lay said he had no idea about any interaction where Trump might have gotten any impression about his drinking habits. The only personal encounter. He could recall was Trump's 2017 inauguration an episode. He called very pleasant but devoid of alcohol at ten o'clock in the morning walking through the capital. He said, no. So he got it. From me says the Washington Post. When we come back after the break, I will play for you. The very audio at the Washington Post. Found compelling after an enormous amount of research. After enormous amount of research, the Washington Post, which obviously could not find anybody in high school or college didn't even contact them. Who went with Lahey ties color college to see if he had a drinking.

Patrick j Lahey President Trump Trump Patrick layhee Washington Post Senate Washington Senator South Carolina producer Mark Levin Brad Kavanagh US Patrick Bernie Sanders Michael Senate Judiciary Putin Ladimir FCC
"intern" Discussed on Stick to Football

Stick to Football

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on Stick to Football

"To rocketmortgage dot com slash football. What's up everybody. This is stick to football. I'm Matt Lee draft rhetoric, Bleacher report, and joining me this evening. Not one, but two co host. We have anyone use that, Mike, it's Dan died. So good luck state way. Maybe don't get too close disinfected. We should've sprayed. It was some four, zero, nine or something. Next time, our intern Walker, Texas Rangers here. Russian from Alabama. Oh yeah. Dr. Long drive brought. He brought to cases of natty light though, so we're gonna let him stick around have some fun on the show this week. And if you're thinking maybe inter inter next year, it's probably a good way to get in bringing beer. Well, this show is not sponsor by ninety late, but this show is paid for by Bleacher reports. Let's talk some sports. We're going around the league. We're gonna put old TR through the garlic because that's what we have to do in. Oh my God, boys, do we have an interview. We have an interview guys. I, we've been teasing teased for weeks pulp tro scouts coming on the show. We spoiler alert we did the interview already. It's fucking treat fun with the quality is a little off. Yeah, he used a voice modulator which we explained in the interview and I love this guy's Twitter. I think it's hilarious, but we're out here to dispel the myth. The he is me and I am him. I can say, one hundred percent. Sure. He is not you and everyone will know it. As soon as they hear the interview, but he was a lot of fun and a good sport because we are not the most professional interviewers, and he's the first ever Friday guest. That's the first time you've ever let me interview someone. Well, no, it's getting you let me a couple times over the summer, but you haven't since then. So I just privileged that I got to talk to. I actually interviewed like Peter, King, Jason candor, and like some like some of our most important guest ever. And Harrison. Yeah, nowhere like, Nope, you're out. You're done. The top of around the league? I are, we talk about slur, et this week. It says, hashtag fantasy suites finishes. We. Oakland. Underwood. Got nervous said I'm not doing the fantasy suites and he got sent home was talking about. I don't think he did that. I think that was more Becca thing. I also say the producer's like honestly, they made Tia comeback, and my girl caught so much heat on Twitter and Instagram where I follow her the producers. Baller in. They're like, you know, we need to get this promoted with her and my boy, Colton. So I don't think any of that was real cold. Our guy through for our football player, I'm really excited that he didn't lie still don't know what position he played in college. I don't either. I think tied in or linebacker. I don't know. I'm not. I don't know not going to go there. That's not what this fantasy suites about. No, it's not. We are doing our fantasy football league Matt, Connor. And I, we are going to be taking part in that. We're going to draft teams also are longtime listener at Tim NFL volunteered to be the Commissioner that league and he's getting it all set up for my in this league. Yeah, we're, we have a team that I'm not the Commissioner right. Okay. You wanna do. Trades and shit. SO part of the would be the worst to be an elitist. I can tell you from the franchise Madden. The listeners are a handful. I bet my DM's. They are right. We love you guys though. We do so part of getting into the fantasy league as we had so many people wanting to do it. We had to come up with criteria for it. So what you have to do, you have to be following me at mellow Esquire. You have to be falling Matt at fell draft scout, and you have to be following Connor at Connor j. Rogers and at Tim NFL as well as the main account at sticks. Football. How the hell do you get Tim NFL. I don't know. He must've been like the second Twitter, like after a non and And it was. it was, yeah. So you have to be following all of those accounts and you also have to contribute to the show which you guys do a great job at anyway. This time you just have to tag on the hashtag fantasy suites to get your chance to play in our fantasy league..

football Twitter Dr. Long Matt Lee Tim NFL Texas Rangers Connor Oakland Underwood Alabama Mike intern Commissioner Becca Harrison Dan Colton Walker producer Rogers
"intern" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

Legion of Skanks Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

"Intern glove me what that last yeah the smart money is on you but i'm rooting for you i'm rooting watch it on vegas fucking assholes i'll watch the livestream you're not going to support me when i am supporting you bro i can't tell you the date yet did not disclose all when you told me off air i will tell you if i can okay well got be my corner i'm gonna get this bmi corner you guys my all my podcasts zack all my pockets brothers it'd be my corner for interns right guys ralph confuse european put on a mask in club is fucking day on the way to the cage hacks is gonna fucking spear him from the side harding it fuck it back dog and we've had our issues but you know what the folks you've also felt my wrath yeah i bet you more than anybody mike doesn't again to win mike do you think that a win this fight compare she fuck a big moment this if you don't love every fucking second of this fucking hack what's going on do you do you you weren't following the conversation up to that oh you guys doing a podcast what's up mike just waiting for the other warriors to pick him up so they could go out and play play harrington do you think that i'm gonna win this fight against ryan o'neal yeah yeah wanna no professional fighter as avails mania right is he knows he professional fighter.

vegas mike Intern ryan o'neal
"intern" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Yeah and i believe that totally because then promise you in the next three months the way things are going grammy listen don't do it when it's cold outside because i have i have the swig little cough syrup in my time well you needed that because you've had you've been ill i had so much just went ahead and checked out for life but really i feel great now string is spring is here yeah and raining snowing hailing sounds great i bet it does anyway i wanna let you guys know that i watch you faithfully every day yours yeah except what i go over and on thursdays when i met my prayer meetings and i've got to pray for you someplace you know really appreciate what i'll talk to you guys later bye love to all of you okay ex ex all the way millie squirrel is up next off the other through my call off man i would really good grace i mean the thing i love about nearly is that she just sees the positive in everything i mean who else these going from a head coach to an intern as a good thing other than milly you know but you don't do millions millions the lady that's always in the front row on on on sunday morning and you need those people i wish i could have her positive outlook on a little check it too i envy her and you know called she met me she makes you wanna like and root for butch jones.

intern butch jones three months
"intern" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Jones an intern an intern i think that i think it's really kind of a good thing you know that called them in turn i mean it's it's a pretty good name for somebody don't you think really don't you you still i know yeah well that's okay i drop the mic oh well i could understand that too anyway i think that he is a butch jones is just you know an inter in there the the new hire and that's what i was when i worked at a job one time so well listen i understand i saw that mark is back it's kind of nice i'm back i'm ellie hi how you doing how was your trip really it was fantastic thank you for asking oh we ask you a question i mean more marcus still moderately young guy moderately overdue right yeah a young you're in your upper thirties right yeah that's getting old but the point is mark did something that i really admired last week i mean just spur of the moment when i just said and i say that we're on the air no you cannot yeah go ahead blanket i'm going to dayton with my team they win i'm going here i mean milly when's the last time you just said blanket i'm gonna do this well why i don't want in my life it said it was going to take off and go someplace although i was a whole of a lot younger than me you know mark was you know we're what was the what was the blanket moment for you.

butch jones mark intern dayton milly
"intern" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Got okay so in west hollywood cal got going to west hollywood so i'm going to be an intern for who walker drew dross his looking for hardworking interns who are highly motivated detail oriented reliable organized and have great time management i well that's not me i need someone here in new york okay let me time management skills not a good enough so much he didn't make my own out l you make your own hours at an internship it's not anymore maybe in the restaurant business i need to be an intern they go internship in brooklyn what is it what is it mule letter it's a contemporary women's ready to wear line i'm so and so what do i need to do as an intern there you have to learn to design for the three fashion uses the posh princess the bold rebel and the mysterious vixen oh got the posh princess in the bag i'm calling me there it's very hands on be prepared to have important daily tasks you'll be coach through them but you should have great sewing skills and knowledge in knowledge of pattern making tripping techniques cal cal maybe i can't do that we'll get into this later if you work for a big corporation here new york city and you'd think it'd be a great intern would you get in touch with no one's calling i want an internship at your company we've got to do a free trip phoned up here we ran in the morning shows free trip phone we're off to beautiful miami beach now if you win this trip to join us for our fourth annual dysfunctional family vacation at the gorgeous eden roc miami beach.

hollywood intern brooklyn miami beach walker new york
"intern" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"intern" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"So why don't you wanna be enter no not for us i want to intern for a big company okay i want to i gotta find an internship do this no real your resume and you put your trump six down and help me let me find unions or engine you have to send it i don't know fashion yes is love fashion i want to be a fashion t squared maybe they haven't figure it out it's never you're never too old to be an intern now what brody brody's in charge of hiring interns i wouldn't hire you here's an intern why not too much attitude am i too sassy little cocky ronin so strict to like if you spell anything wrong on your resume if you use the wrong your route the he doesn't he is so picky when i had interns i went into my intern like bits so when can you start my that of the interview i had an intern that came once then disappeared for a month and i'm like well i don't wear the hell to go shows up one day with t shirts for everyone and i go where have you been you know just didn't feel it coming in any thought it was going to be fine and i was gonna say no problem you can i said you gotta leave you can't anymore oh he was out with his friends doing stuff what what straight nate fastened schober mentorship only.

intern brody brody nate one day