20 Episode results for "Interferon."

Interferon (Entry 652.PS10303)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

55:21 min | 1 year ago

Interferon (Entry 652.PS10303)

"Ooh For the College Football playoff number. Four Oklahoma this is number one. Lsu stoppable the chick filet peach bowl at four eastern then number three clemson reigning National Champs Again Defensive Title Number Two Ohio State Justin field in this offense attack. You in multiple ways playstation fiesta bullet the College Football Playoff Semifinals December twenty eighth on ESPN and streaming live on the ESPN APP. Hello future links. This is Ken and this John. We're GONNA take a second here before the show begins to celebrate the holiday. Winter Solta solstice season season the salt as we call it the Soviets the pulse if you put a pulse on a Soviet because he's turning red. It's sold this Just to mention that With the advent of the holiday season in late November two thousand nineteen through advent in there. That's nice yeah just a lot of just a lot of subtle Christianity Hannity. Every time I talk offended by the starbucks cups that don't have a major everyday. 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That's the main legible and minor or not. John's have Pentagram often do at even higher tiers. You can get an autograph copy of those show notes mailed to you or or even the ability to choose a show topic and rocket your preferred omnibus idea to the top of the queue. Yeah we're going to try and make that as difficult difficult as possible for you to achieve but it is a perk. Maybe collaborated if your idea is terrible or offensive and or even know video chats with the two of us so go to Patriot dot com slash omnibus project. See what tempts you. What tickles your fancy? What credible new he benefits there are for you? To enjoy crave crave my favorite word moist. Happy Holidays everyone And this message we are Ken Jennings and John Rodrick. We speak to you from our present which we can only assume you're distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty first century during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization. We began this monumental reference of strange and obscure human knowledge. These recordings represent our attempt to compile and preserve preserve wonders an esoteric that would otherwise be lost so whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or just reinvented the technology to decrypt our transmissions. This is our legacy to you. This is our time capsule this is the bus the so you accessed entry six five two dot. PS One zero three zero three certificate ticket number four zero four seven eight interferon eh in a Jan around the A my friend. Seth is a facilities. He's manager guy at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute institution here in Seattle. It is a big operation. Have you spent anytime in and around Fred Hutch. It's a local. Yeah I have. I remember when biotech I arrived on the Seattle business seem. This was going to remake Seattle. We're going to be the biotech city. We sure were and they took over the old steam. Plant down Down on Lake Union which extended five. Yeah famously sort of landmark. That had because I still got these smokestack. Was it five or six big smokestacks five. I've been driving by at my whole alive. I think five well when they restored that building to turn it into a tech campus. I Mo genetic Simo genetics. They took the old smokestacks down to do. And put up fake smokestacks that are not connected to the building at all so the Kurds are not even their fiberglass and they are bolted to the roof without they serve no function because they you know they cleaned out all of the machinery. That would have made those necessary. You know the titanic had a fake smoke mark stack. Oh it's three of those were functioning in. The ship just looked ugly. They were off center so they put a fake one on. I wonder if they had something burning in it to the fake ones smoke. Oh yeah it had dry ice. It's like a smoke. It's like a high school production of summer night stream going on in there so you hung around hung out around Fred Hutch checking it. It's a huge. It's grown enormous. Likes Pie sliced down there. But it's been so overshadowed by by Paul Allen's tech campus nearby that became Amazon's headquarters yeah. We never expected downtown to become Amazon country. Seattle was bracing for downtown to become biotech international national right which biotech took off here because the University of Washington hospital was such a sort of like Fecundity conned generation point of this kind of biology. Fred Hutch pioneered bone marrow transplantation for treatment. I'm GonNa Cancer which led to this whole class of immunotherapy treatments for cancer. which a whole variety of cancers respond to my friend Seth is is just? He's in the facilities team there which is all the infrastructure stuff it's everything from air conditioning ducts to the the the super cold freezers. There are a lot celebs there. They need they need Bunsen burners. Yeah he he brings in all the bunsen burners. Yeah right right right here master but he was GonNa have me speak at some kind of facilities abilities management convention and he was like but let me give you a tour for so I got a tour of. That's the kind of gigged our years at your dream to go play Yeah uh-huh to play pink. Floyd songs facilities managers facilities managers at a giant conference room at Fred Hutchinson actually up in Lynnwood. But I got. I got a tour of the building editor. I got a tour of the building I and it was the kind of thing where the tour was. It turned out to be extremely detailed. Like I did not know how many hours I was going to be looking at different kinds of tunnels and stuff like between each floor at Fred Hutch. I guess there's a little mini floor floor with like you know like being John Malkovich style like three four foot ceilings. What's going on in there? Just all the all the duct because they've got a sucky in this air out out that air and all kinds of complicated machinery and wiring too. They let you look at an electron microscope. Did you look through anything at anything. No the funny thing is none of this. Was Cancer Related. These are all super advanced. You know what do you call it. Wage back no and buildings are super green ECO friendly they're all certified certified sure signal six certified to led lead or something like that. Yeah you have to speak lead there. Her and so they've got this amazing state of the art stuff so the building a super efficient and it can run on a AA battery and but none of this Swiss cancer related but the just talking to him and the other guys there they were all super true believers about how they're they're part of this brave crusade crusade and and the Fred Hutch is just millimeters away from solving curing all these kinds of cancers you know he. He was showing all these kind of displays. They have in their visitor's center about how you just need to put Salamander DNA in the right place and the tumor will just light up like wrecking electric ill or something and put the lime in the coconut. You got to put the lime in the coconut. When when all that stuff open down there I think You know because our generation of course was the one that was cynical about everything everything and we worried a lot about genetic engineering in how they were going to we weren't we weren't concerned about putting corn syrup in in our tomatoes. We were worried about the the the prospect of making superhumans or some in runway cow octopus. Calculus yeah no offense that are listening to the show but know that we were going to that that people were going to not just eliminate disease but that there would be some Gatica level of it's all the ethical questions around cloning and Eugenics and all the weird areas around that it's not wrong super people. I don't know we stopped talking about it. That used to be a there was a there. Were a couple of years there were that seemed like the real danger started making billion dollar movies about super people. It's probably all the government campaign to to to so that we don't freak out when they unveil the actual hoover yeah like everyone's wondering why all these movies have to be avengers now like these are marvel. Comics can't sell thirty thousand copies of right wisest. The only kind of movie there is getting ready for the government. Subsidies Hello Grays it's a disinformation campaign that you know that's funny. We never think about that but when the youth does do come all they have to do is where leotards with like logos goes on the front and capes and we'll be like amazing finally Really all I wanted was avengers and now here they are so cost. Play is that will lead to the enslavement of maybe. That's maybe that's why the rising cost play but there did seem to be just from my afternoon tour. They did see seemed to be some kind of feeling at Fred touching general that they were just on the brink of a precipice. That cancer is GonNa just start falling Lake Domino's to these new advances and you you know it's the big boogeyman because it's something that terrifies everyone. We've all seen multiple friends and relatives. You know older relatives succumbed to cancer and ate a lovelace Ada lovelace for example right. Do you consider her a friend. Or a relative Well you know. I feel like having read about all the incest that happened. I believe I am probably related to her and some level and if you were related there that wouldn't really out as a romantic partner. Probably more as a romantic but we we've always been told cancer's not going to be in our air. The last a few decades the line is always been cancer. Can't be cured. There's no such thing as there's not going to be a vaccine we'll like AIDS has become a manageable disease but but it's a virus. There's never been a cure. Cancer is not a single vector. It's not a virus or a disease. It's a it's a thing your body can just start doing right and it turns out your body can do it in a thousand thousand different ways. Just just kill itself with with tissues. It shouldn't be growing. Well there's gotta be a way to to turn it from a from a like a mistake to to a theme right sure. Can't we use use our cancer growing powers to can I think my biceps real big. Can I get my hair line. A little more solid nine out of ten guys would make their penis big out of cancer. Just give me a cancer peanuts. How come I did the G. rated version of that? I joke with paralyzed by you. Had to go right to the jokes. That's where it's my role here. Hey friends we want to talk to you about the future of phone service because it is here and it's called visible Yep for forty bucks a month all all in you get unlimited data messages and minutes on Verizon's four G L. TE network and visible doesn't do annual contracts they also don't do shady hidden and fees or foot long phone bills either when they say forty bucks a month they mean forty bucks a month yeah and when they say unlimited data that means unlimited data. They also don't have physical Michael Phone stores that means no waiting lines or dealing with annoying sales people with visible. You can sign up by a new phone or bring your own device. Get help nope. That's tap away via chat text or tweet and get better phone service all from their APP or website without ever leaving your couch. Yep So are you ready to learn more or switch divisible the head divisible dot com slash stuff and get twenty dollars off your first month of service. An exclusive special offer just for stuff you should know listeners. That's visible dot com slash rush stuff so our bodies are just really good at killing us. There's there's nothing I can do a thousand ways the one thousand thousand guitar chords or no. They're probably one thousand sex positions. There aren't a thousand guitar chords. But there's like literally a thousand then ways your body can make some awful thing happened to tissue. That shouldn't and then you'll it'll just kill itself and that that that's a new discovery because people used to die die of cholera or whatever and now we live long enough. We've killed all the things that can kill us from without and now our bodies have started killing us from within. It's really a metaphor for for the American Century. We we held off all our enemies but it turned out that I really didn't matter but as as recently as in our lifetime years in mind there was a lot of magical thinking around cancer and curing cancer and you might remember the boom of excitement around Interferon is ever on your radar. Absolutely I mean I think interferon was was something that I read an awful lot. A lot of editorials about for time. I caught people's I because it really was one of these. This could be the game changer. Cold cold fusion is exactly right in nineteen fifty seven to scientists working in Britain a British scientist named Alick Isaacs and his Swiss. I believe colleague. John Lindenman Took some embryonic. Chick sells like from a chicken from a unhatched chicken and exposed them to a a flu virus an influenza virus that they had inactivated You know it's a traditional kind of knock knock Yele Shin kind of thing thing but they're exposing December on Excel to see what happens and interestingly the cells produced this kind of sticky protein that no one had ever seen before that happens to a teenager. They will panic some military but in this case they were very excited because this news sticky sticky Peptide Dade created When they exposed to live flew it stopped the influenza virus from replicating? Oh so they keep peptide. They thought they had done you. Know kind of the vaccination smallpox kind of thing on a cellular level and because they had interfered with the replication of the virus. They thought we have done it. We've created a new thing called Interferon. They had they had a great space age name for it which I think is a huge part of the story. Here's the branding is very good. Sure Interferon your fear on it makes you just sit up and and Logan's run. It sounds like something that couldn't possibly exist yet. It sounds like unobtainable right right. Oh we finally have interferon. I needed this whole time now. What is that? It's what it's what allowed Luke to have a biotic hand right. It's like yeah you give it to a wide receiver and then there's no. Yeah no pass Interferon or whatever it. So this hits the media this idea that we've created this new it turns out to be the first of a unsuspected kind of fluid called cytokines a thing that a cell can secrete that has immuno suppressing property and does a cell ever secrete cytokines on. Its Own. No you you. Yeah well in this case to get interfere on you have to go through this whole song and dance exposing it to some denatured or sub deactivated fire thing and so so this is a this is a thing that sells themselves didn't know they could make I guess. Yeah I mean it's a property they have or maybe maybe it just on a on a lesser scale or in conjunction with something else that it had never at least been isolated right And when it hits the media it's a big deal you and I remember it was a full hour of the macneil Lehrer report about two groundbreaking possibilities of interference there front and center you every night. My microwave popcorn are you and your family. Were watching Nova Cosmos and ABS news. Are you're watching your American masters in your dateline. And you're right here geographic Disney after school specials after a Charlie Brown Christmas. I saw this in my like I. I think it was an elementary school textbook. It was one of the reading samples we were supposed to read was about how everyone's worried about cancer. But guess what it's just I Once we get interferon up to speed you know say goodbye to cancer as this is an essay reading in order to pass a reading test on the SAT EXAC- hey this is off the such an excerpt from one of my children's books just got bought by the State of Pennsylvania to be one of their reading samples on a reading governor standardized tests. There's no higher achievement. I feel like it's real apotheosis when you become part of the standardized well and I'm sure that that I think it's it's up to me to make a criticism that it's just it's just making those tests more and more white less and less we've found the most diverse thing. We could a forty-five year old white guy from a game show writing a children's but this was very formative for me at ten years old or whenever I saw this in my third grade a textbook case the upshot of the piece was pretty much like this is the future. It's all taken care of and the idea being that the viruses replicate and if we can just interferer on them as it were we can and stop there. We can't we can't cure their desire to replicate. We just make it difficult for them. It's you know the the mechanism was never actually explained. People were treating this like it was a magic bullet. Because you know the Times piece I read from the sixties makes the claim that this is the the body's main defense against illness and now we have finally harness that we found the secret. It's like we've isolated the secret of how they're white blood cells works except they needed to be triggered. They've been super powered they've been you know it's like giving the Hulk Gamma radiation or something you you pick the cell until it produces the magic juice and then this will do everything and it's really all this media hype release suggested that these things would give us a magical miraculous protective power against disease so this doesn't attack. The virus strengthens the cell right. It's not clear what it would do against cancer because again cancer does not come from a bacteria or a virus right but the the media the breathless media coverage of this really said and of course this because this is just your body's natural disease fighting power it would clearly work on viral viral bacterial even cancer. What so it's a herpes cure is that is that? Is that what you hear when you finally but But but they're just hoping that it makes the cells also resistant to whatever mechanism. It is that causes them to be corrupted by cancer. Sure or if it's if it's doing good things then that'll probably include lights it's like Buckminster Fuller's vitamin C.. Yes die maxine Is it wasn't linus. Pauling the vitamin C.. Right but yeah. It's the same kind of thing all you do is find the one secret and this goes back to the beginnings of for thousands of years. People have had this idea that somewhere out there is a panacea right. Panacea was the name of a Greek goddess whose name I think means you know heels is all you know she. She was the goddess of universal remedy. No matter what was wrong her miraculous powers could cure. And this was one of the main goals of medieval alchemy was was to isolate the philosopher's stone. You know the things that can turn gold led to call and confer eternal life but one of the main things they're looking for. Is this this elixir right. You Really WanNa cure for hepatitis and melancholy. They didn't have hepatitis hepatitis. Having not yet been invented they mostly just wanted to cure melancholy but But yeah I think it made sense to them back that new today. We know it's bogus now that we understand what the vectors of these diseases are. You're it's obvious to us. It seems very unlikely that one thing would cure them all right right but back then. They didn't understand the vectors and also they kind of felt like the natch they had this religious belief belief that the natural state of humanity was to be resistant to all of it right. Like if you read the Bible All these Patriarchs in genesis going back to Adam. They lived for over nine hundred years. Yeah so the implication is that disease didn't bother them so one also disease was connected to moral turpitude right so if we could just get if we could just restored that natural state that makes it seem like a much more attainable task right right and then we can just be like Methuselah and all these guys and I I'll be able to smoke my pipe without coughing and my mucus being a weird color. Goodness finally I can go back to smoking my pipe so this is kind of the the last burst of this kind of magical thinking science will find this panacea interfere on in these headlines just stands in for thousands of years of people thinking the elixirs out there. The magic medicament as you would say I would. And the problem is that as people start wanting to test the properties interfere on the problem is it's in very short short supply. How is it made well at first? A squeeze these cells and create the orange juice. It really is like hand squeezing orange juice you get you get donated blood from people you have to extract all the white cells and then you have yours you have to do at Isaac's I'm Linden. Did which is expose all the white cells to something. Bad that you've denatured that you've deactivated make it secrete it's magical goop and then you collect sweet goop. This requires a lot of ducting in a very small floors. Lots of centrifuge. Yeah you need a lot of three. Three foot ceilings to get all the centrifuge ventilation and the math is such basically you need two hundred seventy blood donations just to give you a week's worth of interferon treatment not to mention all the the men are that go into making the interferon just doesn't seem like an effective way to combat millions of cases of cancer. No with from two hundred seventy blood donors. You can save a lot of lives so it's a hard case to make that really you should take all that out and squeeze out of it. A tiny tiny amount of of interferon the magical juice that we don't know what it does. I see what you're saying blood donating blood in its natural form is a lifesaver in terms of. That's valuable medical for transfer you so just to make thick nick academic case that I need two hundred seventy blood donors just to give me their blood. Most of which I'm GonNa Throw Away Rights that I'm going to use to make magic hypothetical goop. It's hard for anybody to to get the funding for that. Somebody estimated that a pound of Interferon back in those days cost about twenty twenty billion dollars and I remember this stat showing up in my little seven. Seven year olds reading excerpts and just because they make much of this they know Oh kids are wild by that. So they're like it's a million times more valuable than gold. That's that's the power of Interferon right and to us that was a measure of just how amazing and Sada and sought after. It wasn't how powerful it was a really. It's just a measure of how extremely hard to extract. What was the effective dosage? Like one pound of Interferon on could it. Could it cure all the cancer in the world series. Imagine it's like a fantasy novel where you just need one drop from the magical vile I think it was a very very small doses. Dosages were where the study's started there. I saw a lot of news reports from I think we're now into the seventies Three thousand dollars vials of arrive in Glasgow from Denmark. A Scottish hospital has been all these horrible cancer cases and they're just pleading with these state of the art. Scandinavian researchers. Let us try some of this interferon on cancer. And let's see what happens and so little tiny vials. Three thousand dollars are given to a child with ear cancer and the funny thing about the story is it announces that after just a few weeks on the treatment the child could see again. Well yes because he had cancer not I. I can't say no. It turned out the cancer had spread throughout his his head and actually did he actually had been blind to and he did have site return in one eye and And his ears improved as well and of course this is. This being Britain does enough for the tabloids to just start screaming magic drug miracle in Scotland Blend. And he's not. A child is not receiving any other treatment. I think it's I think this is used in initially last ditch cases. See and this. Is You see this today with cancer. If you've ever known anybody WHO's fighting cancer it gets to a point where they've tried all the stuff and then they and their families were just clutching at straws. For what's what's the new experimental stuff right. We read that. There's I read on the Internet. There's this one guy in Minnesota. There's this one guy in Pakistan or rubbing crystal. Can we try this. Yeah this is why Andy he goes to Mexico has some guy con him with cow intestines But that's exactly what happens. In this case these headlines Trump at this amazing using development and suddenly tens of thousands of England alone has one hundred thousand people with cancer at the time all these cancer sufferers and their families Ktar now just storming hospitals. Can you imagine the that desperate feeling of awful. Yeah and you see yourself in it like if that was you oh you would absolutely be grappling. It's the stages of grief bargaining as well or your child right. I will do anything and so. These people are weeping and literally offering you know what their care providers. What can we give to get on this interferon? List and three thousand dollars doesn't seem insurmountable but that three thousand dollars is is not no. That's that's a little vial like you can just go buy it for three thousand dollars. These are just anecdotal reports. Nobody has actually done a study yet. Around there's some anecdotes about the same time of doctors who happen to have someone hand who see what it'll do on cancer and they get encouraging results one small surveys done on with people with OSTEO genetic sarcoma but apart from this kind of run on the Bank of the Interferon Bank. Nobody's actually published work on what this stuff actually does. And and it's not until the very late seventies that a British company in Kent called. Well come what it's welcome but it's two L.'s. I hope it somebody's name well. We'll come no. It's a play on the word. Get well they ask you to come. There could be a nail will could be welcome. I don't know they have. I found a way to culture to make interferon in a lab with by cell culturing. Basically they've got these 20-foot-high tanks where they've they've got some stem them like embryonic cell lines that they've preserved in some way to immortalize them. It's just a more. They've still got to figure out how to stimulate it and how to purify defied the results but finally there's an industrial process to start to make this stuff in quantity and it's still expensive but now there's interferon on on hand to start testing. It's given to one lucky patient. kind of this test best-case some patients zero type and it kind of sad ironic twist the patient immediately goes into respiratory arrest. Because they're using it turns out that too. They're allergic to the binder. Know to this day. Something that wasn't known because Interferon and only existed in small quantities. All of these but to this day we now know that one of the primary problems with Interferon not hinted at in my third grade textbooks is that it has flu like side effects. I assume because is you're you're treating this stuff with with D. H.. It's now believed that. So there's some toxicity to it far from being a cure all actually the body reacts badly to it because it inoculate feel flew at least we now believe the interferon is the thing that your cells cytokines like interferon art secreted created by sales when exposed to viruses like flu. And in fact. That's one of the reasons why flu accompanied by these aches and pains and fevers like that's the medium through. It's the symptom appears so if you're just going to isolate the stuff and give it to the patient you're just GonNa get some of the benefit but you're definitely getting it. All the aches and pains and fevers. I having the flu. So this is a natural process of cells to combat viruses. Not a thing that human technology just just to software the first time I guess I guess we had. We certainly haven't seen it and I don't know if that means that it had not been isolated did or your body different parts of your body your squirting different fluids at different other different parts of your body all the time so it might be something that science had to concentrate and isolate in in order to actually know what was going on but yeah if that theory is correct like that's that's part of. Why being sick makes you feel awful? Your cells are making interferon. It's it's interfering with your good mood and your ability to get out of bed and eat solid food. And in a couple of these early high profile profile cases the patient actually later died in some cases after making encouraging headlines died of cancer or of something unrelated of flu flu I think the the patient with respiratory arrest did survive the patient. That could have killed that patient. The Interferon could've killed in that case. He survived but many of the cases of promising progress. We're actually followed by a a quick downturn and death presumably from the cancer but it was definitely eating into the miracle drug reputation of Interferon and again. It's a problem of this kind of story story that the breathless advances reported all over the world right. It's the it's it's cold fusion all over again. Yeah as we saw with cold fusion when you know the then there follows confused period. Where nobody you know? People are more excited to write the breakthrough story than they are right. The the bummer. takedown down story. Well and that's one of the problems of media particularly media. That isn't the media that's up to to the minute right rather than slow media. We talked about this when we talked about cold fusion. It's the same problem. Today is that when actual science reporting according gets filtered through many many layers from between the time somebody writes an academic paper to the time you hear a local newscaster talking about it or it shows up buzzfeed logistical right and as its gone through those many many steps it gets less and less reliable like a game of telephone because the you know the academics because we saw in the cold fusion segment are certainly incentivised to make their trumpet their breakthrough the biggest way possible but at least that's tempered by their worries. This is about their reputation. The media this point knows there's no reputational downside sure tomorrow is a new day right. Media cycles are now ten seconds Hey there it's Jonathan Strickland from tech stuff. Be sure to tune into a very special episode of tech stuff that was recorded inside a Mazda Mazda. C X thirty at the L. A. Auto. Show where I discussed all the INS and outs of human centric design. While you're listening be sure to check out the first I ever see X.. Thirty at Mazda. USA DOT COM slash. IHEART or better yet to see the entire Mazda vehicle lineup visit your local area area Mazda dealer today so does interfere on over time demonstrate that it does have a practical use. Well well In nineteen eighty shortly after welcome started doing their cell culture tanks. That technology was made obsolete by Genentech the a company that I was able to use genetic engineering to kind of make artificial interferon genentech survives. Yeah GENENTECH's big company. It is and one one of the one of their early advances from this time was using essentially cloning to make interferon in a more quick and efficient way and they had a market for it in the eighties. One one of the one of the things. They were trumpeting. It as a treatment for was Kaposi Sarcoma. Oh sure this the skin lesions that were a common side effect of AIDS so suddenly that's a very visible high profile cancer that they can treat and I think i. This is the period that I remember reading about interfere on on a lot in connection with the with and particularly in the late eighties early nineties when that was very much a clutch to any kind Donovan. Hope Media Era before the age of the of the the multi cocktail. Azt Yeah because because you know. That was the huge epidemiological story of the time. It had a narrative like whole communities. Ladies were dying it had famous faces attached right and it had this kind of ended. The world hopelessness where we don't see any way to stop this. This literally early could be hundreds of millions of deaths and so yeah interferon was mooted as because this was still people's backstop in their mind if we can just get interferon onto work. That's going to be the promising treatment here and the problem as it turned out is that Interferon does not work on cancer cancer. And it wasn't a question of the I mean was the cloning effective at creating actual interferon. Yeah we finally got enough industrial interferon to test. We could try all different kinds of cancers we could finally do large scale peer reviewed studies on what this works on. What it doesn't and it turns out interferon has really no use with cancer at all like it was kind of a naive assumption scientists now realize to just I think that the body magically had the ability to kill cancer and all you had to do is flip a switch right interferon could turn on the body's own cancer fighting abilities ability it's really related to the the magical thinking of the alchemists that deep down we should be able to defeat all this stuff? You just have to unlock your hidden potential right. Did it have any additional us. Was it a gasoline additive. Or did it did it. Produce Mommy if sprinkled on on green beans. It did actually not green beans or gasoline. I'm sorry to say do not do not sprinkle you know you could it. Could it would be he funny if it was still some twenty billion dollar added to put it on rich people's Burgers. MSG substitute like Manhattan today. And there is a gold leaf on your pork belly. Or whatever Josh Show how fancy your your lobster Burger is. I wonder if I'd feel queasy eating eating interferon on my pot stickers as I do with MSG the ultimate poison. Well if somebody tells you. It's a sticky peptide that they got out of stem cells by giving it the flu. I think I'd feel a little queasy. It turned out so for a while. It actually it's it's one. It had very limited cancer you certain kinds of renal cancer. Kidney Cancer seem to respond to the problem was it was it was so it was such a negligible help. And the flu like side effects the toxicity problems still there so very quickly got displaced by more targeted drugs and therapies. There was a new generation of drugs. Coming out this time we understood the biological mechanisms better. It wasn't just like hey. I met a cell squirt. This let me eat some like at this time we were actually kind of targeting the cancers in a better way so even for renal cancer it was it was very quickly made obsolete but It did turn out to have some other uses. I think to this day it is interferon. The the miracle drug I read as a kid has very limited use but it's still prescribe describe for titus hepatitis. I got lucky BINGO cards. Yeah I mentioned earlier and there was oh I thought you meant you personally. Were lucky. I didn't I didn't realize you had been looking for hepatitis no I never have had hepatitis. Thank God I thought you had a Bingo card of twenty. Five personal illnesses hoping Interferon would beat the the two areas in which it did have some application where hepatitis and multiple sclerosis. Apparently it does some good for sufferers in certain situations so it wasn't a total dead end the way it wasn't a fraud like cold fusion was right but what it was was just a very promising alley for future research. You know like uh-huh very early you know theory is it was it was eight a lovelace saying you know. Hey what if this someday. But in the in the age of mass media it quickly became a fuhrer. Well now now that we have A. I think a progressed. Beyond the the. The great prohibition on Stem Cell Research is that is that the case are we now at liberty to use stem cells to research them as a cure because for many years right stem cells seemed also to be a miracle drug or rather a source of of Miracle Drugs but we were prohibited by. Yeah in this case it wasn't scarcity. Keeping US away it was it was the it was the kind of religious legis and ethical fears. You were talking about around cloning and well and it and it involved it involved fetuses which are of course a A A unreal. 'CAUSE CELEB- here in our time. When George W Bush banned the use of federal funding for stem cell testing other than lines already existed he explicitly appealed to not science but religious beliefs? He says because life is such. It's a sacred gift from God. We shouldn't be monkeying around with this. We should not monkey. That's what he said. Yeah not not a monkey. It was partially revoked by Obama. So there has been and there. I don't know of any movement to to return to the the kind of Reagan and Bush era rules but the but the but stem cell research was always ongoing in in Europe it was never prohibited did stem cell research similarly produce not the expected results. I think it's too early to Saffi like it's still ongoing but it's the same kind of thing where you're you're right to be suspicious because it seems like such a sky's the limit kind of thing. We don't know what this is going to do. But Oh you know what it could be really great. And then the headlines are stem cells can cure aids and cancer stem cells. We're going to be the thing that that allowed us. Aw to live Methuselah like lives and it is kind of magical thinking like these are cells. That have not yet differentiated. Therefore they could be anything that could be any therefore there could be the magic curing things. That's right although they could also give us two tunnels do you really think. That's that's possible. Do I think two tongues are possible. DOC tongues go to war the When you talk to scientists today about Interferon and kind of this this brief flirtation flirtation with the public imagination? They'll say that the really the main legacy that interferon gave us was skepticism. Like it it was it it kind of treated you know because it was the boy who cried Wolf Sticky Peptide that cried wolf or whatever it really cautioned a lot of scientists scientists to To bring less hype around potential cures and treatments for cancer. So I think in at least in the scientific community if not in the media media. Ucla a lot less rushing to optimistic judgment do you though. I don't know like at Fred. Not Not not. According to my friend at Fred Hutch convinced that the the the glow in the dark electric L. D. N. A.. Or whatever going to is going to save us all from every kind of tumor I mean that kind of chastising Mistake seems like it would only affect the immediate generation like the the two hundred and fifty fifty scientists that are working on things that might be. A big splash are all sort of They keep their noses down a little bit but they people that that come along. Five years later are like Miracle Cure. It'd be like sure you. Super Dummies fell for Interferon. But now I've got the real deal my super destructive con- on that's right like this stuff can't fail. Yeah my pig tempus the pig to piss urine is restore a lustrous head of hair. I feel like I'd rather dia cancer than drink. Picked up his urine. I didn't say at a drink. It shouldn't have assumed anima. Let's assume mm that a pig to pass urine. Enema gave you a healthy head of hair. Would you do it. This is like the fleet. I think about whether you'd sacrifice years of your life to be conventionally attractive. No I think I would just be like Ron Howard and wear a hat and and keep the pig away from my gut. Is that okay. Would you sacrifice years of your life to be conventionally attractive. I mean more so than you. It's hard to even imagine but You know it wouldn't really help you. Now you're happily married and your kids are grown. That's exactly what to do with your attract and I'm in A. I'm in a culture where I was lucky enough to be born. A man right. We are also ready famous and rich. So yeah I'm not. I'm not the right audience. It's for this hypothetic- right right. What if you could skateboard as good as Tony Hawk sacrifice? Well it's the big dipper Sentamu. Still oh I thought it was five years of my life. Well let's say it's five years of your life. I think I would take the Anima to skateboard like Tony Hawk but not sacrifice by any of my life right right because in five years I feel like I could. You'll have to measure the good. You could do in five years and you think you know is that better than a kick flip but you always just think of it as being the last five years of your life where you know God willing. You're just sitting around anyway. That sounds pretty good honestly like when when people talk about how sad the elderly are and homes eating soft foods and watching reruns. Yeah I think you know what I should have signed me up. I should have chosen the kick flip twenty eighty five years ago and that concludes interference entry. Six five two dot P. S. one zero three zero three certificate number four zero four seven eight in the Omnibus Future llings. I should say that in fact there are about twenty five hundred possible Guitar Court so quite a few more than one thousand playable guitar quarter. Those are those are possible. Ones like yeah you know. There's no way a rush record uses more than eighteen hundred of those right. I mean most people. Don't you don't play the guitar and mixed the Lydian Mode. You would have to be a really good guitar player to to know or a genius musician to no one Hundred Fifty Guitar Chords Alicia keys famously. said she knew one hundred and fifty guitar. I Probably Know Eleven Guitar Chords that I that I could play and say like for sure I know this. Is this election records. demystify your art. Because now I'm like I feel like I should just take a couple of weeks. Learn my eleven court. I'm afraid you probably could. I mean and you know G G minor I know a g seven I know she minor seven and start to run out right around there. I mean and I could do that with an A.. D. A. B. In an e let's twenty eight right but but But you know I start to account the end like what what is I mean. I play things that are augmented nines. But I don't know what they are. It's just like a play a play a seven and then I take one away. We have to know the name for the thing to say. I think if you're going to say I know one hundred fifty guitar chords and somebody throws out a play G.. suss five. You better be able to plant. We need to get Lisa keys. On some kind of gameshow well. It's a game show where she sits guitar just and fields all your Qatar nonsense. I don't even know how to say some of the Guitar Chords. I don't know we make jokes about mixing Lydian. I don't know what it is. I mean but I think a lot of the success that you have as a musician has to do with your your right hand your rhythm and can you put together a seductive or taboo rhythm with your swing and hand as opposed to make the Sassy cords off the Changes Guitar George over here like ultimately who apparently were the one band who knew all the court well George did. Did you just yelling at the keyboard player Bass players or something along guitar Georgia's thrown around. But he he's mostly rhythm he doesn't I wanNA make a crash. Is it implying. Sultans of swing have a lead guitarist. Who knows not that many courts? Yeah that well the lead guitarist in this case. It's because it's guitars nicer. Like George has an old guitar. He can he he just thumps along. But it's you know it's the it's the lead guy like crucially usually angus young. Just plays the lead guitar. He you know the cords are all his brother. And his brother's got that swinging right hand creates the swagger Keith Richards in my opinion having follow the rolling stones for most of my adult life. I feel like Keith played. Some really good Solos in the middle period after Brian fell into the swimming pool. But before Ron or before mctighe before Mick Taylor showed up but once Mick Taylor was there keep never played another lead as far as I can tell but but the stones don't want you to know that they want they want to be the legendary stones guitarist but a lot of his solos. I mean he played some great. So are you just saying he was sad that Brian drowned and so that inspired him to play some good Solo. Maybe maybe we need another drowning. I will drown Ronnie Wood. He was out on heroin. Your and if it gets a better solo it maybe when this when the heroine goes away so too. Does the gift problematic Ouch anyway. Let's hope that none of this. This is none of this survives. Because we're going to cut it out because it just it asked so many questions that can answer strategist threaten the life of Ronnie what. I'm probably on a watch list but but go to facebook twitter instagram omnibus project. Gatt Ken Jennings at John. Roderick The GO-TO instagram. and See me for who I really am Email us at the Omnibus Project G dot Com and we will read your letters on our special program that is available to you if you give it to our patriotic monthly omnibus addenda important elements that you are contemporary listeners. Thought were being left out of the. That's right That is at Patriotair Dot com slash omnibus project. You you can go to our future earnings page on facebook which is a merry bunch of pig. Too possesses all giving one another urine. ANIMAS EMMA's to cure their baldness. They're currently mad that we did not a talk more about George Romero when we talked about zombies. Oh of course swell. They're all Zombie completed. Let's talk about our in our good job Jorge Romero. Hey Nice job. High five plus putting those Arby's in that graveyard or whatnot. Yeah that was. That was clever. And you're really scared us but not really you. Basically gave Jonathan Colton the topic of one of his song. People are mad. We didn't mention the Jonathan Coulton Job Tiro but I got there bro. It's you can mail stuff real stuff mill us. Your Zombie hands at. Po Box don't actually at Po box. Five five seven four four shoreline Washington nine eight one five Zombie. Han sounds like a kind of poisonous toads tool breath like oh look. There's Zombie hands are under that tree right. Did don't eat the Zombie and Berry listeners. From our vantage point in your distant past we have no idea how long our civilization sation is going to survive. Hopefully we find whatever the miracle drug is allows us to live forever and and John and I come to your homes every in the far future to listen to the latest omnibus with you. Let's do but if the worst comes soon if our genetics are already too spoiled if only our children children survive who knows this recording could be our final but if providence allows we hope to return to assume for another entry Dr Dr Q.. Here from the new bear and a Banjo podcast available now on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast. Here is a sneak peek on the road back to Angola prison the four travellers came upon a wagon pulled by two old workhorses with a large figure wrapped in a prison blanket holding the reins as they pulled closer. They saw it. Was the man called bear support for Barrena Banjo. Joe Comes from one. Medical was same day appointments convenient locations and twenty four seven virtual care one medical makes it easy to talk to a provider about anything visit one medical dot com to learn more.

Cancer Interferon interferon Fred Hutch AIDS Seattle Ken Jennings flu Fred Hutchinson Cancer Researc John Seth starbucks Oklahoma Lake Union hepatitis Lsu Ada lovelace Ron Howard
Bat Interferons

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Bat Interferons

"In spite of being hosts for a multitude of different viruses, bats don't display any signs of the resulting diseases. What is it that keeps these creatures of the night, so healthy? This is innovation now protecting humans from deadly viruses. Like Ebola has immunologists working overtime. And a group of scientists in Australia are turning to bats for answers all mammals release a group of proteins called interferons to block replication of invading viruses. Although humans have a large number of these proteins one Australian mammal the black fruit bat has only three unique interference and the bat uses those proteins to offensively fight disease in humans our immune systems kick into action in response to infection the interferon defense for bats is switched on all the time creating an upfront attack again. Disease without causing the toxic reaction to tissue and cells that same twenty four seven response would cause an humans manipulating the immune responses of other species to work in a similar way could be just what the doctor ordered to safeguard the human population for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulling innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Disease National Institute of aerospac interferon Jennifer Australia NASA
#B113 (betaine to bethel)

The Dictionary

10:05 min | 1 year ago

#B113 (betaine to bethel)

"Hello words welcome to this episode of the PODCAST. It's not yesterday's episode. It's not tomorrow's episode. It is this episode. We are going to have a lot of Beta words again Yeah so let us talk about them. The first word is Beata Eugene. I think that's how it's pronounced. B. E. T. A. I n. e. e. The pronunciation guide says bt which is hard to say it is a noun from eighteen. Seventy five a sweet crystalline coronary ammonium. Salt C Five h eleven n to obtained especially from sugar beets. Also it's hydrate or its hydrochloride So this is from the Latin Word Beta which means beat so it doesn't seem as related to all the other Beta words. This is literally related to beats next. We have Beta Interferon two words. Noun from nineteen eighty an interferon produced especially by fiber blasts. That is used in a form obtained from recumbent DNA especially in the treatment of multiple sclerosis marked by recurrent attacks. Yeah attacks alternating with periods of remission compared to Alpha Interferon and Gamma Interferon. Different kinds of interferons now. We have the word BA take. It is a verb from the fourteenth century. Just transitive I think number. One is archaic. Synonym is commit com it number. Two to 'cause oneself to go so definition is just to cause to go next. Beta lacked amaze Beta Hyphen L. A. C. T. a. m. e. lack tomase. It is a noun for nine hundred and sixty five. An enzyme found especially in staphylococcus back area. That inactivates the penicillins by hydrolysed seeing them. Fancy NEXT HAVE BETA. Oxidation two words with a hyphen now. From Circa nineteen thirty five stepwise capitalism Qatar or catabolism stepwise catabolism of fatty acids in which to carbon fragments are successfully removed from the car. Box L. end of the chain. That wasn't mouthful next. We Have Beta particle two words Noun from nineteen. O Four A high-speed electron specifically one emitted by a radioactive nucleus in Beta decay apologies. For All these scientific words. If that's not something you're interested in but you know every once in a while we get an interesting one now. We have Beta two words now from nineteen to one. Synonym is Beta particle. What we just read number to a stream of Beta particles called also Beta radiation next. We have Beta receptor two words with a hyphen now known from nineteen forty-eight any of a group of receptors that are present on cell surfaces of some effector organs and tissues innovated by the sympathetic and that mediates certain physiological responses as relaxed of bronchial and uterine smooth muscle and increased heart rate when bound by specific. Adra nerve agents compared to the Synonym Alpha receptor. So there was a section in parentheses. Those were examples. Visa dilation relaxation of bronchial and uterine smooth muscle and increased heart rate next. We have Beta test. Two words Noun from Nineteen Hundred. Seventy eight a field test of the Beta version of a product as software especially by testers outside the company developing developing it that is conducted prior to commercial release. Beta test is a transitive verb and Beta tester is a noun next rehab a hard word to say it is Beta Hyphen Fella seem lia fallacy. Mia T. H. A. L. A. S. S. E. M. it is a noun from nine hundred sixty. Two Fella see MIA in which the longer haemoglobin chain is affected and which compromises coolies anemia in the hydro no homos condition and Fella Siemian minor in the Hetero. Is I guess condition. Whoa next. We have Beta Theron. Sounds like a robot. It is a noun from nineteen forty. One an accelerator in which electrons are propelled by the inductive action a rapidly varying magnetic field next. We have Beta wave two words noun from nineteen thirty six and electrical rhythm of the brain with a frequency of thirteen to thirty cycles per second that is associated with normal conscious waking experience called also Beta or Beta rhythm. What is the what is the frequency of my brain? I don't know I don't think it's very good next. We have beetle B. E. L. It is not the beetle that walks the legs. We have talked about this before with other words that sound like beetle but are not not spelled the same way this is a noun from fifteen fifty three a climbing pepper peppers can climb a climbing pepper of eastern Asia whose leaves are chewed together with Betelnut and mineral lime as a stimulant mastic. Katori Matt is when you choose. So that's just a word related to that. This is a Portuguese word. Beata knocking to pronounce it. B E. T. l. e. from a Tamil word very lie next we have new beetle juice capital B. E. T. E. L. G. E. U. S. E. and The pronunciation guide does say it is pronounced beetlejuice or beetlejuice or Beta Jews noun from seventeen sixty nine a variable red supergiant star of the first magnitude near the eastern shoulder of Orion. So this is a French word. Beetlejuice from the Arabic word or words bite aljosa which means Gemini or literally means of the House of the twins and this is confused with Orion. It's in parentheses. It says confused Orion and beetlejuice. I don't know but I've said beetlejuice many times so I'm surprised that he hasn't shown up next. We have Betel Nut Beatles the same spelling it is two words. Noun From Sixteen. Seventy three the stringent seed of the beadle. Palm and. This is from. It's being chewed with Betel leaves. I think this is related to that. First Word Bill. Now we have. Betel palm two words from eighteen. Seventy Five and ASIAN PINEDA LEAVE PALM. That has an orange colored droop with an outer fibrous. Husk scientific name is a Rica. Cut at you CA- chew next. We have Bete Noire or could be Bayton Noir. It is two words first. Word is B. E. T. and the I E has that little carrot hat accent on it and the second word Noir and this is a noun from eighteen twenty eight a person or things strongly detested or avoided. Synonym is bugbear. One word so this is French obviously and it literally means black beast. It's a person or things. Strongly detested Bayton Noir. Some Now we have the word. Well it looks like the word Beth. B. E. T. H. But it is pronounced Bheith or Bait or base. It is a noun from sixteen fifty the second letter of the Hebrew alphabet and then it says to see the alphabet table. So this is yeah Hebrew Beth or eighth from Beith which means House and now we have the last word for this episode. It is Bethel B. E. T. H. E. L. It is a noun from circa sixteen. Seventeen one a hell. Our hallowed spot number two a chapel for nonconformists to be a place of worship for seamen like the navy people Yeah this is Hebrew beth-el which means House of God well we are going to pick BAGEL BAGEL beetlejuice say use. I guess Beetlejuice as the word of the episode. Because it's a fun sounding word and it's a star which is cool and it's also the character crazy character in a movie. Which if you haven't seen it you should go see it. There are rumors that they're making a sequel. I don't know if I want them to. I don't know if I believe the rumors. It has potential but I'm also not. I don't have high hopes if they do actually make that is going to be it for this episode. Thank you very much for joining. I don't know what the world is like on May eleventh but I'm recording this still in April. I know here in Illinois. The shelter in place has been moved to May Thirty. First so yeah. I just hope you're all doing well. Stand strong and this has been Spencer Dispensing Information Goodbye.

Beta Beta Theron Beetlejuice Beata Eugene Interferon interferon L. A. C. T. House Fella Siemian B. E. T. Qatar Asia Mia T. H. A. L. A. S. S. E. M. Bayton Noir Illinois Beith Palm
Cycloferon - A Full-Spectrum Antiviral (and Remdesivir Alternative?)

Limitless Mindset

12:37 min | 1 year ago

Cycloferon - A Full-Spectrum Antiviral (and Remdesivir Alternative?)

"This is Jonathan. This is my overview of Sick Leo Feron. You probably haven't heard about this one. This is a immune-boosting medicine and a notable interferon hack that has come on my radar. In, the course of my research into Covid, nineteen treatments, so I've got an enraging factoid for you. Get this Gilead is the pharmaceutical giant that is manufacturing the drug rim disappear. You've probably heard of remedy severe that I thou- She is talking about it all the time. The media is talking about it all the time it's. It's in the news quite a bit surrounding. CORONA VIRUS! What are we going to do about it? And so Gilead received in the neighborhood of about seventy million taxpayer dollars to support the are indeed. This drug, so the American taxpayers are you know? They're taking money out of our pockets to support the D. of this drug, and this is going to be on the market soon and the per treatment cost. That's a ten day. Treatment is going to be between two thousand and four, thousand, four hundred and sixty dollars for ten days of this medicine that has been taxpayer supported. Amazing. Right. As I learned more about big Pharma. I wish more and more that hell was a real place because. there. There are people that really do deserve to go there when they are finished with the work that they've done in this world. Okay, so this is why I'm trying to shed light on. Alternatives on things like sickly of Feron. and. You're going to want to check out the article that is linked below this video where I go a bit more indepth into it because it's. something that's been researched mostly in the Russa sphere, and so I had to track down some studies out there some of the clinical human trials that were done on it, and do some translations, and that sort of thing, and so you're to want to check out that article that's linked below this. It's a direct antiviral which blocks the reproduction of the viral infection and to this effect. It's fast acting. It's treatment. Course is between several days to a week so you'll know quickly if it's working for you. Here's the scientific evidence on this one. It has been widely studied since the turn of the Millennia, there are one hundred and sixty papers on. It published on pubmed and fifty two human clinical trials, so this is a substantial amount of scientific evidence for us to delve into. Perhaps most notably it prevents and treats influenza. Multi-centre Russian trial was done with over five hundred influenza and acute respiratory tract viral infection patients. Sicu fear on treatment was highly effective. Those who received it had about a ten percent occurrence of affection of infection win compared with the control group that did not receive it. Several of the trials combined it with other drugs and therapies, for example, a twenty twelve trial, totaling two hundred and thirty eight patients with widespread forms of pulmonary tuberculosis. Noted an uptick in successful outcomes of treatment. A mammoth twenty fifteen study of over six thousand patients, with advanced, pulmonary tuberculosis. Concurred and concluded the effect of Feron in such cases was likely due to both its direct immune protective action in the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment. Appoint out what it just said there, which is that the patients stuck with the sickly of Feron making it more effective, and this speaks to the general. Safety and effectiveness and tolerability of the medicine. Mini Tuberculosis. Drugs are very unpleasant and patients have problems staying on this is where sickle fair stands out. One hundred patients with manifest HP infection received Cyclic Baron in a twenty ten trial. And it noted that it was well. Tolerated is not painful and increase the effectiveness of an immuno physiotherapy course of treatment to empower the immune system to suppress the nasty infection. While, it's not a nutro pick. A Twenty fifteen trial asserts that it can be used in combination with the drug reimb- Barron to treat recurrent depressive disorders. As far as usage and dosage, take the entire dose together once-daily, no need to split up the doses. You can take it on an empty stomach with water about thirty minutes before a meal. And the specific dosage I've got in the article. Check it out below. Like. I said I would categorize this as. Interferon Hack because it actually does increase the production of interferons which are a crucial immune system component. A twenty twelve clinical trial gave the drug to thirty five healthy volunteers to evaluate. On Interferon production quote, it is established that Cyclic Feron induces the production of early Alpha I F N Within Twenty four hours from the moment of drug introduction. Let's talk about potential. Prevention and treatment of Covid, nineteen and SARS. The most recent piece of scientific literature published was a twenty nineteen Russian Meta analysis, which analyzed over five hundred papers, evaluating and comparing sickly, Feron with other upper respiratory tract infection treatments. The to takeaways from this Meta analysis were it added twenty five percent to absolute and relative usefulness of medical intervention and increased the chances of. From infection by three and a half times. In Early Twenty Twenty School Sickly Feron's manufacturer. Russian company called Paulie San. donated. A significant quantity of medicine to help fight the COVID nineteen cases there in the Philippines moving towards my conclusion I give sickly fear on a B. Plus risk grade. Here's why. The most recent study done with a safety evaluation of the drug, if found the just two and a half percent, a fever patients given it experienced negative side effects and quote them were mild, and did not require discontinuation of the drugs use in several clinical trials was administered to children. And with an absence of notable absence side effects, it can be considered safe for children released according to the studies. As far as corona virus, Bio Hack Oh. This one is a pretty good value. A couple of the studies that I looked at on it specifically pointed out that it is modern cost effective medicine. Quote the study showed a high clinical and cost effectiveness of Szekler fear on treatment, compared to traditional methods that allows to recommend it for the provision of specialized medical care in the treatment of patients with infectious and complicated gunshot fractures. That's from the conclusion of a Russian study that was done actually in I think a battlefield hospital in Yemen. And so I hope certainly that you do not get covid, nineteen or shot, but. It's not just you. It's getting crazy out there to paraphrase that great line from the twenty nine thousand nine hundred film joker, which so captured the Zeitgeist of. The current year right, things are getting a bit crazy out there and considering sickly Feron's affordability, it's general safety its effectiveness, the amount of clinical research done on it. I think this is a broad spectrum. immune-boosting antiviral that deserves a place in the anti fragile. Bio Hackers Doomsday prepping war chest. I suggest that you pick it up and just keep it around. You know it's one of these pharmaceuticals. It'll probably take two or Or three decades for it to expire, so it's one of those things that I'd like to have in my doomsday prepping war chest, and just leave it there and hope I never get shot. Hope I never need it right, so you can pick it up from Lou Forma. They sell a package for about fifteen euros. That is twenty, one hundred and fifty milligram tablets, and they do ship all around the world and. Order from them using bitcoin ideally or One of the CRYPTO currencies because you don't really want to have a lot of bank records time you to warehouses in Moscow. Anyways, let me know what you think of these sorts of these sorts of bio hacks, immune hacks that are a little bit of the mainstream. Let me know if you want me to do. Some of these translations and track down some of these sort of things out there on the Internet shed light on them I'm Jonathan with limitless mindset looking forward to a continued conversation with you?

Feron Covid interferon Leo Feron Early Twenty Twenty School Jonathan upper respiratory tract infect respiratory tract Gilead nutro Lou Forma depressive disorders Cyclic Baron SARS Moscow Barron Paulie San.
NEJM This Week  January 16, 2020

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

26:01 min | 1 year ago

NEJM This Week January 16, 2020

"Welcome this is the New England Journal of Medicine. I'm Dr Michael Barr this week. January sixteenth. Two Thousand Twenty we feature articles on an Frawley Mab AB for systemic lupus erythematosus divella Kathleen in hemodialysis patients with pro rightous. A trial of tripoint in preterm infants lowering during life approaching a tapping down interferon signaling and Beta blockers and tetralogy of fellow a review article on suicide a case report of a man with fever and respiratory failure and perspective articles on dial logic practice on sounding the alarm on climate change and on treating addiction as a terminal disease trial of NFL Inactive Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Eric Morand rand from Monash University. Melbourne Victoria Australia. NFL EUM AB a human monoclonal antibody type one interferon receptor sub unit at one investigated for the treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus S. l. e. did not have a significant effect on the primary endpoint in a previous phase. Three trial the current phase. Three Trial Tulip to used as secondary endpoint from that trial as the primary endpoint in this trial. Three hundred sixty. Two patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous and Frawley Mabbutt Placebo. Every four weeks for forty eight weeks the primary endpoint endpoint of this trial was a response at fifty two defined with the use of the British Isles lupus assessment group based Composite Lupus Assessment Piccola. The percentage of patients who had a big law response was forty seven point. Eight percent in the anti-fraud Group and thirty one point five percent in the placebo a group among patients with a high interferon gene signature. The percentage with the response was forty eight percent in the NF rally Mab Group and thirty point seven percent in the placebo group among patients with a low interferon gene signature. The percentage was forty six point seven percent and thirty five point five percent respectively secondary end points with respect to the glucocorticoid dose and the severity of skin disease but not counts of swollen and tender joints and the annualized flare rate also showed a significant benefit with any frowny Mab. Herpes zoster and bronchitis occurred in seven point. Two percent and twelve point two percent of the patients respectively. Who received an Farley? Ma'am there was one death from pneumonia in the NF rally map group monthly administration of an Frawley MAB resulted in a higher percentage of patients with a response as defined by a composite. endpoint at week. Fifty two then did placebo. In contrast the findings of a similar phase three trial involving patients with S. l. e. that had different primary endpoint. The frequency of herpes zoster was higher with an a a frog mab than with placebo. Jane Salman from the hospital for special surgery and Weill Cornell medicine. New York writes in an editorial that only one drug for patients with systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Bellamy Mab has been approved on the basis of support from a randomized placebo controlled. Trial and numerous development programs programs have immunomodulators treatments have failed to show benefits with respect to primary end points in phase. Three trials patients continue to be burdened with complications -cations from uncontrolled disease and from adverse effects and risks associated with glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive drugs. That are used to treat lupus the current trial of any Frawley Mab Tulip to showed a significant effect on the primary endpoint of response at week. Fifty two defined according to BIC LA if one considers the the two end points bitcoin and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index. Sri Response rates used in the three and a frowny MAB trials Muse used to whip one and tulip to the results for five of the six primary and key. Secondary endpoints favored the drug over placebo. Given the I need to bring drugs to patients with S. L. E. The lupus community has urged regulators to consider trial designs that allow greater flexibility in defining mining success for example perhaps benefit with respect to just one of two end points the SRI or the BIC LA needs to be observed to declare drug effective effective in this complex disease. Alternatively regulatory requirements to pre specify a highly ordered structure of primary and secondary measures. There's could yield to a series of equally weighted clinically relevant outcomes. Such strategies might accelerate drug development in lupus until we have available label universally accepted response measures and biomarkers that allow grouping of patients with SA According to biologic pathways. That drive live their disease a phase three trial of Die Fella Kathleen in hemodialysis patients with Rightous by Stephen Fish Spain from the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of medicine at Hofstra north. Well Great Neck New York Die Fella. Kathleen is a peripherally restricted and selective agonists of Kappa opioid receptors that are considered to be important in modulating per rightous in conditions such as chronic kidney disease in this phase. Three trial. Three hundred seventy eight patients undergoing hemodialysis had moderate to severe per rightous were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous. Venus stifled Caitlyn or placebo. Three times per week for twelve weeks fifty one point nine percent of patients in the Divella. Kathleen Group had a decrease decrease of at least three points in the mean score on the twenty four hour worst itching intensity numerical rating scale as compared with thirty point nine percent percent in the placebo group. The imputed percentage of patients with a decrease of at least three points in the itching intensity score was forty nine point one percent in the develop Pella Kathleen Group as compared with twenty seven point nine percent in the placebo group Die Fella. Kathleen also resulted in a significant improvement from baseline to week. Twelve in each related quality of life as measured by the five d each scale and the skin dex ten scale the imputed percentage of patients with a decrease of at least four points in the itching intensity scored twelve was significantly greater in the Divella Caffeine Group than in the Placebo Group. Thirty seven point one percent versus seventeen seventeen point nine percent diarrhea dizziness and vomiting were more common in the Divella. Kathleen group patients treated with develop. Kathleen had a a significant reduction in each intensity and improved issue related quality of life as compared with those who received placebo in an editorial to`Real David Steel from Massachusetts General Hospital. Boston writes that as reported by fish. Bain colleagues the use of develop Kathleen in a population Asian of patients undergoing in center hemodialysis resulted in a significant abatement in pro-rata symptoms as well as a significant improvement in pariahs related quality of life. The findings are compelling although diarrhea dizziness and vomiting were frequent side effects. For whom should the use of develop Heflin be considered if it is approved approved by the FDA data from the dialysis outcomes and practice pattern study describe. Eighteen percent of patients undergoing dialysis as being very much much or extremely bothered by itching. Some patients with manifestations of uremic Veritas have symptoms that respond to standard therapies and to improvements to to their dialysis regimen thus stepwise approach to treatment should not be ignored. That said there are patients with refractory. UREMIC priorities who may now have another option option. While we begin to understand its properties and biologic characteristics die Fella. Kathleen has the potential to be an enhancement to our practice ultimately as as we focus on improving patient care outcomes under the recent executive order on advancing American kidney health in the United States with more of our attention focused on control control of symptoms and on aspects of care that have been under recognized in patients with end stage kidney disease. The results of this trial may offer us a step in the right direction. A randomized trial of Ruth reporting for neuro protection in preterm infants by Sandra jewel from the university Washington. SEATTLE HIGH-DOSE ARITH- report and has been shown to have neuro protective effect in preclinical models of neonatal brain injury and phase two trials have suggested justice possible efficacy however the benefits and safety of this therapy in extremely preterm infants have not been established in this randomized trial of high dose. Oh sorry three point. Seven hundred forty one infants. Who were born at twenty four weeks zero days to twenty seven weeks? Six Days of jazz station were assigned to receive a three-point three-point in or placebo within twenty four hours after birth there was no significant difference between the Earth Report and group and the Placebo Group in the incidents of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment at two years of age ninety seven children twenty six percent versus ninety four children twenty six percent. There were no significant differences between the groups in the rates of retinopathy of prematurity. Intra cranial haemorrhage. sepsis necrotizing enter Colitis bronco-pulmonary displeasure displeasure or death or in the frequency of serious adverse events high dose Arith- reporting treatment administered to extremely preterm infants from twenty four hours after birth breath through thirty. Two weeks of post. Menstrual Age did not result in a lower risk of severe neurodevelopmental impairment or death. At two years of age leipold protein a reduction in persons with cardiovascular disease by so cheerios to meet us from the University of California San Diego la La Hoya leipold protein levels are genetically determined and when elevated are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a Arctic stenosis there are or no approved pharmacologic therapies to lower lie protein levels in this trial involving two hundred eighty six patients with established cardiovascular disease and screening wipeout protein levels of at least sixty milligrams per deciliter patients received hypothesis directed anti-sense Ola go nuclear tied. Apo A. L. Rx or sailing Placebo subcutaneous for six to twelve months administration of the Anti Sense. All go nuclear tied resulted in dose dependent and into decreases in leipold protein levels with mean percent decreases of thirty five percent at a dose of twenty milligrams every four weeks fifty six percent at forty milligrams every four weeks fifty eight percent at twenty milligrams. Every two weeks seventy two percent at sixty milligrams every four weeks and eighty percent at twenty milligrams every week as compared with six percent with placebo. There were no significant differences between any any dose of the anti-sense Olivo nucleotides placebo with respect to platelet counts liver and renal measures or influenza like symptoms. The most common common adverse events were injection site. REACTIONS EPO A.. L. Rx reduced leipold protein levels in a dose dependent manner in patients who had elevated lipoprotein levels and established Cardiovascular Disease Jack Inhibitor therapy in a child with inherited ESPN eighteen deficiency by Fahahd also him from King Saud University Riyadh Saudi Arabia deficiency of ubiquitous specific pep. Today's ace eighteen. USPA eighteen is a severe type. One Interferon apathy type. One Interferon oppa `these are mono- Genyk auto inflammatory disorders orders. That are characterized by the overproduction of or an enhanced response to type one interferons U. S. eighteen down regulates type one interferon interferon signaling by blocking the Access of Janice associated kinds. One Jack One to the type one interferon receptor the absence of us. Eighteen results in unmitigated. Interferon mediated inflammation and is lethal during the perinatal period. The authors describe a neo nate who presented with Hydrocephalus Kalisz necrotizing cellulitis systemic inflammation and respiratory failure. Xm sequencing identified a home azaleas mutation at an essential central splice site on US eighteen. The encoded protein was expressed but devoid of negative regulatory ability treatment with Russula Taeb was followed by a prompt and sustained recovery. Suicide a review article by Sina Faysal from Warneford Hospital University University of Oxford United Kingdom suicide accounts for approximately one point. Five percent of deaths per year worldwide risk factors for suicide have been investigated at the population and individual levels in addition predisposing factors and precipitating events have been examined mainly at the individual level. Each of these factors offers can be mediated through genetic psychological and personality characteristics making most explanatory models complex and difficult to interpret one one approach to understanding. Suicide has been life course analysis which is based on the premise. That risk factors come into play at different stages of life and that suicide is is the cumulative result of risk factors over a lifetime individual factors particularly psychiatric disorders have the strongest effect on suicide rates. In life course models predisposing factors for suicide are thought to interact with precipitating factors and predisposing factors may have different effects. Depending on the resilience Zillions of the person management of suicidality calls for a comprehensive approach to assessment and treatment assessment should focus on past suicidal behavior. You're only addressing ongoing suicidal ideas and psychosocial needs assessment of the risk of self harm and completed suicide may increasingly draw on new technologies such as clinical decision making tools and safety planning to establish evidence based practices sixty four the old man with fever and respiratory failure case report of the Massachusetts General Hospital by Marwan and colleagues a sixty four year old man was admitted to the hospital because of acute renal failure four and a half months earlier fevers Malays mild cough and pain in the left. Flank developed a clinical diagnosis of Sinusitis. And you sinus was made fever persisted and worsening cough developed. The patient was evaluated in an urgent care clinic chest X.. Ray revealed faint airspace. Opacity is is in the left lower lobe and left Perry highly region and Amoxicillin Club. Yanic acid was prescribed for empirical treatment of pneumonia two months before this admission repeat heat chest X.. Ray revealed persistence of the airspace. Opacity in the left Perry highly region early society nausea and non bloody diarrhea developed along with worth off Neha Edina in the legs. Abdominal distension decreased urine output and weight gain laboratory testing revealed acute renal failure presumed to be due to rapidly totally Progressive Glamour Yelena Francis Plasma Exchange and treatment with Glucocorticoid cyclophosphamide and reduction were initiated. The patient reported that he had traveled to Ventura County California the preceding autumn about two weeks later fever painful oral ulcers Disney on exertion productive productive cough and respiratory distress developed. Ventura County is a region in which cock mycosis is moderately endemic Sierra logic. Dick and Antigen testing on urine and blood. For Cock city authorities. Species was performed cytokine. Isa's Betablockers and congenital heart heart disease a clinical implications of basic research article by Catherine Yahtzee from Cincinnati. Children's Medical Center treatment options. For Congenital heart. Disease these are limited. By the relative inability of mature cardiac muscle cells Cardio myocytes to generate new cardio myocytes through proliferation. After birth earth the current understanding of how Human Cardio myocytes proliferate during heart growth is incomplete owing to the rarity of access to heart tissue from healthy infants and children moreover studies in animals including mice and swine are limited by the fact that humans differ from other animals in the timing of cell cycle arrest during development and and in the number of nuclei per individual cardio myocytes these limitations therefore render a recently reported study of Cell Division in a congenital cardiac disease notable notable for its findings. The study results showed that the failure of Cardio myocytes to complete the last stage of cytokine nieces is a feature of tetralogy of fellow. Hello and that this failure is linked to address signaling multiple rounds of cytokine Isa's failure lead to the creation of the multi nucleated cardio myocytes sights seen in tetralogy of fellow studies of Muren and Human Cardio myocytes implicate act to epithelial cell transforming warming to in Cardio Maya Site Cell Division and support the use of Beta blockade as a potential experimental therapeutic strategy for promoting Cardio myocytes myocytes cytokine Jesus in the context of Tetralogy Fellow in human infants die logic practice a case study in social medicine by Dominic Baggy from Vanderbilt University. Nashville Jay a sixteen year old boy presented for evaluation and treatment for anxiety learning disabilities and behavioral problems. Jay lived in a shantytown in southern Brazil and was referred by his school psychologists for evaluation by. Hi Dr m a psychiatrist at a Community Clinic. According to his mother Jay had a history of aggressive behavior which intensified I after he failed two years years of school when he was thirteen and fourteen years old and then when he was violently assaulted when he was fifteen Jay's mother reported that shortly after the assault Jay began using drugs and alcohol spending more time on the streets missing school and withdrawing socially sessions with Dr m led to a shift in perspective. Active on Jay's difficulties what came to occupy most of Jay's own attention in therapy and in general were the conflicts and judgments he experienced as poor person and his resulting feelings of anger and hopelessness when Jay began to understand that his feelings originated from something other than his own psychological characteristics heuristic or biologic deficiencies. He felt more optimistic. Dr M was educated in the nineteen nineties in an interdisciplinary curriculum encompassing medicine. Addison Social Sciences and psycho dynamic principles the social theories underpinning clinicians training emphasize the importance of dial logic praxis praxis dialogue practice is a process drawn from fraying educational theory in which clinicians and patients engage in bi directional critical critical analysis and learning sounding the alarm on climate change nineteen eighty nine and two thousand nineteen a perspective article by James Dunk from the University of Sydney the subject of climatic and environmental changes. That result from human activity has been much in the news. Recently only Alexander Leaf wrote in the Journal thirty years ago threatened by acid rain greenhouse gases ozone depletion and global warming the planet and it seemed vulnerable humans would face disastrous consequences as the planet ruptured around them. Leaf was sounding the alarm on climate change and human health. Environmental Environmental Change had become part of the burden of physicians as the climate crisis continues to unfold the story of Alexander Leaf who devoted his attention. I to the a nuclear threat and then to planetary health offers much needed inspiration for physician activists in one thousand nine hundred sixty. Six Leaf became the Jackson professor of Clinical Nickel Medicine at Harvard and chief of medicine at M. G. H.. Living in the shadow of nuclear war leaf helped found Physicians for social responsibility in nineteen sixty. He won and became a prominent member of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. Both groups called on physicians to extend their vision beyond the clinic. leafs ecological approach to human health led him beyond the nuclear threat. As leaf later wrote in his memoir there are social and man made hazards with possibly disastrous this consequences to human health that were ignored by medical training. To protect human health. Physicians had to educate themselves about those hazards and take their stand Dan in the vanguard treating addiction as a terminal disease a perspective article by Amy Caruso Brown from Suny Upstate Medical University Syracuse New York ms a had a history of opioid use longer than her adulthood and had been through Inpatient Rehabilitation Methadone athlon maintenance and buprenorphine treatment programs without lasting success. She'd been admitted to the hospital. In septic shock severely malnourished an echocardiogram revealed. The two valves had been destroyed by the infection. Although this was ms as I episode of Endo Card ideas her condition was too unstable for her to survive surgery surgery. Her distraught family agreed to a do not resuscitate order but despite the dire prognosis ms as conditions slowly improved just as the CARDIOTHORACIC author. ACID surgeon had agreed to operate. Ms a announced that she wanted to be discharged. She did not want surgery she just wanted more morphine to alleviate. Her intractable tractable chest pain. When the attending physician questioning her decisional capacity at that moment hesitated ms as family fired him as Dr Caruso Brown? Listen to his his account. She focused on the obvious questions. Did ms a have decisional capacity. And if not who had the legal authority to decide on her behalf. Furthermore was mm-hmm is a likely to die within six months even with treatment when Dr Caruso Brown met Musee her family and the medical team. The atmosphere was tense. Ms As as moods swung between anger and despair but she was startlingly lucid. Ms As simply wanted to go home or to a hospice facility and die peacefully really are images in clinical medicine futures a thirty four year old man with a twenty pack year. Smoking history who presented to the emergency department with a four or month history of progressively worsening Disney and nonproductive cough. The oxygen saturation was sixty five percent. While the patient was breathing ambient air he appeared appeared to have Disney at rest. His fingers lips were blue and his fingers showed clubbing sounds on of the lungs were normal. CT of the chest revealed will diffuse ground glass opacity with Inter low bar an intra labile or Septa thickening a pattern described as crazy paving bronchoscopy yielded milky appearing appearing lavar fluid and pathological testing showed macrophages filled with proteinaceous material that was positive on periodic acid shifts staining as as well as large a cellular Philip aggregates. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary. Alveoli pro noces which has caused by impaired surfactant turnover crazy paving is not pathogenic Monica of Pulmonary Alveoli approach analysis and can be seen in a number of other conditions including acute respiratory distress Stress Syndrome. LIPOIC pneumonia organizing pneumonia pulmonary hemorrhage and Neum assistace Jura visa pneumonia. The patient underwent large volume lavar of both both lungs in sequential procedures with the use of fifteen leaders of sailing in each lung at follow up six months later. The patient had substantial improvement in his clinical condition with oxygen saturation of ninety two percent while he was breathing ambient air an eighty one year. Old Man with a history of atrial oh fibrillation and hypertension presented to the emergency department after a fall his medications were a pixel band ramp real bizarre Polo and loaded Pene am Yoda Ron physical examination revealed blue and gray pigmentation sometimes referred to as Cerolo Dermot with discoloration of his nose cheeks cheeks and forehead and sparing of the deep skin folds. He had no injuries from the fall and reported that his discoloration had been long standing an electrocardiogram showed showed atrial fibrillation with a heart. Rate of sixty eight beats per minute treatment with amiodarone had been initiated fifteen years earlier for an episode of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular. Taylor response. Skin discoloration is an uncommon adverse effect of amiodarone and may abate with cessation of drug. The fall was attributed to Ortho static. Hypertension attention during the hospitalization adjustments. The patient's medications were made including discontinuation of Amiodarone at a six month. Follow up visit. The skin discoloration coloration persisted. The patient reported no further falls or any further episodes of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. This concludes our summary. Let us know what you think about our audio summaries and he comments or suggestions may be sent to audio at N. J. M. Dot Org. Thank you for listening.

Kathleen Group Lupus Erythematosus Interferon Placebo Group pneumonia glucocorticoid attending physician Jay New York Frawley Mab AB New England Journal of Medicin United States Massachusetts General Hospital Mab Group respiratory distress Dr m NFL Amy Caruso Brown Frawley Mab Tulip
What Really Causes Autoimmune Disease with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

35:59 min | 1 year ago

What Really Causes Autoimmune Disease with Dr. Todd LePine

"Coming up on this episode of the Doctors Pharmacy when you go into the medical literature in auto immunity related to Lupus and the Epstein Barr. Virus is associated with seven different autoimmune conditions, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis lupus type. One Diabetes Ulcer Colitis. Welcome to the Doctors Pharmacy. I'm Dr, Mark Hyman and that's pharmacy with an F. F. A. Place for conversations that matter, and if you suffer from on autoimmune disease, if you've had Lupus, this conversation is going to matter to you if you know anybody who has got these problems because they affect eighty million Americans one type, or another, which is more people than have heart, disease, cancer and diabetes combined. So it's a big problem and has very poor answers with traditional medicine, we have today with US my colleague at the Ultra Wellness Center Dr Toddler was an incredible physician. He's one of the leaders in functional medicine. Teach all over the world and from Dartmouth Medical School. He's been working with me for now twenty five years together and you've been on this road. He looks the same as the day Madame I. Don't know how he does it one gray hair on his head. And and he is going to talk today about a patient, his with Lupus who had autoimmune disease that is. A very common problem with very bad outcomes, it can lead to brain issues. Kidney failure lung issues joining shoes. It's a really horrible problem, so tell us what is the? Lubis and what is the traditional approach in medicine to to this problem or is? The lupus actually comes from the Latin word meaning Wolf. And typically people with classic lupus have We'll get a facial rash. Oh, it's called the male Arash. It's like a butterfly rash and. Over time, they can actually. They say that you built like Wolf like. Appearance. Cheeks get all ran. Exactly and that's due to photo sensitivity, and so lupus is one of those conditions which we see a lot. Interestingly, it's about nine times more prevalent in women, so that raises the question. What's the difference between women and men? And why are women still trying to figure that out? I, actually I actually think I have A. I have an insight into that. It's really quite interesting. Women are different. Right right, and then the other thing that is also interesting. Is that we traditionally treat it with medications like steroids methotrexate PLA- Quinnell those kinds of things we're telling me I'll have their significant side effects. And in my opinion, one of the powerful immune suppressing drugs, and they even use biological agents logic, which really shut off your immune system and they they can work, but they're often fraught with danger, including the risk of cancer and overwhelming infection. If you get about infection so right, they're not. They're they're very expensive up to fifty grand a year per yeah per person. And then also you know one of the things I always used to. A was intriguing to me when I was. Doing my training was drug induced lupus because we were taught that lupus immune condition, but there is a condition called drug induced. Lupus raised my question. What's what? How is a drug causing lupus and what we see is that in one of the? Major drugs was an older drug called Pro Amman. Remember using that. Yeah, it was an anti arrhythmic and in certain patients who got pro canidae develop. Lupus looks just like you know what we call Lupus. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. And that always fascinated me that a drug would be triggering this and when I actually went down that sorta rabbit hole, we find out. Is that it? Can actually damage DNA. and. It's probably theorized that that some types of things like drugs or stealth. Infections like viruses. May trigger a the body and caused some damage in DNA and when we test for Lupus I mean some of the tests that are are double, stranded DNA antibody with traditional blood tests. Look at one of the autoimmune antibodies, and it's interesting because there's a whole bunch of different markers that are are used in the diagnosis, autoimmune conditions you autoimmune panels like tradition. One is an A. A the anti-nuclear antigen typically in patients who have lupus that's positive, and then you can look for other other biomarkers like double stranded DNA and such a million. It can be positive and many many people, even if they don't have Lupus, and there's this whole phenomena pre autoimmune disease where you starting to have these autoimmune antibodies, but you don't really have a lot of symptoms yet right by. Betes priore immunities exactly and I. Always Tell my patients. That's like when the check engine light comes on your car. You ignore that you're going to get you know smoke coming out of the Hudson's. which traditional medicine ignores a told. Me these five criteria for this diagnosis. Then you don't have it and we can't treat you right. It's like Beijing, AD who came with blood sugar of one twenty as Jesus you doctor, check that out. He's like Oh. Yeah, I, said, what's happening. What are you recommend? He's well said I should watch it until it's one twenty six, and then he'll give me treatment for diabetes. Isn't that crazy? Yeah, it's we'll wait till the horse of the Bar, and then we'll try to corral it. It's it's unfortunate, but I guess. When you look at how how many people do have conditions? That are you know, even some clinical hypothyroidism? There's a lot of things that if you look early enough, you'll. It's a lot easier to treat them when you kiss them early. You know if you're starting to have early cognitive decline Alzheimer's. Is a lot easier to treat when you catch it early. Diabetes is a lot easier heart disease, autoimmune conditions so preemptive personalized medicine is the way to go on, so we do the ALTONA center here at the medicine, so so this patient had had this condition. There was treated by as much on a bunch of drugs. She actually came in. Had done courses of primarily lack mel and prednisone on. She was actually pretty proactive in in her. Sort of self care. If it's. By. The way for those listening is the same as hydroxy. Clark when they're using for covid nineteen right and we also realize that plaque actually antimicrobial. For Malaria that's the original use for him, but they somebody somebody must've. Somebody must have had malaria and then develop Lupus, and they said Hey, this is working, so it's sort of like how they sort of discover other uses for a medications. But this particular. She was actually involved in the healthcare field. I think it was a therapist. Recall properly and associated done a lot of stuff on her own. The big thing with her is that she told me this that she felt that her lupus was actually triggered by stress. She had a son who had some medical issues and was having issues both. With Dealing with a teenager who was having some illness, and that's tr- shifted over, and oftentimes I take the history of patients who develop autoimmune condition. It's oftentimes followed by a period of chronic stress That's unrelenting, very very common thing and. Just from it because you know my thinking about stress, is it sort of sets the table for other things to sort of take over so? It doesn't cause not ended up itself. It may may cause some illness for some people, but for the most made exacerbates. Whatever's going on? So if you're stressed, your immune system suppressed. You're going to get more inflammation Yup, and then if you have underlying issues like this woman did it. They're gonNA. Come out at so tell us how you approach this functional medicine perspective. How do we think about autoimmune disease in general from a functional medicine perspective and Lupus when I see a patient who has lupus and go down the checklist so a look at great do they have sensitivity to gluten? The thing which I find a lot of lupus patients is obscene virus. Oh Epstein Barr. Virus the virus that causes mono. And Mono stands for mononucleosis, because the virus infects your white blood cells. And the thing about Epstein Barr virus is, it's very common about seventy eighty percent of the population, has it? And most of the time, the immune system will clear it, and it's a herpes class virus, just like a culture, and once you get herpes a cold sore that Irish stays in your body the time most of the time immune system keeps it in check, but there are certain individuals where the virus will reactivate, and the herpes virus will come out, or the mono can actually reactivate a cold sore, and your lip is basically a herpes virus. Doesn't come out all the time. It comes under stress under stress weather. He's at emotional strategies. Sunlight getting cold sunlight, so it's sort of a late and virus that we all live with hundreds of viruses and us. When we're stressed, it allows US viruses to emerge, and so this is what happened with patients, and and and and so I. I always liked to go down and ask the question she'll. Why is this? Why do women have? Lupus more the nets, functional medicine, Y Y Y, and then, and then, and then interestingly when you go into the medical literature in Auto Immunity Related Lupus the Epstein Barr. Virus is associated with seven different autoimmune conditions, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus type, one diabetes, all sorts of Colitis. So what happens is the virus. In some cases, patients will reactivate it causes the stimulation of the immune system, and the immune system will then start reacting to it, and then interestingly I've always. been curious about photosensitive. Why? Why does photo sensitivity happen in patients who have Lupus? What what's what why? Why is when they get sunlight Is it affecting them and what they found in literature? Is that the? Virus. Causes the body to produce more Interferon Gamma Interferon Gamma is our bodies of the. Of. Kinds that help our bodies to fight all viruses, and when we have high levels of this interferon gamma it. As the body to sunlight, so that's why you get that that sort of lupus lighten photosensitive especially with exposure to sunlight. And Interferon is one of the treatments for looking at for fighting yes. They have what they do is they have an over abundance, and it may be a genetic predisposition. There may be some single polymorphisms that certainly patients haven't. They produce lots of Interferon Gamma, and and in that in that actually gets involved in the skin cells, and can make them more photosensitive so it's. It's an interesting. It's an interesting phenomenon. And then the other thing about you know when I've seen this with a lot of regular mainstream doctors, they'll say well. You can't really check representing bar virus because everybody's if antibody positive just means that you've been exposed well, that's true, but if you actually do specific testing for Epstein Barr, so there's a panel that we do which checks for antibodies to the nuclear antigen and the Settled Plassnik Antigen, and then also the early Antigen and then also throw in the Epstein Barr virus by PR PCR's checking for the DNA virus, actually seeing if there's live virus around circulating in your blood, not exactly exactly so typically in the panel that we that we use if you have the three out of four antibodies that are positive, especially with the early Antigen, and or with the PR Epstein Barr Virus. You know proof positive that the obscene viruses is reacted exactly reactive, and that's where then you can say then you have to ask yourself. What do I do to calm down that particular virus? So. It's it's. There's a lot of things that you have to look at yeah. True folks from really has a different perspective, and that's why we we see so many patients here at the ultra. Center who've tried so many things, and then they get better because we look at all the factors so when I think of. Patient or just any disease in general, they're really only five main triggers a toxin, so I've had patients with Lupus have autoimmune disease triggered by medals for example could be mercury. An infection liked lupus, or it could be the microbiome changes. Yes, Allergen, something. They're eating like Luton. And it could be poor diet, which is inflammatory and has for example, the EMULSIFIERS, our food like Carrageenan, and all these gums. Yes, they caused leaky gut, driving inflammation, and it also can beat stress like you said and. Many of those things together. He's Athle- Superhero. It was a few of those things for her with stress in the virus and also. her. Gut was a mess to yes or was. He so the other thing that that she noticed is that if she ate foods that were high electons, things like the nightshade family that her symptoms actually got worse, and there's interesting some of the work by Peter Dedom-, Oh who was the author of the blood type Diet. He's the Guru electons and what we find is that in certain individuals when you have heightens in your diet? And these are. A compound that are found in plants which actually act as a defense mechanism for the plant so that. Animals and insects are less likely to eat them. ELECTONS, there's A. In the medical literature. Case Study of a hospital that thought they would have a healthy eating day, so they served everybody red kidney beans in a in some type of a casserole or soup, and then everybody got sick from because it was very high electons, and it actually caused transient leaky gut. They had a response to the elections in plants and I've had a number of patients. Not everybody will have that was elected. I mean there's a lot of. Promotion, their elected free diets as the cure for everything electons, low electons. Yeah, it's impossible to get elected and I think I think it can be helpful for some specific patient I think the thing is. Everybody finds the latest fad, and it's the cure for everything really not, and when you're in functional medicine, you get humbled by understanding. How Complex things are absolutely? Everybody's really different. How you know. One person may tolerate gluten. Piece may not one person may be Biden's and other person may not, but if you have an autoimmune inflammatory condition, it's something worth trying. Absolutely. It is I'll interject here because this is an interesting finding I stumbled upon this again. This was actually by Peter dedom-. Oh, who got me down? This rabbit hole I just recently had a patient who had five. Autoimmune conditions including Lupus. And I checked for a lab test called mantles binding elected for actually. No, but. Right it's one of those things and he's the one who got me to understand this so binding letting is is a. Compound that our body makes to bind mantles and a lot of sugar. It's the sugar mouses, a sugar and You find out. Is that people who have manolis binding, Leptin, deficiency or higher risk for Lupus. And Hers and undertake. I wanted to point out that you know you're talking about this patient. Lupus and shed gluten had got issues shifts trashy. This virus shed elections. But that was her only take ten other their patients with Lupus all different. They're all different. High podcast listeners it's Dr Hyman I wanNA take a pause from today's episode about something pretty important, air. If you're listening to my podcast, it's likely that you've have peaked interest in nutrition and health, you might be eating healthy and exercising and meditating, but one area that a lot of us tend to neglect is something. We literally cannot live without I'm talking about air specifically clean air. Here five reasons. Why think you need to consider an air filter today? Studies show that are indoor air up to five times, and sometimes in other places up to one hundred times more polluted with toxins than outdoor air. You know that many household items are covered in toxic chemicals. New Carpet furniture paint perfumes cookware mattresses. Even many baby items are doused in the chemical flame retardants that we use preservatives, phthalates chemicals that are slowly released and off gassing into the air that remained trapped in your home. Indoor air pollution can contribute to short term health effects things like sneezing, wheezing, itchy, throat, nose, skin, or eyes, irradiation, nasal congestion, runny nose. Could this be your air if he's our only happening at home? Air pollution also contributes to chronic diseases. long-term risks include respiratory diseases, heart, disease, asthma, cancer, and worsening of other conditions. Contaminated air can also contribute to sleep apnea and other sleep issues and poor sleep is associated with irritability, anxiety, depression, brain, fog, fatigue, weight, gain, hormone, and blood, sugar issues, and a whole slew of other conditions and air filters can remove lots of these toxins and pollutants. However not all air filters are created equal. The doctor is the only air filter I trust in us, and it's affordable and removes ninety nine point, nine nine percent particles, and the vast majority of toxic compounds in the air, including volatile organic chemicals and gases from your indoor air. It features an ultra filter which is one hundred times more effective in ordinary. Ordinary filters and is one hundred percent sealed which insurance all the air you breathe is pure and filtered now I'm offering an exclusive special deal to my listeners right now. If you go to Dr, Hyman Dot. com forward slash filter. That's Dr. Hyman dot com foy slash filter. You can access the air. Dr Filter for three hundred and twenty nine dollars. That's three hundred dollars off normal price so head over to Dr Hyman DOT COM forward slash filter to access this deal today and stay safe out there. The problem with traditional thinking is that everybody would lucas the same treatment once you make the diagnosis you stop thinking. Functional Medicine when you have the diagnosis, that's when you start thinking. It's just the first step in solving the problems. Okay, this is what your picture looks like okay. What are the potential factors that we need to think about to get to the root cause? And then we have to treat the cause, not the symptom. Yes, that's the beauty. For her. How did you treat the causes of her Lupus and what happened? For her. It was really focusing on a she already actually was doing very well, actually tested her, even though she was She said that she was eating clean died. I made sure so she said she was avoiding gluten aborting dairy avoiding electons. And her testing was negative for any reactions to gluten so I said. You're doing a good job. Keep it up. It was negative for leaky gut. You're doing a great job. Let's let's do that But what I did do and she had never had done, is she? Did tell me that she had a bad case of model when she was a teenager. Might my theory with with her? Is that she probably when she went under this very stressful time period that the Epstein, Barr virus reactivated for whatever reason and hers was positive PCR, so the DNA of the virus was floating around in her blood, and also she. She had positive antibodies. Three out of four antibodies were positive. That was to me a smoking gun that her Epstein. Barr virus was really driving her Her lupus symptoms so initially what I did is I treated her with Some medicinal mushrooms things like Turkey tail, used also lysine, which amino acid which help and combine that also with some model Lauren lysine is often, he will take to prevent herpes outbreaks on their lip and we're GONNA work. Wherever works quite well? That helps the virus and other foods. Argentine like nuts, which are good for you, but in this case they have arginine levels that you can activate yeah. That's an interesting observation, but. That was so that was one of the ways in which initially treated her, and she did get some improvement with that and then another thing which I added to her regimen is load trek zone. and. I'm sure us that yourself and I've been really amazed. Zone so so now treks on. This is an interesting thing, so naltrexone is an opiate blocker. And I'm not sure how they actually stumbled upon this, but if somebody takes too much opiates and the overdose, you can give trucks to block the effect of the opium and when someone has an overdose. Of Heroin or or narcotic, they give him nor can. which is not trek sound, and that stops them from exactly, and it's theorized that when you give naltrexone at very low doses. What you do is you block the body's own opioid receptors in the body senses that and it starts producing more natural feel-good molecules. endorphins these are these are bodies pharmacy for. The paint pain molecules, which in turn modulate the immune system so when you up regulate opioids, you're actually modulating the immune system and I've been there. I used to use it primarily. In patients with ulcerative colitis in multiple schools. NAM, using a lot more patients and I find that it worked really quite well in a whole host of autoimmune conditions, so I used it. In her and it's very low. Toxic. It's probably the safest thing it's your safety as. You can have a couple of side effects in a few people, but it's probably one of the safest medications that are prescribed absolutely very s to be compounded and you slowly work your way up on it right experience with it as it can help, but unless you deal with the root cause. Yeah, again. It's a symptom manager, so it can help mitigate the symptoms, but it's not gonNA, address the underlying biology. It you're you're actually true. It's not going to reverse the condition, but it's one of those things where the risk benefit is so good that it's worth doing. A lot of patients so I I actually add that to her. And then we went to the next level, which is that she tried the the natural route, and then she got some benefit, but it wasn't really where she wanted to. So I said well. Let's go ahead and we'll give her an antiviral, so he actually gave her. Some Valtrex at high-dose gave it to her I think three times a day. I think you probably have done that yourself. HIGH-DOSE VALTREX were Epstein Barr virus there is no simple one-size-fits-all treatment for Epstein bars. I've learned now. It really isn't. And she responded remarkably well to that. Within a couple of months, she was eighty percent better using the VALTREX and I've had a few patients that that was a very very yeah I. that's right. I. Think you know was interesting it. The more you do, this memorial liberalize you work with one person may not work with another person. Using bar, you can valtrex. I mean I do anything and I. Think I've had the same experience some patients you give them as relatively benign and viral. VALTREX and it works while others don't respond to that. About other patients using valves site, it was very expensive has higher levels of toxicity. But actually can be effective in select patients, but I think there's other therapies that. which are also important to mention because you know as I've gotten more experience in this, I'm more interested in. How do I activate the body's own healing systems? How do I use therapies? Are Regenerative therapies that are facilitating the body's own ability to fight things and joined abusing one of these therapies. Can you talk about that short? Yeah, well before actually talked about that. The other thing that also I've used patients is intravenous vitamin C. And that's actually in the medical literature. Highly Vitamin C, at high doses about twenty five to fifty grams has been shown to be very effective, also for Epstein Barr Virus. It's another thing in her. Particularly by the way, how does that work I'll just at work I will. At high levels. It actually works as a pro oxidant. Vitamin C is an antioxidant, but actually it's working as a pro. which goes into the next her therapy, which therapy that's. How do you explain how well the Ying and the Yang? Because there's there's? Reduction, which is the adding of electrons and oxidation, removing electrons, and it has to do with a coupling coupling of the oxidative forces versus the reductive forces, but it's a little bit like a magnetic pole and it high dose vitamin C increases the release of hydrogen peroxide. From the white blood cells, so people don't understand this, but how does are white blood cell kill bugs leach. It produces bleach, hydrogen, peroxide, and ozone, which are all oxidants. So that's exactly our bodies kill things in. It sometimes can't do the job and using these other therapies like height vitamin C can help actually increase the body's ability to kill infections he's. She studied in ICU or using Kobe nineteen in. Yeah, you bring up a really interesting point. which is that you know these we. There's a term in medicine called Reebok signaling molecules, and when you have these reeboks, signaling molecules, which of ozone will be one, it actually up regulates your body's own repair of forces talking about what she did with with ozone ozone. Ozone was a game changer for her. She ended up using ozone and she said it was. It was like a game changer per which is really intricate, but the first time I had a patient who had lupus who responded to ozone in that way. It was really quite quite amazing. It was it was how did get the ozone? She got it she got. Actually she got. She was administered by local a physician who she was seeing. She was seeming consultation and she actually got wrecked and. So, not intervening, get intravenously. Yeah, and she had that response. It was really quite. You'RE GONNA give it intravenously. Give it in the muscle. You can give it. rectal eventually gets absorbed, and it can be very very effective, rectal and vaginal treatments. You can do at home and you don't even need a doctor. Order it. I mean it's basically oxygen on steroids, really what it is high dose oxygen and a little bit of ozone right so if you go out after a thunderstorm and you got that nice clean smell afterwards. That's ozone in the air that the lightning producing ozone. As an as a Special species of reactive species of oxygen, and it's one of those oxidative therapies. See that gives you a little bit of a stress, but it also activates your body's own eighty-five. Matori, mechanisms, the oxygen mechanisms absolutely yeah, it can be anti viral and kill bugs, which is powerful. It sounds like wacky therapy, but it's something we do here at the Ultra WanNa Center I. Mean The for something that is, we were talking about earlier that when you both our patients talking about this and I, often heard this one Dr Hammond I tried everything, and I did ozone therapy, and it was the thing that made me better and I was like Oh. That's interesting and I had a little footnote in my head when I was like. That's a little weird I. Don't know about that and when I got sick with mold toxicity and autoimmune and Clyde Lewis. The thing that actually put my body into a healing response, and it doesn't treat any disease. It just activates your body's own healing mechanisms. And that's a very powerful very powerfully, and very quickly I mean I, I had autoimmune disease brain fog, and within a few days it was. It wasn't like a took weeks. It was in a few days. I really turned around dramatically. Absolutely the other thing which saw a mentioned as it relates to Lupus and women and I found this actually. Whenever I see something. That's sort of out of the box thinking I'll go into the medical literature. See substantiated, and what I found is a pattern in patients who have lupus. Is there estrogen detoxification pathway, and when we check estrogen levels and hormone levels in patients. We don't just check your estrogen and maybe your process room. We check all of the hormones, and then we also check metabolites of the hormones. And I found this pattern in not all lupus patients, but some lupus patients is they have a increased pathway for metabolism to the what's called the four hydroxy estrogen. And four drowsy estrogen is not. You're not going to go to your regular doctor. Check that they're not going to check. It comes on the urine. It comes out in the urine. Exactly it comes out in the urine. I learned about this through. Jeffrey plan and it's one of the things we test here at the ultra exactly and Jeffrey Bland He basically called this. You know like that. The Dancing Shiva. And in some individuals, because the women's hormones go up and down, and they have to be outside throughout the a monthly cycle and you. oftentimes we'll see patients who have lupus flair with their cycles. and. You measure therefore hydroxy estrogen there very high, and the four drowsy estrogen is what's called a quin own abduct, so it damages DNA and when you have a high level to this time, and actually increases your risk for per breast cancer. This is why you think women might have a higher risk of lupus. Absolutely absolutely I've got. I've actually I. Have a literature paper that sites and I've been doing it in my own little courts, patients oftentimes check it and then a lot of patients. Patients they have that and then the other thing. That's the way we before you just WanNa unpack that because I was very powerful. What you just said really said is that. Is that there? Some women who have trouble metabolising estrogen and it goes down a pathway that produce toxic estrogen, the damages DNA, which is what we see in Lupus, and that by fixing that and we know how to fix that with functional medicine, using food, and nutrients and herbs actually help up regulator. Fix those pathways. These patients can get better absolutely. Yes, absolutely, and and the other thing that's the. Most traditional doctors would not be looking at your hormones if you have lupus right, and then the other thing that we then then do within look at genetics, we look at your genetic pathways, so there's a specific polymorphism calling the one be one pathway. When that has a variation, you are more prone towards producing the the four hydroxy estrogen so typically you start. You fix that well. What you do is interesting, the the particular. Snippets involved in. At that particular pathway get that gets actually up regulated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, basically, if you eat a lot of chocolate world, food and barbecue, you're going to be up reading up regular that pathway so patients got lupus. They don't you don't want them easier. Grilling your vegetables or grilling your stake, it's exactly the same problem. The ash is that those those black against lack installed exactly that up regulates that enzyme. Enzyme the other thing which you can do is by adding through your diet. cruciferous vegetables supplements like dim a helps to shift that pathway in a different direction. Yeah, so it's very very very powerful stuff, and when you start doing the testing and start looking at it from all different angles, you can really move the needle and I had I'll never forget this one patient or at first learned about this. The patient basically told me in her history that everything started after she got as a teenager, her life changed after that and she was never able to clear it, and when I checked her her estrogen and estrogen detox pathways. She had the highest drugs ever since she was very very sick. And that's where I sort of understood. Okay, maybe playing the role with the sex differentiate between men and women Lupus, because it's like nine times more prevalent in women, so this is such a great example on a case of someone. WHO has an autoimmune disease which is so common that you acted like a medical detective and you found all the various things that were going on with her she had. Of this chronic team bar infection that was reactivated by stress, she had got disturbances she had elected. Intolerance shed gluten sensitivity. She had. This hormonal dysfunction with abnormally estrogen metabolism. And these are the kinds of things that that we do here. They'LL WANNA. Help US navigate to how to treat each person as an individual. This is really personalized. Medicine personalized nutrition. And it's very sophisticated. It's very effective and it's something that. Helps. Relieve suffering for so many people when they get stuck. And I feel like this is where we're going into medicine. It's where the scientists going functional medicine is just. An approach that helps us apply the science of. Systems, medicine and Network Medicine today rather than waiting ten twenty thirty years. We actually know how and we're learning every day. I mean when I think about how little we knew about the microbiome when started this twenty five years ago and how much we know, now are now we literally groping in the dark, but we had the basic idea, and we were able to apply these principles and get people better. Even if we didn't quite understand what was happening right and it was, it was put quite amazing, so. I think it's important to understand that this is one case of Lupus and this was her issue, but these are common themes, and for somebody else who might be something else, and that's really the beauty of functional medicine is why we have such great success here we have providers collection of doctors and staff here. We've been working on this for sixty years over collectively treating these complex patients from all over the world. We're not doing virtual consultations given covid nineteen. We've switched over because now. We have the ability to do that and I just encourage anybody who's struggling to think about getting help, and they're welcome to come see us that the ultra wellness center. They've got center DOT COM. And we're here to help you navigate through some of these complex issues and figure out what it is. That is your issue. That needs to get treated, and that's so encouraging to me because I love doing this because I remember working as attritional doctor, and that was good, prescribing pills and matching the pill to the ill and people you know, manage manage their symptoms, but I got sick a managing and they wanted to fix things. Yeah, and that's the beauty of medicines that we help relieve need to suffering for millions of people all over the world from practitioners every country, and this is the future where it's going. We're just a little ahead of the game. ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO NOT LOSE HOPE and to seek out answers and learn more about functional medicine. And I encourage you to share this podcast with your friends and family on social media. If you liked it that common, we'd love to hear from you. And subscriber every at your podcast and we'll see you next time on the doctors pharmacy thanks mark. Everybody's Dr Hyman thanks for tuning into the doctor's pharmacy I hope you're loving this podcast. It's one of my favorite things to do and introducing you all the experts that I know and I love that I've learned so much from and I wanna tell you about something else. I'm doing which is called marks picks. It's my weekly newsletter and in it I. Share my favorite stuff from foods, supplements gadgets tools to enhance your health. It's all the cool stuff that I use. And then my team uses to optimize our health and I'd love you to sign up for the weekly newsletter. Only Senate. You once a week on Fridays nothing else a promise. And all of us go to Dr Hyman Dot. com Ford slash picks to sign up. That's Dr Hyman DOT COM, four size picks P, I C K S and sign up for the newsletter, and I'll share with you my favorite stuff that I used to enhance my health and get healthier and better and live younger longer. Hi, everyone I hope. You enjoyed this week's episode. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes. Only this podcast is not a substitute for professional care by. By doctor or other qualified medical professional, this podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you're looking for helping journey, seek out a qualified medical practitioner. If you're looking for a functional medicine practitioner, you can visit IFM dot, Org and search. They're fine a practitioner database. It's important that you have someone in your corner. WHO's trained WHO's a licensed healthcare practitioner and can help you make changes especially when it comes to your health.

Lupus Erythematosus autoimmune disease Functional Medicine Epstein Barr Mark Hyman Diabetes lupus Interferon Peter Dedom Doctors Pharmacy Diabetes Ulcer Colitis Ultra Wellness Center Dartmouth Medical School US Beijing Lubis Madame methotrexate
#A137 (alphabetization to alpha-receptor)

The Dictionary

07:17 min | 2 years ago

#A137 (alphabetization to alpha-receptor)

"Hello word nerds. And welcome to another episode of the dictionary. Yes, I'm back at it. That means nothing. I word is alphabetizing nation. That's kind of a weird word to say alphabetize ation. This is a noun from eighteen sixty four one, the act or process of alphabetizing, something that I kinda liked doing as I've mentioned before to an alphabetical arranged series list or file next. We have alphabetize vis is a verb from sixteen ninety one one to arrange alphabetically to to furnish with an alphabet. What does that mean to furnish with an alphabet alphabetize earlier is a noun next? We have alphabet soup vis is a noun from nineteen thirty four a hodgepodge, especially of. Initials, as of the names of organizations next is alpha Fito protein, alpha. Hyphen Fito protein. F. E. T. O. P. R. O. T E, I N, this is a noun from nineteen sixty eight a fetal blood protein present abnormally in adults with some cancers as of the liver, and normally in the amniotic fluid of pregnant women with high or low levels tending to be associated with certain birth defects, as spina bifida, or down syndrome, next. We have alpha globulin, two words, globulin is spelled. G. L. O. B. U L, I N. This is a noun from nineteen twenty to any of several globulin of plasma or serum that have an alkaline P H, the greatest electro for Rettig mobility next to elbow. Human, and it says compared to beta globulin and gamma globulin, a lot of information I didn't understand next. We have alpha hyphen helix. This is a noun from nineteen fifty five the coiled structural arrangement of many proteins consisting of a single chain of amino acid, stabilized by hydrogen bonds, alpha helical is an adjective, next is alpha hydroxy acid. Three words. This is a noun from eighteen ninety nine any of various car box Silic acids with a hydroxyl group attached at the alpha position. Specifically one as malic acid or lactic acid that occurs in natural products as fruits, sugarcane or yogurt and is used in cosmetics for its exfoliating effect on the surface layer of skin called also. Oh, A. H A next. We have alpha interferon two. Words interferon is I. N. T. E. R. F. E. R. O N. This is a noun from nineteen eighty and interferon produced by white blood cells that inhibits, viral replication, suppresses, cell, proliferation and regulates immune response, and that is used in a form obtained from recombinant DNA to treat various diseases compared to beta interferon and gamma interferon. The first part sort of sounded like a song to me, an interferon produced by white blood cells that inhibits viral replication, suppresses cell, proliferation, that was stupid next. We have alpha iron visine noun from nineteen to the form of iron stable below nine hundred and ten degrees celsius, which is. Is one thousand six hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit next. We have alpha Merrick, this is an adjective from circa, nineteen fifty two. We just have the synonym alpha numeric, which is actually our next word. But if we added an aide to the end of alpha Merrick, we would have alpha merica, so maybe there's something we can do about that Alf America. I don't know. So here we go with alpha numeric, also alphanumerical. This is an adjective from nineteen fifty one consisting of both letters and numbers and often other symbols as punctuation, marks mathematical symbols, as in an alpha numeric code, also being a character in an alpha numeric system to capable of using or displaying alpha numeric characters alpha numeric. Glee is an adverb and alpha numeric six is a noun next. We have alpha particle vis is a noun from nineteen. Oh, three a positively charged nuclear particle identical with the nucleus of a helium atom that consists of two protons, and two neutrons and is ejected at high speed in certain radioactive transformations called also alpha alpha radiation, or alpha, Ray next is alpha private or primitive. I think it's private of it's an odd word this is a noun from fifteen sixty eight the prefix a or a n expressing negation in Greek and in English. So we've come across this a lot since we are in the as we've seen a lot of words that have a or an thrown at the beginning to make basically the. Zett so that, that part of the word that precincts. A or n is called an alpha privilege of or alpha privatised feel like I should probably know which one it is. But here we go with the last word for this episode alpha receptor. There is a hyphen in the middle. This is a noun from nineteen sixty one any of a group of receptors that are present in cell, surfaces of some effector, organs, and tissues interview did by the sympathetic nervous system, and that mediate certain physiological responses as Vasil constriction, relaxing session of intestinal muscle and contraction of most smooth muscle win bound by specific Adronico, GIC agents and compared to beta receptor. So when we get to the bees, specifically the Bee Gees, we are going. To see a lot of these again, but they'll be slightly different because it'll be beta instead of alpha that will end this episode. I know you are so happy to get to the end of it. But guess what? There's another episode tomorrow. And I'm going to go record it right now. Thank you, and goodbye.

alpha Merrick interferon spina bifida F. E. T. O. P. R. O. T E sympathetic nervous system Rettig G. L. O. N. T. E. R. F. E. R. O Ray Alf America Adronico one thousand six hundred seven ten degrees celsius
15-We Order To-Go Munchies, Peddle and Paddle Virtually and Go Day Trippn

Life in 16 oz.

1:10:19 hr | 1 year ago

15-We Order To-Go Munchies, Peddle and Paddle Virtually and Go Day Trippn

"Hello welcome what are you drinking? We'll have a life and sixteen ounces. Please she is welcome to life and sixteen ounces the show that raises a pipe to the explorers. The adventure seekers those wanting to break free from the nor to fill their glass with memorable experiences and basically have a good time. I'm Brandon and man I done with this quarantine stuff. I'm Paul. I actually tied my shoes the other day for the first time to you might get right into hooked on phonics right after this. You know what? Let's just get the show started this episode. We order to go from gourmet food. Trucks are rolling along and feeding your community next. A company who specializes in peddling and paddling puts the brakes on in order to stay afloat during this pandemic finally missed in. Well we speak to a business who offers the things you need. So you're not rippin your hair out that our usual crack in this episode of life in Sixteen Ounces Salon shot to another show and another great chance to meet it with you man. Yeah Number Fifteen. Holy Moly made it. We made it past evil number thirteen and welcome to the taproom. We are well into this. Covert situation I am. I'm ballistic. My hair is itching every day. I've I've a beard that actually I think matches the greatest beer that you ever had and I know that you're you're very fond of growing gigantic colorful beard so What what are you what are you? What are you going through anything that's craziness about you? Having freaking out moments we talk about ripping our hair out but honestly I'm getting out and doing stuff but at the same time it's amazing how we go and meet people during our little Ventures out to get interviews. Yeah how people are so ready there so saturated I wanNA have. I don't WanNa say desperate. But they're so excited to talk and have this social interferon. Well I think that all of us going through that and say At some point I think that you know we. We've been With our significant others. We've we've been you're still with yours. Yeah still barely the kids and you know the neighbors although it's not a bad thing. I'm pretty good I've got a good relationship with my neighbors and and we talk a couple times a week. You know going out. Put put the trash out just doing normal things that you do during during the week. I have a lot of projects that I'm getting to finally for the first time. And you don't what actually The they who they is. But they say that you're not supposed to to to To Bird yourself with a lot of different things Because it it adds undue stress right. All these projects are things that you think that you have to. That's well that's one thing that I heard but for me. That's what's keeping me sane. True is that I'm able to go outside and do these things and you know and and kind of do some physical work alongside Working from home. And so that that's the one thing that's keeping me The most sane. I would say this though. I thought that may be the staying at home working from home during the zoom meetings or whatever other kind of like based like Microsoft teams and those types of virtual meetings. I have to accomplish as much as I do if I was at work. But there's a point where I'm reaching like this crazy Part of there's a lot of stuff going on it to me. It's it's a lot harder to work at home. Well then you throw in the kid obviously trying to do their homework and you're trying to provide them with some sort of interaction. I mean my my kid through other guys. Don't play with me as much as I'm like. Oh well then you have to make time you have to come up with these funky games and watch these like right now. We're watching episode one through all the Star Wars. Just kind of get her up in up to speed on all every single thing about who's who of course why is episode one look more more cooler than episode for stuff like that so. I can trust me. We're not even close I mean. Can you imagine your three kids when they were younger? And what you had to go through so props to those families. Mothers in the parents are have to deal with the kids. That have you know the young ages Barnes and so amazing. What you guys are doing out there. Those and those who maybe can't work from home And and can't go to work and so they've got this very interesting dynamic. Where maybe they're pulling from the from the unemployment Benefits that are out there. Yeah and it's it's. It's I know that it's real stressful in and asked you about that to us. I did you get yours and did I. I didn't get mine because we're not eligible. Yeah but I mean that's all those things come into play to at least smooth out some of the some of the concerns that were going through an and again just people have. Everyone has a different situation. Ever has a different take on. What's the impact this covid? Nineteen th situation providing or does towards but all desperately to be over time. Buddy what do you think And ready to get back into this. Let's get into our first store Martian. Manhunter here you're listening to the life and sixty announces. What's in your pint? Well before we get into this I I want to bring this up a fan of this of your fan of the show. Everybody is game right. They are then. Then all of you are going is something wrong with our audio. There's something wrong with dame right. There is some some echoes. Much as we have to say that we've mirrored every time that we're in the the taproom. What is it called the insane bunker remember by white walled padded white walls? I know for some reason. There's it just there's something. Wrong with the microphones. Maybe you can't hear it but we we sure as hell and his bothering out of this. I don't know what's going on. Maybe you can't even del so the hell we're going to go with it so go all right One of the things I wanted to throw at you. Brain was last episode. We talked a lot of breweries. This episode I wanted to maybe focus on the food industry that are sort of supporting the Burris and certainly are keeping a force responders that are keeping medical staff. And you know like you said earlier you know you you do you eat at home. I mean there's people that are still not leaving their house. Sure Yeah and then. They've got a massive collection of food items at their home in the macaroni and cheese. Damn Right Raymond. Ramen noodles news again. Who Sure live out there. Uh neither kids playing out in the street. What they're all kind of but it's still it's still true and I think to support local businesses and see what's going on with with what's happening out there in and I said food trucks okay. You go and you go online and you you look food trucks. I found two places out that were interesting Roaming hunger dot com and secto which was another website that I found on certainly the Sacramento area. Which if you spend any time in Sacramento lived up there. They they have a huge a food truck presence and as massive massive amounts of breweries in the city area so I was luckily lucky to find a Paul Several thousand who works for Sanctum Mojo and he was kind enough to talk to me about the the future industry so I asked him a little bit of background about how it came to be because we all know right. I mean there's still people that are living ten years by which is by the way my brother. Who's a roach coaches know? Jack Astronaut Roach coaches gourmet gourmet food trucks. Oh yes several in my town as well absolutely. We're talking about the things that have been on like a food network and they have these massive challenges if you're who's the best food truck? In particular towns Guy Aries chose up and hell yes and these are legit passionate people that have beautiful food that they can whip whisk up right there in in a in a truck in every location that they pull up in Seattle so Paul talks about the the food truck industry coming into his respectful power position as gourmet food. Trucks Started about ten years ago as more of an accident. I discovered that food trucks which at the time warnings diversion trucks that we know now there were more old school conventional light Taco trucks and lunch trucks that go to construction sites and a friend of mine was very passionate about them and he wanted me to take a look at them when we were chatting with the owners. I I asked him why they wouldn't come downtown. Sacramento because their food was so cheap and frankly delicious and they said that they weren't allowed to so that led me down the rabbit hole of figuring out if this was true if it was just sort of misinformed and covered that indeed. The restaurant lobby had written the rules for food trucks and I'm needless to say wasn't very favourable. So that started a four year degree of Accidentally tripping on something and then it becoming my whole life. We fought the city and we worked with the county in since. Then we've worked with a number of counties on improving the Business. Climate around trucks and it coincided with the a resurgence of of what we call now gourmet food trucks in the in the northern California region it had started in La but we were about two three years late to the Party and in San Francisco embraced it in. We eventually embraced it. A couple of years later to so as as as that New Economy in that sector started we had to get to go through some some rough patches and some pretty animated discussions and some legal threats from restaurant owners and it was pretty automated time but eventually we prevailed and part of our compromise was that we weren't interested in conflict. We wanted to work together in the same environment without stepping on each other's toes in Sacramento. We're lucky because we're a very horizontal city so you don't have Five skyscrapers next to each other with twenty thousand people working in them. And then all the restaurants at the bottom of those and so as a food truck operator in San Francisco downtown elites almost impossible to park anywhere without you know parking directly in front of a restaurant in Sacramento. That's not the case where we're very spread out. So there's many many opportunities for constructive be able to participate in in the economy without having to create real or or fictitious conflict with with the restaurant. Operator that's kind of how it all started while in the process A number of food truck started asking me to help them. More and more with Finding locations and finding event opportunities in what started as a hobby eventually became a monster and we were just last summer we were averaging by two hundred and fifty events per month for truck so we we basically set up and make sure that everything we do with around food trucks all legal and permitted and ultimately that it's also profitable for the food trucks. Y'All says talks know He. He just flows right into the whole covid. Nineteen situation with the food truck industry and how it has sort of had to re imagine itself reinvent itself and improvise pre coded. We had dozens of those where we would pull up to a park. We'd have life music have children entertainment We'd set up a multi multi faceted event and the goal of course is to have people come out. Hang out and stay because in our research we. We saw that the longer people hang out the more likely there to buy dessert or to buy seconds so that was beneficial for the trucks once pandemic hit. We've we've kind of had to re imagine our industry because everything that worked prior to the pandemic including public events concerts all the corporate lunch parks where we normally would allow now closed and empty literally ninety. Five percent of what we did is is gone for at least for a year. And you've you've had you've had you've gone to brewery that's had a food truck yes several. Yeah Yeah I it's. It's a beautiful concept right. I mean to me you go there and then you drink and you go. Oh well kind of getting hungry. Because I'm getting the munchies from drinking beer meanwhile you seen people you know seats seats away getting fed food that they're bringing in your like Alan Crap. Let's go get some food. You never expected it but damn right is it just. It makes sense in most of the part that they just they pair well and they. I don't know if they actually pluck these particular of food truck styles to match their food or not but well down in Modesto they actually have an area laid out for. I forgot how many like up to eighteen. Maybe that's too many but a lot of food trucks to come into this athletic invasion this young this lot and they knew what they were missing so they actually put in place where you can purchase alcohol After you've purchased her food and you go. Yeah and you can go to you can go. Vallejo or Sacramento or fair. There's a lot of places that have A location within the city or town that food trucks congregate well before this covert situation. And that's where you actually you. Could you could sample. It's almost like you go into the State Fair you know. Let's try this. Let's this by. Let's get an appetizer. Here let's get ountry from there and let's go get the desert from there anyway. It's still it's it's a neat collection of styles and Palettes and then at the same time. Unlike what's going on right now. Is You socialize. You gathered together you you sit at the park benches picnic tables. That are right there. But what's going on right now. Paul explains a little bit about. This is a bit of a backlash and the social perception of what's going on right now when it comes to food trucks going out to communities and being seen that might not Go over too well with those. That are super sensitive about the covid nineteen situation over the last two months. We've had the do some serious. Improvisation in come on come to terms with the fact that things are different. Now and so. Some of the adjustments we've had make is now when we set up trucks in group. We set him up in in unwelcoming spots. And what I mean without is rather than setting up at a park where people are GonNa hang out and picnic and get us in trouble when people take pictures of that in you know There's a lot of people on social media that don't understand the context and they get very angry because if a family comes of for people and they get in line to order. And they're still practicing social distancing That's low that's illegal. That's loud. They lift together. They're allowed to stand together. But if somebody drives by and takes a picture of that in uploads it than you get this whole ridiculous storm of criticism and so we've had to be very mindful of that because the last thing we want is to get a whole bunch of negative feedback that we're not being mindful and responsible about this and then potentially be told that we can't operate and that would be the end. Does it would be devastating trying industry if we couldn't actually at least be open in this new form. So we've we've found abandoned parking lots and We kind of aggressively Ferry people out as they have the food we do online ordering. We're trying to do everything so that the truck can still do. Business folks can still get food but that they're not using it as a social opportunity anymore at least not for the foreseeable future. So that's a pretty dramatic shift of where we came from another thing that's really well during this pandemic. That's been unusual an that? We've never done before in that. We also kind of stumbled upon accidentally was apartment in housing communities are away from a major shopping area. So suburban type areas that are not close to Large quantities of food or where. What food is available to them is now closed because of all this craziness so we've been pulling into those neighborhoods and we've found some success that way and so that's it's also not typically how we we do things but extraordinary times could call for a near measures. These apartment communities have worked pretty well. It's over ninety percent contexts delivery. They order on their phones and the name fifteen minutes later they walked down in. The food is sitting on a table ready for them. So it's safer everybody and it's a it's a convenient way of ring food to some communities that are a little out of the way and where they we can also prevent people from interacting with the larger society. Kind of a win win for everyone. But they're also helping out right. They're doing a whole lot of great things in their communities. Yeah Paul goes into mean he does talk about how he really truly believes that the food truck industry is is built for social gatherings. And this is why. They're taking a huge hit right now but the the there are some out there supporting local breweries like trek. Seven for instance in a Tomas Trick. Seven was the pioneer in the Burris that supported trucks. And they they were quick to embrace that and if not the first one definitely one of the first handful of breweries that understood the value of pairing with trucks. They I'm the the rules have changed changed a little bit through the years but and and we're seeing more burris open up now with food licensing and they will offer their own food but a lot of Burris just don't have that option and so they pair up with a food truck to make sure that when folks coming out they can get food to during this time. I haven't seen too many breweries getting attention from food trucks. Just because everything now is pick up in a take home type stuff. There obviously socializing burris discouraged and not allowed so that I think I've seen some pairings where BEREA and truck will pair up and then they're offering food and beer to go. So there's some of that where I'm seeing. Most trucks find success in shopping centers in front of large stores. Where there's lots of traffic if you go on their facebook page or you just look up food trucks helping out right now with the COVID. Nineteen S. There's a lot of stuff and this is not just Sacramento and it's not just California is across the nation New York The D. C. Area Florida. You know up and down California. There's there's places that fruit truck industries are starting to jump on the bandwagon supporting the first responders supporting medical staffs doing beautiful work in. Paul talks about that right now. We partnered with The Sacramento Labor Union and Senator Plan to do a feed the frontlines project a week ago and we serve seven hundred fifty meals to healthcare workers at UC Davis Medical Center. And that was really need. Just as I can't imagine what healthcare workers have gone through over the last couple of months and to be able to put a smile on their face and make their stomach. Happy for a few hours was was very rewarding. That's the so there's a. There's definitely been positive. Salang the road of uncertainty in craziness. He also talks about networking right. So you know important. He talks he he mentioned was seventy and it's pretty cool. If you go in their site you can actually find where These food trucks are finding where these made made. Huge events are and and if you are out there trying to start a new food truck business they actually network wonderfully together. He mentioned how one of the silver linings is just them collectively coming together as a community helping each other out but yeah to build a food truck. They have these these like one day. little symposiums if you will where they can come together and they learn from each other but there's there's absolutely real real standouts That are out there There's a fundraiser. They just did by the way. Six thousand dollars was raised for Two feet formerly homeless women and children They mentioned the Saint John's program for Real Change Which can be found at Saint? John's program Dot Org. They have a nonprofit that these support is a big day of giving for the furry friends at Front Street animal shelter so they. They threw a love that way towards the animals they They're out near shriners hospital for lunch on Fridays. They are out in force of course for the singer. Demayo on the TACO truck Taco Tuesday. Yes but it was called feed the front lines and they at the UC Davis Medical Center. And it's just it's it's great that they can figure out a way to bring the food to the people that need it. The most that are working their ass off. They're they're doing what they can. Obviously you know you. I'm thinking you bring food every single day. You kind of get tired and bored of it. You go to your break room. Eat It but you'd be able to go right outside and have food right there in his brought to you in. It's fresh in it's beautiful. It's it just makes sense so Kudos to those guys. I'd love to have one right outside my door right now. It'd be nice. So here's here's Paul once again just to talk about his view on what really makes You know you miss those gatherings How food really brings people together to me. Food is such a secret part of the day. Such a great opportunity to sit down and break bread with with with others and talk about whatever it is that you're passionate about talk about your day to be able to contribute to that in passive way is is definitely one of the most exciting parts of of what we've done with with Sacramento. What was that Brandon? What do you WanNa know where to find? Food trucks? What we saw several today In in and around the Sacramento in yet correct and for all of our listeners. All across United States you can go to secto Mo fo DOT COM or honestly look up food trucks. That are in your area in an hopefully. They have some sort of Like a booking agent like like Paul to help you find out where these guys are keeping this in mind as phases of covid nineteen th start to To come out and we're able to return back to what we're what we would consider. See Get out there flood as much as you can safely these companies. That have been dying to. Have you walk up order some food and get back to normalcy as quickly as possible? Yeah it's not bad food. All of it is an amazing stuff as a ridiculous stuff man. Oh good because I mean there's a lot of these guys that are doing this this food truck business but they also have a brick and mortar. So yes you know. Find find if you find something that's really angered. You never know the much much you have. We saw one up. Shannon does Tacos they're actually having a brick and mortar opening up which they couldn't do because the coping nineteen banana go by there a couple of weeks bellio truck out there checking out support him and hello. My name is Paul Summer House. I'm the owner of sector like sixteen ounces. What's in my pint? Usually especially on a day like today was community. Some degrees really enjoy it very cold. Belgium triple. We'll hope you enjoyed that story of sack. Domo fo- again you can check them out on facebook at Sacramento Mojo that's S. A. C. T. O. M. O. F. O. Oh all right. Do and thirsty again. I don't know what it is. Maybe it's a little hot in the soul. Yes but I'm hearing a little Tina Turner in my head. It must mean it's time fault bear. I WanNa be a beer beer. We she gets road. No alcohol sucks. I can't chase sisk much longer. GotTa have a well before. We dive into our final stories in two minutes. That wonderful sound. You heard means it is time to feature are twenty twenty head to head and beer game known as big for. May We actually picked style themed lagers or or Beers in general that kind of fit within the Cinco de Maya Catts. Passing folks guys. We're monthly podcast. That a lot of stuff. We just can't just can't match in time like for instance July Fourth. But we're going to try well since we're at pulse. Taproom I can do the honors. You can do your thank you. Ladies and gentlemen. This is the main of this corner my beer from the brewing school of Stone Brewing Hailing Sandiego wing in at four point seven percent with an IB count of two N T wearing a huge bottle with a day of the dead skull. It's their way as So in the Moneim Logger and in this corner from the School of Angle Smith Brewing Company. Hailing out of San Diego California weighing in at five point two percent with an issue count of Twenty six with a label that is black with the sublime logo on it the band. Who's what their sublime Mexican lager. Right he had the rules. The be must be Mexican style. Laga was something in a Mexican profile and kept US close to that stylist possible A. Bv Percentage Must Be within three percent of each other served the proper temperature according to the Nevada. Heat Gun case. Oh Mexican style. That's between forty two and forty eight degrees Fahrenheit Celsius crack here all right clink glasses. Godia corners pry those open. Porous a taster ring. Dad Bill. Let's have a clean fight slump shop as much as we would love to have beard. Judge Competition certified taste. Buds will defer to experts for their official ratings and eloquent reviews after the match to see how close we got. But now let's continue talking about some interesting people. Yes without further delay. Let's roll into our less stories as not as good time they'll love you got fast. Being I think he I brandon. Yes for the next story or stories. Aca audience members list listeners throws a bone now and then just give us give us an give us a story here there if this is what we're going to have to do but we're fine with it because we magically make things happen so here's the deal. We actually decided. Let's just freaking go to Sacramento. Because we had we had. We had lied and lied us into simply just driving around and brandon. Who would who would we end up eventually Pulling up too well so I had been in contact with Sack Brew Boat Dot Com. I thought that it were that that it would be a whole Larry Story to have the the booze cruise. Captain go out and Booze Cruise. Captain you here. Yeah Braille Oh cruise. Captain is hanging out audience today tonight so I thought it'd be hilarious. They wouldn't go out. You know on the water on In Sacramento I had sold this site sack. Brew Boat Dot Com or whatever and I reached out to Chris Ferron Sereno no right. Yeah Chris Brown or Krill. No-no Chris Farren. Sereno Smith is his name. Yeah all right well so Even though the the boat was kind of because of the coal covid nineteen thing. The boat was not in play and it was not docked it was yeah it wasn't funds. Could actually see it bruce. Captain would've had when you enjoyed that boost cruise. Captain Go gone. Check that out bro serious. I was ready to go on the water. Exactly I mean. He was dressed up little ridiculous guy. He's crazy but he's definitely He's definitely at ease when he's on the water. Yeah well so guess what they also have a a sister company or a conglomerate that is alongside the br the boat yes sack brew bike. We pulled up and I'm like dude the bike. It's the bite that you see traveling all throughout the downtown Sacramento area crazy stuff. So yeah we got the opportunity to sit down with With Chris and to talk about The business that is run kind of in the downtown area of Sacramento and man. It is so amazing. The stuff that they do and so Chris Talks about the The business at length right here. Our concept is provide fifteen passenger pedal-powered experiences both on the river in Sacramento here and on the streets so visit different bars and burris where we spend thirty to forty minutes or so each taproom bar gives people the chance to experience different crappier that Sacramento has the offer also liquors available if you're a Laker fan and the same concepts done on the water where people paddle this big giant paddle wheel. That's on the back of the boat and we go. We've stopping at cried ads on the river where people can kind of get off and Cocktail get back on the boat and paddle off the next bought now. I was intrigued by how you come up with this kind of a concept I mean I guess most Metropolitan cities have something like this right and so maybe they had taken You know some some steps toward this your idea of beer drinking while being tortured and a dungeon I was horrible business. Model now fly. These guys have something going here. So yeah so. Chris Talks about their beginnings so it started in two thousand thirteen as far as when we first saw the concept. We actually moved up to Portland. Oregon and Portland has a lot of you know or is craft. Beer Mecca and up there. We had a new apartment out the window. We'd heard this kind of kind of party rolling down the street and we look at the window and we saw these beer by. We were blown away by the concept. We'd never seen him before. We thought it was awesome super cool so a year later after moving up the Portland. We cited to move back to Sacramento where we were from and start the brew bike here in Sacramento. Two thousand fourteen. So Chris Talks about them expanding into something else in two thousand eighteen. I got like a Voltron. No one and all four of the head no not like that okay The brew boat started in two thousand eighteen so this would be our third summer up and running now. Chris goes into detail about what to expect With the experience right with with going in onto the the boat or the The the the the pedaling biker. Mike Boat Yeah yes so I think people who generally come on the bike. It's generally serve mostly locals and when I say locals it's probably people within a forty five minute range of Sacramento and there's a lot of people looking to celebrate like Birthdays Bachelor Bachelorette parties lot of team buildings and a lot of friends and family kind of getting together just for fun unique experience. Of course I had to ask the best yes experience and and the worst experience looking for at this point somebody throw he got up or dislike going. We have a bike out of control. Armstrong steamed ballistic. That's where the greatest stories come into play. You never know what you're going to get so I of course I wanted to know a little bit more about you know Those different those those interesting experiences. Go Gadget Bite Bike Brew Bike with. It's like somebody throws up in. Slick cars dude. It doesn't work that way. Double Seven Bond Group bike. Here's here's would. Chris had to say as far as the best crowds. You know the best crowds insofar as anyone particular. Unc like the best crowds are just goop groups. Who Just WanNa have fun. They kind of maybe toe that line as far as imbibing but not too much. But they're also like they're they're boisterous. They're having fun. They're singing songs singing eighties music as we walk down. The street doesn't really matter what type of music they're saying as long as they're singing and having fun really whether on the water or like the bike themselves as far as like more. I'll say one of the more challenging groups was a group of Police officers on the bite a few years back and A little bit hard to wrangle. Those folks they were trying to break the rules. We told them you`re. The people are in charge of forcing roles. Guys can't break the rules so that was kind of the one more challenging groups but yes so those are probably the two groups that can a standout. This is interesting. Chris talks about the sweet spot on the bike itself. Yeah everybody rushes to like the pedal the backseats in the beginning. So there's no pedals on the backseats so that's GONNA cheat everybody re rushes to spots in the beginning It's for whatever reason it's usually the biggest dudes also that just want to sit on the back and just have the ladies pedal. I agree you. You need to be like people need to arrive ready right if you if you're invited by your buddies and your do let's go to this one place and you're going on. This is not one of those moments where you like. Guess what surprise. We're GONNA be biking and night you don't you. Don't pull that crap dude. I don't WanNa frigging pedal so I I asked about the the downtown breweries in the beer. Experience and what people are going to be getting from You know going getting this. This downtown You know hole. Big stuff was one of the guys member. Yes he's talked about well. We know that we're on one of the roads or at least the routes that they come across so you connect with them and you bring in more revenue more People to come to your for interesting stuff. It's super important. I've said have great relationships with all of our bars. Were pretty much in constant regular contact with them asking making sure everything's okay with our patrons and also if there's anything that we need to do on the flip side for them to make it kind of a good experience because it's obviously they need. They need our support and we also need their support right to function really well so we kind of connected with them early on. We identified a number of different bars and breweries and tap rooms and restaurants that we thought would be a good fit and overall with our overall vibe. We found though spots. We kind of talk with them and most people were on board and then a little bit later people. Maybe who weren't as excited in the beginning people continue to reach out to us as far as bars and restaurants now to see if we want to join them as partners because we do bring a lot of these spots so they have a brick and mortar building. And I thought well I mean what's that all about. I mean couldn't you this kind of just on the fly but maybe not We got to go inside and kind of check out what they have to offer inside and he talks about Chris. That is what they offer to their patriots. Yeah so it's kind of a cool of that space We are designated a bar so we serve beer wine cider in champagne here no liquor. But it's just kind of a cool fun spot for people to just check in before your tour. You can grab a drink. Kind of loosen up warm-up before your ride or have another drink when you finish your tour but we primarily serve local draft beer and kind of Sacramento regional based especially mostly California beer. That's all in draft beer. And then as far as we have domestic cans and stuff to for people. You're not as adventurous in terms like scrap Sacramento crappier. You know it. We have a lot of domestic STU and cans and bottles so of course I had to ask him this. Not that we want to dwell on any of this kind of stuff coming loose cruise captain driver okay. Oh yeah well no. I didn't ask them that but The covid nineteen sure. Yeah stuff how has that affected their business and You know What do they see going forward? So right now we are. Complete hundred percent shutdown. We actually did some tours for the brew boat in February in early March this year we actually had some nice weather but since March fifteenth for the bikes and the boats we entirely. We've been shut down so we've seen just from our google analytics page checking that out. We've seen our our website traffic. Just take a deep dive off that ends. We have seen like no traffic to our website. Sacra back inside doing small tours. Were you're close to one another in tight contact area? Obviously that's the concern for people right now. So we're hoping is things loosen up the next few weeks that people will be a bit more excited hopefully want to get out. Enjoy the weather. It's outdoors so we're hoping up. People will be taking that risk if they proceeded as a procedure is here in the next few weeks. We didn't get into the particulars of how many people they had to say. Sorry but this is not going to. Yes yeah his. Imagine though but he talks about the reopening that he has slated for a couple of weeks from now and I mean it's it's kind of a glorious return for people getting out of jail after twenty five years sentence unleashed like let's get out into the public Yup I can imagine we definitely have some things in place that we're going to new protocols. I guess coming forward as far as when we are allowed to reopen for the bikes and the boats. We're GONNA use the more social distancing amongst the bike The bikes all see and the boats about fifteen or sixteen people so we might be cutting the group size down into half of that might be a little bit smaller. We're also GONNA do some sanitation. Some regular cleaning. All of our employees are going to be wearing masks and there might be partitions on the bike and the boat here so safety is number one priority. Right we want people have a good time. Want water while people down the streets burris tap room's in Sacramento Support Small Business. But obviously we gotta make sure people are safe while doing it. Hey so check them out. They are at fifteen nineteen nineteen street in downtown Sacramento. You can find them at sack. Brew BIKE DOT COM or sack brew. Boats DOT COM. I think that it's no you think so. Yeah it's both of them. But also if you look on facebook there had sack brew bike bike right and you know. Remember the merchandise. I WanNa see I wanNA see somebody one of audience member. I want you to send me a picture of you. Biking around Sacramento in their undies. There's a lot. Some of the photos are pretty interesting because people people wear some interesting stuff while they're the town and I and I'll tell you this Look for the Booze cruise captain to be part of this whole experience This summer guarantees. It'll be out there. We're going to do that. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do a little tour. We're going to a booze cruise insane. Thanks Chris appreciate it. It was. It was a fun time in it was obviously. This is crazy how how reserved and timid. It is without having that experience on the bike. But we'll get there when we're GONNA make it epic excellent come support. Us book seats the tours private tours for the remainder of the summer for the bikes in the boats. Come out looking to celebrate a birthday Bachelor Bachelorette team building. Come out friends. Family were ready for you. Ain't here very soon. You're listening to life and sixteen ounces. What's in your what's in my mind I would say like a WPA That sounds pretty tasty. You've got one more story. Yes I WANNA throw this out there because this might be the change that people might notice. I don't think we're going to go with restores anymore in the future for the show so so that we can kind of expand on two stories right. Yeah yet yeah exactly to expand onto stories and maybe provide a little more of a a tighter collection like frincis. Bless everybody out there. If you made it through the last episode it was a little long. It was a little long but yet trust me when you come across people who really WanNa talk and we absolutely love true symmetry and renegade brewing and No renegade bruce applies young and dying very passionate all passionate about the about their businesses. Shut up and you keep recording and you know what magic happens and we're not gonNA when I got to tell anybody to shut up because we want to cut the story short come on and what the hell are you doing. What are you doing what? What are you doing right now? Nothing right so shut up and listen to this story but we do have to produce it and we have to edit it so we're gonNA try to short issue for us because we're just getting old and it takes a long time. I define find the buttons fat fingers all right but we we struck gold but yeah exactly do all every time we go out together. We strike gold. Yeah we don't know whether stuff's coming from so check us out we're rolling out of sack brew bike and one of their employees. Jimmy from GIN right roles. Yes I know. We're probably butchering everybody's name today. But he rolls up and he's a guy guys. There's there's an extra part of this that you might be interested in so this this guy he I believe he lived in in in. Dc Area And then he came out the Sacramento He was he's pretty big into politics and he came out here and he came out and he wasn't really sure if this was his his Area he wanted to be in but guess what he met the people at Sack brew bike and immediately you know loved their connection their friendship relationship. Everything about them made him feel at home. Which in turn Meet him a fan of the Sacramento Midtown area. And when you're a fan of that you want to turn around and you want to give to the community. You want support the businesses. That's what he's done. Were a business here in Santa Cruz. In Sacramento that does curated day trips in and around Northern California and obviously right now. We're not doing day trips. So we're doing these curated greats talking about so we know we. We asked the natural questions. Like is this like a a a one off from sack brew. Bike is this a separate notes together. They this is another way that they can connect with the community to generate Crowds to the to the business right. Yeah but Yeah talking to talk about coming up with a creative idea so the baskets came out because on the day that we were gonNA launch our business which was march seventeenth. We got shut. Down was terrible time. We've been planning to launch for months and months and months. We had a waiting list and on the day that we were going to actually start taking money. We found out that the governor was shutting down bars restaurants and most of the businesses in the state. So I sat on my couch and just kind of stared at my phone and read the article for about forty five minutes and just thought Jimmy he he. He wanted to to support and emphasize some of the the businesses that are certainly not going to be able to survive otherwise during covid nineteen situation like the big box places or the ones that are clearly very well established sure in have revenue. But there's ones that you know that are small. Certainly in the more boutique areas of of the downtown in city areas of Sacramento. They they rely on the local neighbors to come down and grab a little bit this and that and their specialty stores I looked at the local business here. In Sacramento we're doing. Which was they weren't giving up. They were so excited about what they normally offer to their customers that they are trying to find a way that people could bring it home with them and for me. Somebody who like I said has unexpectedly fallen in love with this area. I've become very passionate about supporting especially in the midtown downtown core area Sacramento supporting the businesses. That do good work. Good people doing good work and so I reached out to some of those businesses and said hey if we were to collaborate around a theme. What's something you would send home to somebody? What something special that you could bring into their life or that you would want to share and so I actually got around to working with a few SPA oriented companies and relaxation oriented companies to do the basket that we currently have which is called SPA in place. Where you bring the SPA home to you from the different places around town normally it would take somebody hours and hours and hours to go around and visit all the different locations schedule it. We're putting it all on a basket where you have the opportunity to get a facial from urban bath house. Which is the Bath House? Old World style down here in Sacramento. You can move on from your From your facial into a relaxing yoga practice. That's offered by Bennett. Hanan from trail yogis. Then you move into bath time. You're stretched out you're relaxed. Your face feels good. And just lay back in the bath with a bath bomb goddess bombs another local Sacramento Company. And then you finish off with a candle meditation. That's also led by Bennie. And that features a candle from tipsy sisters company which are Gypsy Sisters Kendall Company which supplies a lot of the yoga studios and the spas here in Sacramento so normally in order to counter all these products you would have to go and chase it around to their different vendors. But we're putting it together so that they can reach into your home and comfort you and help you relax. So this nor cal ripken. You can find them at nor cal at T. R. A. P. P. N. dot com whereas. Let's say dot call Dot Com. Yeah it's not just like for instance the spawn place that the came over this the the trip and curated crates and that's and a lot of that has to do with the mother's Day. Push up Louis and del but I mean come on. I mean they've they thought about this A month before mother's Day. Oh absolutely it made sense because people are starting to get frigging crazy like I'm done. I don't WanNa be mentioned to begin to show is just one of like. I'm I'M GONNA RIP my frigging like our story says Moore freaking out so to be able to have a moment. It doesn't matter if it's freaking mother's Day are not people need a break? This spun place is a really cool idea But it's not just that says if you go onto nor cal trip and dot com There's one trip been curated boxes I like this the at pedals pints and Putz which. I didn't know what you call me with your butts wind wellness yet. Just click on there. They have social distance. Friendly curated boxes. Jimmy explains more doing other curate. Greats going forward. We're going to be doing a date night where we're GONNA be working with some of the places that you would normally go for date night right. You put your kids to bed or you know. Tuck the dog in the bathroom or whatever it is you do for you leave for a couple of hours and you need to go out to a restaurant you might go get a drink or something. We're working with some of those bars and restaurants to put together things like take home cooked kits where you can cook a gourmet meal in your house That is from some of your local restaurants and from your favorite spots. But bring it home to you We're looking at working with some other vendors. Forefathers Day are the candles that we have in our mother's Day box are really light and airy and lavender scented and they have healing courts. Crystals candle that we're GONNA put in our Fathers Day. Curated crate is called a mandal because it has Smokey overtones and kind of a would nature to the smell. And so sometimes you know when you go to light up a candle you don't necessarily want to be smelling like pine forest and this is a chance to smell like an old fashioned instead So we're trying to think creatively about it and give other businesses an opportunity to to experiment and provides something unique. Something that's really cool and we'll stand out for a long time. Okay Mandal You. WanNa talk about Mandal. What so what would you boot will be your mandal aroma. That's tough because I I can't you can't nail me down like Gelo Piney Guy. You're not I'll tell you something. There's a candle my wife lights every now and then and it smells exactly. Like a hazy. Ip A and. I'm like I don't know why but I now thirsty for his EPA I'm more like a doritos meets. Eight some really nasty like Some animal like a raccoon animal. And I've been sitting in the hot sun for one hundred five degree. I last hour that kind of aroma. That's that's that will really bring me home like in like in army latrine. Yeah make that kind of mandal flashbacks to the crap that I had to go through the military but all right so yeah mandal's smell like a like a man but out there in the back backcountry with some some pines and stuff like that. So Yeah. Hey good stuff. Thank you very much of Jimmy for Lennon's know that that there's that there's always people out there that are that are looking out for each other doing the right thing and trying to find inventive ways to To bring awareness and revenue to some of the small businesses out. There we can all link up arm in arm my business and the businesses that were also supporting through our tours and through our curated crates. We can make sure that the economic impact that is flowing out of our community is turning around from local business and coming back into it so that it becomes this cycle of looking out for one another an amazing amazing experience for everyone involved in Yup. My hat is off to him to get out again nor CAL TRIPPING DOT com. Hi this is Jimmy from nor cal tripping and you're listening to life and sixteen ounces. What's in my pint? I'm drinking a breaking Bud from deep brewing company here in the Sacramento area. We're looking forward to getting out and seeing some more local breweries when everything goes back to normal. Well thank you all of our guests who were kind and brave enough to step up in front of the microphone and share. What is in their pint? Well it looks like we are approaching last call. I'd be glad that didn't break. Let's head back into the ring for Beer. Dome where two to one but both get drunk. Hell Ya not gonNA waste beard sort of paint a picture here. We had a random audience member. Thank you very much by the way. Lovely lady they poured Brandon's Ale Smith Sublime Mexican lager. Yes and my stone. Veza salt and lime lager and we don't know which is which well we've hydrated and have written down our readings from one to five two. So let's see which beer takes on the Chin and which one goes to the Matt's the winner will make it into the champions bracket and return at the end of the year for our ultimate beer drinking game also known as a long day and night of drinking. My Gosh. When's IT GOING TO HAPPEN? Luckil- luckily we're building up our immune system. Yeah all right. So let's start with the room I got guys. I'm sorry. I'm not a logger unless logger lover. Okay so not saying this was bad just saying I I gotTA born simply just. It smelled like corn Any longer dust ahead. What do you got? Well I would directly to a four. Que Nos fun before well because for me it smelt like corona and the actual beer corona got. It you're saying for isn't it smelled. Good enough for lager. Yes okay. Maybe I should have said something like that too but I I'm not saying one is guess when his bad moving okay. So flavors next okay. I scored it a to look at that and the reason why is To me it's still it was it was a classic lager. Okay and I had nothing negative to say about it. It was extremely clean with a slight multi to it but beyond that it was just land and longer to so I put it to okay. I'll give it a five. Yeah I thought that it was extremely refreshing that there was a lot of flavor to it and it was really salty for some reason. Yeah Oh okay. That's something here in the future. All right Mouth feel I went with a one Why because I I just I didn't get anything from. It is simply a bland classic lager that right it could easily have been a corona or a freaking to me. There's there's no complexity about it. There was nothing that which maybe that's what it was meant to be basically based on a Mexican themed beer. I think that that's where I was coming from his well. I thought that you know okay. This is a logger in brightness so I'll give it a four okay and then let me let me throw this out there. If I could through this I actually would be quite proud. Okay because it's very hard to to brew lager and to able to get the clean in Christmas of of the of the Ale or lager in this case. Yeah yeah that'd be. That'd be quite quite proud so I would at the same time. I would never do this. Well this would be something that I would. I would say you know what. Give me that whole six pack because yeah. I'm going to drink this thing throughout the day. You're different in well but if that's the only thing that that's around Then so be it. Yeah I was. I was fairly impressed with with this Okay with this logger Mexican logger your from Modesto right so let's circle back to the The number two. Yeah number two to start with the Roma I I said a to and again I said to was a neutral smell again. I don't think logically have that much of a distinctive smell except for Korn pros but it didn't. It didn't smell anything right so we know I gave it a two as well. Finally I know I didn't use it the first one you gave a four I did. Oh Wow I know the second one. Yeah definitely a to at a seemed darker to me. Something was there was more going on with this one and I and and I don't know that I was especially a fan of it but now let's see what happens so did you. Do you have allergies? Oh no no. I can't smell with a right now. All right let's go into flavor flavor. I scored it a two. Wow so did I think this is crazy? I mean I'm just blown away and I'm sure you are too just don't don't wreck your car. After not driving. I thought it was heavy heavy. Yeah I got a very heavy taste to it. It didn't seem like a a crisp lager and that's kind of where I maybe I was because of the first one going into the second one. I thought this is not the same kind of a logger so I did notice a difference and I wrote down that it was has more character. Okay and there was Zing to it very clean finish but there was extra like you call extra notes but they were very slight so mouth feel I. I gave it a one because whatever I just I just said I had no impact on how different it tastes from the other one I was. I was giving it the benefit of the doubt. I give it a three and thought you know okay. I'M GONNA try. Which gave him the other one. What a four four okay. Yeah okay so there's food the mouth will still there for a logger Again I was basing everything off of that style and but then I also did say this is a one and done. I don't think that I would have another one. This is really way across. This is really see now. This is why this is so fun. And we're so opposite folks and why we send our numbers into a gigantic calculating machine. Tally up the scores. What were your overall impressions? Drinking pleasure suggestions on improvement in anything might pair it with. I mean like you said one. And done or yeah. Well I'd say the first one to me. There was no zero head retention. There was no there wasn't they looked like they had snow. But I would stick with. I would deficit number one through this It could be. You could pair it with with basically any food that you had in front you any food truck food except for maybe Italian. I wouldn't appear with a tally exactly. But you know you your big smile. Yeah your Demayo your your Tacos burritos that kind of thing. Perfect the second one. I think that you're probably you're you're gonNA run into some barriers. When it comes to how much you're going to be able to eat versus how much gonNA drink with that second one. Okay so our through this out before Before the calculator thing comes back but Like we said in the beginning when we introduce the both beers yours simply said it was a Mexican Maga mine actually said Salt in line lager. I'm sorry but I barely detected any salt knows. How do you know which was which don't know exactly what I'm GonNa Guess? I thought I was going to be like this. One clearly has someone in Lyon. It but unfortunately didn't happen. And that's where I'm really. I'm really Downtrodden I can't wait for the results on this who all right so Here comes the final scores in a sealed envelope before we reveal the winner. Which beer do you think is which who so? I'm GonNa go with what I chose. I'M GONNA say that my sublime Mexican logger was number one and your Um Stone Wayne of visa. I'm going to say that that was number two later. I'M GONNA agree with you. Okay I agree that the sublime is is number one in stone as number two okay. Let's what happened. Machine has finished the slowing this out. What's what's I cannot believe. This crap is going on. This is not right so hold on a second. You need to taste these again because you always. Do you always do this where we think that somebody screwed up? Firing everybody in the IT turns out that stone Bueno visa was beer number one. Yes I scored at a four okay. You scored in a thirteen total of seventeen gimmicks but we we thought it was Ale Smith. Yeah we did and then the number two which was the Ale Smith. I scored five and you scored a seven. Yes little points of twelve so that makes going Veza though winner of May Beer fight I forget twister folks and play this game at the next party or visit were game all reserve. Speak Blah Blah Blah Blah. The studio there the lights and it's closing time settled Tom. Tanya covid nineteen getting out of hand man. People can get crazy. I hope you've enjoyed the show. Yes tell your friends and support us by visiting life and sixteen ounces dot com and subscribing to wherever you get your podcasts from remember. We are a monthly podcast. So keep checking our social media sites for more of our Usual Crack. Where are they? They're all linked at the bottom of our website. Hash Hashtag people that's right. We use life in sixteen ounces. And what's in your pint. Our email is life and sixteen ounces at G M dot com to suggest show ideas and pitches story. This episode was stitched together and with the help of UNICORNS and magic and all those things that That just come together to make things happen to you right. Tom Thank you last minute. ferries music is by Any through truck platelets. 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Ep 49 Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Triple EEEk!

This Podcast Will Kill You

1:13:26 hr | 1 year ago

Ep 49 Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Triple EEEk!

"This is exactly right. Madison re delivers gorgeous. Professional Ammonia Free hair-color straight to your door starting at just twenty two dollars. Their color is crafted by master colors and with over fifty five shades to choose from. You look like you just came from an expensive salon. Find your perfect shade at Madison. Dash Reed Dot Com and get ten percent off plus free shipping on your first color kit with Promo code this podcast. That's Promo code this podcast at Madison Dash Reed Dot Com on the seventh of September. My boy took her from the pasture a little before sunset and harnessed her. While standing at the door I observed she slathered freely and was stupid and downcast in her appearance. I observed that she was loath to go faster than the walk. And although repeatedly urged forward by the whip would shortly resume the walk once or twice on ascending the hill. She stopped for a second as fatigued or in pain and several times. In descending small pitches she appeared in great danger of falling from the very bungling manner of using her four feet continued my ride without discovering anything farther till the latter part of the evening except that whenever the whip was applied a distinct interval was obvious between the time I struck her time she perceived the blow when she did perceive the effect was greater than expected for. She started off as if surprise have been added to the usual effects of the lash on my return home in the latter part of the evening. I experienced great difficulty in keeping her in the road on account of an obstinate and constant tendency to the left that required strong effort to counteract. She could scarcely be urged out of a walk and it was perfectly evident that she was laboring under some alarming disease. I now made a careful examination and found the whole surface of the body cold and Tremopoulos countenance dull and listless a leaning and stepping to the left with so much appearance of general weakness as to induce the fear that she would fall in the harness with much Ado. I got her home which was then but a short distance. She however grew worse very fast and when she arrived home did not recognize her own stable. She was now well rubbed and a gallon of blood taken from the neck while this was doing and afterwards she often kicked violently with her left foot about eleven pm. I was called from home and did not return until the next day about two PM. When she was down incapable of rising she was left in care of a Farrier who had her blood again and given her several Cathartic medicines without effect she lay stretched out upon the floor with her head drawn back and the muscles of the neck abdomen and limbs frequently convulsed at short intervals. She would revive or attempt to get up but could only get upon her hind feet for her forelegs appeared to be completely paralysed. She would however make a powerful exertion to rise forwards and throw herself several feet ahead without regards anything that might be in her way no material alteration took place till next morning except gradual demolition of strength and exertion in the morning she commenced moving her legs backwards and forwards was generally convulsed and apparently in greatest distress. This state of things continued till nine. Am when she expired film alone no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no. Um I know really sad. Also that was about a Horse. That was yeah. It wasn't it wasn't obviously clear rain the first hand but that was about a horse like taking her from the pasture we should. We should feet four feet. So that was an account of the eighteen. Thirty one eastern equine Suffo- lettuce outbreak in Massachusetts written by a gardener impact and it was from a nine fifty seven article titled An epizootic of Equal Status by ARP Hansen. Hi I'm Aaron Welsh and I'm Aaron Omen Updike and this is this podcast will kill you and today we're talking about Tripoli Tripoli eastern equine encephalitis. Yes that's very exciting. It is so we actually. This is similar to ours Deng episode. We have done this already in person at the University of Michigan Bloop. Yeah but just like Dang. I've forgotten everything I don't remember. I didn't even remember Aaron. Like my own part of this. When I went back to my notes I was like. Oh this is depressing so yeah it is and I yeah. I didn't remember any part of a mind. Which definitely means I remember zero part of yours. Oh No I don't know the history of this like in the slightest so I feel like it's kind of alarming. How how little aggregate? Yes but that was but it was super fun to be in Michigan and we really liked hanging out with Laura so we wanted to give Laura and that group a huge shout out to having US and inviting us. That was so fun that was when we did like actual chemistry. Remember that my gosh. It was like such an action packed. Fun Day it really was enjoyed leading everyone talking to everyone who superfund screen arbor so cute. Yeah I know I wish we got more time there. Yeah maybe someday in the future we can go back someday right to be show business to attend to. Erin I mean we could just do. The usual suspects one more time. So we've got alcohol-free episodes you can find them on this podcast will kill you dot com under the episodes tab and we also have two things related to books. One is a good reads list so we have a link to that on our website under the books tab and we also have an affiliate page on bookshop dot org that is an online bookseller that works with independent bookstores. All right now for the most important business of all time. It's warranty any time. What are we drinking today? Aaron we'RE DRINKING THE TRIPOLI SHOT. That's a straightforward name. Yeah I know I feel like I think at the time we were like. Oh we'll come up with a better one when the episode comes out and then here of Gypsies have just been dried up. I think we're you stop. I don't know both. Maybe what's in the Tripoli shot? The Tripoli shot three things Of course a half. An ounce of Coffee Tequila okay. Delicious even on its own A half an ounce of Hazelnut liqueur and a half an ounce of half and half FAB. It's it's delicious it's simple. It's easy there. You go all right fabulous anything else that we should cover or should we just jump straight into this depressing episode. I mean I think it's just let's just do it. And let's just let's just dive right in entering. It'd be very interesting okay. Well I'm excited to relearn everything I've forgotten. Yeah me too right well. We will start doing that right after this break. Technology has changed so much the way that we live like. Okay you and I- Aaron we watch a TV show together while we're house partying or facetime ing at the same time so we can follow along and have watched others reactions. It's the best. It's the most fun thing like it's the most fun part about being a part is being able to stay in touch on your phone. You know seriously yeah. Technology one thing. That hasn't changed too much. Is that we color. Our hair using outdated at home colors or spend way too much money and time at salons and do you know. Madison Reed is changing that game. They have gorgeous professional ammonia free hair-color that they deliver right to your door starting at only twenty two books. People who use Madison Reed are always raving about the results beautiful shiny multidimensional and healthy looking hair. Some even say that their new hair-color improves their actual lives. And what makes medicine reads color. So unique is that it's crafted by master Pelorus who blend nuances of light. Dirk cool and warm tones and they have over fifty five shades to choose from. So you look like you just came from expensive salon. Find your perfect shade at Madison. Dash Reed Dot Com. This podcast will kill you. Listeners get ten percent off plus free shipping on their first color kit with Promo code this podcast. That's Promo code this podcast at Madison Dash Reed Dot Com. Hey I'm curt brown older and I'm Scott Landes we're too silly dudes who love the absurd We got a brand new podcast called bananas. You should listen. Every Tuesday we discuss absolutely bonkers news stories from around the world. Things like man. Walking oddly found to have twenty one live pigeons in pants. Missing PARROT TURNS UP MINUS BRITISH ACCENT FOOT SPEAKING SPANISH NASA prepped for Alien Communication with LSD DOLPHIN SEX EXPERIMENT. Who and we've got great guests like Norbert Star Kristin Shaw so for all you. Tv or movies barring actors producers. I'm I'm I can take out my teeth. That's one more. If you WANNA real weird look pretty cheap so give us a listen if you enjoy the nutty shocking and the Downright Bananas Listen To Bananas every Tuesday and exactly right subscribe now on Stitcher Apple Podcast spotify or wherever you like to listen to Eastern at Quine Encephalitis Aka. Tripoli Aka also sometimes called sleeping sickness. But not to be confused with African sleeping sickness Tranessa myositis okay or some light is lethargic because I think I can tell you it was also confused with that disease for at least the early years fascinating. Yeah all right well This is not that eastern equine. Encephalitis is a viral infection. It is an Alpha virus which I don't believe that we've covered any Alpha viruses thus far in this series Tripoli virus. It's an Arin a virus. It is round in shape. So it's really kind of adorable when you look at it. Under scanning electron microscopes there are four major lineages of this virus the four major strains but group one which is the one. That's most common in north. America is also the most virulent and the most common cause of disease in humans. So that's the one that will focus on just because that's the one that makes people sick. Okay uh-huh all right so I'm not GonNa talk a lot about the evolutionary history or the ecological cycle of this virus. 'cause YOU'RE GONNA do that right Erin I hope so excellent but I will say because we have to understand how this virus is transmitted trips e. That's what I wrote down. Is the name for it. That's not going to be confusing at all Tripoli virus it's mostly a bird virus okay. So it circulates enzootic -ly among a number of different bird species but it can cause both epizootics so that is an epidemic in animals when it jumps from bird populations into for example horse populations echoing ovulations hence the name and it can also cause zone attic outbreaks in humans if it jumps from birds into humans okay All right so among birds it's primarily transmitted by mosquitoes in the genus Kulesza. But it can be transmitted by a number of different Genera- of mosquitoes including eighties. Mosquitoes and others of course an Asterisk to that statement that I'll go into. Oh why can't wait to hear about it? I WANNA know Okay Renault. Right now yet kind of so. Basically they call these. Other mosquito species the bridge vectors. Okay so jumping a little bit into the ecology side of things `cuse at a which is the genus while kilos set a milliner which is the main species. That seems to perpetuate this infection cycle in like birds right. They are not mammal biters wrangler human fighters very very little and so researchers. Well it might be that. There's either occasionally bite humans. And that's how these things happen or it's bridge vectors. But in one study that looked at the viral load of other species of mosquito. Some of the the proposed bridge vector species. None of them had viral loads. That were high enough to actually in like cause infection fascinate so it might be that you can detect the virus because that mosquito fed on an infected bird but the virus might not be able to replicate within that mosquito. Oh Oh but there's still a lot of question. Mark Question Mark Question Mark in race sort of thing. So it's like that aspect of the ecology is pretty not very well clarified yet in terms of like the contributions of this mosquito species versus this -squitoes species species and also geographically because that can play a huge role so then it's like unclear exactly which mosquitoes might be infecting humans right so basically I think the takeaway that I got from that article. Was that if even if you detect this virus in a mosquito. It doesn't necessarily mean that it's going to be infected an able to transmit right because these viruses have to be able to replicate within the mosquito and then leave the mosquito's gut and traveled to their salivary glands. And then be there in high enough concentration that win the mosquito bites it's next host. It's injecting enough virus to actually get that host sick so these are. These are very complicated cycles within the mosquito Imax sense that not every mosquito is going to be able to transmit every virus right so right even if you can detect it just when you smash that mosquito like found some virus but where was that virus within the mosquito. Was there cool. How interesting all right. So we've covered now that this is a disease transmitted by mosquitoes will ignore the details of which mosquito it is for now. So let's talk about how this virus makes you sick. Once it gets inside you owe crime so like many Arba Viral Diseases. So virus is transmitted by arthropods like mosquitoes. Win and mosquito bites you the first place that it spits that virus is kind of towards your lymphatic system. Rights was kind of right under your skin. They don't spit it necessarily directly into your bloodstream. That they spit it under your skin and that virus goes into your lymphatic system from there it travels to your lymph nodes and in the case of eastern equine encephalitis virus. It infects our white blood cells. Okay so those are the cells that it goes into. And that's where it replicates. Remember that viruses have to replicate inside of ourselves? They don't replicate on their own so it turns out. That Tripoli replicates inside of our white blood cells white blood cells can travel pretty much anywhere in our body including crossing the blood brain barrier and making it into our nervous system All right so let's go through kind of how this makes you sick. This is a bit of a spoiler but this is a horrible horrible disease. Okay so that much. I do remember yes from Michigan if you if you have like a magic eight ball and you shook it. It would say outlook not so good. Yeah okay one of the questions that I like to try and answer when we look at a disease that causes such terrible outcomes is how does it do that? We are usually very good at fighting off infections. So how can this virus kind of beat our own immune system right like how can it make us so very sick Okay so the other reason that it's important to understand how this virus makes us so sick is because in theory if we can understand how it makes us so sick we could maybe try and do something about it right. We trying to counteract that okay so I found a few different studies that tried to shed some light on exactly how this virus makes us so sick. One of the important things is that this virus is very good at evading our immune system specifically it seems to do a very good job of inhibiting one of our major responses to viral infections. And that is something called Interferon. She think we've talked about in like the hepatitis episode. Probably I don't remember but anyways interferon is a protein that we make that helps to stimulate our immune response specifically to target and kill viruses and viral infected cells. Gotcha so triple e. Like many other viruses and a lot of Arba viruses specifically targets and shuts down the production of Interferon. It like in us. And what's really interesting is that there have been some other studies. I found that compared the effectiveness of interferon on actually killing virus infected cells. So like even if you gave someone a bunch of interferon like if that's the problem the viruses blocking this production give them interferon. The this virus actually like inhibits the action of Interferon. That's wild I know. And here's where it gets even cooler. This is why I get excited about this. Remember I said there are many different strains of this virus like in these four in. It's only the North American strain. The tends to be the most virulent and cause infection in humans so this one study compared North American strains to South American strains and what they found was that across the board all cells infected with triple viruses North American or American had very low levels of interferon so they blocked the production of interferon but on top of that the North American strains were the ones that were also resistant to the effects of Interferon. Oh so like no matter. How much interferon you had in your body. It was going to be lower with an triple e. infection than with other viral infections. Right but the interfere on that you do have works to kill that South American virus but not the North American strains. Wow that's very interesting I know okay. So that's how it causes disease and why at least part of the reason why it probably causes such severe disease. Okay Now let's start to talk about the really depressing part. Which is the actual symptoms? Okay the one good news I have. This is it. It's estimated that only about four to five percent of human infections actually result in symptomatic disease. So light was just about to ask. Oh good preempted you. Ninety six percent of people who get infected with triple E. virus will never have dramatic disease. They're going to be just fine. Okay that the ADS. But that's I feel like that's a trend that we see a lot in Arbil viral diseases and there's a huge rate of asymptomatic individuals yet. Do these people have immunity to? They develop immunity to terrific question. I did see in several review papers. Just sort of talking about the symptoms in general that it is thought that yes when you are exposed to this virus you'd have a long lasting immunity. Remember that point because it will become very interesting when we talk about the vaccine. Yes okay but yes. It is thought that if you get infected with this virus whether you're symptomatic or not you do generate long lasting immunity or crass that's the thought goodness it is good news. That's the end of the good news okay. So let's talk about the symptoms of this virus. It's called Eastern. Equine encephalitis encephalitis. We've talked about this before right. This is inflammation in your actual brain. it's not good news so this causes a viral encephalitis in theory. Almost any virus could potentially cause encephalitis if it gets into your brain and causes infection there for most viruses. That's a very uncommon manifestation but for some reason a lot of Arba viruses so mosquito borne viruses do cause viral encephalitis And we've also talked on this podcast about one of most famous causes a viral encephalitis. That is rabies. I saw your face just be completely blank and I was like. Don't worry so. Rabies is like the most probably famous viral encephalitis. I think so. Let's talk about the characteristic symptoms of viral encephalitis. There's three number one fever. This fever tends to be quite high and it tends to come on very rapidly number two headache because your brain is inflamed number three altered level of consciousness. Now that doesn't necessarily mean that you will go unconscious although as you'll see it often leads to that but it does mean that like overall you can have fluctuating levels of consciousness. Okay Okay and kind of awareness and then because viral encephalitis is a viral infection of your brain. You will often have specific. Neurological symptoms that can be very varied and they tend to depend the specific symptoms. You see tend to depend on. What part of your brain is the most infected okay? So let's talk about triple specifically if you have symptomatic infection with Tripoli which again is only four to five percent of people so that's the good news. The symptoms begin with a pro drome which essentially means nonspecific symptoms before the real bad symptoms. This is like that fever. Maybe headache maybe even some abdominal pain just very nonspecific symptoms and then about five days later is when the neurologic symptoms begin. And in the case of Tripoli this can be anything from a mild confusion to maybe some focal weakness like your arm feels weak or your leg feels week okay. You might have seizures. Seizures are actually very common in Tripoli. Okay you might have Paris. Dj's so like weird tingling feelings or just like sort of sensory things. That aren't normal. Is this just because your brain is inflamed. Yes Okay Yep. But in the case of Tripoli once any of these neurologic symptoms tend to start even just sort of confusion and maybe like coming in and out of being very aware like not being able to focus that kind of thing very rapidly in the case of Tripoli people progress to coma okay. What's the timeline of this like ours to a couple of days? Oh Wow yeah. So once people develop these neurologic symptoms after this like five day program of kind of feeling cruddy. Having a fever having headache people deteriorate very very rapidly and then once they're in a coma. The mortality rate is between thirty and forty percent. Okay so what? Proportion of people go into a coma like developed these severe neurological symptoms. So almost everyone. So okay. If you become symptomatic almost certainly you're going to go into a coma of those. That survive about a third of them will have significant neurologic impairment permanently as a result of this infection. Yeah who I have a question. Okay these unlucky for percents Why such a good question Erin? I have no idea and I think part of the reason that so some of the literature says children under age. Fifteen and adults over age fifty. They're more likely to actually get the encephalitis form of Tripoli. That's the most that I've seen in terms of like who is it that ends up getting triple E. versus just getting infected and not showing symptoms. I think we have to remember that. This is a very very rare infection. So it's really hard to understand exactly. Who IS THE MOST AT RISK? And why like what is it about the characteristics of these people that make them more likely to have this neurologic manifestation versus never having symptoms right exactly. Yeah so of all the Arba. Viral encephalitis viruses in the United States. This is by far the worst one like yeah mortality rate so much higher. It's possibly even worse than Japanese. Encephalitis although that's more common that's not in the United States. It's in China and Japan. But there's a vaccine for Japanese encephalitis. So why isn't there a vaccine then four to believe this? Oh I was GonNa talk about all of this in more detail in the future in the current event. Just wait for the future. Then yeah do you want me to talk about it now or do you want me to talk about in the future up to you girl. Let's talk about it later because we'll talk more detail about the research that is being done. Okay but one thing that I think is really interesting is Although there are small case numbers they have been a few good studies like grouping all of these cases and trying to understand like what is effected in the brain when you get infected with Eastern Acquaintance. F Lettuce And it tends to actually be the Basal Ganglia which is part of the brain we talked about that's affected in. Parkinson's it's also infected in encephalitis lethargic. If you remember yeah okay. And it also infects your mid brain and that's part of your brain stem and so it's really interesting because you know when I am looking at this I want to think like. Why do we see the symptoms that we see? So if you have a virus like rabies that infects your brain. It affects a part of your brain that changes the way that you behave right and your mood. And then we see that in the symptoms right where you get angry etc. If you get a herpes in syphilis which is actually the most common cause of encephalitis viral encephalitis in the US. It infects the temporal lobe. Which is where your language centers are so your symptoms are like having trouble finding words which is called a Faiza. Okay so for me. I'm like okay. So we know that it infects this part of the Brain. But how can we don't see these symptoms like maybe shakiness like in Parkinson's or these certain types of symptoms? Yeah Mike Guesses because it causes lesions in these areas like your brain stem that are so important for generally being alive then you progress so rapidly deteriorate so quickly that there's no time to have those specific isolated neurologic findings right raiso pressing. Yeah yeah makes sense We can talk quickly about treatments. If you'd like there isn't any was gonna say just supportive care yet. It is There are no antivirals even in screening studies that have been shown to be effective against Tripoli virus. That's a bummer. I did find a few case reports where they've been using Ivy g which is a intravenous pooled concentrated human immunoglobulin Which is used a lot in auto immune disorders it's used in the treatment of neurologic disorders Whether or not it works who knows Because I found two case reports that were like we use this and they survived and did great and then I found one that said we used this end. They died. But that person also had informa- select who knows but we have such little data on any of this and it's so difficult to study because we have so few cases that we really have no idea if ivig would be actually ineffective treatment or not at this point but Gotcha what about with with other of the encephalitis viruses. Whether we have antivirals. Yeah good question. I don't know Yeah Yeah I. I don't believe we have any for Dan. Gay which can cause and several ladies mom the more common ones like Saint. Louis Encephalitis West Nile virus. I honestly don't know I haven't done the research on those yet. Yeah interesting but we will talk in more detail about the vaccine in a bit but first Aaron I let the heck. Where did this thing come from? And why does it invade our brains and kill us so rapidly? Oh I don't know if I can answer the why to. I think we're just sort of a bystander. I mean once again this is. We did not plan this. But coincidentally we're talking about two things for which human seemed to be a bystander and for which birds are heavily involved birds killers. I will answer those no I will. I will attempt to answer those right after this break Hello there I'm bridgier. Wine Iger Look Chances. Are you've received gifts? You've probably also given gifts. I have a new podcast called. I said no gifts on exactly right every Thursday. I have a conversation with a friend loved one or somebody. I'm secretly trying to ruin. I only have one request. No gifts unfortunately. Every one of them deliberately disobeys maintaining our conversation eventually turns to whatever object lies beneath the wrapping paper. It's an absolute thrill. I've received gifts from all kinds of people. Incredible people incredible gifts subscribe now on Stitcher Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you like to listen and no aw. Okay ready yes. The year was nineteen thirty three. I love it when you're section start like this Erin other each time for. I also love the Little Cherry. Pick things that I have here I? I'm like okay well whatever anyway. Lots of bad things were happening in. Nineteen thirty three in the US. The depression was in its worst year. Hitler became German chancellor the dust bowl was still raging in the midwest the US an earthquake in California caused massive damage in Long Beach. There forest fires in Oregon and horses were dying by the dozens. In pockets of the northeast particularly along coastal swampy areas of New Jersey Delaware and Maryland. Horses started acting strange. They started to walk clumsily. Their heads were only able to look in one direction and that led to them walking in circles and gradually losing mobility before dying about ninety percent of the one thousand horses. Roughly that were affected by this illness. Died during this epizootic. Wow Yeah that's a lot that's bad it's really bad and because this was nineteen thirty. Three germ theory and microbiology had advanced enough to the point where researchers were kind of like you know quickly mobilized on the case taking brain samples from these horses that had died and seeing if they could isolate whatever pathogen was causing this damage and the figuring out pretty quickly that it was a transmissible filter bill agent which is essentially code for a virus. Most of the time or pre-owned Not New York not a fan. And they discover that it was. This transmits will filter real agent because they were able to successfully inject it whatever it was into guinea pigs who also died as a result of the same order systems acting like guinea pigs and the researchers gave this virus a name eastern equine encephalitis virus eastern of course like the. Etymology is very exciting. For this one yeah eastern because it was in the eastern US equine to indicate that it was found in horses as you've mentioned and satellite us for all the reasons that you've mentioned the least exciting of all. I think boring. Yeah Yup so at the time when this virus was isolated and named in many researchers retreating it as a new infection that had never been seen before. But it didn't take long for people to realize that Tripoli virus had shown up in the north eastern US previously and it only took a few more years to realize that this epizootic wasn't an isolated one off that there would actually be another outbreak even within the same decade in Nineteen thirty eight which is five years after this. Massive outbreak in horses took another outbreak of Tripoli began. But this time it wasn't just in horses. Although horses were affected humans especially children were showing signs of infection and also dying at extremely high rates so in late summer and early fall in. Massachusetts particularly the southeastern part of the state. There were thirty four cases in humans and twenty five deaths. Oh so man. Pretty high case fatality rate and. That's a lot of cases for just a couple of months in state like dot. Yeah and like you said. The handful of people that did survive had these long term effects and so because of the severity of the disease and the really like horrible side effects in the people who did survive this kind of gains really widespread national attention. I imagined too because it was primarily affecting children that that Yeah it was kind of really became apparent that like children were a very high risk group for this and so because of the severity of this illness. People were starting to put in the hours to do research. They started to look in the past for old epidemics and they also started looking around them to see whether they could determine what the source of this current disease outbreak was and people started noticing some unusual deaths among pigeons and ring necked pheasants in the same places that people were getting sick and then researchers were able to isolate the virus from some of these birds and researchers were suspicious that mosquitoes were responsible for transmitting. The virus or transmits will filter bubble agent. But it would take a little bit of time before they could pin down the exact species that seem to be the culprit and part of the reason is because a hurricane washed away all of these mosquito collection sites in one thousand nine hundred when they were here at the height of their research. Just on things on top of things Things on top of things. Okay so as I mentioned. Researchers also realized. Hey this is not an brand new disease to humans or two horses so let's go back to eighteen thirty one. The year was eighteen. Thirty one just kidding but just like in nineteen thirty three in eighteen thirty one. Lots of horses were dying in the northeast particularly Massachusetts. Not As many as in the nineteen thirty three epizootic but about seventy five horses died in total which you know thinking about in eighteen thirty one and how people used to use horses so much more than they did. Nineteen thirty three. It would have been devastating to the horse's owners and also devastating emotionally. But but yeah in terms of like economics and losing a horse would have been hugely hugely devastating. Right and like in the nineteen thirty-three epizootic. The one in eighteen thirty one horses also occurred late summer and had a very high mortality rate as well again close to ninety percent. Why is it higher in horses than in humans Aaron It's a good question. I've been thinking a lot about that ever since you mentioned that and also you were mentioning the like symptoms that you see in horses where they have a lot more motor symptoms in like trouble walking and leaning. Yeah I. It's a really good question. I don't know enough about veterinary medicine to know. Like what the differences are in their immune response may be or what but. I wonder if they like have a longer period before they deteriorate. And that's why you see those motor symptoms as it affects their. Basal Ganglia and things like that but yeah I don't know maybe they have less interferon or something to begin with. Maybe they just have a different. I don't know anything about horse -nology so I have no idea but it's a really interesting question interesting ingesting a so. It's also interesting to contrast the eighteen. Thirty one epizootic and the nineteen thirty-three epizootic in terms of the response like the Scientific Response. Because if you think about eighteen thirty one germ theory wasn't really a thing yet and so people were like we have no idea what's causing this and so some of the guesses were like while horses that fed on grass. Were the ones who got sick. So there may be something in the grass. What have another thought? Okay because it sounded like from what you were saying like twenty five out of thirty kids died in Massachusetts. Thanks a lot higher than today so I wonder if it could to have to do with supportive care like today. The mortality rate is thirty percent. Maybe in humans because we have some supportive care in the hospital whereas you're not gonNA probably intimate a horse and try and keep them alive if they've got Tripoli I don't know just a thought. Yeah I mean it's that seems definitely possible. Possibly I don't know yeah. So like the the nineteen thirty. Eight outbreak was around seventy four percent of people. Okay yes yes or maybe. It's just the difference in supportive care or something. I don't know yet we're guessing here. We should stay on not so shaky ground. Yep and so part of the reason that that one of the guesses was will the horses at Fed on grass for the ones who got sick as opposed to like. Hey and the stables. Okay because what they were seeing. Was that horses that were kept on. The pasture seemed to be more likely to be sick than the ones who stayed in the stable. And so the MIASMA explanation almost kind of worked in this case. But let's go to the treatment so treatments were not helpful full verses mostly as you heard in the firsthand account it was to drain the horse of a couple of gallons of blood. The one and only thing. I remember from our Michigan Day. Aaron was that we had someone in the middle of our presentation Google. How many gallons of blood is a horse have yet? I loved that ethic that they also googled like several other things for us and auto fact checker. But do you remember how many gallons of blood horses no going to have to Google it for myself. Okay twelve point three. Did you get that from the Horse? Dot Com I got it. Yea Dot COM gotta be a legit website right. Oh see now. I'm seeing different responses here. Okay so it seems like I mean. Horses are coming all different shapes and sizes so if you have a massive Horse Rabi fifteen gallon eighteen gallons of say like ten to fifteen gallons sure. That sounds reasonable. So a fifth of your blood your blood. It's a lot of blood and it's not GonNa do you any good okay. But after this relatively short lived epizootic ran its course it. Kinda just faded from memory because it showed up again in Eighteen. Forty seven in horses again and people were like. Oh my gosh. There's this new disease it's horrible. It's killing our horses. We don't know where it came from so interesting that it fades from memory so quickly I mean but it's so I think it was so localized as a wasn't it didn't happen to the same individual people that second time maybe right and I don't think it maybe it did happen in the same region but I also don't think that's like Google in nineteen forty seven. You can't Google horse disease. Yes so problem in many other things on their minds as well. Okay so all of this had happened before. Meaning Tripoli outbreaks in humans and Horses. But what had taken so long for it to return. And since the nineteen thirty-three outbreak in horses in the nineteen thirty eight outbreak in humans. Tripoli virus has continued an upward climb and human cases or at least in the frequency of outbreaks. Which is a pretty big concern for the people who live in these high risk areas. Right okay so but in order to answer why it seemingly disappeared for about one hundred years because from eighteen forty seven to nineteen thirty three. There's not there doesn't seem to be any outbreaks or at least notable outbreaks that I could find And so to answer why disappeared and then also why it's on the rise now. We have to look back at history but we have to do that through the Lens of ecology which is fame. Britt our favorite all right so we already talked a little bit about the ecology of Tripoli virus. But let's kind of go into it again in a little more detail. Yeah all right so first of all we know about the Tripoli virus itself. We don't need to cover that again. mosquito the mosquito species that's most closely associated with Tripoli virus again is Kua Seta Melania and we have not talked about this mosquito on any other episodes of the podcast before even though we've done like a fair number of mosquito diseases at this point and the reason for that is kind of what I've already said this is not a human biter and so it's not really associated with many human diseases like Dengue Yellow Fever Zeka etc. Some of the ones that we've covered and we haven't really had much of a reason to talk about it before but this mosquito isn't really even a mammal biter at all. Like I said it feeds on birds and so this was -squitoes species can be found over a pretty wide range geographically so from like the southeastern provinces of Canada throughout the eastern US and some southern states along the Gulf they require. Freshwater wooded swamps or sphagnum bogs with little water filled hollows in fallen trees in order to lay eggs for the larvae to develop interestingly trees and water rate typically standing water or at least water at like the soil level and after the larvae develop these little nooks and crannies adult Miskitos than happily emerged to feed on whatever. Birds are around and those birds tend to be water dwelling birds although not a hundred percent of the time there was a study in Massachusetts that examine the blood meals of mosquitoes of these mosquitoes. Both inside and outside of the swamp and both times nearly ninety nine percent of the blood meals were from a bird host. Okay sounds like a very specific feeding patterns Gary very specific so then the virus basically continues in this natural cycle so in birds in mosquitoes and birds and mosquitoes so from year to year. It's not really entirely clear. How it over winters. It either over winters in birds of that seems less likely because birds do recover from infection or they die okay birds. Some birds don't seem to be affected at all and some birds die within a few days of being infected stickler mentally says a lot like West Nile. I feel like Right there's very varying susceptibility among okay. Yeah and and some birds contribute more than two the viral prevalence. Yeah but yeah humans horses pigs so I don't. I don't think you mentioned pigs. But pigs have also been shown to be infected with Tripoli virus. These are all dead and hosts as we talked about so they don't contribute to the circulation of the virus in the environment so like basically what that means that if a mosquito. Let's say that a horse got infected with the virus and then mosquito. That was uninfected. Bit that horse. It probably wouldn't get enough virus to be able to replicate in that mosquito and then it would also take the appropriate mosquito species bite that horse which tends to be unlikely given the low biting frequency outside of birds right okay. So how on earth do humans or horses or pigs ever get infected and it turns out the answer is not that straightforward as I mentioned earlier because the disagreement on whether these bridge vector species actually contribute to infection. Okay but first. Let's talk about sort of this year to year variation outbreaks because some years we see a big increase in cases. Some years we see none at all and because this is so rare. It's kind of. We don't have good enough data to kind of make clear cut answers on this but it seems to be that it comes down to you know mosquito ecology mosquitoes because they live outside our super dependent on environmental conditions and the weather. So let's say that there was like a super rainy season last year and a hot and humid and early summer this year and that could mean higher warm water for the mosquitoes to lay their eggs in the little nooks and crannies of the trees and then develop more quickly and then the viral replication itself also depends on external temperature and so that could mean. So let's say last year. Twenty nineteen was rainy and hot in some of these more. You know swampy or boggy areas. Then maybe this year we would have a higher cases of Tripoli virus and then geographically the variation has a lot to do with these larger weather or climate patterns and also just how much mosquito habitat there is for this particular mosquito all right. Let's look at some of these larger overall trends in the frequency of outbreaks. So like more on this larger time. Timescale okay okay so remember people get infected by the bite of mosquito whether it's culas seminar or this bridge vector species but in either case those mosquitoes have to be infected by a bird and these birds tend to live in these boggy swampy areas. And so you think as a human you'd have to be pretty close to those in to get infected right all right. So let's talk about the history of swamps and boggs in the northeast particularly Massachusetts and I'm using Massachusetts a case study because that's where AAA cases have been highest and outbreaks that seemed to impact the most All right so during the two hundred year period from around sixteen fifty to eighteen fifty European settlers essentially stripped the land of forest and wetlands. They used pines for masks. On ships. These cedar swamps were destroyed to make shingles posts barrels. Other forest were used for lumber firewood and charcoal or they were cleared entirely to make room for agricultural fields and by the mid eighteen hundreds deforestation was at its peak in Massachusetts and the countryside was like naked gives. Nothing left Henry David. Thoreau who wrote Walton said about Concord Massachusetts around. This time of the primitive would woodland which was woodland. When town was settled. I know none well. And so as you can guess. This massive deforestation caused enormous cascading ecological effects and especially relevant to Tripoli bird numbers and species richness declined and culas. Melania also lost the swampy hat that it needed to survive and starting in the second half of the eighteen hundreds reforestation picked back up because people were like a we can't continue to over exploit land because there's nothing left like we have really put ourselves in a very bad situation by doing this already and also people started to abandon these unproductive farms to move to cities so sort of both the conscious decision of we need to reforest and also just sort of happened naturally as people stopped using the the wood for farms and whatnot. Yeah and so. This meant that forest cover increased greatly throughout the early twentieth century with wetland restoration lagging a bit behind deciduous forests but ultimately what this meant was more habitat for birds and mosquitoes and thus Tripoli virus And several researchers point towards this large scale landscape change as being a cause of the reappearance of the virus in Nineteen Thirties. And why it has stuck around ever since then but before you take up your chainsaws us to re clear cut. The forests of New England and drain the swamps in bugs. Consider please that. It's not the mere existence of these habitats that leads to these Tripoli outbreaks but really it's sort of the way that we develop suburban communities right especially residential once areas and so these a lot of these suburban neighborhoods tend to creep into and on the borders of these wetlands. And so that's where you have this like once you do that once you get closer to that. That means that you're just more likely to come into contact with these infected mosquito species and also wetland conservation is hugely important for flood protection and healthy water supply and they provide these amazing habitats were diverse and unique communities of plants and animals and so by the time this episode comes out it will have been roughly a week after Earth Day. Oh Cool Earth as April twenty second tomorrow couple of couple of days are now an earth. It'll be the fiftieth anniversary of Earth Day. How exciting wow happy birthday REWA? So let's just keep that spirit going weird certainly not anti wetland no no pro forest pro wetland over here. I think it's just a really interesting example of how large scale landscape change can influence disease transmission particularly zone attic diseases yet definitely so from these outbreaks in nineteen thirties to the last decade. Or so we've seen sporadic human cases here and there largely restricted to the northeastern U. S. But we have seen more horse outbreaks. But since that time we've seen both an increase in the frequency of cases and in their geographic distribution. And because this is a vector borne disease teasing apart the cause of this reemergence is tricky because it depends on so many factors so like I talked about increased rainfall one year reestablishment of wetlands or development of human dwellings in close proximity to these wetland areas or any sort of habitat where culas. Elenora likes to its eggs. So many things can play a role in this. And although this is a rare disease can be extremely deadly and that can lead to fear response sometimes out of proportion to the actual risk a lot of controversy surrounds. The control measures that are often used to try to prevent infections. And there are these questions like. Should there be widespread aerial spraying with insecticides or is that just asking for another ecological disaster is public education effective or is even enough. Are we in for a bad year of Tripoli Virus Aaron what do you think do we stand with AAA Today? Let's talk about it right after this break So Tripoli is unsurprisingly a nationally notifiable disease right because it's pretty devastating so let's talk about how many cases we tend to see in the US per year from two thousand nine to two thousand eighteen so about the last ten years. On average there were seven cases per year and that ranged from three in two thousand nine to fifteen in twenty twelve. Okay okay so like pretty rare and like not a huge amount of variation year to year from two thousand nine two thousand eighteen Now in total I will say that entire period there was only seventy two cases in total. Could you extrapolate upwards and say if that's four percent than there were x number of people? Who were likely exposed to the virus? Sure let's do like is that. Is that a reasonable extrapolation. That's a good question. Theoretically why not if we think that ninety six percent of people are ASEM dramatic? Then yeah if there were seventy two known cases that were reported then. How many cases is that total over that time period? Actually I have no idea how you do that. Math seventy six over X. equals four over one hundred. And then find the x seventy two times. One hundred divided by four Eighteen hundred cases over about ten years still pretty low. Prevalence pretty low. Yeah absolutely now. That was two thousand nine to two thousand eighteen. What about two thousand nineteen? There's there's a reason that we did this as a live episode in Michigan and that is that twenty nineteen was far and away the worst year of Tripoli in a very long time as of December Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. There were a title of thirty eight confirmed cases of Tripoli in the United States including fifteen deaths. Wow Yep that is more than twice the maximum of the last ten years. Pets very okay. Why Green Question? I don't know if it was a lot of what you said right like a bad year for rainfall the year before or something like that. But what's interesting is that the these cases happened in a number of different areas. It wasn't just all in one spot. The two states most hardest hit last year were Massachusetts and Michigan So in Massachusetts there were twelve confirmed human cases and ten confirmed deaths. Now there was also a large increase in the number of animal cases last year as well There were in Michigan. Forty eight cases of Tripoli in animals last year so yeah. It's it's a good question. I don't think that we have a full handle on exactly how to predict which years are going to be the worst like she said in that. Article Right. He wasn't the first author at all at all said in that article. We we need to do better research to be able to answer those types of questions right. We need to have a better handle on. What are the factors that contribute to whether or not we're going to have a bad year right now? The only good news about this is that so you kind of mentioned where this tends to be a disease. That's common right. It's on the east coast a lot of it in the northeast but also along the East Coast and the Gulf coast as well as the Great Lakes region right. So the other states that had reported cases last year include Alabama Connecticut Georgia Indiana New Jersey. North Carolina Rhode Island and Tennessee. What's the good news in this? Most most of those areas have like a mosquito season. Gotcha okay so at least it's over for now effectively right now. It's springtime so welcome back. Yeah so that's that's the only good news is like at least it's over for now. We can hope that this year is going to be better. And that's the other thing too is that it seems to be based on when these cases happen it does seem to be like in a very narrow time window throughout the year particularly in the northern the more northern places where Schiavo season is so concentrated. Yep So make sense. You can sort of heightened your vigilance. During that time I guess so. That's where we stand in terms of the number of cases of Tripoli. You asked about a vaccine because there's one for horses. There is one for horses as it is a whole killed virus vaccine. It's not great even for horses so from what I have gathered for some reason. This is very interesting considering that we believe that. If you are infected with Tripoli virus you do mount a good immune response and are then prevented from getting infected again. But for some reason the vaccine that we've tried to develop for humans and that we even have for horses and other animals. It doesn't generate a very good immune response and the the immunity that it provides is not very long lasting even in horses. Yeah so I'm not sure like the schedule for. If you have a horse how often you have to give that horse boosters. It might be something like I have to give my dog. The rabies shot every year. Something like that so it might be the same for horses. Yeah they do boosters. Yeah so that's it's really interesting right like why it that. We can't develop a vaccine. That is more immuno. Genyk that provides us with a longer lasting immune response is is part of it in the funding and that this is a rare disease you put the nail on the head there. Erin how that goes. Yeah there is no market for a triple e vaccines may we still don't even have a West Nile vaccine and that causes a lot more infection in humans every year than this does. So if you want proof that there's really not a market for it ahead. Found papers of people doing research on this. So in two thousand seven there was a really interesting paper that made a hybrid attenuated vaccine so instead of doing a killed virus they made a hybrid virus out of Tripoli virus and some other virus. Don't remember which one and they tested it in mice and they found that it was highly immune genyk that was in two thousand seven. Nothing else okay. So in theory in theory it's possible I did check clinical trial Dot Gov. Which again is where you can find all the clinical trials that are happening and there are studies listed for Tripoli. Two of them were. Us A. M. R. I. D. US Amred. I don't know how you say it the. Us Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. They had two vaccine trials that are now concluded one of them had results posted which are actually very difficult to sort through on clinical trials by the way overall. It's hard to get an estimate on exactly how long lasting the immunity was from this virus that they tested but it was somewhere between like twenty eight to seventy percent of people depending on the time frame that you looked at it so like seventy percent of people they tested had an immune response like right after their second booster but then of the people they were able to test out a one year. Follow up only twenty. Eight percent of them still had high tigers of antibodies so they they mounted an immune response. But it wasn't very long lasting right just like a horse. Yeah and so. That makes it even harder to try and get funding for a vaccine like this if you think like this very very very rare infection and you'd have to get a vaccine for it. What like every year like. That's very difficult to try. And sort of convinced funders or people to get a vaccine like that right right so then a lot more so it comes down a lot more to the prevention and surveillance. Absolutely yeah yeah definitely. So yeah. That's where we stand with Tripoli. Well do you know what the predictions are for? This year was places. Was IT hot? Let's Caesar early summer. It snowed in Chicago like two days ago. So I've been thinking that it snows every April in Illinois every April I go. I can't believe that it's snowing but it does it. Every April I remember my mom in Kentucky it snowed. That's wonderful. Yeah I got out of Prom and there was snow on my car. I was like. I'm in a hot pink sleeveless dress. I can't believe I've never seen pictures of your prom. Dress his now. I love what you'd expect. I Really WanNa see it now. Hot Pink sleeveless. I love it. Let's see according to this news article. I just found health. Experts believe Tripoli will rise again next year I guess normally these cycles tend to last for two to three years. We have two to three years in a row of bad Year and it was very wet and rainy in two thousand nineteen so great. Great you don't like how with with lime disease and ticks. There's like that distinct like the mast and the mice. And then the deer and the ticks right news events that lead to these high outbreaks or these like outbreak years. They're just not well known. I think it's because the outbreaks themselves are so small so small and so it's sort of now we're playing like you know retrospective detective trying to pick apart the pieces and that's challenging because Ecology is ecology. Don't happen according to some. I don't know plan or hard. Yeah yeah there's so much like random noise in the system and so trying to say is this noise or is this a component is really challenging particularly when when you have such a low incidence of disease. Yeah and if you you have so many different hosts you have so many different bird species that can be affected and their emitted so differentially that it also that plays a big part of it too. That's really difficult to get a handle on disease ecology ear. Yeah I mean part of. It's it's why I love it and also why it can be so frustrating was fun hopefully. It wasn't too depressing I don't know who I don't think I can judge anymore. Okay sources close sources rate. So I WANNA shout out a few. I have a bunch of papers that I liked But a few that I leaned heavily on one is titled or one is by Armstrong at all from twenty thirteen called eastern equine. Satellite is virus old enemy new threat and then there was that a rigo at all paper titled Evolutionary Patterns of Eastern Acquaintance of elitest virus north versus South America There's more to that title but it's very long so I'm not gonNA keep going. Oh and then another one where I got a lot of the ecological sort of time line of Reemergence in Massachusetts from a paper by Komar and Spielman from Nineteen ninety-four titled Emergence of Eastern Satellites in Massachusetts excellent. There are a bunch of different papers that I used for. Different parts will post all of these online. If you'd like kind of the most cited source of the clinical aspects of eastern quantified is. There's a paper from nineteen ninety-seven called clinical and neuro radiographic manifestations of eastern acquaintance lettuce But again we'll post all of our sources from this episode and all of our episodes online under the episodes tab you can find. Oliver sources listed there as well as links to bookshop dot org if you like to purchase the books yet and also we neglected to say earlier but you can find the recipe for our quarantine and are Non Alcoholic Placebo Rita on our website. This podcast will kill you. Dot Com under the quarantine tab and we also post those on social made. So if you'd like to see them follow us. Thank you to blood mobile for providing the music for this episode and all of our episodes and thank you to you for listening. Hope you enjoyed this episode. Yeah and I hope you always anyone who is at the show in Michigan first of all. Thanks so much for coming. We had so much fun there and all hope you still learn something new from this episode. Yes thanks again to everyone at Michigan. Who helped us make that that trip one of just the most amazing games ever also all right well until next time? Wash your hands. You filthy animals

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Inflammation is Aging Your Brain  Dr. Andrew Miller : 643

Bulletproof Radio

1:11:18 hr | 1 year ago

Inflammation is Aging Your Brain Dr. Andrew Miller : 643

"Absolutely classic depression caused by a molecule. That stimulates the immune system and stimulates consumation and so began this whole notion. Insulation May Cause Depression in some people bulletproof radio station the high performance. You're listening to bulletproof radio with Dave asprey. Let me tell you about this on. That makes me sweat. Bullets clear lights on us. I put a lot of of time and energy into researching in vetting the top biohacking products and I found that clear lights on us. Really meet my high standards. Here's why clue lights on his amid all three are- wavelengths of infrared spectrum they've got near mid and far infrared and most importantly they really pay attention to minimizing IMF exposure the state of the art it technology throughout the sauna including APP. That allows you to turn on. 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We use it upgrade labs and saw I've ordered for my family check them out at he'll with heat dot com mentioned Dave will ordering and receive five hundred dollars off regular price on as and get free shipping go to heal dot com in my latest book superhuman. I talked about the best Reggie's for living better living longer. Maybe even living two hundred eighty and one of my top longevity hacks is red light therapy your cells need healthy natural light every day and one of the best ways to do that is with red light therapy device that can treat your entire body like Juve. That's the J. O. V. I I learned about red light therapy years ago when I was recovering from a car accident. It was a game changer for me to manage pain. And that's because natural light is a key ingredient for making your mitochondria make solar energy to power. Your body and making more energy in your cells is one of the best and aging strategies. You can have. My might've device helps increase my circulation and even helps to rejuvenate skin. The Jews devices are FDA class two medical devices and they've independently measured their power measurements and specs with Jews modular design. You can build a full body system over time like with Lego blocks and lastly there hand-held device that you've go works really well for for travel a little bit larger than an iphone delivers the same therapeutic power as their full body systems. Wireless totally rechargeable. And it's less than three hundred dollars. which is really cool? Good at juve dot com slash Dave. That's J. O.. V. Dot com slash. Dave you'll see a unique code that will get you a free copy of my new book superhuman with your purchase Happy Juvan. Today's cool factor. Today is that everything counts in large amounts. Okay that might date me because that is depeche mode reference If you don't know it depeche mode is too bad. I you have to Google it but it turns out there are twenty. Newly discovered moons in Saturn's orbit which makes it the moon king and that means there are eighty two moons and it's now ahead of Jupiter which normally before that had just seventy nine minutes there isn't this is interesting as the fact of the day is that it took astronomers at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington. DC years because because they're using data from two thousand four two thousand seven to figure this out just now more than ten years later and what's happening now there's data we've already captured that. We can now processing crunch in new ways and there's all sorts of new data coming online so when people look at you and steering the face and say this this is a fact the bottom line is there's probably another layer underneath it that we haven't figured out yet and I want you to take this little fact and just say well will you would have met someone. Five years ago that there were x number of moons and said no it's actually x number of known moons. And when someone tells you oh your body can't can't do that. There's a pretty good chance that they don't know something about your body. In fact there's very good chance that no one on earth no something so keep pushing. If there's something the thing you want your biology to do who knows it might actually be possible. Today's guest is someone I've interviewed for a while. And and someone you might not have have known He is He's an internationally recognized expert in the way the brain in immune system mm-hmm work together specifically around stress and depression. He's vice chair of research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory School of Medicine and also the director of behavioral. Immunology there. And you're saying that is a mouthful. This is how you behave based on what your immune system does this idea that the tiny cells in your body even sub cellular things are driving large behaviors. Such as whether you want to punch someone or not is it is shocking. How real that is so the little mitochondria other little things? They are kind of in charge of things way. More than we like to admit to ourselves and Andrew Miller has researched these underlying mechanisms including how inflammation can cause depression in humans and other primates primates primates and he did the first clinical trial examining how effective immunotherapy would be in the treatment of depression. Listen more than two hundred and fifty scholarly publications numerous awards and was voted a top doctor in psychiatry for the past four years in other words a game changer. If there ever was such a thing Dr Miller welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Dave very pleased to be here. There are lots of things as you can study as a medical doctor and there are lots of things that will make your colleagues really really pissed off and and one of them is saying exactly what you said that the immune system is causing behavioral issues. In fact there are people have had their licenses has taken away for that. What made you decide to go? The high risk roots in start studying this and Publicizing it while it's actually an interesting story story And and you're right. I think most of the believes that what we think in feel is driven largely by psychological factors that are going on in our lives our relationships with other people in in things that happened to us were can in our various pursuits but the The thing that was fascinating to me and got me started in this area was Some work that was going going on in the in the area of cancer and very early on there were Some of the first immuno therapies in as I think most of your audience and you know that some of the major changes in cancer treatment have come about through our understanding the immune consistent in using different types of therapies that target the immune system to treat cancer will. These are some of the very earliest treatments that they were using immuno therapies earpiece to treat cancer what they would do. is they would Administer these drugs which are usually Molecules that are normally found in the body. So that's how he made. A therapies are working with the immune system to help it. Fight cancer in this case they were giving a molecule ultimate Cited kind which is one of the many molecules that mediate how the immune system works in the body. Immune cells release cytokines so they were Giving an a side kind that induces inflammation to patients to treat their cancers. which was it's Interferon? Alpha interfere analysis and inflammatory cytokines. Actually one of the first. If not the first immunotherapy and at that time being used to treat malignant melanoma arena arena cell carcinoma so. It became apparent very early on to the oncologist when they gave this Interferon Alfa two the patients that the patients started becoming depressed and They were quite concerned because patients were dropping out at treatment in would not continue. Continue not want to have that. That drug again felt miserable and so eventually they said we need to get psychiatry involved in so I was asked to Z.. One of these patients who was receiving Interferon Alpha and I expected going into the to the infusion center where they were fusing these molecules into into the veins of these patients. I was expecting to see people sort of covered in a blanket and shivering and looking miserable and of course the colleges don't know anything the thing about depression so you know will vote. We'll see what's really going on so I went in and there was a woman sitting there and improbably took every ounce of energy and wherewithal. She had to get prepared for her seeing the psychiatrist but shoes news nicely dressed and she sat there in quite sober. Fashion told me that she was absolutely Depressed that She had no interest in anything. She had no interest in her family. She had no interest in her husband. Her children she said she loved to cook. She was is not cooking. She left guard and she was not gardening. She said she couldn't concentrate or memory was shot. She wasn't sleeping. She was exhausted. Costed all the time and yes may be the thought had fleeting thought that maybe is this way to live your life suicidal type thing. And I looked at her and I said Oh my God this is someone who looks exactly like someone I would see it in my practice. Who had just lost a child or just had broken up relationship or had Had some other you know horrible thing happened to them in their in their lives and I said this is real depression odd. Ah This isn't something. That is a sickness or a or a fever or some type of medical reaction. This is a purely league psychological brain reaction to this to this truck to the site Chi to this inflammatory but Chedda cancer cancer I mean. Shouldn't you be depressed if you have cancer. I asked her that quick. Astor exactly that question. Good question I said well you know look you have malignant melanoma. That's not a good cancer. And she says look. I came to grips with that months ago. Okay this isn't about cancer this is about having received this yes Well she tied it to the treatment. She's got felt fine and then she had taught to the treatment and just related to that which I think is important because this comes abso- often is on our studies. Did originally focus on cancer patients. Imac that issue came up Multiple Times in presentations into whatnot. And what I could just briefly to address that is that we also gave Interferon Alfa two non-human primates Theresa's monkeys monkeys can and they too became depressed and showed all user monkeys who who weren't already depressed because they were living in a letter. Ah Well they're not. They're not happy about it but they're not I understand it. They're probably pissed off a- and a lot of people who succeeded in fighting cancer they are fighting cancer and they are full of fight right. And you're saying here's a drug that it shifts you from that fight response into absolutely classic. Depression caused by a molecule that stimulates the immune system and and stimulates inflammation and so that began this whole notion that inflammation may cause depression in some people for now one of the core tenets in in the entire body of things that I've written and taught and learned over years is that inflammation is pretty much the root of most aging by the way right now is a recording this for the first time in my career as an author. My new book superhuman about longevity evident aging is in its second week on the New York Times Bestseller List was awesome. Congratulations thank you. But a big thing is there. Hey you better turn down inflammation if you WANNA live a long time And the primary cause of inflammation is actually my cadre like because you don't get inflammation without them And if they're if they're not functioning all of the cytokines will affect your mitochondria somewhere another And in my own path of being much happier and not weighing three hundred pounds and all that turning off inflammation is a fundamental goal of almost everything. I do what I found though. Is that anxiety you not just depression. Anxiety is very much tied to biological wellness if your cells are working and I've all kinds of theories and certainly you've I've got all sorts of of laboratories there but for people listening to this okay. They don't have cancer. They're not injecting cytokines cytokines. But uh they're doing stuff that causes inflammation in where I'm going with this. Is this kind of a binary thing. Either you have enough. You're depressed or is IT A. You're a little depressed. You have less less less bounce today. You're far from depressed but you're a little bit inflamed so you're little bit less effective in your life is it. Is it linear or is it by well you know. Of course as a physician we tend to be more binary about things and we say well. Either you have depression. Are you tote when we we all know that people have a lot. There's a lot of great Gray area in between and I think it is linear. And and and what you're talking about is extremely important because the level of inflammation in your body and and we all as you as you pointed doubt that we all have sources of inflammation we can get into that information. Come from if somebody's not ejecting it into into your arm or you don't have cancer. For example. There are many sources than we go over. The you've already touched on something. I was recently in an aging conference about you know what what what are the drivers to people getting older. It's conference this was at Stanford and the conference was really It was all about inflating so that is a concert. Inflammation aging is one of the hottest topics in immunology. Right now because we recognize that much of what drives the process of of aging in the brain and much of what drives lives many of the illnesses that eventually Do People in our driven by inflammation. So we're talking about cardiovascular disease disease were talking about diabetes talking about cancer we're talking about neurodegenerative disorders really talking about. All of the diseases uses all the modern ills that we as a society are are are grappling with right now and the thing. That's really cool. All about this is if you go back and you start to say well why you know where did all this come from. And it's interesting if you think about it from an evolutionary perspective we as human beings are were not designed to live in the world we live in now. We were designed to live in a world where there was a very heavy high passage pathogen load and we couldn't get attacked by Predator at pretty much any point in time and in order to survive to reproductive eight in ancestral times. You needed a really aggressive inflammatory response. A very aggressive immune MM system to go after all these pathogens that were rife in the environment because there was no sanitation. The water was contaminated. The food was spoiled. There was no way you can get around. Not being exposed to a Tana passages plus. There was all this wounding. That's going on in what is inflammation mation do. It's all about fighting pathogens and healing wounds so okay. So that's if you're alive today your life half because your ancestors had really aggressive immune system and I think something. That's kind of really an added. Coolness factor in this when humans migrated did out of Africa into Europe Asia. We actually had to mate with sub human species to took pick up their DNA in order to fight the pathogens that were in Europe in Asia. Because they could not in the NFL's ZAC exactly so if you go into every you know Caucasian every person. That's not African of pure African to step de descent you will find DNA and from the the neanderthals and that DNA is sitting in regions. The Gino that are responsible for fighting infection. The reason that that is so fascinating is that I've looked into something called the H.. Hla D. R. Four genetic sub type. And something I have something about a third of people have that makes you more prone prone to inflammation and in fact my first book I wrote about this a lot to do with toxic mold and lyme disease sensitivity environmental sensitivities and the theory. There is that we picked up those jeans because we were the people. who were the marauders? So in addition to fighting adding tigers we had to go to a new village with new bacteria. We had to take our swords or arrows or clubs or wherever that back then and survive getting cuts. Your blood clots quickly. And you have a hyper aggressive immune response and unfortunately that means you're very likely to have massive health problems if you live in a building with toxic mold so that was my my focus done a documentary on toxic mold but your your work is going to be on just inflammation. Does that mean that people who tend to be more inflamed that they're also more likely to be anxious depressed angry warlike jerks. Uh I would think that I guess the answer to that question if you just look at the data eight of the answer to that question is yes because if you look at thank you if you look at individuals for example who have auto immune or inflammatory disorders. These individuals vigils have much higher rates of psychiatric complications including anxiety depression. And what's interesting is say. Oh we can go back to your if you have cancer. You'd be miserable anyway. So what's you know was this has to do with inflammation if you take those individuals who have these higher rates of depression Russian anxiety and you treat them with a drug that blocks th-these cited kinds like we were talking about earlier few block lock just those kinds. The depression scores dropped the anxiety levels drop and the people feel as if they are new. People people in terms of their psychological wellness their psychological wellbeing their mental health. That is one of the most powerful will things in seven hundred episodes. That that I've heard someone say just just straight up in one sentence in my own own path when I got over time control of all the different inflammatory cytokines that had problems with and it was more than just a couple at a lot of inflammation I stopped. Being jerk mags. ID levels dropped my performance at everything I did went out. My energy levels went up and I like to think I'm generally a nice person person The vast majority of the time. And if I do something that causes inflammation I see a change in my happiness levels goals and it's it's very noticeable on even sometimes a half hour basis I can see shift in my energy levels. And it's not just the Andrew like Run faster my veto to Max's slightly better. It's I care more or care less about everything and I'm not depressed. I'm very far from depressed. But for me very linear and I think it's that way for most people is it that way from people or just the third of us who have the extra neanderthal. All I will invade your village and take your food. Even if it spoils him. Well I think this is something that we're struggling because we we. It's very clear that if you have high levels of inflammation that the inflammation through a series of processes that have a lot to do with what you're alluding according to which metabolism that metabolism especially even within the immune cells themselves Leads to release of these these. He's cytokines these inflammatory cytokines which we know can get into the brain. They get into brain regions that are relevant to Behavior and they go to a couple of brain regions. They go to one brain regions that are subcortical brain regions. That are involved. It's all in reward processing So your motivation. And they go to a region of the brain that's involved in your perception of threat. So when you talk about being irritable and maybe a little aggressive you see things more her as threatening so your likelihood interpret something that's going on in your environment and an interpersonal interaction. You'd see it as more threatening threatening as than it might otherwise be so that's clear to us. It's clear that if you have significant inflammation there two things you body wants to do the number one. It wants to shut down to shunt energy resources to wound healing in fighting infection. Second thing you need to do if you're if you're were infected or wounded and these are evolutionary derived. We think behaviorist is you need to be on hyper alert status. You need to be looking for trouble in the environment because that trouble could be an animal coming to finish off the job they wounded you start with a now. They're looking for you to to ultimately have you for lunch and so there is a certain vulnerability that comes with being sick or wounded. And so you need to be on alert that you may be attacked because of that. That's so those are the things thinks that those behaviors are the behaviors we think feed into the psychiatric disorders per se Tiso depression anxiety. But let's go back to the linear. What if you just had a little bit of inflammation a little above normal decided pat behavior behavior and the answer? We think and we're testing. This now is yes that the decision making process process is influenced in such a way that you begin to discount things that take more effort. So if you're thinking about going to the gym you go well you know I'd rather just Kinda get my my my my goodies by sitting on the couch and and watching. TV instead of going all the trouble to go to the gym and it may show up in that you just kinda not as motivated to go in and do these other things. This may be a little fatigued so that they're lower levels of of symptoms that ultimately impact our decision making. Am I gonNA go out of the store and buy a series of healthy foods that I'm then going to have to bring home and cook or am I going to go to one of the local fast food places and get something that is simple easy and quick so I'm end inflammatory and feet data and feeds the fire. Yes absolutely I mean it it. It feeds on itself really. I mean if if if you think about it so yes to answer this year question I think is linear and this is the kind of thing that we're now so sort of working in two so research studies is cognitive neuroscience where we can begin to see how people make decisions and There's a process of of of of of of of discounting as if I say I'm GonNa give you a dollar now or five dollars two weeks you'd probably say look take the dollar. Now wait wait two weeks for five dollars so you you're discounting by virtue of the time factor we think inflammation the effects those decisions so that even if the payoff is bigger and bigger and bigger the person will still take the immediate reward because because they don't WanNa wait they're not willing to put in the time and energy For the for the for the big win in the future that may require some work could swell one of the things that didn't make it into Into superhuman my anti-aging book is the idea that as as we age we pick up slow growing bacteria. Things like Mycoplasma Bartonella things. That really aren't going to do anything for twenty or thirty years but the long you live the more you're exposed to them and these bacteria actually make cider kinds specifically to cause silo destruction. So they can use. WHO's the parts of the cells as their own either fuel or building blocks to make more of themselves and that I believe I just didn't have enough? Evidence is to put it in the book but I believe some of the things that happen as we age are coming from those guys my personal experience I had i. I had the toxic mold exposure an lime disease and by by the things I really dug in on the bacterial side of things. I take a stack of herbs. This is a Extra some I've never talked about on the show but herbs that come from all around the world that I know based on lab testing in addition to the studies that turned down all the the inflammatory pathways to the half. When I take those get sick very often and I perform really well and if I don't take him for a while I start to degrade right and it's literally? Managing Cytokine is do you believe that. These sub clinical bacterial infections. That are common but really. Don't make it out sick or those Are Those common. Are those relevant to what you're studying. I think that They likely are. It's not an area that I I studying. There's not a lot of literature on it. There is a growing rapidly growing literature on this on the microbial and Dan. Those are all the bacteria that are basically in the body and a in the gut and the skin in pretty much all the parts year of your body and what we understand now. Is that the microbiome especially in the gut is playing a huge role. Oh in Dictating exactly how the immune system functions that is now expanding the viruses I'm sure it will expand to parasites and other the various infectious or commensurable Organisms that are kind along for the ride. We just are. It's just now The tip of the iceberg. We really have half not dug down deep enough but what is very clear. Is that infections. And the microbiome or playing a huge roll on your level of inflammation in your body and part of it is related to how the microbiome regulates the immune cells roles as well as leaking into your circulation through a leaky gut Based largely on your diet and other factors such the stress these can all lead to leaky gut microbial products from your gut will leak into the circulation and activate immune cells to then release inflammatory molecules. That can affect you right. If you're listening to this in asking yourself seriously I'm probably not someone who's who's affected by this. It's starting to sound like you are affected by this. Interestingly thinking about that time you were hung Over and when you're really drunk ADA bucket of fries and some pizza and you woke up the next morning. How did you feel you just turned on massive inflammation throughout the high in trans? Fats and God knows what else he did that night. So that was not a good day right. We can all feel that inflammation so this is just to get over that little skepticism. Say Hey actually I have at least one case in my own life where this happens or you felt really crappy after the flu and it wasn't just the symptoms you. You're dragging the this is how I picture these things. Are those good examples of things that most people have experienced. Yes I think especially a specially the flu. I think most people have experienced pretty much. What inflammation does in stark relief? I think that that's sort of a dramatic mattock example. The those moments when you have the flu where you literally cannot move even though you WanNa move you can't move and if if it's almost like a paralysis and you hear people with lyme's disease in some of these other infectious illnesses will describe exactly the same thing hanging as I said. This is a grand designed to shut us down. We are were infected because we really need to shunt those energy resources to feeling the immune system. I'm I'm just blown away to hear you say this Especially given what you're studying in your background and and this is entering the field of hard science and medicine so that we can start looking at people who have anxiety depression and okay all right. Do you have an infection. Do you have inflammation and are there parts of your brain. That aren't aren't necessarily structured right around working but even if they're not working is it because of inflammation and and so I'm a fan of Dr Daniel Ayman's work with SPEC SCANS AND FM. I looking at the brain. My own brand we did the radioactive marker injections and all and found big parts of my PFC that just had no metabolic activity Sorry for people listening. PFC's prefrontal Cortex the logic part of in the front of the brain and his determination was look. You know you had environmental toxins from mold. Most likely maybe mercury or something else that were inhibiting activity there now. Are you seeing or are your colleagues seeing specific regions of the brain you mentioned subcortical but are there other spots that get hit by inflammation more than others that would affect our behavior in other ways. So that's much of the work that that we've done and their other. Investigators that have found very very similar. Alert results all of us going at the at the issue a little bit differently. So we know this is the these findings are relatively reproducible reproducible. Across different inflammatory stimuli and across different laboratories in what we find is that yes there are affects in the prefrontal cortex that yes. We see a decrease in activity Metabolic activity in the prefrontal CORTEX. We also see activation active ation of threat related regions in the brain including regions May Not be relevant to your audience for maybe some well. That's yes the big dilemma for sure. The hippocampus the door slammed terrier cingulate CORTEX. These are on the insular. These are all brain regions that form circuits and much of what we do in psychiatry. Now of how circuitry. What different brain in recent talking to one another leading to behavioral phenomena in that circuit that involves the mid July the insulin the campus astore slammed terriers singular cortex the anxiety circuits? So we see this activation of the anxiety circuitry. We also see Looted to this previously Ashley Effects On reward circuitry so that includes both subcortical regions The stratum and Cortisol regions Ah The venture medial prefrontal CORTEX so in those prefrontal cortex regions. What you see? is you see increased activity in the anxiety circuits markets and you see a decreased activity in the reward circuitry and the amazing thing. is you see a linear correlation between the activity activity in these circuits in the amount of inflammation in your body as measured by C reactive protein. which you can if you can go oh to your doctor right now and get measured in fact? There are three lab tests that I have recommended since the verb beginning of of writing my first book my blog post it's homocysteine AC- reactive protein in LP to and the first year because inflammation and matters and the third one is because everyone's afraid that cholesterol is going to damage their arteries and if there is damage to arteries the third one goes up. And if you just have those three numbers magically you're GONNA no no if you have inflammation if you have inflation. It's your job to figure out what it is and what to do about it now. Here's a question for you. Who are not who? What would be the best single anti-inflammatory compound you've come across that that might make people feel better? That's a tough one and I think that's the Right now that's the holy grail in Madison we. We recognize that inflammation is driving these diseases But yet strangely enough we do not not have any drug at this point That blocks inflammation in a way. That doesn't Leave one pretty vulnerable to infection. So the drugs that are used for people with autoimmune inflammatory disorders those great drugs than we actually are giving those drugs to patients with depression right now and these are drugs that block a certain inflammatory cytokines. They're very potent anti inflammatory agents. In if you have a bad inflammatory disease that's great. 'cause you'll feel much better but if you're someone someone who has middling semi high levels of inflammation without frank inflammatory disease than the the risks of having a serious infection. are greater than the benefits that you would receive from blocking inflammation. Sure so right now there is not a drug we recommend couple of so we do. We recommend obviously the lifestyle style factors that contribute to inflammation. You've alluded to some some of which you've struggled with yourself. OBESITY OBESE HANDS DOWN. The obesity is the biggest offender fat cells grow at a very rapid right and when they grow they outstripped their oxygen. Oxygen supply their blood supply and they die and anytime there's tissue damage or destruction and so wound as far as the immune system is concerned. It's not quibbling colling. Is this good bad whatever and the immune system cells enter fat tissue. They release a ton aside kind. And if you go into fat tissue you by upside you'll see a ton of these Inflammatory cells democracy will be there and they'll be activated so obesity. The city is clearly the number one offender then you start looking at stress As being a major fender especially early trauma early childhood stress. appears to really have lingering influences on how the immune system is regulated in biases towards words inflammation. Even how you're absolutely and that was my first book. Yeah if not in the the more we learn about it if there's a lot of in utero stuff that's going on as well so some of this you may not have a whole lot of control over. Although their arch. We are learning a lot about that. Changes that occur to your genome the EPA genetic changes. I don't know that that's come up in the those changes changes where the environment influences. How the genes were so even if you have a certain genetic predisposition the the the environment could influence how those genes are expressed a? We've learned about that so I think there'll be some treatments along those lines but stress can cause chronic the commission and then we talked about the The despite haussas infections obviously cause inflammation. Then of course there are a ton of things we do to people role in my world. Madison where we do surgery and Redo radiation chemotherapy. The cancer treatments people kept for cancer and whatnot in terms of medications This is a scenario that I'm actively working on right now but I'm not targeting inflammation. I'm going downstream of inflammation and targeting. The molecules inflammation is screwing up in your brain and one of the molecules that seems to be a number one target is dopamine so think about dopamine is head up dopamine. You might as well cash it in. I mean that's Parkinson's you have no dopamine. You can't move your course Parkinson's disease. He's very high rates of depression lack motivation no dopamine. That's pretty much it that's you know. And so what we do is is. This is how I treat my own patients is that if they have increased inflammation. We will work with medications that are targeting dopamine as their main mechanism of action. So that would be there. Certain antidepressants Be Appropriate and being one of them. Stimulants other drugs that directly activate dopamine receptors brownback solving one of those even giving some of Parkinson drugs to patients with increased inflammation and this kind of The loss of motivation the Nanna Tonia we call it depression fatigue here and so on so forth your sensitizing their dopamine receptors base. Where would yeah be more responsive to smaller stimuli? Yes that's mind blowing out what about nicotine. Nicotine Nicotine Patches Alzheimer's timers. Yes It's there's not a lot of work in terms of the impact of inflammation on Nicotine Other than to say that nicotine binds to nicotinic receptors in immune cells and actually shuts off inflammation summation. So how that all works and I mean obviously Acetylcholine has other effects that are probably hopefully more dramatic in the brain that you're talking about but in terms of the effects of inflammation on the brain the neurotransmitter systems there. There's not been a lot a lot of work on what's happening with What about the other natural compounds things like fish oil will Things like turmeric and I like full disclosure. I make a fish egg oil thing. My Turmeric formula includes some the Chinese herbs that I use for inflammation not all of them but some of them and there's like this long list way longer green tea extracts reservatrol. The David Sinclair has been studying. And I mean this is hundreds of compounds that you can buy at the vitamin store. Is there any any efficacy any research. Just your general thoughts on that path. I think there's a lot of interest at this point and there are studies underway. I The the The National Institute of Health is is very interested in determining which of these compounds Actually we have biologic activity and much of the interest is related to inflammation the data is. It's not entirely clear yet because there are multiple issues around dosing there multiple issues around the quality the compound. Oh Yeah and in order for us to study these various food supplements if you will that you'd this all has to be run through the FDA so in order to do these kinds of studies you have to get a supplier hire who's willing to give all of the details from the actual growing a herb for example and one contaminants might be introduced introduced in the process of growing. It's really quite quite detailed in there. Not many suppliers who are willing to give you that information or even have that information so that really blocks us as a as a As a society from getting access last two good quality supplements that may in fact have major impacts on a impact on our health. And so that that's kind of just just one of those things that we don't have a lot of control over and so you're kind of catches catch. Can when you go to the to the vitamin store. The health food food store and you This and that and the other thing we just don't know the fish oil There is better data data with fish. Oil there are some studies that suggest that it has anti inflammatory effects and potentially antidepressant effects That's an active area of investigation But they're using again highly purified you know really really high quality stuff and it has to be has to be standardized absolutely. It's the same thing people say. Oh my I hear is from functional medicine doctors a lot. I told my patients to take this specific brand of whichever this was and then they went to Simul store and they bought the six dollar color version and then they came in with pimples no positive effects and they told me they were doing what I said and unfortunately having dug in on the supply chains and stuff like that Eh a good indicator of the quality of your supplement is the cost because it costs more to make the good stuff however unethical companies can also raise their price to make it look. uh-huh how do you crack that code. I found it frustrating as well so I I'm I'm with you. There are some studies of single ingredients dance but quite often. They're out of India but we do our best and I feel like the worst. That's going to happen for most of these natural food based these things but if you try taking Broccoli extract or turmeric or whatever the thing is and you feel better and your joints don't hurt and you sleep better or whatever. Whatever happens good for you? Keep doing that and if nothing happens don't do that. It seems like the risk is relatively low so it might be worth experimenting. But I know if I had experimented I wouldn't be ram today but also I'm a corner case because I had all the bad side and and one thing that you should be aware of it and you may be aware of done. What your thoughts are on this? But there are efforts and we got into this with the with the Curcumin Molecule where you can actually the chemistry will take the curcumin and make it more bioavailable more potent and so you're taking the natural natural compounds and creating drugs that are fall intents and purposes the same thing that are now being produced. You're using chemistry to make the natural troll world even better so I know that wanders out into a little bit dangerous territory but now it's not dangerous at all. I mean the delivery systems of supplements are important that we make liposomes good liposomes. Those little balls of fat that can carry drugs passed or drugs or natural compounds. House passed the lining of the Gut and the curcumin formula we use a standardized extract called ninety five with clinical studies that show that goes up but we pair it with brain octane oil which is the Cape relic acid based not. That's a part of bulletproof coffee because we know that that oil also affects how things things are absorbed and we had some other compounds more from the Chinese website of things in the end of the day. The effectiveness of delivery the system. We know that it matters and I have studies on the BPM ninety five but the other things I'm doing I believe they're going to work so I only talk about the effectiveness I can prove but I'm doing other stuff in there and Things that are known to be safe and I believe likely to be effective. But it's it's doing your own chemistry at this point that yeah you have to but you your work talks. It's about thanks for the going there and the fish oil and all that stuff I know for a MD.. Sometimes that can be like if I say good or bad things. It's it's almost like you're talking about a vaccine like polarizing and not trying to be poisoning there. It's not just dopamine. I mean though it's also glutamate and include mate is a very interesting compound in the brain because it's tied to Migraines if you have access glutamate you can definitely get problems there but there are also some issues around autism. It's issues with aging but it's also necessary gary and people who are depressed crap you give them glued a mean which isn't amino acid magically their gut lining heels and their brain also can turn on in about ten minutes they get less depressed at least in my experience not being qualified to diagnose depression so talk to me about glutamate good mean inflammation depression. Okay so this. This is a the second sort of downstream target Of the inflammation that. We've we've had a lot of interest in and we saw all this very early on With those patients who are getting the inflammatory cytokine Interferon Alpha for For treating medical illnesses though we saw that glutamate was going up in the brain and This very well with the larger basic science right state of it shows that if you treat sells Typically Astra sites which are the molecules that contain kind of control the levels of glutamate in May in the synapse That inflammatory side at kinds Disrupt the ability of Astra sites to control glutamate glutamate. It is extremely important. Is the the the major excited story. neurotransmitter in the brain and critical to brain function. The problem is is that glutamate even in just minor leaner increases is toxic. It's excited toxic. So whenever you have something that's excited Tori the the bleeding into being excited. Toxic is is xay is something that can occur at very low concentrations did so does that mean. MSG is bad for us. I'm not sure turf now but the Clearly too much glutamate is and so when there is excessive glutamate it can spill out of the synapse and that leads to chaotic signaling in the brain It leads to The death of sells and It leads to premature for or accelerated aging in the brain. So it's killing. The sort of the white matter tracts. In your brain in the white matter tracts in your brain or the or the highways along which you are The signals knows go from one series of neurons to the next. So if you destroy the highways everything slows down and then you're starting to talk about degenerative generative disorders associated with like Alzheimer's dimension those types of things so the effects of inflammation on glutamate seemed to be much more of a destructive nature than the effects on dopamine which seem much more functional in nature There are functional consequences as said with too much glutamate. does 'cause this chaotic signaling in the brain And when there's a loss of coherence and signaling in the brain it Kinda screws everything up and so that that's when you start to invoke diseases for. There's really pro. Broken brains like autism and schizophrenia. And these kinds of disorders We have started to a to Tests treatments that target glutamate to treat potentially depression to treat Some of the consequences of Chemo. Therapy like Chemo. Brain which we think is an inflammation related phenomena. And of course they're already using drugs. Shrugs block glutamate to treat DEMENTIA UNRELATED TO INFLAMMATION although. We think they'd be most effective in individuals who had high inflammation so there's a whole evolving glutamates story. Is there anything someone listening. Who maybe is doing information? Or maybe maybe even knows that they're sensitive to higher level of that they might want to consider lifestyle pharmaceutical. Not that you're going to prescribe over the air this on talking about but just like areas of focus I think that at this point It from the data that we have as little premature to go targeting Glutamate as we were talking about dopamine. I think the best thing to do at this point is to try to get the inflammation down and so that would include exercise it is and And some of the the the sort of yoga. Meditation all of these types of Strategies these increase para sympathetic tone and the pair sympathetic nervous system has been shown to reduce inflammation so much so that. There's there's actually a treatment which I think is really cool where they stimulate the pair synthetic nerve outflow pathways and it will treat arthritis and throughout the body. It's Vegas yeah and it's an electric vehicle. It's they call electric suitable very cool. And they're stimulated you got a couple of out there stimulating the vagus and it's FDA approved. They've done the clinical trials the FDA said good enough and you could get your rheumatoid arthritis treated with stimulating. Your vagus nerve and it sticks stimulating. It going down from from the of the brain down it's Steven porges the father of political theory has been on the show and we re talking about. Just how profoundly important that is for inflammation and I mean. I've done weird stuff. I've also put five percents. xylocaine lighter came on the vagus nerve and the bottom of the left ear canal to to lower inflammation mission. At least for me it ensure that you wouldn't expect but you can see as a as an md.. I'm not injecting is just like annoying amen or actually a water based liquid works best. So we're talking about glutamate We talked about dopamine and dance. We haven't talked about the big gun anti-inflammatories that we all know about Ibuprofen naproxen aspirin and I mean if I'm feeling depressed. A little bloated. Should I just pop some of these things in that worry about bleeding in my gut. Well that that's I think the A A a question that we haven't quite resolved yet. There is a paper that just came out with off patients with Bipolar disorder and depression. And they used Cele- Cox Zip which is a Cox two inhibitor which is along the lines of these the anti inflammatory drugs and And they found a significant benefit of the addition of this Solid Cox excessive To to to the treatment to standard antidepressant treatment. The problem is is that we what we understand about inflammation psychiatric disease. Is that the psychiatric diseases that we study. Let's take depression. For example not not every depressed patient has increased inflammation it really only occurs in about thirty per set of depressed individuals so this only applies to about thirty percent The trials that have been done using drugs like Motrin or Ibuprofen are these kinds of aspirin. Whatever All these trials have treated everybody and they don't split people out they don't split out without. You would think they do this the right way but they have not and fortunately or unfortunately been very outspoken advocate for doing trials. The right waste waste that we can actually get the kind of information that would help people make a decision. Should I take an aspirin. Along with my antidepressant if I'm inflamed or or or a a Motrin or any of these other drugs but none of the trials that had been done have split out the patients into those with high and low inflammation. Know that when I hear thirty thirty percent there's two groups that have high inflammation that both are thirty percent one or the people with methylation pathway disorders. Mta Jeff are and people listening to this. Probably probably see me writing about that. Whatever else that's a third of us so they're going to have inflammation and the other third is h. l. a. d. r.? Four people have the things I talked about earlier that make you more. Susceptible folded lime disease mold toxins and probably medals as well. And if you have both of those things you probably different you're probably inflamed but we can test for those to look for any kind of test for the presence of signs which is what a fifty dollar or less task to such or would you just be yeah. Yeah and that's like a ten dollar test. Okay now there's other big limitations to the body of research that you and I both rely on most most of it's done white males because going back through nineteen fifty. There's a preponderance of young white males walking around universities and you can use them as guinea pigs. Thanks for free. I mean this is just how it's been and now education is much more as we have a mix of men and women and we still don't have for like a mix of these most schools that matches the genetics of the planet so Southeast Asians or Africans or Indigenous people might not happy walk well-represented do results working the same or your findings. Do they apply to women and men in different races. Different ages yet Yes so most of depression question is over. There's an overrepresentation of women. So most of the patients that sixty five percent of the patients in our studies are women and we do see. The women are showing similar responses As men and in fact there's some data to suggest that women may be more sensitive to the effects of inflammation nations that men That's something that we're very interested in and going after it's obvious it's called love has. I'm not even joking. That is one of the easiest ways to know if your inflamed do. You have love handles today. That weren't there yesterday and two women get love handles more easily than men they actually do and as someone who's a professional at grown love handles I know this so yes and and and the other question the other issue is the the the ethnic and racial mix Savar samples. WE'RE IN WE'RE IN ATLANTA Georgia. So we're a city that has almost fifty fifty black and white and so we have a very nice nice representation. Ah both African Americans. And Caucasians are samples and we do see there Similar similar so it isn't a debris haven't saved the you know the thing that was interesting is that You see these very high rates of depression in women and so people say there will. Maybe there's a biological piece to this. When we did our early Interferon Studies? We found that women seem to be as sensitive so our data's not consistent with some of the other date of we have fairly large sample over one hundred patients and receiving This Interferon Alpha and the women develop help depression the same as the men. There was no difference so we at the time were writing. And so we'll see how this all falls out but we at the time time we're writing that that inflammation was an equal opportunity Phenomenon that it really was affecting both sexes similarly similarly. I don't think that inflammation is equal opportunity from From a racial perspective. I mean we see more diabetes which is an inflammatory Tori disease amongst African Americans than we do from Caucasians and it might be economic because the food quality. But I think there's also something to do with a sun exposure vitamin D levels because higher mellon in your skin means you need more vitamin D. N None of us get enough vitamin D right now because we're all indoors all the time which could be a part of it. We'll tease that out. I don't know if if you have any more data on that but inflammation affects all of us. I don't know that it affects every we. Yeah when you start out the economic stuff who when you start to sort out the economic stuff it things do change. There are some differences though in has to do. It was stress so there there we silver studies are done on in the inner city hospitals in Atlanta. which are are probably seventy five percent to eighty percent African American and in these populations you see Of extremely high rates of early life trauma and then chronic stress dresses well in the. PTSD levels in these populations are higher than the PTSD levels. That military personnel coming back from Iraq can ask Ghanistan there also is all the the racial bias that is in our society that everybody just hand. That's frenetically there. That would not aw there for someone who was wide so that there is a kind of a low level discrimination that that causes stress and you can measure this when we have it is related in part to to some of the physiologic changes that we say well. The idea here is to build the environment around us so oh that it supports our biology which means that we go on natural stressors and so we all have access to the things that are actually foods and things that look blake food and you can't eat and things like that. That's it's going to take some big work but at school because it's GonNa take a little bit of time and if we can all live for a couple of hundred years we'll do it. I'm I'm very fascinated. If you can't tell by your research and directly glean scientifically in detail tying together what's going on inside inside of our inflammatory pathways inside side of ourselves and the way we shop in the world I have intuited and figure this out in my own life and I've shared the things that that have been best practices for me and it is. It's actually relaxing an invigorating to read through research ago. I always thought that was the case and I could show people how to do it. But you've told us the Y.. For a lot of this in a way that as far as I can see no one else's ever done I think it's truly groundbreaking and very meaningful for what it what it means to be human beings. I'm I'm grateful that you've done that. I have one final question for you. I mentioned my book on Jeopardy and I've been very public. I'm planning I need to live to at least one hundred and eighty and because I know I've seen someone do one twenty so I'll take that and I'm counting on guys like you. And many of the other people live interviewed in some of whom have become friends with. They're gonNA do fifty percent better over the next hundred years than we could do today. So that's why my numbers one eighty. What's your number? How long can you live? But I don't know about myself. My genetics were pretty good. My mother's almost a hundred so we have a strong family history of longevity Eddie. I think that there are some intriguing. Studies targeting the inflammation inflammation that we were talking about before. Four in Metformin is the one that is the Nabet form and trial. It's going on right now to see if they can extend Lifespan in humans is already been shown in just about every other species. It's been looked at. They've even done this. Worms give worming list long periods of time and so in the company. That did the worm in the mouse that he was called biomarker affirmative early two thousands. I started taking metformin based on those studies. So maybe you will. You'LL BE UH-HUH I quit for other reasons. I'm really curious with the latest study. Says I I'm going back and forth. It's a hot topic. It is and and whether math formulas the the right one but metformin targets argus the metabolism that drives the inflammation so as you get older. Your metabolism changes in that change in metabolism becomes pro inflammatory in nature. And if you can block those metabolic pathways that drives the inflammation than you. Block the inflammation. And so that's where or I think people are sort of going in terms of the you know. How can you live to one eighty? That's where they're going and so I think if this trial they're doing now that they actually had to crowd fund I could. They could not get any other governmental agencies to fund it so I think they crowd sourced listed I know that crowd sourced and and the study has started it. Good one to get into. Are you taking not yet. Wave Wave my wife and I have discussed it but we have not. We've not gone that that race. Don't don't take it when you exercise. Because it does the the current thinking from a group of top anti-aging people. I've talked to just interpretation probably two or three times a week. It might be worth it but every day I think the the risks outweigh the benefits. Not taking it all. Maybe you miss out on something. But the the daily thing I was doing before does suppressed press mitochondrial function in ways. That maybe isn't good but we will will tease this. And you can you can have metabolic you know disruptions. That'll land to the emergency agency Ramos. Well so that that there's that little problem if you don't have diabetes obviously a dot Venus. That's different story and I've not recommending Metformin entr for anyone to take be careful about that was speaking of Not having diabetes. I'm waving my continuous glucose. Ma Results You have diabetes. I just track my blood sugar. But it's five point one and just kind of hangs out there five point one multi eighteen to the US around ninety. Oh that's that's great. That's where you WANNA keep it. I feel like we are going to get there. And the Diabetes High Blood Sugar Inflammation connection which you have now said. Oh there's your anxiety there's your depression and maybe not full blown clinical diagnostic but moving in that direction. So I bent. Thanks for your work. I'm I'm fascinated by and I plan to continue following it for people who are just turned on an excited by this There is a Eurorail you you can go to. ITS BEHAVIORAL IMMUNOLOGY DOT COM. You can set up for a high end. TRAFFIC CONVERSION MARKETING BEHAVIORAL UH-HUH IMMUNOLOGY DOT COM and it's at emory university. Where a lot of this information is and were are you teaching and I gotTa tell you if you're looking for what you want to study and you're in high school your university looking for your PhD or something like that? You should look at this kind of stuff. Interpersonal neurobiology and behavioral immunology are areas of decades worth of fascinating knitting work. Like we're nowhere near done here and these are going to rewrite what we know about us of a fascinating work. Thank you thank you very much for having me appreciate it You've probably noticed that I mentioned a lot of new biohacking and anti-aging technologies on the show. I love that I get to see and share. Almost every new thing that comes out and some of the companies that I talk about it really upgraded my life and I walked the talk by partying with her investing in some of the companies buddies that I really love bulletproof. Radio was created in his hosted by Dave asprey. And the PODCAST. Assistant is Bev. Hamson research is provided by Darcy himes and all technical aspects aspects are handled by our podcast mastermind. Brock Armstrong was podcast inflammation purposes only statements and views expressed on this podcast. Not Medical advice is podcast. Including Dave asprey and the producers claimed responsibility for any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own in. This podcast is not endorsing accept. Responsibility for statements made by guests because podcast is not make any representations warranties about guests qualifications or credibility individuals on this podcast may have a direct or indirect financial interest in products services referred to herein. If you think you have the medical problem consult a licensed physician. This podcast is owned by bulletproof media.

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Office Leasing Won't Recover For Five Yrs: Cushman & Wakefield

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

30:06 min | 9 months ago

Office Leasing Won't Recover For Five Yrs: Cushman & Wakefield

"This podcast is brought to you by HP engineering experiences that amaze HP creates technology with purpose to make life better for everyone everywhere learn more at hp dot slash sustainable impact. Welcome to the Bloomberg markets podcast on Hall Swinney along with my co-host upon. Quinn. Every business day we bring you interviews from the does market pros and Bloomberg experts along with essential market-moving news time to Bloomberg markets podcast on Apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts. On Bloomberg Dot Com. Well as more and more people work from home for longer and longer period the question is what does that mean for corporate real estate office space in some major cities? You get a sense of kind of the future here we welcome Rebecca Rocky, global. Head of forecasting for Cushman and Wakefield located in New York, city? Rebecca. Thanks so much for joining us. You know I was in the city a couple of weeks ago back in the Office for day and you know I was Kinda of shocked to see the the the fewer people on the street, and that's just to be fewer people. In the office buildings, give us a sense of where we are kind of. The global workforce and the office space and how you are thinking about it. Sure well, first of all, thank you so much for having me today You know clearly we have a number of things going on in the office sector in particular. Now, the least of which is dealing with the damage that's been done in the economy and the labor market as it relates to the return to the office. There are also a number of a trends emerging and most offices are operating well below capacity right for the country and really in most of the parts of the world we're seeing that office utilization is below where it was and in some cases significantly and you know fortunately office companies have been. More, resilient win think about the damage that's been done to different industries. Office employment has fared disproportionately better, and there is somewhat of a ability to work remotely to get through the Times to continue to work just not in the office right now. So that's really what we're seeing take place and or some of the things that we talk about in this report you rebecca. You did a global office impact study and found that office leasing will stay below pre cove levels until twenty twenty-five, which when you think about it, sort of makes sense what does that mean for the likes of Cushman and Wakefield, and others like you. Why it was a lot of opportunity to ask you to our clients and helping them think about this new world that we're facing. Right. So we believe that the office is a critical part of how companies do business how they create value in particular, and so we fundamentally think there's intrinsic value to the office place. The question is, what are the kinds of things we're doing in the office and how behavior change from a leasing perspective as we go into this new normal the fact that we're finding that despite some of the structural changes we anticipate work from home to emerge that the office sector does recover from a demand perspective to me was a really strong find an indicative of the fact that many companies view office as part of the broader ecosystem that will allow them to the cheap the goals that they have is company. But it's interesting. We've heard a lot of corporate leaders in your city calling for companies to bring their employer's back open up the city again yet it just seems like you know just the people I talk to they say, okay maybe I'll go back into the city, but it ain't going to be five days a week. This work at home from thing works just fine. So is it going to be a sense that there will be some permanent change? Absolutely absolutely and you know in the right now we're in what I call the adrenaline rushes coca nineteen, right. So we're dealing with competing forces of trying to figure out what's going on with schools and folks who need to maybe take care of their their parents. Right a huge concern as I need to go his mom groceries on the weekend and I don't want to be exposed and put her at risk the we have a lot of that going on and this report really looked at different scenarios where we do find ourselves in a post Kobe world defined as a world where we having medical solutions such that we can really subside in terms of the level of fear of the virus. But to your point, we absolutely believe there will be long-term changes and a majority of those are in the evolution of what we call agile working. Part time at home part time in third places and part time in the office. We we think a minority of the folks who work from home will ultimately be permanently there most people want to be in the office most people want to be in the office a few days a week. So it's really that evolution that we expect to be long lasting in nature, and which we tried to quantify in this report here are to statistics that really jumped out at me US office vacancy is. Expected to rise steadily and peak at seventeen, point, six percent, but get this by mid twenty, twenty two. So not even next year. But presumably, well after we already have a vaccine and you also found that asking rents are expected to decline by nine point three percent peak to trough. I, that doesn't seem like that big of a decline if we're looking at nearly a fifth of office space going away until mid two, thousand, twenty two are these in the major urban centers and and so on. I think from the vacancy rate perspective, it's important to note that we were really at a low point for the cycle at just under thirteen percent. So the increases really relative to that which was A. With prior. Peak stuff expansions in terms of the Perico level, of Bacon. But we are expecting this shift upwards by about four, hundred, fifty or sixty basis points, and that's really that is the increase that is putting a downward pressure on railway so that that effect is something that we expect to play differently across cities. One of the things we do fine is that in this is consistent with history as well a suburban market, the rents there. Be Less elastic. They tend to move less during down cycles and are the central city rest. Do tend to buy a little bit more in our findings were interested with that as well. Rebecca. Thank you. Presumably, there'll be more studies like this and we will continue to keep in touch with you and hear more Rebecca. Rocky is global head of forecasting for Cushman and Wakefield joining us today. As we approach the elections coming discussion on Wall Street on what a possible Joe Biden presidency would mean for economic policy for financial markets to get some answers to those questions, we welcome Edmund Phelps Edmund as Nobel laureate and director of the center on Capitalism and Society at Columbia University professor. Phelps. Thanks so much for joining us. What are you? What are your thoughts here? of former Vice President Joe Biden win the election. Certainly will. I think the economy really depends on it. I I I've just been Very disturbed over over these past years to see trump's. Attempts to to guide to guide the economy intervene right and left. This creates enormous uncertainty that's very bad for investment and it's very bad for. Innovation. And innovation is already been suffering quite a few decades but with the. Innovators won't get a chance to breathe. So I think I think it's very important that. Vote out the trump administration. And Give a new group that chance. So that I I saw your article in the Guardian, the editorial in The Guardian, and then later on as sort of a April most of you like in Project Syndicate and you basically start off by excoriating president trump's policy. Quote Unquote Economic Policy because as you say, he practices Mussolini's doctrine of corporatism. The government has puppetmaster pulling the strings of puppet companies. You also go on to talk about as populist rhetoric not translating into better pay for less advantage workers or victims of discrimination, and you have a whole sort of take down of president trump's economic plans or actions. But why aren't we hearing more from Biden about what he would do? So yes, we know that he's offering pell grants to everybody and so on but we're not getting. A really developed economic platform as far as I can see. Well I think. That Biden has shown an interest in Doing. Something about the wages bottom in this country, which has been a Continued to be a terrible problem. For decades I think I. Think he has shown interest in addressing. Core rewards. To To the least advantaged in the country and I think maybe the question is pointed to what do we hear from Biden about investment innovation. Well I. Think he's I think he's shown some. Definitely shown some. Awareness of the need for of picking up innovation. And of course, in the long term, you can't have sustained high investment if you don't have underlying innovation billing on so. I I think it's fair to say that the. By grownup in his is seventy something years he's grown up in the economy and he understands what's going on. The understands the weakness of the economy you understand slow growth. And you know there have been one hundred things that he's had to talk about. They just not talked enough about investment innovation, but he has done some focusing on economic justice was the other grand scheme of mine. Yes and I understand that and I appreciate that you say that he displays an awareness but the models been politician, his entire life, and surely he has ideas for what he would do to redirect funds and the economy and not just on the corporate innovation side. But also as you say to translate you know currents. Politics in the situation into better pay for less advantage workers, victims as discrimination, erase economic justice injustices, and so on. He's not coming out with any of that is he too scared that that will alienate some of the demographics that he might need. I'm not a politician I'm not even a political scientist. I really wouldn't venture. Venture a guess on that. All. Right. So so Edmund give thoughts quickly here on trade that's been a big issue for president trump how do you see a biden presidency as it relates to economic trade? I. Think that the trump is towards straight has been another contributor to of poor economic performance. Being able to trade with the rest of the world is awfully helpful. In a developing new products in finding markets were new investment. It's hard to imagine high prosperity. In the American economy without without very considerable amounts of international trade foreign trade. And, of course, another thing is that trump has gotten in the way of bringing in highly qualified people to engage in innovation. In the American economy Silicon Valley is being star of of the of of much of the talent that. It needs. I saw the other day that about trade and immigration I saw the. Three thousand companies are now suing the white. House over the tariffs. That have been instituted by the trump administration so that just that just is an indication of Oppressive and how retarding trump's influences in on the economy. Well, professor. Thank you for that. We definitely hope to hear more from Joe Biden of course the first debate is next Tuesday and I imagine that there will be portion on economic plans and for anybody who's interested in this the economic case for Biden by Professor Edmund S, Phelps Nobel laureate, and of course, from Columbia University as well. A legend in our lifetimes really is both on project syndicate and in The Guardian and Paul I think it's important. I think we need some details where fewer than four days away from selection and both candidates need to step it up. With actual concrete proposals. HP's vision is to create technology that makes life better for everyone everywhere last fiscal year HP's sustainable impact strategy helped influence more than one point six billion dollars in new sales creating positive lasting change per planet people and community for the planet HP is transforming its business for a circular and low-carbon future for people HP championing dignity respect and empowerment for all people with whom it works, and for community HP is unlocking educational and economic opportunity to the power of technology with the goal of enabling better learning outcomes for one hundred, million people by twenty twenty, five learn more at HP dot com slash sustainable impact. Finding we are so fortunate to have on a regular basis the good folks, the Johns Hopkins University come on and and help us get a little bit smarter about this virus and potential therapies. Potential vaccines today rejoined by Lawrence our at the assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns University. Lauren thanks so much for joining us here. The new story I guess I heard today is something called interferon us a possible nutrient. Educate us on kind of what you think this might mean. Yeah the two studies that came out recently on interferon were really exciting to see and I think What? I. What I've seen briefly is that this May. The scientists who did the studies feel that this May? Account for nearly fifteen fourteen or fifteen percent of the severe Kovic cases. what they're seeing is that this sort of lack of interferon in the body is is helping to facilitate severe disease. So people are getting sicker the good thing about it is that we have used interferons especially, thank interference for a long time for other diseases and so if the target that risk patients and use some of this research to identify them early we able to treat them quickly with therapies that we already have in our toolkit for other diseases. And it's particularly amazing if it ends up being all true in the research proves itself out because it's the type of thing that hits young people and also it means that it might save you from going on respirator, which we all know. Then you know is a whole other stage in this illness. When might we know something about the effectiveness of of an interferon? Rehabilitation came if you like. Yeah. So the the the study that came out are already telling us that Inter treatment may be an effective option the new arm of the NIH adaptive trial act is also an interferon study and I would imagine that there's lots of interfere on studies across the country and probably across the globe there's Just too doing interference specific studies. Especially when you're thinking these studies may target or only enroll people with severe disease We are seeing more outpatients with Calvin and fewer severe disease at least where I am and so focusing on enrolling those patients into clinical trials quickly and efficiently to hopefully save lives. But also to really better understand the mechanism is critical right now. So Lauren, it appears the data remains stubbornly high in terms of new cases. Y- perhaps, the death. Rate is declining is that kind of your understanding? Is some of the data were starting to see more recently. Yeah I think one of the things we're seeing is that we're we are getting patients out of the hospital quicker, which is Great and that may be. I think we're going to need a lot of long term studies to understand why that's happening but a big piece of it maybe that we're getting better at managing these patients because we're learning more about the courses illness in the course of these. So we're keeping people from entering into that severe disease state you know a ventilator. Off Of those high flow oxygen needs because we're managing their earlier or or identifying them earlier, and we're managing them better in the hospital and getting the not quicker. So Lauren we were talking yesterday about people in the UK proactively getting injected or infected with grown of to try and help studies these people. Are. They risking long term consequences. I I think they absolutely are the challenge study model that talking about that we're seeing in the UK is a model that we've used in other diseases to better understand how vaccines work so that it's a controlled environment and we understand the exposure, we understand the course of the disease and exactly where in the disease process the patient or the participants, the vaccine and and what their exposure level is after getting the vaccine. The hard part in this situation is that we don't have a really good therapeutic tool kit. So if something goes wrong with these patients we don't have a great. Series of great options to treat them so that that is a higher risk than than you would want in a challenge steady. And There's a lot of ongoing community transmission in many places across the globe. So. There are opportunities to do vaccine trials the right way in a well controlled environment understanding community transmission without putting people deliberately at risk and exposing to co to the corona virus. So it's a risk that we're taking unnecessarily. So Lauren again. I'm just GONNA, ask us to try to triangulate around timing is still fair to suspect that we will that series of vaccines will be available sometime early next year maybe late this year, but it'll take time after that to kind of figure out what's most effective is that still the way to think about it Yeah I think that early next year is probably on target for a few of these vaccines We're seeing the phase three trials happen right now we're seeing good data come in I think the challenges that scale up piece. So once vaccine can go through the process. We still have the regulatory environment for getting that. From the FDA, for example, there is discussion of view of using the city's authorization in the interim space between or preliminary data from the phase three trials and getting approval from the for the vaccine to roll out more broadly. But we also have to consider scale of manufacturing distribution plans, prioritizing the people who receive it, what are the most? Important populations and so there's a lot of things that have to happen between now and massive roll out of the vaccine trial and I think mid to late and mid to the end of next year is probably reasonable for large scale. Allow Lawrence thank you as always up three love getting your updates straight from you know the epicenter of where all. The research is happening Lawrence. Our is a system feser of emergency medicine at Johns, Hopkins, School of of Medicine, and of course, the Bloomberg School of Public Health supported by Michael on Bloomberg founder of Bloomberg LP Bloomberg philanthropies. This podcast is brought to you by td Ameritrade in these unprecedented times having access to the right information can help you make better informed. Investing decisions for today and tomorrow TD AMERITRADE is committed to providing a range of relevant educational content like timely articles, informative webcasts, and even access to daily live market news. So you can stay on the path to becoming a smarter investor learn more about their breadth of resources at td Ameritrade, dot com slash market hub td Ameritrade, where smart investors get smarter. Markets is brought to you by with them forward, thinking advisory and accounting firm helping clients to be in a position of strength in the new reality of business learn about their innovative solutions by visiting with them dot com. So it's time to tell commodities some are seeing good news. Some are not seeing so much good news. Let's bring in. Mike mcglone. All about the precious metals then also precious metals and every other commodity out there. He's commodity strategist Bloomberg, Intelligence Mike. We haven't talked too much about China recently mainly because apart from Tiktok and Oracle and so on. There haven't been many trade developments but at the same time underlying commodities are moving still because of this, for example, China went on a buying spree and so that seems to have revived export profits for some top crop traitors. So that's good news right? Are we seeing prices reflect that? Oh, certainly in soybeans. Soybeans at ten dollars a Bushel they're up about five percent in the year they got about ten thirty. That's been a good sign. It's almost completely on exports because cropped this, you're not really soybeans but corn. So that's a big deal and also the market's anticipating potential peak in the dollar and the US now exports about fifty percent of its soybeans. So the value, the dollar, the value, the Brazilian, real big thing. Just the fact that the China's been back in has been in in crops really better and take them. Taking them off the bottom, but for new highs to really go up to for more strength. Eggs need a peak our. All. Right. So but also look at the dollar index here at ninety four. That's not peaked dollars. No He and it's really from from the standpoint and we watched a trade-weighted broadened our because the dollar index is sixty percent array almost two-thirds euro traded broad is mostly China to twenty percents sign it doesn't take every day, but gives you good indication. The key thing is what's been really driving strong the last ten years ago. So is outperformance the US stock market so we're seen lately is a bit of a divergence there been flows into commodities commodities outperforming during this last little soon, their correction, the stock market's key is Greg's eggs aren't really going to really matter to the stock market so. Much button copper that's been a key thing I've been watching copper's the highest correlation to the stock market ever and a fifty two week twelve month basis, and it's really not in it's still hanging around three dollars a pound versus ten percent correction in Nasdaq. That's a good sign that maybe we're seeing some divergence, I think people are looking more for the physical assets, notches, gold, silver platinum played him not just the precious but more base metals like copper. Well, I was GONNA say with the exception of gold which seems to really have just gone and got its code and left the room right Mike. In the short term goals still up twenty five percent in the year NECESSA P. Five, hundred unchanged bitcoins, fifty percent of the year. So and my bias at the beginning, there was a quasi currencies gold in bitcoin should continue to outperform I don't see why should change that they go just got a little bit extended. Fifty, it was well above its fifty two week in the highest in a long time it's it's it's consolidated in a bull market the way seed right now, it's going to back up into good sport around eighteen hundred dollars an ounce but if you look at the foundation, for gold. Rise in US debt to GDP an increase in qe on a global scale it's unprecedented goal has a very fan foundation for the next five ten years and just help us revisit the bull case for Bitcoin. We can talk bitcoin Vanni doesn't have a no bitcoin policy. Tom. keene. So give us that bull case for Bitcoin, again, Mike bottom line very limited supply actually less may potentially less supply gold higher prices will not bring on more supply and then it's about the man. So all my indications demand are higher and Bitcoin is been becoming adopted in the space. There's more and more people getting in there. The man indications are quite positive futures, open interest exchange traded products coming on for and on an addresses used and things like that. So bitcoins is getting the cool thing about Bitcoin has had a significant correction it's had a period disdain, and so that's usually. A good foundation for a higher prices and the correlation between Bitcoin. Gold. Is the highest ever depending on how you measure it so I see Bitcoin is is becoming a digital version of gold. It's just more of a kind of a baby and it's catching up taking baby steps. Now at the moment, well I on that note would like to compare cerium with Bitcoin and if you look at returns over the last year is theory was up one hundred and three percent bitcoin up twenty five percent versus the US dollar does that just suggest that bitcoin is a little more mature as a cryptocurrency. It is and there's a big difference. It's theory I'm kind of part of the whole other crypto space and their seven thousand of them thirty of the number two crypto currency. But if you look the current trends at Theorem, we'll be surpassed next year by the stable coin tether. So thirty got good things that has going for it is defy decentralized finances finance and de decks is decentralized exchanges. Like, the first platform for that, but it has a lot of competition there and got a little bit expensive around five hundred. It's meeting good support around three hundred. I. Think their overall bias is sorts of continues to increase, but bitcoin should continue to outperform the overall broad market in the problem is there's just too much supply in the broad crypto market. So Mike, we can't let you go without talking soft commodities agricultural. Do we have evidence I mean this is market now just completely driven by China on China office. That kind of the only thing we need to focus on the white now is China has really helped bring it out of the doldrums and we we had multiyear lowest lows in corn just a few months ago and soybeans are getting pretty beat. Up Yet we have you know have a pretty good crop but this year, actually the revisions for for the US productions actually come down since August reports. So it's a good sign it's going that way but I don't see us sauce I e corn soybeans really having a good ball mark until the dollar peaks because us now exports more than fifty percent of its soybeans, an oversight, the percent of its wheat. The Dow really matters there. Well, I mean just on us you know how can dollar peak again or even get much stronger when the Chinese have the on trading around Six eighty at this point and looking to go even lower I e stronger. Well, so they you want is actually been strengthened recently because it's six, eighty, seven recently. But the key thing remember from the dollar standpoint is a dollars measured against other other other currencies, which are all paper currencies, and that's where you come to see the physical assets like most notably the medals gold bitcoin world there rising versus all paper currency. So it's that race for cheaper currencies. Everybody's qe and everybody's zero rates, which means physical assets like copper and gold and Bitcoin are gaining that value, and that's what I see going forward, and hopefully that will trickle down to the other commodities. PROBABLY NOT GONNA, trickle up to crew because there's too much supply and we all know the trend decarbonisation. Really quick going to slip in a discussion about cattle. What's going on house heard look. That's one thing I don't watch much of. Apply, sorry about that one just one thing I've never been able to figure out is good high robust correlations to the price of cattle. Right, I see possible to stop Mike mcglone Michael. Thanks so much for joining US commodity strategist for Bloomberg intelligence all over the Commodity Complex Force von it's great. Have Mike On. Cattle. Teachers don't seem to be shifting around much poll of course I. looked it up. It's Elsie one if you want the generic. Every farmer out there would say. No cottle is generic thoroughly individual. Thanks for listening to Bloomberg Markets Podcast, you can subscribe and listen to interviews at apple podcasts or whatever podcast platform you preferred. I'm Bonnie Quinn I'm on twitter at on equipment and I'm Paul Sweeney I'm on twitter at PT. Sweeney. Before the podcast, you can always catch US worldwide at Bloombergradio. HP is leading the way in protecting our planet people and communities for Future. Generations together, we can make a quantifiable difference learn more at HP dot com slash sustainable impact.

Bloomberg US Joe Biden HP interferon Lauren Rebecca Rocky China Mike Wakefield Edmund Phelps Edmund Cushman Bonnie Quinn td Ameritrade president Paul Sweeney Mike mcglone Michael professor
#B143 (biopsy to biostatistics)

The Dictionary

08:42 min | 1 year ago

#B143 (biopsy to biostatistics)

"Hello all of you. Lovely words, thank you for listening to this strange strange podcast. Apologies for yesterday's episode My brain was just not working very well like it normally does not work so well, but it was a specially bad all right, so maybe I'll just try and comment a little bit less. which I know. Some of you will enjoy Let us talk about the word biopsy. B. I. O. P. S. Y. It is a noun from eighteen ninety-five, the removal and examination of tissue cells or fluids from the living body. This is the thing that happens. It is from the prefix by plus the SUFFIX oxy. As in autopsy, but what does the prefix oxy actually mean? Is it the removing of something the opening of something? I don't know autopsy. I think actually means What is it that? I always screw this phrase up. The active seen with one's own is. Is that autopsy or is that something else anyway? That's a really weird documentary. That's the name of really weird documentary about autopsies moving onto bio. Bio Psychology. The first six letters are the same as biopsy. So when I first read it. I wanted to pronounce it with biopsy at the beginning, but that is not at all. What that word is. This word is bio psychology now from nineteen, thousand nine and we have the synonym bio knows psycho biology the flipflopping it. Bio Psychological is an adjective and psychology. Gist is a noun. Now, we have bio reactor noun from nineteen, seventy-four, a device or apparatus, in which living organisms and especially bacteria synthesize useful substances as in as interferon or breakdown, harmful ones as in sewage. Well. That's good right next. We have bio region noun from nineteen seventy eight. A region whose limits are naturally defined by topographic and biological features as mountain ranges and ecosystems, bio regional is an adjective. Next is bio. Noun from Nineteen eighty-one, an environmentalist movement to make political boundaries coincide with biology regions and bio. Regionalist is a noun or an adjective. Next is bio remediation. Noun from Nineteen eighty-six, who knew that there were all these words that start with bio? The treatment of pollutants or waste as in oil, spill, contaminated groundwater or an industrial process by the use of micro organisms as bacteria that break down the undesirable substances. So, let's read that again. Without the parts in parentheses, the treatment of pollutants or waste by the use of micro organisms that break down the undesirable substances. Next is bio rhythm noun from nineteen, sixty and innately determined rhythmic biological process or function as sleep behavior, also the internal mechanism that determined such a process or function. By rhythmic is an adjective. They tell us where they wanted to see what the actual or the The normal bio rhythm of persons daily cycle is and I think they figured out. It's either a little bit more or a little bit less than a normal twenty four hour day. Obviously, everybody's going to be a little bit different. Some people are night, owls night owls. Some people are early birds. Some people are some other phrase that has to do with the foul of some kind, a plucky duck. No! Next word is BIOS. BE I. O. S. ALL CAPS ABBREVIATION for basic input output system. And there is a slash between input and output. Next is Biosafety Noun from nine hundred seventy seven safety with respect to the effects of biological research on humans and the environment will. Yes, we want to be safe at all times. No matter what the circumstances are what we're talking about. Next is bioscience noun from nineteen forty one. I was actually just thinking well isn't bioscience biology and then it has the number one definition for the word biology, also the synonym life science. Bio scientific is an adjective and bio. Scientist is a noun, but now we just say biologist. Next is biosecurity noun from one thousand, nine hundred five security from exposure to harmful biological agents also measures taken to ensure this security. Next we have biosensor. Oh it's very close to bio. Spencer, who? What's a Bio Spencer? That's I. Guess I'm Bio Spencer. biosensor is a noun from nineteen sixty to a device that monitors and transmits information about a life process, especially a device consisting of a biological component as an enzyme or bacterium that reacts with a target substance and a signal, generating electrochemical component that detects the resulting products or byproducts. That was a mouthful. Next we have a SUFFIX BAIO SIS be. I O S I s could also be bio sees. That's the plural be IOS es this. Doesn't give a year. It's just means mode of life. The example is para BIOS. This is from the Greek Bios, which is from the word by Yoon, which means to live from the word, bios which means life, and there's more at the word. Quick quick is such a versatile word I had no idea next we have bio social adjective from eighteen, ninety seven of relating to concerned with the interaction of the biological aspects and social relationships of living organisms as in bio social science. Bio Socially is an adverb. Next we have bio solid I can only imagine what this is going to say, so let's read it now. From nine hundred, ninety solid organic matter recovered from a sewage treatment process, and used especially as fertilizer used usually in plural bio solids. Yep, that's pretty much what I. What I thought it might say something related to that. Next we have biosphere noun from eighteen ninety nine. This is a name of a movie, too. Isn't it number one? The part of the world in which life can exist number two living organisms together with their environment? biospheric is an adjective. There's part of me. That wouldn't totally mind living in a biosphere at least at least for a time. I'd have to learn about gardening and stuff like that, but it might be Kinda Nice. Next we have biostatistics, that is our last word, B. I.. O. S. T. A. T. I S. T.. ICS DUP DU. Do back to gap noun from nine hundred and forty-nine statistics applied to the analysis of biological data. Bio Statistical is an adjective and biostatistics BIOS. Step this decision. Oh, Jeez bio statistician is a noun and the worst word to say. What are we going to pick? Well let us just pick bio rhythm as the word of the episode. Because, it's kind of an interesting idea I guess. That's all I got for you today. Thank you very much for listening. Please rate review. The the written reviews really help. Of course. Five stars helps a lot as well share. Go Go tell some people about this I think I got some new listeners i. don't know if. There's a guy who who runs and owns a brewery and He said he started listening I. Don't know if he's listening to new episodes our old episodes, but maybe some day he'll hear this and so high. Thank you for listening that, is it? This has been Spencer Dispensing Information Goodbye.

Bio Spencer. biosensor Spencer B. I. O. P. S. interferon Regionalist Scientist Yoon O. S. T. A. T. twenty four hour
Episode 23: Modulating the Signal

Novel Targets

36:23 min | 3 years ago

Episode 23: Modulating the Signal

"This is noble targets bring to life science around innovative new drugs, gene. And so for peace. I'm Pedro foot in this episode. We're looking at cited kinds and that potential in cancer university. Interleukin ten is a good example of psychiatry thought was an evil side kind that it did bad things to cells. But as it turns out, it also does good things. And in the context of the tumor. Mike on virement, perhaps does very good things. In terms of activating had a toxic. He lymphocytes cancer cells immune cells are in constant communication with each other one of a ways do this secreting soluble proteins called cited Coyne's B cell, signaling molecules can stimulate all suppress immune response, these kinds. Basically, you're you're poking the immune system into wakefulness, and they can recognize the tumor and they're getting excited and getting engaged. And that is what we can see here with these kinds for cancer immunotherapy to work, we may need to tip the bones with cited kinds to achieve desired effect, a simple way to think about this. If you have a. There you can boost the base a raise for trouble to create a balance of sound and change what you hear much letting the psyche. They may be a key to an anti-cancer response in some patients did turns out there is a whole telephone to retro site of kinds. I'll to I'll three four actually there are over thirty Interleukins and then interferon gamma and society kind as kind all those are considered cytokines invisible towed with focusing on interleukin two and transforming growth factor. Beata? We know that interleukin two very important side of kind for t cell function in proliferation, and those are two things you might want for t- sauce to do within the micro environment. Research is also looking at into the tooth ways to deliver two kinds to whether needed called next generation cartesian, call them armored cars, we defined an armored car is any cartesian. That is a dish inally modified with another biolog-. Active compound, and the first iteration of armored car T cells were Carty cells that secreted the profile Matori side, kind twelve. The bottom line is is that we may find that these cartels at our armored, especially for solid tumors that make I'll twelve fifteen eighteen whatever the case might be might be much more potent than than just the unarmored cartesian. This sponsored budget Intech with grateful for that support as a reminder sponsors have no control of the topics. We cover who interview all the questions we asked if we do mention the sponsor product, we might own decision to do. So. Let's start closer look what site kinds of and how they work. My name is Mario snow'll. I'm medical oncologist at Yale. I treat primarily Villanova in kidney cancer patients. And I'm interested in immune therapies, set of kinds are basically hormones that are secreted by cells that bind to receptors on the surface of cells, and that hormone receptor interaction affects the function of those cells he can guide the way though, so's differentiate and ultimately what they do. And remember side kinds can affect other cells in the micro environment. They can affect in case they might be able to affect modest to macrophages. Right. So you can imagine that some side kinds might actually reprogram other cells other than T cells and reprogramming of those other shows might bring T cells in how do we choose which kind to give to which patient? Well, we don't know that side of kinds of very complex molecules because they bind to different receptors. And sometimes they share chains of the. Same receptor? So sometimes they have redundant functions. Sometimes they have non overlapping functions. And sometimes what they do to sell is context. Dependent depends on what else set cell is seeing at that time. So interleukin ten is a good example of the kind that everybody thought was an evil side kind that it did bad things to cells. But as it turns out, it also does good things. And in the context of the tumor, micro environment. Perhaps does very good things. In terms of activating cytotoxic, t lymphocytes, I'm not the world's expert on sided kinds, you couldn't possibly be because there's so many of them, and they're they're so complex, but what's very clear from all the years that I've worked with these agents is that they can have these essentially contradictory functions. Again, I'll ten is a good example of something that in this context would be good. Although all the data that we've generated of two time with suggested sell secreting interleukin ten that is an immunosuppressive action. So your question is how do we pick the right side kind for the? Right patient. And I don't think we know. But there are some clues we know that interleukin two is very important side of kind for t cell function in proliferation. And those are two things you might want for t- SaaS to do within the micro environment, particularly the cyto-toxicity function of of t cells, and we also know that interleukin two when cells become exhausted. That's one of the things that they can't make anymore. So it seems to make sense to provide more to to T-cells in the micro environment because it's doing the right things. Now, I'll to also is important side of kind for the function and expansion of t regulatory cells. So you're doing something possibly bad at the same time that you're doing something good. But as it turns out, depending on how you give it like, for example, the neck two and four product you expand regulatory cells in the periphery like outside the tumor, but in the tumor, in fact, you get less t regulatory cells and their people working on trying to explain the mechanism of that. There are other side kinds which would seem to be really relevant in the two. For micro environment. So into Lukin twelve is important side of kind and the tumor micro environment. Have recently been looking at interleukin eighteen it's an interferon gamma inducing side kind. It turns out that there's a binding protein for eighteen which is induced when interferon gamma is made. So it acts almost like a negative regulatory checkpoint just as up regulation of pedia one. And when this team binding proteins made it binds interleukin eighteen and so people have made cars that actually make Islay teen, and they look very good pre clinically. So the short answer your question is we don't know. Chuma microwave Arment like a fish pond is very each system of so many different cells impact, the Stromer is just giving us lighted kind enough to modulate the cells that are in that pond. The answer is for some tumors. Yes. So look clinically when we give high dose interleukin two patients with melanoma. We get curator five to ten percent that's without giving anti PD one anti C type for anything else. So just interleukin two alone is enough to convert the tumor micro environment. Subset of patients into responds. It's also true in kidney cancer. We actually don't know. What would happen in other tumors because we never really explored it very much in other tumors because of its talk city now interleukin two when it acts on cells induces Otherside kinds. Right. So it's not just the into two. It's what interleukin two does it self. And then all the other things that it induces that ultimately causes tumor regression, but the answer your question, which is can sing. Aside kind alone have anti tumor activity. We've had proof of concept of that for thirty years maybe longer than thirty years now would other side kinds be effective in that setting. The answer is probably yes. I mean, it's hard to match a side of kind to tumor because we don't really understand the biology that will, but you could imagine for example, interleukin twelve as a single agent had activity in some patients. Almost every Saudi kind that you look at in a small number of patients had anti-tumor activity. I'll Twenty-one had activity. We've seen the peg. I'll ten has activity and all of those have a little bit of single agent activity. So for some patients, whatever you're doing with outside kind is enough to tip that tumor to hit that threshold for anti tumor activity, but that's the scribe at at a super high level. I mean, it's much more detailed and complex that not sure. Even I understand how to how to do that. It may come as a surprise to some people, but the potential of cited kinds of constant union for note recent news, in fact, interleukin two was discovered. Him Roach robot Gallo back in nineteen seventy six. I was approved the treatment for kidney cancer, the twenty five years ago of a time of approval in nineteen Ninety-two. The FDA Commissioner David Kessler said fish treatment represents one of the first successful attempts to fight cancer, bug minting, but function of bodies immune system in nineteen ninety eight the FDA also approved system. I o to therapy for metastatic melanoma, however, it wasn't widely used because it came with the price of high cities O'neil subset of patients to tolerate it had to be given in a hospital setting, which is why now so much excitement about NATO to one full a novel. I'll tooth p. Don't Adia melanoma specialist. The MD Anderson concentric Houston nectar to four comes as a forward. Step in the second, therapists, novel strategy that garish to advantage is not show one. It's a safe site to count to be giving us an out Bishen, do it gathers advantages of being more efficient than the high does too because it does not lead to the recruitment of deregulatory cells inside the tumor the end results of nectar to and for treatment show in the tumor micro virement high rate of CD aids with low T Rex hi see the aid to t ratio, which is very important prognostic marker and also with higher responses of checkpoint inhibitor and that across many tumors. That's been shown to be very good prognostic marker the site to cons are the most powerful drugs. Specially I'll to to bring T cells to the tumor micro environment and having an extra two and four. Which is an improved form that brings specifically effector cells without Tila towards self and then combining it with a powerful drug such as anti PD one in our Nevada mount and preclinical model that was a very powerful combination. And the preliminary data is very promising. And that's good news for the patients. Don't Jonathan's less is chief scientific officer at night offer a few ticks and takes us to refer ver-. And there were number of additional reasons why the combination of Nevada map plus nectar to fourteen really makes a lot of sets. So besides seeing the infiltrating cells as I described we also saw that the cells up regulated expression of cell surface, PD one. So this is the target of Nevada amount. So it's really important additional feature of nectar to fourteen because it actually increases the cell's susceptibility to respond to the PD one PD L one signaling access thereby when you combine. With of he should expect to say, even greater synergy from this particular combination. It's one of the few places where the two mechanisms really make very deep scientific sense to combine together. And one of the things that we're seeing with the clinical data is that even patients that are PD L one negative whether they have lung cancer Arenal cancer or melanoma, they have a high frequency of response to the combination of nectar to fourteen in volume out, and we associate that with certain tumors that are even PD L one negative baseline that can still sustain an immune infiltrate and particularly type two interferon gamma signaling, and this is very much a new new finding because we know that the response rates imperial negative patients really are nowhere near as high as they are imperial one positive patients. And this is true. Whether you look at monotherapy checkpoints are even combinations. But with nectar to fourteen or seeing high. Higher response rates even in PD L one negative patients. And so this is very much one of the most exciting, and we think transformational parts of this combination therapy. The idea here is we're capturing indirect signal right? So pedia one is not a good thing to have up regulated in Timmers. But it is what it represents the represents the fact that there's likely an activated immune response their that t cells and other immune cells are making gamma interferon that's causing this reactive up regulation of pedia one. So this is a footprint of an activated immune response, and what you seeing with this nectar agent is you're seeing that you can turn these colder tumors into hot Timmers. I'm James gully. I'm chief of the genital urinary malignancies branch indirect of the medical oncology service at the National Cancer Institute. So these people potentially who don't have a pre existing response why we don't see any pedia wanna stop with. But I'll to team multi cells, which is Craig. Thomas loop of mobile interferon. Gamma pedia one. Yes, I think these kinds basically or you're poking the immune system into wakefulness, and they can recognize the tumor and they're getting excited and getting engaged, and that is what we can see here with these kinds. Don't to one full is different from high into into its related molecule designed to signal through CD one twenty two the I'll two receptor Beata sub-unit celestial therapies, very well tolerated. So patient stay on they're not discontinuing adverse events like they are with a lot of other. And then they are seeing the greatest benefit with time. Right. Because it's basically every three weeks that were ministering the drug. They're getting a new flurry of immune cells every three weeks kind of like clockwork, and it really blogs escape mechanisms of the tumors trying to use it's constantly keeping inactive immune system. Heaping pressure on that tumor consis. Distantly and the fact that there's a great tolerability patients to better better better over time. It's really important take away from the actively of the Dublin. I think of a wave of new T-cells every three weeks the detailer endings with always of T-cells eventually, overcoming Schumer immune defences, it's early days nectar doing with re-engineered. I'll to is a proof of concept that has created a resurgence of interest in sight kinds captured my attention was idea of converting patients who were pedia one negative to PD one positive. So what's happening there? So I think this is a very important point a lot of people have been focusing on T cell poor versus tesol inflamed without really understanding that there's a third phenotype of this T cell exclusion that is equally important probably very common and not likely to respond to immune checkpoint in addition alone. When there's beta there. Fronts, filming growth that to Beata or TGIF. As commonly known this another cited con attracting lot of therapeutic interest live here. I spoke with professor Thome polls until two sons eve Mary Tessin about that paper nature. I was lucky to be involved in a piece of work which was based out to San Francisco, which Genentech lead, and I was lucky to some great scientists there and the. Immune phoenixville role than just pedia when expression what I mean, by FINA. Tell like these we talk about inflamed humor's, and we talk about Baranov desert's where there's no CD infiltration. But actually, a huge group of patients have what we describes excluded chambers where the activated immune cells say eight cells of funny a hall to infiltrate into the tumor, and those excluded humor's seem to be a problem that don't seem to respond well to immune therapy. And we showed that TGIF Beata was associated with resistance to Tesla's a map a co of bladder cancer samples, and then we explored that further and showed it to be relevant in those excluded. Choose and you could reverse that process by any Bishop TJ feta imperial together. I'm sends you thousand senior scientists in the college. A market department Genentech. We had a face to child Abby had samples from about three hundred patients of tumor tissues. And so we did our nasc- DNA sequencing and also understanding by histopathology, the different kinds of tumor immune micro environments from immune desserts to highly tesol inflamed to miss rather T-cells within the team of micro environment. And then but fifty percent of the bladder Kansas. You have this excluded phenotype t cells that kinda struck in the Stromer surrounding the tuber. And for some reason they cannot get into the Tuma to kill the tumors. So then be asked that question in. What is unique about these excluded tumors y on T cells kind of infiltrating into the steamers and be found that a particular gene signature that was interest in the side of kind cottage it better. I if all it was high in these excluded tumors. But it was. Also higher in patients who did not respond to the anti PD L von therapy. So if teach you features high those who don't respond always able to tug it TGIF e to and get rid of that immune suppression a lot of bio Maka analysis festival. Just see associations of these genes signatures that responders and unresponded, but it's never quite clear. Whether these signatures all these biology's or biological features associated gene signatures, the actual drivers the causal effect of this. Right. So it was important for us to then ask the question. Now, if you inhibit these signatures that are associated with poor sponsors. Would you see better response now, and this what be call every translation previously people start bench book it goes into this forward? Translation of go into humans. But then I think it's important now that we. Have these therapies in the clinic than to ask the question? Why do some people do not respond and then find these biological features associated lack of responses, and then the ask the question came back into research can be inhibited these path base in preclinical models. And exactly what we did. So here we took most humor's that had excluded phenotype. Yeah. The T cells stuck in the NFL Stromer, and then we gave them either an antibody to anti PD Oman all at TJ better to neutralize the teacher signature or we did a combination of anti PD L one. And chip at a and b the not surprise. We were hoping this is what we would find that the combination of teacher and pedia one kind of synergistic that you got complete responders in this mice suggesting that you can combine these two and the teacher better. Then have a positive influence in recruiting T-cells into the microbiome us. Theodosius shunts noted in a nineteen sixty four essay nothing in biology makes sense except him Elisheva Lucien. I dunno anthropomorphic. Sizing these tumors, but from evolution perspective. You can also think that this tumors have also evolved to suppress immune responses, and maybe one of the functions that does is to make these immunosuppressive teacher better that also does other things, including know, putting this wall around it of college and fibers it's like a Trojan wall, right? And so now the T-cells cannot come in. So they work he's preclinical translational, but it sort of neat because. The first chapter immunology drugstore. We talked law about building up simply by adding immune checkpoint or adding immune activators form baby Futi, but she by looking at the bulletin in detail and trying to work out a mechanisms of resistance, it's possible may get to the owns as we need quicker role than just piloting the drugs until each other which I think we've done a little bit. I'm not I'm guilty of that too. I've tested many nations in the enthusiasm of this first period with meteorology drugs in the hope that by testing twenty different combinations. One like full pedia one, which is similar type results in cancer outside of metronome row. Kidney cancer. Sure we've seen that yet. And it may be the translational on college projects will give us clues to the next generation of combinations. One of which oversees TJ Beata so how do? We talk it. Teach. You be to a recent Astro annual meeting galley presented data for new compound in development, cooled, seventy eight twenty four. So this is a very fast in any compound. It is a by functional fusion protein that is an antibody against pedia one that on the FCC portion that tale of the antibody as to TGIF beta receptor molecules serving as TGIF beta trap. So basically you bind to block the signaling through PD L one, and you also can see quest or vacuum up. If you will all the TGIF beta, we did a I in human doses. Collation study at the National Cancer Institute. And we saw that it was safe to give in doses between point three and thirty milligrams per kilogram, and the toxic profile is very similar to what you'd see with PD one or PD L one. In addition would one exception. And that is the addition of character Achim foam, this is a low grade tumor of the skin that typically does not need to be. Treated. So what we saw was also some preliminary evidence of activity, and what we present Lasko was the response rates in patients with HP positive cancers. So what you see is if you look at the time or TC G databases, you can see frequent dysregulation of TGIF beta signaling in these HP positive cancers in HP, positive cancers PD one in addition has been associated with response rates between sixteen and twenty one percent what we saw in our cohort. Patients was a response rate of thirty five percent. We had to complete responders and four partial responders out of a total of seventeen patients. Now, if we looked at those twelve patients were known to be HP positive. We saw forty two percent response rate. Interestingly all of these responses were deep and ongoing at time of analysis ongoing as late as two years, so. So we have a follow up study with HP positive patients or HP associated malignancies there's ongoing at the National Cancer Institute, we hope to enroll about seventy patients in this study to look for more evidence of efficacy. Several companies have small molecules antibodies but target TGIF Beata, but one novel approach in development uses a therapy. I am doing see. I'm the deputy director for Rosa pack, Comprehensive Cancer Center and also the executive director for the center for him. You know therapy atrocities pack, teach beta is a major side of combine that has two faces that are good aspects of TGIF better. But it also has an ugly side, Jeff reduces proliferating. It also affects the differentiation of CD fourteen cells promotes differentiation to regulatory t cells that inhibit CD t cell proliferation and function to Jeff bid also has effect on other populations of immune cells such as cells and the list goes on while we have done on. In fact, one of my colleagues at Rosa park. Dr Richard Koya elegantly. Him up with a concept whereby kind we generate T cells for Dopp Tiv immunotherapy whereby we render those t cells resistant to the impact of TGIF better. So he elegantly generated Tissa construct whereby those cells are targeting very important to rejection onto gene NYU, so one NYSE one is very unique because it is not expressed by normal tissue, but expressed in several two more times, the only normal tissue where you find NYSE Awan is the dull male testes on. So what did was still use a unique receptor and engineer the or to also have a decoy receptor for TGIF better. So that this decree of prevent to Jeff beta signaling. On this resistant to the impact of TGIF para. So this is a very unique strategy. So would you potentially be selecting patients with the high TGIF Beata as a biomarker to talk it who would be most likely to optimally respond. Actually, you really do need to select patients with high tea. Jeff beta because Jeff bitter also ecause attactive response when the two mice on the immune attack. We know this house, so maybe his than Tun's onto Jeff better. So even if you have low levels of TGIF, Jeff beta baseline, this content Jeff better, and so it's important to deploy T cells that are going to be resistant to the impact of Tf better. So that's how we're thinking about it on a FOX throws park. We already have a clinical trial. We completed all of the neighboring studies on we recently on the clinical trial ten. In this for the first time in humans this approach whereby we're targeting NYU, so one we're looking at solid two months in general again this proof of concept solid tumors, including ovarian long melanomas sarcomas GI Toomas on sue on. Cytokines are likely to be important in some subset of patients. I don't see how we can avoid using them. I think they are important molecules. I just can't imagine that we can manipulate the immune system. Perfectly in each patient. Just using either antibodies of buying co stimulatory or sceptres antibodies block Cohen hepatoma receptors that's understanding that sometimes just anti PD one alone. Can cure patients and sometimes anti PD one placebo for is enough. Sometimes this anti today for is enough. And they're all these other molecules that are coming along. But in some subset of patients. We may need to use two kind in order to get off to mow effects. I just don't know which ones, and I don't know which side of kinds. It's hard. Could cite kinds play a role in overcoming some of the challenges. Carty cell Therapy's have experienced in tackling Sula Shula's, I'm rainier branches. I am a unconscious to does research and sees leukemia. Patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center, I started working in the field of cartesian therapies of twenty years ago now, and we were really one of the first groups working shell satellites lab to explore the possibility of genetically engineering t cells to recognize tumor targets, and to treat patients that way, I had a technician I started out my own lab, your NetCom and the online of alternately going into industry, but he called one day a year after he left, and he goes, I got the name for you called the next generation cartesian call armored cars, so that was a pretty robust name. And so we started working in the lab what we call armored car T cells. We defined an armored car is any Carter. Okay. So that is a digitally modified with another biologically active compound and the first iteration of armored car T cells were Carty. So that secreted the pro-islamic, Tori side kind twelve. Now, what that requires that you need to conceptually look at the cartesian differently. When I started twenty years ago, it was a killing machine. And it was there to kill anything that had senile teen. And that was okay because back then we didn't know much of the two migrant virement, and we didn't worry too much about antigen, heterogeneity, etc. But over the years, we started realizing that we had limitations and so. I had a student James Lee in the lab who was working on regulatory t cells, and he had hands of gold. He could isolate regulatory expand them. That's no small feat, by the way because I've had many since fail in having that ability. So he would these regulatory teases and he could demonstrate that regulatory t cells when co-cultured with cartesian with inhibit the cartesian house, which is nothing new. That's either regulatory t cells, but then decided to do then decided to add very site kinds to to the co culture. And see if any of these side kinds would be able to overcome this inhibition by regulatory t cell. So he looked at all he looked at every site of kinda head in the lab at the time gratefully, we had I'll toes one of the side of kinds we had. So he looked at two seven twelve fifteen maybe even twenty and one I don't remember. And very distinctly in very discreetly. I'll twelve these T cells were able to start killing tumor again, they were able to start proliferating, despite the fact that the regulatory t cells in the co culture mix I'll twelve was looked at as a cancer therapeutic has just systemic high-dose twelve turn out to be very very toxic. So we went back and looked at our Carty cells. And we realized that are cartesian go to the side of the tumor could potentially deliver therapeutic but localized drug be decided kind. What have you? And so that was kind of the paradigm that we went from. So we modified the cells now to express I'll twelve so it had a car and twelve and we started doing experiments in mice and we could demonstrate that they could overcome regulatory t cells, but we also started to learn and other models because we had shifted now to ovarian tumor modeled, we started to realize that the twelve could monitor. That the tumor remark environment favorably for the T cell in other ways, including altering the suppressive nature of tumor associated macrophages and so on and so we started looking at twelve in the ovarian model we could demonstrate that we could radically disease from my set had Monday two weeks to live so really really advanced disease. And so that's where we started our first solid tumor protocol, which was ovarian cancer with these. I'll toss secreting armored car T cells targeted to sixteen. So we're still in the midst of evaluating it and trial is now open and were enrolling treating patients. I was that was probably the first true armored car that I know of that has ever gone to clinic, but it will astray a principle that we have of how we look to see how this therapy may be able to function in the context of solid tumors. And so by modulating the tumor micro environment. You potentially could make. Make the tea so more effective. We're looking at different side kinds eighteen we recently published also shows remarkable affects and being able to enhance an induce EPA Tope spreading which we were very excited about eighteen is one that should definitely go to the clinic soon. So there's a whole family that we're creating of these armored car T cells when you talk about the personalized medicine of this approach. There's no doubt going to be at some point where biopsy the tumor. You see what the cell content is of the tumor, and that will dictate what cassettes this tumor should do with twelve in PD one blockade that tumors should do much better with CD forty Ligand and I'll eighteen etcetera etcetera. And that's hopefully where we're going. We had these little cassettes that we can plug into our T cells. The prescription will be in the tesol, and what the tesol so can secrete to me that would be the nirvana is that we create this whole army Metareum, and we developed technology the. Tells us exactly what we need to put in the tesol. And that probably will vary by patient, patient, and cancer type and cancer types. So that's where we're going. Maybe that's ten years down the line. But for the short term each one of these armored car approaches needs to be tested in the clinical setting. And that's where we'll go on the translation side. I think of innovation as the ability to see round corners fought delta Brenston colleagues doing a great example of this prescription Petit cells that's delivered by McCaw. We're a few years away from that. But intense time I much for people very different from what it is today. But the still a lot of what we don't on this innovative approach, it's incredibly interesting, and you know, mouse models if you get T cells to make I'll twelve and then the tumor marker environment tumors are very unhappy the same thing as to into Lucan eighteen actually, you know, interleukin eighteen won't work very, well, unless you have a little bit of into Comptoir I fifteen around beforehand, right because you have to induce the second chain of that receptor for eighteen it's a little bit complicated. But the bottom line is is that we may find that these cartels at our armored, especially for solid tumors that make I'll twelve fifteen eighteen whatever the case might be might be much more potent than than just the unarmored cartesian house on the other hand remember that Dr Rosenberg tried and experiment where he armed till cells with interleukin twelve but some of those patients got incredibly sick, huge levels of if I remember. Interferon gamma TANF, but other induce side of kinds huge elevations of their function tests. And so that approach has turned out turned out to be too toxic. You're gonna make a side of kind like that with a t cell. You have to be able to control it and turn it off, and it has to be measured. So it's mostly in the tumor migrant varmint, those are still I think challenging problems if you want to hear more such kinds Kelly his chairing session at the meeting in November. Snow is the incoming president of the society. Please come please, tell all your friends, I think it'll be a very strong scientific meeting. I think it'll be bigger this year than it ever has it's in the Washington convention center. I think it'll be very interesting meeting. This is noble togas Brington life the size around innovative new drugs. Gene himself for piece is production of blue is publishing. Saudi Schiff executive producer, the visit is David Shulman. My thanks to Elspeth Morrison for coaching script. Vice for Cuevas helps me sound good. That'll dusty studios, south Florida. I'm patriot put thanks for listening.

interferon solid tumors cancer kidney cancer TJ Beata Jeff bitter National Cancer Institute Carty Stromer Yale HP Nevada Coyne Genentech Mike Intech Mario snow Villanova FDA
Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

Coronacast

10:35 min | 1 year ago

Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

"This is an ABC podcast. Hello this is corona cast podcast goal about the coronavirus. I'm health report a Teigen Taylor and I'm physician journalist Norman Swan it's Monday. The twenty fifth of May and an anniversary. It's the four month mark since the first case reported in Australia on my Gosh. That's an milestone. I think anyone ever hyped. We'd get to but we are starting to open up a little bit again and it's nice to be out of see friends and family again but hide is asking. While we're still keeping social distancing mommy made up with people when will it be Arcada? Say Hug out all the parents when we visit them. Look I think this is a hard one and I think that we're taking away autonomy from older people here. To be honest I think when the viruses that low levels in the community and families are being responsible. Sofas a cough for cold or a sniffle any doubt or anybody's been tested. You simply don't go to visit your parents at all but if everybody's well I think it's up to the parents if there's a small risk but how long do you go without hugging your kids. You're so what are you doing here? You're T you're making a decision on the part of your elderly parents that you're not going to hug them to protect them but they might be prepared to take the risk. And if so why not so? I think this is a conversation. You need to have in families because it's not so much about spreading the virus. It's more about protecting them against serious illness. And if they're prepared to take the small risk you know why not but families have got to really be responsible about. No coughs colds. Sniffles slighted symptoms maximum testing particularly families. Their parents so that you know that you're you're as much as you can know that you're safe as you can be. It's funny because we've actually got quite a lot of questions along the same lines of just elderly people trying to know how to take care of themselves and rub its asking He sort of pointing at people. Seventy are at greatest risk of covid nineteen. But he saying he's feeling like this little advice that specifically for his generation he wants to know Kenny sees grandchildren. Can they visit his hyman eight with him? Can they drive them to and from school? Can I go back to work? How do these people know how to protect themselves? If they can't be informed. I mean I think it's a fair comment. The answers aren't easy because just like the previous comments have a risk based discussion and decision. So if you're over seventy and quite on well and you've got lots of other problems and you are worried about yourself. Then you wouldn't want to expose yourself very much at all. You probably want to wear a mask when you're outside even though a mask doesn't protect you as well as other people protecting themselves from spreading it but nonetheless you might want to wear a mask lots of hand hygiene and so on so if you're seventeen really healthy the still an increased risk of dying if you get covered nineteen but it depends on whether you're prepared to take that risk as an individual if the rule is in your family just repeating myself is that nobody comes to you with a call a cold. If there's any doubt toll the family gets tested then it should be no reason why you can't come round and have dinner with you at home assuming this basic hygiene driving to and from school where you probably put the kids in the back of the car anyway. So that's that's going to be okay. And you disinfect surfaces. And you have you have hand sanitizer with you and going back to work. That's a risk based decision. And if you maintain a reasonable amount of social distancing when you can if it's felt well-ventilated workplace then the risk is probably going to be relatively low but again if you've got lots of other problems if you're obese if you got diabetes heart disease and so on you've really got to think this through whether or not you're willing to take the risk. The risk is low at the moment because we got very low levels of virus. But it's there and I think now is the time when you can start easing back into things but with a lot of care a lot of care by the people around you. I think people feel like they may maybe getting mixed messages because we have another question from Lennon's that are going for kids to go to school because statistics show. They haven't been getting the virus and transmitting it to adults as much but at the same time we're being told died visit elderly grandparents for fear of spreading the disease. So he's kind of going like which one is it? Well it's it's not one size fits all here so for example residential aged care. The problem there is that as you go into the residential care facility. Your elderly relatives might be perfectly fine and well but there are other people in the facility. Who ARE REALLY SEEK. And therefore you don't want to bring in any disease or infection and that's why residential aged care facilities are being super careful. You just don't want an outbreak like the one they've seen short contact outdoors is pretty safe. Indoor contact that's prolonged. Even with social distancing can be risky. So you've got a balanced these things out but essentially grandparents in the current environment was not allow around with hand hygiene sensible disinfecting surfaces particularly in bathrooms and nobody coming close. Who's got any hint of illness and people are getting tested in the family. I think the we're getting to a point was pretty safe. So do you think that maybe it sounds like the theme? That's coming through. The what you're saying is families should be having conversations and deciding what their rules are going to be for their family. That's right and giving some autonomy to older people. There's no reason why they can't make decisions about their own lives themselves and the fair prepare to take a calculated risk. Why not it's just. He can't take a calculated risk in a residential care facility. Because you're taking a risk for other people who are not your relatives who live in the same facility so residential care. You're going to have to follow the rules of that residential aged care facility but when it's your elderly grandparents living separately from you then you should make the rules together. So Norman. Last week on chronic cost we were talking about measures that people could take to be able to basically go back on public transport. And you recommend will. You were making the comment that if ever wearing a mosque and if everyone had the carpet Saif App then maybe we could have more people in public transport. We had some feedback on that from a couple of people including Helen who says that not everyone has a smartphone especially all the people she can't actually use smut fine. Because of a hand impediment she has and she says that your suggestion is discriminatory and presumptive. Take that one on the Chin Teagan and say meal Copa. That I hadn't really thought that through in terms of order people's access to that I was kind of assuming that smartphone access was broader a shooter through. But they're still might be a way of doing it which is particularly for young people who are spreaders so for example forty percent of infections that are causing spread between twenty and forty now they will have smartphones so the question is. How do you administer something that this understand that but you could have somebody asking? Do you have a smartphone is it. They're encouraging it. You might have a washing period for example so I think even if you got that twenty to forty year old age group with the covid safe APP with high density than that would be a big step forward for what it's worth. We actually got other feedback from people who have oldest smartphones and even those people with smartphones but all the models are finding that the site. That doesn't actually work on them. I think it's quite a lot of work to be done on the covered safe at which I think I did say last week. So it's not. This is not a straightforward exercise and I thank Corona Kastner's for keeping me right on this one. Well let's talk about some research now. We are learning more way. Scientists are learning more every day. About how the virus is working in body including how to fix our immune system this new research into these which also has some implications designing treatments. Yes this research looks at how the virus gets attacked by the immune system or not as the case may be and broadly speaking. There's there's a to phase response to There's an earlier response of the immune system. There's a slightly later response of the immune system to a viral infection and viruses. Incredibly clever getting round this. I mean for a little thing of that doesn't actually live by itself. Just a little bundle of irony doesn't by itself needs our bodies to replicate it. Devises fiendishly clever ways of getting round our immune system and so what what they're discovering with this forest and they've never seen it seen it to the same extent with other viruses. Is that when it gets? Into the cell it really inhibits the chemical messengers alert the immune system these are called interferon so these are the chemical messengers that tell the immune system. Something's going wrong here. Come on guys and gals get in here and start attacking and whistling the army so it suppresses these interferons and then the second response is actually an over an overactive response but it's a dysfunctional one terribly. Clever response on the part of the virus but it is a serious respond. Swear it interferes with the jeans in the second wave of response. These are called site kinds and some people that have heard of the site. Kind storm that you get. Which is what largely kills you with the COVID. Nineteen seventy makes you seriously ill now. What this means is there's an opportunity in this first response. So for example there already finding indications that interferon treatment for a covert nineteen does seem to be helping particularly in combination with antivirals or other medications and this makes sense when they started using it own with covid nineteen. They didn't know the results of the study. But this was study shows. The interferons are very low. So in fact you're replacing them and then also now that you know more about the site of kind response. There are some targets there that you can use to block that response which again. They're already trialing but it allows you to do that more effectively. So you get a sense. Where if you really do attack the virus and its effects in that first episode you're going to help minimize the reaction the second episode as well because it won't get a chance to whistle up. This overreaction Fascinating Watch and wait to see if They can develop a treatment based on this already are but I could be more targeted because the already are using interferon in some of the clinical trials. Well that's all from us today. Don't forget to leave us a review on apple podcasts. If you can and if you want to ask us a question go to ABC dot net dot Edu Slash Corona virus and. Leave us one there. Be Sure to use the word corona cast so we can find it and we'll see you tomorrow then.

interferon ABC Norman Swan Australia Teigen Taylor COVID hyman Corona Kastner viral infection Kenny Lennon apple Helen forty percent twenty fifth forty year four month
COVID-19 Decoded #1: Coronaviruses 101

Raw Talk Podcast

58:34 min | 9 months ago

COVID-19 Decoded #1: Coronaviruses 101

"Hello, everyone, and welcome to raw talk live Cova decoded series. This year were making the most of the new normal and bringing you a virtual discussion series all about covid nineteen pandemic. Over eight weeks this summer we live streamed our interviews with experts on Covid nineteen and its impact on science and our society. The theme of the first installment in Dakota series is, Corona Viruses One oh one, my name is and I had the chance to chat with Dr Karen Mosman, a world renowned virologist and vice president of research at McMaster. University. We chatted about the basics of chroma viruses do unique aspects of source covy to and how it behaves in the human body. Before we jump into this question, we wish acknowledged land on which the University of Toronto and our podcast operates for thousands of years. It's been the traditional land of the Huron, Wenda the Seneca and most recently the Mississauga's of Credit River. Today. This meeting place is still home to many indigenous people from across turtle. Island and we're grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land. Okay. Let's get into it. Welcome Dr Moss very to have you joining us today. Thanks so much trading that. I'm elated to be talking to you today. That's great We'll just jump right into it so Can you tell us how you got started with virology? And what does being a molecular virologist until? So that's a tale for many many years ago when I did my undergraduate degree at the University of wealth and I went to well because I wanted to be back. It was the only my plan a and I only had plan age and I was fortunate enough when I was at well to be able to volunteer as a first year student in the large animal that clinic and I hated it. it wasn't what I thought and I realized very quickly that that was not profession I wanted to go into and I did not have a plan B. Meanwhile I was in a program molecular biology and genetics and one of my thinking cider third or fourth year. Research Project or thesis project was an apology lab, and so I love to the research and I loved working with viruses and then say the rest is history it is So what does being a molecular biologist tale like what's what's your day to day look like? Oh, I guess not as a Pi when you are a molecular biologist. We're really interested in an understanding how viruses work and when he say molecular biologist it really at the the molecular level. So you know how our how viruses interact with their their host cells and I'm really interested in virus host interactions and so how how do cells recognize viruses? How do they respond to viruses, and then of course, how do the viruses counter response? to allow them to continue to replicate propagate. and it's this back and forth You know response counter response counter counter thoughts in evolution between the virus and its host. which really has helped on the systems and also you know the the breadth and extensive viruses. So it is that that I'm the most interested in. A and as you said there so many viruses and millions that we probably haven't sequenced or discovered yet. So. Can you explain the difference between? What Corona viruses and some of the other common viruses that we do encounter. So. There's a as you mentioned a huge favor. So the viruses not just in their structure on. So there's diversity in their structure as to what the source of their genetic material is. It aren as DNA is single stranded is a double stranded also the diversity in size complexity you know some viruses code for few as five or six proteins. Some viruses code for hundreds of protein. there's diversity and the simplicity of their structure. Some are just the genetic material and team coat I'm have. you know they they bring in proteins and nucleic acids from their hosts. They have a protein coat potentially and envelope. So there's just Huge diversity in in structure, but also huge diversity in the types of. mammals or in or reptiles that they in fact. So how is the corona virus different? Specifically, how was source code two different from? What would make novel? There are in the coronavirus family again is diverse. There's corona viruses that infect many different types of species. there are four human current viruses bat most people have been infected with its estimated up to You know thirty percents of the common cold nearly common cold. It are due to one of these sports human corona viruses. So what makes SARS Kobe to NBA original SARS. Corona virus You know probably more interesting is that they didn't. Originate in in humans so You know they were they were able to jump species into human. So of course, as soon as you disrupt but virus toast evolution, you see much more devastating effects whereas you know people will be infected with a a human corona viruses that have been involved with humans for many many years and it causes. To no symptoms and common cold, and that's just because the these evolved humans and because of this evolution, they've sort of come to a balance between the infectivity, the lethality, and that's not the case for these viruses that jump species. Is that decade that right? That's absolutely correct. So when a when a common virus has evolved. In human. Not. Only does the human recognized the virus and know how to respond to that particular virus. The virus also have had to respond you know to the immune response of particular host. So when all of a sudden now you have. A virus that has jumped species. the the virus, know how to to replicate because it has replicated in other species. But if the human immune system has never seen that virus, it hasn't generated the specific responses against that particular virus. Right So what makes? A virus more likely or less likely jumped species. Some of it is all about real estate location location location Does the particular virus that might be. Found within a particular species has it ever had the opportunity to? You know to even experience and potential to interact with with human or on human cells, and then does it have the right? Mechanisms proteins to even get into human cells. when you think about a, you know virus infection, we talk about two different things susceptibility and permissibility susceptibility is Kinda. Even bind and get into a cell type of a different species. And then once he gets in, is it able to you know to replicate an environment a suitable host? Does it visit have the right? Things that the virus needs within that particular host for it to replicate and is it so that when we talk about criminal activity so there's lots of viruses that we might be exposed to, but it can't get into ourselves or ourselves won't support what they need. So we be exposed to them. But they have no affect your most of the viruses by Mass on earth probably bacteria phages right and they they affect. Cubans. not at all. Or you get into. The ocean and sea water, and it's estimated that her one milliliter seawater there can be ten to the eight to ten to the ten virus particle. When you swim in the ocean, you're exposed to those all the time, but they're a very different type of virus and they don't get into or have access to you know human cells. So it doesn't cause a problem. So you recently awarded US CHR grant to study the novel SARS virus. And actually, Orange Banerjee a post doc in your lab was part of one of the first Canadian groups to successfully isolate our scope to what's the importance of being able to isolate grow the virus Lob Turkey really want to understand the virus. You need to be able to work with the virus. You know we can learn. Some about the virus just by looking at clinical symptoms. But if you really want to know you know how does the virus work what cell types can get into? How does it? How do you know human cells recognize the virus? What's the response of the human cells? You really have to be able to study that question you need the virus to be able to really to study it to interrogate it and then if you WanNa, look for certain therapy you know if he wanted to have new drugs You you need to be able to to have a model system where you have the virus that you can directly test the efficacy of a drug to test the efficacy of a vaccine in an animal model So it's really important to be able to have the virus to work with to study and to be able to you know one of the first things you know we did and and the the larger group that isolated the virus was to make sure that colleagues across the country who have the right facilities also have access to the virus because one group alone can't solve all the problems that have to be a collective effort because there's too many questions. There's Louis still learning more about nice suspect. We'll be learning more about it for years to come. So, we're the aims of your grant in what are the potential impacts of developing these infection models. I know you mentioned vaccine development. So again, you know we're really interested at the level of really understanding the virus and the you know the molecular neurology affects and how it interacts with with its host. So we do and we've already done Erin, Jay's already You know answering a number of the questions we were really interested in, for example. What type of host cells human cells can this virus even get into and replicated obviously lung cells because it's a, it's the respiratory tract infection. By you know clinically, they've also seen gastrointestinal sequoia and other clinical fines. So becomes really important to understand you know what are the different cell types human cell types that the virus can either enter into. Replicate in and spread from, and then how do those cells respond to? They have a pro inflammatory response because body gun contributes to symptoms that we see clinically. Can the virus get into immune cells because as we know from HIV viruses that can get into and potentially kill immune cells has huge implications for the immune response immune system. So. We're really interested in you know not just what cell types but how did those cells respond? How does the virus counter respond? And you know from that, you know we can. We can help come up with some good model systems. So is there a good lung model system? Is there a good got model system? So then and if we can get the model systems working, then we can work with colleagues who are very good at drug development for drug development is not our expertise, but we have colleagues that are fantastic strength. But they need to be able to test their drugs or the combination of drugs in a model system. So that's where the collaboration on ensued. What. Model System does your lab axiom play. I know arrange as a specialist in a bat and understanding viruses in bats what kind of model system do work within the LOB. We've been working with a lung system lung cells were just starting to We have a new post doctoral fellow in the lab that has expertise in got in making organized three D culture systems. So again, that better recapitulate, you know what happens these three the organized systems better recapitulate what happens in a in an Oregon in an individual. So we're setting up a number even with human cells of wargin weighed system. And and we are interested in in bath for you know for a for a different reason. But we it's thought that this virus evolved initially from. And we know that that can harbor a whole variety of viruses and they don't get sick. But yet they're very similar test with her immune system so we want to understand. What are those subtle differences and? Basically, what do bats know that we don't know and how and once we understand what those small changes are how can we then use our modern technologies? To to really recreate the outcomes of those changes so that you know we can use the same trick. Let us. As novel therapeutic right with gene engineering work novel drug discovery targeting. Specific Immune types of though sort of approaches and. Going back to modeling with Organiz in that's better. The modern layers because we have were complexity of structures or What about it makes it better part of it is the complexity You know when when you have a single model layer of cells in a tissue culture dish. That you know the that's providing the easiest possible advantage to the virus because you're you know, that's not how our bodies work. We know for example, even in you know for respiratory viruses, you know there are mucus layer. So the virus has to get through with nuclear and then it has to get through You know multiple cell layers to potentially get. into the type of of cells that it might replicate it. You know we know for example in lung for sure that the top layers are are often being left off. So you know there there are multiple with our Intrinsic Immune system, for example, mucus and all of this. Structurally, there's many many more barriers where in if you provide a nice malir single layer of cells. Layer. Makes it really easy for the virus. Right the virus is GONNA win because we're we're giving it all of the advantages. So you know the more we can make it look like what would happen potentially Within a human with an in Vivo model without having to work with an in Vivo model. You know the more it makes it more challenging for us but. We can understand better than how how does the virus get around some of these challenges. That's very interesting. Going off of what you're talking about bats. Just leads me to think about some of their pets we in most people seem to have. Some sort of contact with animals, pets or otherwise can they can they be affected? One in two can debuts dot com debut source of transmission like as a vector so it was really interesting I must be now you know two or three months ago when the first report I think it was a tiger in one of the disease had had some symptoms and they found that it was Kovin positive. So you know there had been sporadic instances where animals have been found to be positive We certainly don't see the same sort of level of infection and spread. You know that you know in in household pets you know dogs, cats that we we've certainly seen in humans. Now part of that could be I. Don't know if we're testing I mean you don't. You know the more you look the more you find. Right but they're certainly anecdotal evidence or evidence and reports of animals being positive. Now, how efficient? That is how efficiently they spread a loss not known and it might be because we just haven't looked enough. That makes sense it right now I guess the the priorities definitely trying to figure out public health consequences of the whole pandemic so I guess we can talk more about how it affects humans now. So what do we know about what happens to the body once it's infected with the novel coronavirus? Know you've probably seen in the paper and heard there's there's a variety of different symptoms. So it's it's not sort of a one-size-fits-all and that's because not everybody's immune system is I got a call and there's you know there's many things to consider. Some might have an e symptomatic infections. You know why other got extremely ill and sick You know part of it is initially how much virus were. You actually exposed to I mean that's a huge component for any infection, not just our koby too. But really for any viral infection you know how much initial virus exposed to You know if you have someone who you know sneezed and you walked past them a couple of minutes later, you might have only been exposed to a very, very small number of virus particles. You know the chances that is not enough to initiate an action because again you have all of these intrinsic. Mucus all these physical barriers that exist all the physical barriers You know if you are though in exposed to very high numbers, of virus particles is because of the nature of how you became infected. The virus pay told because. You know your body. This is a new virus to humans and you haven't if you've never been exposed to this virus before You know in many cases for young healthy adults. children that have an active immune system and a robust immune system. Your innate immune system is there to to deal with new pathogens that come in that put your innate immune system is four, and so you know some people don't have any symptoms. Some might feel. Like they have a a typical you know, and this is the problem with every year. When someone has a cold, it could be any one of a number of viruses. The responses the same and so you know you make some interferon. You makes them cited kind you feel carjack you might get a bit of a fever. You might have a bit of a coffin for row. That's the normal response to a virus infection right and that's the body responding to that and. The symptoms are a factor of the body's response absolutely, and you know all viruses you'll get a slightly different response, but in general response is. Making of interferon his by the kind making some pro inflammatory sided kind and collectively, very similar types of. Now I if you are if you have a preexisting condition so that your immune system Is Not working at full under percent capacity often in the elderly just overtime the the the you know the strength of the immune system or the efficacy of the immune system Wayne's with age bachelor were and not surprisingly. Seeing you know the hardest pit in the elderly population not only are their immune systems left robust. By by that point, there's often other preexisting health conditions as well, and and so that's unfortunately where you know we've seen the highest level of of infections and severe clinical. What's happening mechanistically in the body? Like how does? The novel virus get into our cells and infect us the pathogenicity of it. We know we don't know everything about the mechanics behind it. We certainly know that one of the receptors is aced to see probably if the same same receptor that the original SARS also used which you know is not surprising because the two viruses are I think at the protein level about ninety five percent similar. So we were not surprised that SARS to uses the same. Receptors the original, SARS But that it can't be as simple as that because you know the the symptoms and the ability to transmit are very different between the original SARS and and. you know the original stars was more of a lower respiratory tract infection and not an upper The original I didn't transmit as efficiently but it did have a higher mortality rate. So in the original, SARS the overall mortality rate I think globally was around ten percents. In Canada was seventeen percent. I mean, fortunately, this virus does not have a mortality rate of. Percents, but or that would be devastating, but this virus transmits. Much, much easier and we don't. We don't understand all the differences but there are some things we do know about eight to You know we do know about another cellular pro as got involved also in how the virus gets in we're starting to understand what cell pipe it replicates in and what some of the host responses are. we don't see as robust of an interferon response, for example, as we see with some other viruses. So we are starting to understand those subtle differences, which is now starting to allow with understand Oh, about why we see that clinically or about how why it might be different from the original third. Yeah. I mean five percent difference in. We see so much difference funeral typically about how it presents in patients incredible in understanding like you said, is still an ongoing process so. Do. We know about what the like any particular changes that we've already identified between the. Original source fire some novel SARS virus. Dot contribute to some of these different effect. I think one of the biggest ones one of the biggest. Differences is. where? Not Not just a to and and we know as to is one of the receptors when it's not as simple as that we know there have to be other receptors as well but the original far really was a lower respiratory tract infection. Um whereas when you have predominantly an upper and nasal court of infection that partially, what really lends itself to that transmission because any cough any sneeze runny nose saliva I mean it when you have a really upper respiratory tract and they will type of infection transmission is is much more robust than if it's a really deep lower. Respiratory Tract Infections and another subtle difference with this virus is and again, it could be due to those. You know it's five percent changes. Five percents is still you know quite a bit at the protein level you know the ability to have the. Instructions that are the. Asymmetric infections. There were very few asymptomatic infections that we understood with the original SARS if you really develop that lower respiratory tract infections. You know and almost everyone that has symptoms was positive. You know now we know there's a lot of asymmetric carriers And that enables spread. and and I think that's really why you know we're seeing received such robust spread if you don't know you have it. It's hard. It's easier to to quarantine to protect yourself. If you know you're in fact, if you don't know you're infected, it's so much easier to spread the virus. Even if it might not affect you down the line, you're still acting as a vector to transmit to maybe multiple people down the line So as you mentioned, the coronavirus research is still ongoing in lots of groups internationally you're collaborating with this on in I've seen your published lot of preprinted covet. What do you think is the role of the international collaboration and? How scientific community has been using pre-printed to? Inform. The public. Some of the downsides in the positives of that well, it's not just using pre-printed to inform the public also to inform your call. So some disciplines have used the concept of either reprints or you know that concept of of quitting your work out into. If not a public forum, certainly, the research community before obsolete publications. So there are there are some disciplines that had been doing this for years. You know historically, you know you know in the medical field you know. biosciences you know bad has not been common. It's you know it's been very much got the paper published, and then once it's published, people can read about it. I mean, some people even at conferences at some large conferences sort of in the biomedical field we'll. We'll really only present research that are there have been published very close to publishing because they're they're worried about getting. And that's just you know the nature of some of some field. With been really, I, think it's been really gratifying. No is you know for one? You know this is now a pandemic that has affected everybody I mean even if you think about you know other pem in our lifetime, there have been some regions either been very hard hit other regions a bullet. Bulewa. Africa has been very hard hit with a bullet North America. Europe knows that has to do more with the environmental conditions of. A lot of different absolutely a lot of different conditions how the virus spread where the virus comes from. this virus. Will all in this it doesn't matter where you live. It doesn't matter You know we're all we're all in. So that's almost given a camaraderie within the scientific community and you know most people just want to get their their workout there and so preprinted now have become I think standard and that's good. I mean it's been back. So it it's good because all of. That, was fair but you have to be it's like anything that you find on Google just because it's in a preprinted it has not yet been pure reviewed not to say that once Caribbean that's absolutely correct in the truth because you know they're they're you know we're humans and peer reviewed three or four people have have reviewed it now usually they're experts in the field five you know we're not perfect for. So you know you do have to you know evaluate what you read in a pre prints maybe a bit more. So again, you know you sort of get to know within any particular field You know who are you know who have very strong scientific records you know publication records is you know are the methodologies that were used the right methodologies. There are ways that you can definitely evaluate. You do have to be careful by I. I'm hoping my even after this whole pandemic subsides that got. Willingness to collaborate to not worry about getting scooped to you know make sure that the information is out others to use this sharing of resources. Not. Just a creep rinse everybody is willing to share information share resources. because we're all in this, we all WanNa vaccine and honestly I mean if we're involved in helping the first back, seen the anti viral come out or not. I just want someone to do it. Because that's GonNa make my life easier. So even if it's a completely different group that and we've had no You know we haven't helped at all it doesn't matter I mean. So I, think there has been that collective which has been amazing. So. Working with this very dangerous virus I know everyone around the world is working on it up. What kind of precautions do you need to take for working with some something? That's so dangerous in potential for pandemic. So, if you're studying the virus, the way we are growing. On you know looking at with high tigers, you you have to do that in a containment level three facility. So you know there is one in in Toronto dot for the. G. WORKED WITH COLLEAGUES IN TORONTO AT their containment level three 'cause that's where the patient samples were. Can you explain what containment level three means? So containment level three laboratory. So there's four there's four different what we call biosafety level or containment level laboratories you know a lot of viruses that we work with normally are what we call level to or biosafety containment level two, we still work within a biological safety. So the virus or the pathogen or bacteria to cell line or still within a cabinet. So it's protected from getting contaminated and the worker is protected from also being contaminated. Once you're in a containment level three facility you wear much much more P. So in instead of just working within a biosafety cabinet, for example, that the level of personal protective equipment is is a much more robust All of the protocols are are more robust there. There's just more checks and balances in place so that you know like but the actual. Has To have negative pressure. So it's not just that you're protected because of the biosafety. Cabinet that you're working in your protected by the entire facility and the set of facility and the filtration of the air. So it's just that and then you know the highest level, which if you're working on a bola and some of these other viruses now you're in, you've probably seen some of the movies like. Spacey. Right. So they're. Action you go in you know. So it's just increased levels of protection. And that that's what stopping the spread from lobs outside to the general public. Absolutely. So, if feels like. More and more about the virus at such a rapid pace we mentioned the role of pre-printed how that works. And it can be hard to keep up with the latest information. And I think that poses a challenge for scientific communication like the something that we've been trying to tangle with. At science communicators as graduate students. There's been so much confusion about in the general public about the origins conspiracy theories. What are some of the misconceptions that you've? Heard of about the novel coronavirus. Yeah I mean we've we've we've heard a lot I think the data are. Solid but you know it originated from a bat corona. Virus. I it was. It was not. I don't think it was a man-made. Generated Dire. Yeah, no Now what we don't know is that you know in the. You know wet markets in China You know did it go directly from bats into human? that unlikely I mean the the Human Corona virus and the Corona virus are I think ninety, six percent identical which sounds like a lot. But we just learned about the five percent differs we old SARS virus on the new one. Well, and you know that's about the same level of of similarity between you know eight guerrillas and hidden. Right so I mean it it. Five percents is a lot So there is. And this is where you know the folks that do evolutionary biology and you know that becomes a fascinating area because and you know they're starting to look into pangolins where. Maybe an intermediate host. certainly with the original SARS, it was thought to go from that specific cap. And then into humans So I think a lot of a lot of that information has been. You know you can never say with one hundred percent certainty but know the data are are really heading that way. I mean, I certainly heard You know originally because it was affecting lung function that you know if you held your breath for a certain length of time, you know you could get you know there. I. Mean we've heard so many different you know it just. cell phone towers I mean in some areas of world they think cell phone towers. So they burned and destroyed cell phone towers because there's a a correlation between an area that has cell phone towers and virus outbreaks. So therefore coming, you know that that correlation that's not causations Sir So yeah, we heard lots of. Different interesting theory must be frustrated as someone working on covert to hear some of these conspiracy theories. But as our understanding of this fire send, the disease quickly evolves. How can we assign tastes better communicate the finding to the public and make sure some of these misconceptions are either resolved over don't arise in the first place. Well I think things like what you're doing right now is really important You know being able to have conversations between you know scientists and and the public You know being as open and honest that we don't. We don't have all the answers but you know here are the answers you know here's the information that we have. Here's how we interpret that again the more. Collaborative and in the more you open up your data to collaborator around the world they can also evaluate that data. but but it is important. It is important with the public to be. As, open and honest you know sometimes we data our data are people will hope. For certain resolved but the. Date aren't sometimes. We. Don't like what the data suggesting Sometimes you know we make a hypothesis and we're wrong. But that's the whole point of hypothesis. Right? You either prove it right or wrong no-one likes to be wrong. So I think you know as long as you're doing science for the right reason and you have an open mind and you're open to all of the different interpretations of what your data might mean, and then you do have to have a way of being able to disseminate that to the public. That makes sense to them. and it has to make sense to them right And then hopefully you know everyone is you know has has their own opinion but hopefully they. Are Doing enough reading and and you know informing themselves and but but we're also human where you know or W- I've even found over the twenty years of doing research that. We published wasn't necessarily wrong. But at the time we did have enough information or the right tools that. We weren't able to. Now we have a different interpretation of what we saw twenty years ago because now we have more pieces of the puzzle or we have more sophisticated You know methods to look at a question, and so now with not that, are you know we we did the experiment, the wrong way or our data were wrong we just. interpreted. The date of the best that we could with the tools and knowledge we had, and now that we have more data more tools, we realize. Oh. Well. This is a different way to interpret and not now actually make more fun. So it's it's an evolving. It's a very iterative process and you build on top of previous research. I think the point that gets lost a feel like when we're communicating general public is that. We can be wrong but the pursuit of science in trying to find new knowledge will eventually self-correct. Absolutely and and the more people that work on it and look at it from all different areas. Again it it's you're developing that picture. You know every one scientist as one small piece of the puzzle but the more people that do that then all of sudden. The puzzle starts making sense and even maybe if it's not filled in, you got a really good understanding of what what is the final product going to look like. Right so I'm actually my time. This conversation has been very interesting. We've just flowing past forty five minutes. So. We're going to sort of go into the audience questions shortly So if any of the viewers watching, please start sending in your questions, we already have some lined up so we'll go and ask. Some of those Let's see here. So, questions here is I think we tackled it but maybe you can just briefly just expand on it. What exactly is happening when someone has the virus but isn't showing symptoms And how does it affect how? To pass it on. If you have what we call an ace symptomatic infection. It's likely that you know you do have. You have some virus it's replicating it shedding. But it's it's not. Either replicating to the extent that it could or in the number of cells that it could that you know you're the the immune response is. isn't triggered to an a an extent where you're actually feeling the outcome. So you might be making you might be having respond but not to the extent where Oh, I have enough cited kinds in my circulation I'm feeling lethargic or I have a fever or you know so you so you can have you know. Either very very mild symptoms or you know the symptoms just aren't sufficient enough that you recognize them but you still at a low level could be shutting embarrassed for. The TROPE ISM of the virus and trump on the soya's the. Areas of the body or the south are more affected by the virus or virus can get easily into those cells or it's only a couple numbers south small number cells, Mal number of virus particles that are being replicated. It's Kinda. Like just. Flying under the radar. So it's there, but it's flying under the radar, right? Spread it. Yes exactly. But you can still spread it. Okay, I think that covers. The main part of the question. Another question we have here. I think it's pretty interesting Do, we know about the mutational frequency of genes in the novel coronavirus. And mutational frequency here would be the rate at which the virus. Has Mutations in its genome, all viruses when they replicate. Mutate. I mean even when even when our DNA. There's a mutational rate, right which is why we get cancer and other diseases. and. So this is an army virus. In general are viruses tend to mutate have a higher be patient rate than DNA viruses. but we don't and we have been they have been seeing mutations and the virus, and the one thing that's been happening around the world is a Lotta sequencing so that they can start tracking you know the mix and the sequences of the virus. Not, just to see how it you know changing over time, but also within a certain geographical location. you know there have been some mutations that they have been. So for example, one mutation that they have found around the globe. So in multiple geographical locations is a mutation in the arnie preliminaries. Memories. it's a very specific mutation and they have found that this alters the Arnie preliminary as. and actually help increase in you tation rate a small bit. and. So again, if you have a mutation in preliminaries, the virus might be able to replicate a little bit better if you haven't mutation rate for example, in the spike protein dot to the fact. How it finds the ace to actually other receptors that it could bind to and and therefore, in fact, I mean we had but we haven't seen a a really high need patient rate in part because Colona viruses also encode proofreading enzymes. So you know some viruses only have You know a polymerase, an aren a dependent arnie preliminaries tend to have a higher error mutational rate than and eight Plymouth uses. But this. Colonial viruses also expressed more proteins and have more genes and some other small aren't bars and one of them has proofreading function. So. We do see some you know mutations, but certainly, not on the same order as other viruses like HIV is a classic example. Extremely high mutation rate even within one individual, the viruses mutating and changing, and that's one of the reasons why you know trying to find a vaccine has been really challenging for HIV because it mutate so quickly That mutation can just help it. Overcome some of the factors that identify in our body through the immune system. Right absolutely. So Since we we've had air travel mostly suspended for the general public for over about three months. Now do you know if they're already different strains on different continents because? The world is more isolated than it was when the pandemic started I, mean they are starting to see. You know certain certain. Strains or or Clayton's you know in different geographical regions. Now, that could in part be as you said because there's not. One homogeneous population because of all the travel but we also know you know again from other viruses that. You know certain You know there's also the genetic of the hope. So you know, we've seen with other populations where certain populations are more or less susceptible to different types of viruses, and again, it comes down to the virus host evolution and depending on you know particular you know genetic within a particular population. Why we? You know different susceptibilities and and And outcomes in between you know we see differences between men and women. You know we often see differences between different You know ethnic backgrounds. So there's so many different factors that that allow that to happen it. It's it's not just one factor, but there there definitely are. Different different strains or different claims that are more prominence in in some areas than others. I'm actually glad you brought up the ethnic differences. So in some of the countries that do have a diverse population, we we've seen differences in outcomes for patients of different ethnicities. Do we know if that's related to? Genetic factors or is that something else? You that's where it becomes I. Don't think we know enough yet if it's strictly genetics. but there's there's so many different say and this is this is why for not just a viral infection with a lot of different diseases. You know you always try to understand what are the underlying factors in some cases it's genetic in some cases it's environmental. You know in some case, you know there there's all diet. you know there's so many different and it's usually multifactorial. So it's it's. It's rare that you can look at you know an infection or disease and say it due to one factor. It's usually due to a multiplicity of factors That makes sense they I don't think there is enough data out there to make conclusive statement about that but it is something that is very. Odd I haven't seen this before for Some of the other vice that we've encountered Let me just look at some of the questions that we've got coming in. I see one of these questions I. Again, I think we've sort of tackled it, but if you could briefly expand on it. How do we know that this virus came from bats or another particular species? So the reason. So for one bat again, bathroom really interesting and they harbor. You know many many many different types of artists in bars families. And? There are actually papers from I. Think even before the original SARS, Corona Virus broke in two thousand and three bat where they had started sequencing and identified different viruses and different species You know there are some papers even before the original SARS outbreak that had found corona viruses, and by that, you know had very high like in the ninety percent similarity to some of the human current viruses. In so And this. You know certainly happened not just with SARS but some of the other Abullah Virus Marburg virus again sequences found in In in. That have and this is historic. So you know there's even a Egyptian tomb bat. So again from thousands of years and they they, they were able to get enough to sequence some viral sequence from an Egyptian tomb bat, and in one of the proteins I think it was the preliminaries. That fragments and it was only a fragrant fragment that they sequence One. Hundred percent identical. To. You know. So so again you know we know bats Har have harbored you know corona viruses and for an that have been you know for for millions and millions years. you know they're one of the most diverse the Malian species known so they have. harboured. The viruses for longer than Homo sapiens even been on the planet. So again, good evidence about the origin of where these viruses and pain from. It's very interesting You mentioned that have been harboring these viruses for a long time what about the bat immune system makes it possible to sort of be a reservoir for these viruses, but then not show any pathogenicity or symptoms because of it. So again, part of it I think is because bats are so as a as a specie or the you know the order I think there's something like fourteen hundred different species about. you know they've been interacting with viruses for millions and millions and millions of years. So they've learned how to deal with viruses for again longer than Homo sapiens even been on the planet and so they've they developed some trips on you know. So we're starting to learn what what some of those evolutionary tricks are. So for example, bats don't show signs of disease because they don't to SOM- viruses make pro inflammatory cytokine response and Aaron J as part of his PhD thesis when he was in the University Scotch on found an element a negative Regulatory Element. Upstream. of corn planetary kind. And so when he was able to prove that by now if he takes that. and He puts it in front of the human pro inflammatory clad kind. Virus infection does not make that chrome planetary declined, and if he takes that sequence away from bat now they make prone until recited kinds. So we're starting to learn what some of those really small subtle differences are. So the pro inflammatory cytokines kinds are the ones that are causing this the presentation of the symptoms in. Any of the animals are infected is that am I getting that right? Yeah. A lot of I mean a lot of Tyne. -sarily, come to the virus per se they succumb to it the same thing with influenza like the Spanish influenza you hear about sight a kind storm. You know. So it's an overactive immune response and it's usually the pro inflammatory cytokines and then they have you know negative Kuala. If if you have an overactive grown flaming planetary cited time response, you want some information. But some right it has to be controlled. So you know and and so you know bats don't show finds of disease because they don't have you know the they're not making the trump clamato recited, but they can still be diseased. Than if they're not if they don't have a inflammatory response, but still harbor the virus do they do you classify them as having the disease or not? Depends on what your definition of. So they don't have. They have the virus they don't have the disease. That's true I guess the. So. We have very little time left and I think. This will be our final question. So just to wrap up. For the proteins are encoded by SARS COV to how How many do we know the function of out of those genes or proteins? and. How do we go about that? So. I think because they're corona viruses and and you know between the family of Corona viruses are certainly you know a lot of similarity. So we know a lot about the corporate team preliminaries. Spike protein. You know some of the ones that forum. But. Then it's all of these accessories accessory protein. So you know not required for the absolute replication not required for the physical structure and we're just starting to learn You know what? What do some of these sort of accessory proteins? Wide do they do and how do they modify the immune response? So so that work that that I mean our lab is being that they're doing that So we know some about the virus, but through is a little extra bit that that you really need to understand. Actually just always said the final question but if you can just entertain me for one more. What what are some of the pressing questions that we still need to answer about the novel coronavirus? The most important ones is if you've been inspected and even if you have made an antibody response. Are you protected. I think. That's one of the most important ones because we've seen evidence that. have been positive. And then they'd been negative and then they're positive again. So we don't know if that just Again in the negative path is because. They flew under the radar and and the tests came up negative do so. You know, did they have an infection all along and they just didn't clear it but that's still over a long period of time or more were they infected cleared the election action and then got you know a a mutated or different strain of the virus So we still don't know and this becomes important when we get the serology passing working just because you're cyril positives. So it says, yes, you have been infected. You have antibodies we don't know yet are those antibodies protected, right? And that is going to become that to me at least from the clinical dot the most important. Also has implications for vaccine development because if antibodies can't recognize it, then vaccine's might not work for it absolutely or or in a vaccine strategy. Are you making the right type of anti-god? You're making a immune response but is it the right type of right? Interesting So thank you very much Dr. Mosman for being on this show and it's been very. Nice and informative to have you on. Am I'm sure our listeners also agree aware can our audience get in touch or keep up with your research? We do have a lab website. Just Google Mothman Lab mcnall thinker having been in the description to. Yeah, we do have A lab website I mean most most of my guys are busy doing all this work that I don't know who's actually maintaining right now but but we have been trying to put all of our findings into the pre-printed as well. So if he just went into Google or to bed purchase I'm not for the the latest information simply. Thanks for tuning in we hope you found this discussion. Informative to kick off season five Cova Dakota series hosts sat down for roundtable reflection on what we learn from this. And the pandemic large. You can check out that episode and the other quoted streams wherever you get your podcast until next time keep it raw. PODCAST is a student presentation of the Medical Sciences. Medicine University of Toronto. Opinions expressed in the Shope, not necessarily those of the. Faculty of Medicine or the universe. To learn more about the show, visit our website podcast, dot com, and stay up to date by following us on twitter instagram youtube and facebook at rods podcast. Support, this show by using the affiliate link in our website shop on Amazon. Also don't forget to subscribe to spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts and rate. US five stops until next time.

SARS lower respiratory tract infect Google Respiratory Tract Infections Dr Karen Mosman University of Toronto fever Mississauga Credit River interferon Covid Dr Moss Toronto
Help I Want A Rhino On My Face

Help I Sexted My Boss

33:10 min | 11 months ago

Help I Want A Rhino On My Face

"Hello GM divas Jordan. Hey, just want to drop a little message to say that this episode of help sex. My boss was recorded in Spain last week before the new government guidelines. Just want to let you know and joe the episodes. Children. Why don't you talk to us and just push us to sit on? Boston. Of. A fallen asleep in some, if cover you promise. I can't promise anything. Ready for this. On so a fall. And so. I'm I'm sure Tom Lines. Out Welcomes Health sex that my boss, the podcast swear we help navigate the challenges. Can you hear the file in the background? Poe custody. The podcast way we help you among alive at a few drinks today. The podcast can I just say give you a hint? It's the same sentence that you've done two and a half years. The podcast where we help you navigate the challenges of Modern Day life I'm so you took I edge questions and find. Out How. This is going to be a long recourse. So burbs. He put something aside for a foamy. No problem pulse. Start without me. I'm. For a subject question, the violence lose everyday dilemmas. Like how long should you give him the silent treatment, and is it okay to Microwave Cueva Cup of tea when it gets cold I do that all the time. Is that okay? Coughing, I can't do that because my teacups have a very thin rim of platinum. Yeah you don't ruin them, and you don't want to ruin a platinum. No, you don't love of platinum. Would you say you was a platinum Rim Kinda guy every time I have at platinum rimmer there we go from William Hunters. And of course, what should you day with you accidentally sunk. Of God, and of course was accidentally sex that you bus, but we're not usually lagging, and so we will hunt and UK's leading etiquette expert. No, we're not Jordan radio presenter more. CHATEAUNEUF PAP your more chateauneuf to cramp. Up On, it's been an I have forgotten credits. We didn't come up with it, so you're in Spain. C C C yeah. I'm in Spain of video nearly a week and go about tomorrow. Currently me bedroom recording. Got Nigel my grandma next door ready going out for Chinese after this. Harsh. It's been a fantastic week. Really really enjoyed it. Should we toast the Spanish oh? Yes, sorry, I've already started. Yeah, let's put for putting up with a with Jordan this Spanish. They're lovely paper. Cutler Interferon the they. What are your Spanish neighbors called Derek Simon? Lorraine No angle. What they called you probably got to go for miles and to find any Spanish Paulina Mick the. Poorly. There are lovely couple. Can I just before? We talk more about Spain? Assigned from that hideous shows that you are wearing, yeah, round your neck and the usual thing that we used to sing around. Your neck is a chain. And help basis that you might potentially have copied that of someone that you and I know I did great I will go to. My grave did not copy of producer bad minds thinner. I copy of Karnal offers normal people. Have you sit at nine? So. I mean I haven't seen it but I've seen enough photos on on social media I would say and I'm not just saying this because I prefer him to you. I think Ben's China a bit more than. This mine's no mine's McConnell, because it's thinner as the Spanish market and there was this guy there, it was lovely. From, Birmingham and he sold me. And Bite. Thin chain of just to tickets it was it was punished this bloke. On the. Spanish market ago, Connell chain I gotta think Spain is just called the market. Spanish market got cuddle chain a got. Some Race Games Games. I went to the Spanish market and Michael Caine Spanish Kay. Connell chain some Berry. Sunglasses and sloppy for twelve year-olds. I'm trying to remember to google mix slush poppy. Our auditor algae say mix flavors in Spanish. May Wind does make wanted to enable mix flavors because. Of everything in a mix. Yeah, so I was trying to I. Don't do in Spain language barrier. Going makes an announcement very British. Sport loud makes makes different flavors. L. Blend. L. Blando L. Blend Don L. let them all in. Just put a bit of each flavor. L. A.. Goldman A. You can't wait lying. I've been off six on holiday. No of been off six. Mountain biking a miracle Brian. But Mountains. El Paso. The police about that. Into snakes as well as ship myself. I absolutely honestly. Sit down the. Right Komo scattered now as a proper real life snake, and you know I hate snakes, and does the snake road and my uncle out. mcduck denies Senate and as I twitter around it moves and I. Hated hates him hates him. What sort of saying I don't know a big thing we're not be. Sin To. A deadline a real life that one. Wasn't real lying. Dead Yeah, but he's a real life that snake. So. Else got to tell you. Of the grandma water him up first night thinking in bathroom. She notes five minutes when you'RE GONNA. Be Much longer. Thank. You for ninety. Oh God. Why are you? So Yeah Anyway How's your? Guessing Weird, you'll family just stripped down into a poll. No, they didn't strip off. They got some moment. Catherine, a few of the BRA and knickers. As well forgot and God. God Spanish market. Make sure you're recording. This is just the markets, so he's going on off the world. Feeling hot hot spots. Philly. So you bought US on Brera? Mexico a dancing Spain is it? Off Top of my I mean I know that there are overlaps but I have a feeling some berries and nothing to do with the Spanish fan. You just let me know. Can you take that off? Why! I mean I'm talking to a big molehill. Okay, how's your we'd be? Yeah Yeah. It's been science intially. Nothing nothing particularly exciting enough managed to venture out. But I get tear bureau tasted with people. Don't follow the guidelines and think face mark public transport. He that's no you May. We've, but they're really strict out here with A. Few people have message me on interesting facemask Jota you. Take them off in bars ball. We've been rather strict who we have. Actually Pretty much with just been in the fellow most of the time. And you'll find with Moss because having. Tightly pressed up against your face you'll, you'll find with a don't actually very suffocated. Internet nope I am not Oh, before we go to listen to this question. I believe hey, H MGM News Has Gone Down Pretty. Well this cousin. It told you last week I said if you're listening, you need to watch this video. It's gone down a storm. It has Hanson Media Group Network News Not News as you say. Yes. I'm more emotionally embarrassed the finally. Gone apps into the end of the public sphere. And if few people even some place friends not quite understanding why I did that as a child, but. I kept trouble. I didn't do any silly. Knock Doran Games. Oh, yeah, not run over things while people talk about last week's episode of the. WHERE DID HATE GM? So, WHAT DOES HE STANFORD? Again Henson Media Group Network News and tell us about simply either every month news about your family. Yes it was monthly news. It was kitchen, sink, drama, news, and because I ran a company just before eight. Am M Jan Hansen incorporations? and. My brother was on the board of directors as my father, he was the champion of Henson. Inc. we have monthly board meetings. Trick Oh, God and I was above the champ I created. A unique position called the supreme commander. And I would host these meetings in my grandfather's teaching gowns. It's my grandfather was a teacher. So his university, Teaching Ganz. I would come in in my robes and once I had arrived and I was thirteen at the time. I was my father will be able to conduct the and we would. We would organize sports days for the family. We would organize ice all sorts of fun and Games Christmas show. We would do. We did films eventually when I became too big for the fish. The Fish One came the news studio. You actually spent a lot of women that growing hope. In board meetings. Yes, I've never seen my package. Actually. Mom? Have, you got any antihistamine plays. She coming around. Stain. Hi William De. Oh, hello, can you hear me? I want him I'm very well. It's better see. Have you met Ben? Live show. I'm just to pop in. The shower will go back for Jordan's last meal gas, and what traditional Spanish food you having window having a Chinese. What's your order? A. Sweet and sour balls. Love girl after my own heart, exactly I'll save you so very lovely. Thank you. Yes, Jordan can bring them back by. I've looked at this rate. Tocado me the amount of eight when you've left. Yeah, no, no shed last night to go. The same out. The amount of the amount of what did I. Say to you last week in the pug. About feeding you. Oh that comes a fetus because you'll just say oh I bet so much bad and alley only. Or always Elliott Elliott rally. Saying is probably wrong the. Ben The garlic thing. I was at school with her Allio live. Are you pronounce said. EO Lay la. Thank Relatives Allio live, but yeah I've missed. A victim has been nice. It's weird. You can still be twentyish. And you reversing I'm certainly revert back to type out. A Euro. At the start of my career. What we can call my career. Want, my career has become when people are in BBC Radio Somerset would phone up to soon interview with me on queuing or something seminal. Obviously, they would phone because I start doing it. Kevin is seventeen and they would phone the landline at HCT. My father would answer Nya you want to speech putting yes one moment, and then he'd go go to the bottom of the staircase. and Go. Where you. Don't do that on the phone. Why because I don't want BBC Somerset knowing? Hey! Two up two down in some. Place like Burnley. So we do this. We're not allowed to say house during this villa shouted. said to my father, we gotta servants, Bell Board Use it. She'll go by the way accent you a present. Oh, not not to Spain onto. Didn't pay the postage on that but it should be there for when you get back with very close. I know everything that's going on in your life, so I've sent you I've sent you something that I think will help. Nice. It's something I send to all. Friends in. A similar position. Tell me more now you'll. You'll find out. You'll find out tomorrow. Maybe Saturday when Iran's I'm not king. Case of anything is going straight back. I think you'd have to have a pretty twisted mind to use this kinky way. Thought Boston. So plumbing. SOMEBOD-, Bird. Record Friday coming belly right now. Okay, let's go tell the listeners questions please William Hudson. Excuse me. Skip over the best of the whole of God's sake. Right, go on. It's time for Williams. Wacky word of the week to it. It's time for William's sake. Of the week? Okay, it's a now. And it's F- large. Garage S. Definition after the break. I think s Laurent quiet. F. Laurent F- Laura means. A large number of people. Lounge number people know it's the use of gentle circular hand movements in a massage. Put my hands on your body which I wouldn't do at the moment and it's condition. No one's touching it. I gently did batch. We get lots of people asking where you can buy the D. from, so we're going to have a big deep push. We've made it very easy for people. If you just goes to sexist, my boss dot com slash by the D.. Or, Click on by the day on sex with money box DOT, com able to get it from there so if you struggle to find the G. Wherever you. Can come to the corners of your premises and. Click on that me on our website. Thank you William Hunt some first question, please. From enormous, so we can't. We can't say this from Dan William Jordan and produce that produce hyphenated indus email Muslims. There's no hyphen in produced in Israel. Hyphen Donning Hyphen Zone on. The inverted commerce thing. Is the sign? Producer Hyphen Ben. Do you know what they were GonNa have a problem we had was really changed his ins- to handle to produce event. For Gun is the talent. In, William Jordan and produce a heightened ban. I have always wanted to under go rhino plastique. I firmly decided on it three years ago and now I'm in my early twenties. I decided. This is the time to get it done. During my research, my dad told me to ask my arm for any recommendations and tips and her experience. My aunt is obviously had quite a lot of facial does say tips then did you say? Tips we pay tips goes right. Okay I'm with you. Probably including her nose, yes, she will reject any claims. She's had an east cosmetic correction. In addition to this I do not have the closest relationship with her. As we didn't see each other free few years, juicer family conflicts, but I've seen her. A couple of times in recent years I wouldn't normally ask, but my dad mentioned that she might be willing to contribute financially towards the procedure. So what is the etiquette of politely asking an aunt who denies having had cosmetic surgery, and who I am not particularly close to about right named musty. Many things anonymous festival on God's Green. Earth is Rhino Plastic. What's the. Cosmetic surgery involving a Rhino, is it? Do you gotTa Rhinos off tasty efface. You've done. Explain it. On what? I'm trying to swear. Ran Off plus day. Job. If you actually before we answer the question from animals. If you had to have, if money was no object in pain was no object. Is there, anything. Would you have worked on on your ears, my ears? Let's what's in my years I've got likly. Would you don't have anything to them if I had anything stolen? Base! Or I have either got out today. Probably avid belly told me tilk. Stomach. It? No. said the answers to the question. What would you have? I would probably have hand transplant. Yeah! Well first of all right. Somebody close to me his hot cosmetic surgery. She has both talks every six hours. And salonpas medic surgery. Can I ask you this. You've. Bought all my. Own. My God you ever! Wants twice you have. Can I ask you something here? Yes, I you. How often do you have bosox? Twice a year, yeah! Don't have a six months second thing gays and talk about her a lot darling, but you'll know she's never had anything done. Really, absolutely promises. She's such a glamorous pre lady I promise of Hand Har. I know of. She's never never. She's never had anything. What would she tell if she did? Oh, yes, she cheat for for as long as I think about this as Long as I've known her, she's always talked about whether she should get both talks now. I should have made it doesn't I've had. told me that boats. An look forward. Could lend the jumbo jet on the. Jobs. You don't need it first of all at anonymous question I really don't think any poll talks to the agency. I don't think they're not asking. For News Job. Zing your nose enormous I didn't really know. quant cash comment, but The trouble is if you have an aunt who is denying that she has cosmetic surgery. You can't really ask directly about it, but you could say oh. I'm thinking of having a nose job. Because dot and see if she volunteers information, but if she doesn't then you've got to leave it and move on. Yeah I agree I. The thing is like I. also think is while he should never ask someone if they've had surgery really personal question. Quite re I. would I would agree. If, you could pay anything, would you pick anything I? Thought that everyone wants something done or isn't happy with. Ben Benefit Rhino Plastic. Ben You've got no sane is no school just news, can we? Just curves curved one I'm GONNA put this. I'm for the echoes. He's definitely the best looking person on this podcast. Would you agree after me? Would you see where he becomes on a tram? Shape is his his lack of modesty, and this is what he does. I when we go until he literally. Walks round the audience. Top on say I'm Patricia Band. To just a change of clothes. On the back twenty miles. In different. Right Ben, but actually has a costume. When we're going to by the way we're going on. Sorry twenty to anyone, you can get your tickets sex. My Dot com women calling. Me and William was like stressing what to wear Ben. Carson Change. Room so I was getting nervous before the show as well as. Well you put in a share? -spense longer makeup the knocking to. Question comes from Hamish. Jordan help my brothers snap trophy. Boyfriend gave me my first post lockdown. Heck ups a physical. You. and. In. The second also. So was sounds. is a qualifying Baba. I'm sure my brother can attest to how good he is with his hands, but it's a dreadful haircut. Seems to have been very lazy and completely ignored what I asked for on talk. Sorry in compiling asphalt on top of all that I gave him twenty pounds. Rather than? Challenged. And rather than just give me five pounds change. He said I'll take it off your next one. I always thought as it's basically family. It's just something one does to help out I. Want to go back to using proper barber shop, but don't know how to tell him. What should I do kind regards. Hamish was great question first of all. I was I was brought up by Wendy that we heard before. Never charged family I thought that before. Yes, have away. You've disagreed. Depends you're doing and if you sell it a car line fair enough. Yeah, my my will makes it if we perverse light. Charge each other for stuff like a share something, so that's why I used to I. Mean we'll talk about this another time I use my bedroom also aligned brain. As a child and if people took a book count and didn't bring on, did find them. So I would charge them in that regards. This is why wealthy people are wealthy because they are tight with money. So we said well fact, it's like getting blood from a stone. Really Rich May at school with rich school. Don't why who makes me. Around as moment chippy. And charge me to power fifty. Honest to God. Is Honest to God. I mean. Had you broken something? No, we got chippy. Charon it break or something. Got Fifty feels Joe I was like. I did. How much fish and chips would cost could lose two pounds fifty, but yeah. I would say so about. Pounds fifty. Our got it as well because we will give me a five without going to get ten lumber in a butler, Glen's vodka. And That was that was raided gangs them. where? Che's dilemma. I. Would I probably need to go and get something a bit more specialist done at the handwriting? So you could. When I didn't go to you because I was having a perm, or I needed a bit of color. Something that your brother's boyfriend can't actually do it home, and so that's a nice reasonable excuse. Actually have to permit. You could just say you had a permanent didn't work, but whatever? Yeah, I agree that it's always awkward getting you by to to be. A reason why I've never gone down from from what I gather one of my best friends, fiance's really good hairdresser, but she keeps angels company out all the time and I'm like no I'm thirty. So I'd avoid that income. Excuse like Williams says. Has Anyone. This I've got a good hairdresser. Bigshot potty great. Cooks, my yeah, she listens to me nothing worse. If you are Barbara Hairdresser listened to your client okay. Yeah. televise vodka. As anyone ever ever gotten echo of justice. This new set it now. They've got their. You hate it when these Mirra Bucky Reggie's go. Chase Pal, Has Anyone any BOB is listening to. Get in touch as anyone actually said to. I know Bob made suburban. He's like he's been out on Friday. Gotten at forty morning got into work at night. So what was their jobs done and they've all gone. Yes, not. has anyone actually ever to went? No, I don't like it. Get in touch next question. This next question is from. Janet is coming to US health. Thanks in my stalk. Bellies actually sweating though. I've got sued Kremlin and it looks like. Are we able to longer than two minutes where it doesn't have to be about You d women Jordan I'm having difficulty explaining to my rather nosy friends and family what my relationship status is! I have been seeing this gentleman for just one hundred year. At first, it was a bit of fun. Things have since become more serious I have discusses with him a great night and we have decided there's a natural progression into relationship is best for both of us. Do Shoe Complicated Relationship Histories, his and mine present. We have decided. We don't need to label what we have. However my friends and family. Family didn't understand this and think he's taking advantage I know. This isn't the case as I've explained my face about this to him, and he's made it very clear. This is not the case I'm the happiest I've ever been someone. But we opinions of my friends and family do bring out my insecurities, and it does have a minute. I'm a twenty four year old and capable of making adult decisions. I guess what I'm asking is is a label requirement or should I just tell them it's none of their business is the wrong use of. Just. I'm happy say. Why should it matter to anyone else? Thank you for the advice and advance I love the show and can't wait to see you. Nine is always good when women about your relationships as I think I think basically what was she called Jess. Basically Jess. I. Think Everything you've written in that letter that you've told us you just need Celtics. Moment Dad's. Because you've. Headley I think you need to say look I'm happy. Don't want to put labels on it, we we start off as a better phone. Probably, would you wear it? Breath you that we were just shocking to start out with, and then we just went on a few coffee dates. And then. Yeah, how did you? Did you own stress you about your relationship status. Night when you single. Neck no mom. Don't appreciate a private person. and. I think just as long as you are happy and he is happy. That's fine, but I would say that the dangerous for about five years. You still haven't put the label on it and I. I can only speak for what I would want to do, but I would want to say have a label on that. After five years, a year may be is okay. But I think when we start to approach eighteen months two years if there has not been any further conversation about shit. Or discussion, or we haven't edged closer towards it. That's up to you to review that but. The, easy option is to say nothing. But as long as you do, what is right for you? What's right for you both? You should be okay, but yes just explain it'd be adult treatment. Parents treat you like meddled. Dear William and Jordan I'm writing to you from very busy train. I'm currently on my way to Preston from Birmingham. Quite the journey and I'm starting to become peckish as I look into my lunchbox. I, wonder, how on earth can I eat this banana without removing my mask do I put down or folded up. which would mean covering my eyes and a banana blindfolded? Like one of the on awful tanks in Spain. Something I would expect Jordan to do whilst tied up with his dressing count belt. Bill honestly. The players can put Benaroya pulling out from it's. Amazing of a two year olds solely charges. Get some fish and chips and Burnley for this, so my question is what is the answer can't be eating on public transport while wearing a mask. Hope you are well lots of loud death in Staffordshire so great question. don't think. I believe I can only speak to the NFL regulations living in London but I believe you are allowed to remove your asking order to eat or drink but I. think by definition my each. We don't mean a full course meal. It just means like the the mint. Or piece of chocolate or crisp perhaps is fine a banana. At maybe you could do it chunk by chunk. Rather than putting it in whole. But. Maybe you could have been honor in practice. Now I got the trae Beckham recently and I got a little, little, sneaky, snacky snow and I pulled my. Must Down that way, but then put it back up and can I just say I? Please please don't be one of those people. The wears the mask on the. Chin. Why? Why wear a mask on? You cheered why going to shop we must. Get. Bask properly is what I'm trying to say because. Is Annoying people. must the it was bite enough, but yeah. Melon more George Jordan says in the bedroom I. Want you to put my news when he put his name from my mouse. I want not able to breathe. The world we live in. This time last year would be talking about outweigh. NARONHA train. No thing what would be talking about this time next year? So Gene Davis. If you want any fruit, related questions solved then you can always tweet US auto some instagram sex boss, you can send your tells of trepidation to help it sex with my boss, dot, com, or you can. Rights haven't literally any Henderson. Lettuce yes I fall, but the dress website sex at my boss don't come. A failure like I've got prickly eight now I think I'm getting pricly. Certainly go the festival. Like enough. Right go and slander yourself in Vera. And I'll speech next week. Thank you William Thank you. That's doing it for Ben. Diaz makeup.

Spain Ben Spain William Jordan Jordan US William Dan William Jordan Joe I Boston GM BBC Birmingham producer Hamish Williams UK William Hunters Interferon
COVID Cover Up w/ Dr. Judy Mikovits: The BioSecurity State Illusion That Led To Your New Normal

The Last American Vagabond

1:10:03 hr | 8 months ago

COVID Cover Up w/ Dr. Judy Mikovits: The BioSecurity State Illusion That Led To Your New Normal

"Cope it has little if anything to do with SARS cope to it's a cover-up of XM RVs. It's clear. All of these diseases are acquired immune deficiency home from Mouse monkey and all kinds of viruses transmitted into humans via contaminated vaccines and a heavily contaminated blood supply. Welcome to the last American vagabonds joining me. Today is someone you're all very familiar with and that's in large part due to the unjust suppression and censorship of her work and her efforts to expose the truth speaks as I see it to the overwhelming desire for the unvarnished truth. That's bubbling up in the masses as we speak. They now seek out exactly what they're told not to look at a table and never-before-seen. We all at some level out there feel what a dangerous path were on right now. We all feel to one degree or another the dishonesty the lies the tyrannical pressure building in our lives at this very moment. And this is why we're not just thirsty for but bone dry parched and burning for the truth at this moment. So I'm honored to be yet again speaking with researchers scientists and medical professional doctor Judy. Judy mikovits who has made it her life mission to fight for the truth. Thank you so much for being here doctor megabits. Thanks Ryan. It's a pleasure to be on the last summer. Vagabond again. Yeah, I was great. That was one of the first discussions that I had with this whole thing was with you and dr. Bitar on the round table. And and it's of course that's been entirely censored along with everything around this discussion. So to start off today, can you briefly go over for us what you've discussed in the past? Cuz you've got a lot of interviews on this but it's important for you to understand how this plays in in regards to falchi in a cage yourself the suppression of your findings the attacks on you and really how that shaped the research at the time as well as into today and what we're dealing with. Yeah, exactly. So basically the entire thesis of of the discussion of our book plague of corruption, which is now a New York Times bestseller, which came out April 14th of 2020 of this year. It may have been before that first conversation or just after that first conversation we have but plague of corruption. And literally reads like prophecy of covid-19. So so here it looks like we predicted in every chapter wage war but the government was planning to do beyond our wildest imagination that that they could get away with this month plan demek and and in fact the movie planned demek part one which which first debuted on May 4th of this year was actually supposed to be a promotional video of a plague of corruption. It was just it was just going to be a promotion for that book cuz nobody in the in the world had heard the term covid-19 on you know, really October 13th was was the highlight for me October 13th of 2019 honor about I gave a talk at the track. About cancer and what they had asked me to discuss was a cover-up was persecution and cover up and in order to do that talked all I really did was search science mag Cohen and my kibbutz and you can walk through the fake news media and how bout Achi who was named in our book our first book plague, which was first published in September of 2000 or November of 2014, right? There's a there's a chapter there that says who and why and that was slide five of the talk that I gave in at the truth about cancer in October of 2019, and The Who and why was the invitation only meeting that's chapter seven or eight of our book plague and it was July 22nd 2005. And at that time we had input we had impressed we had submitted on May 6th our paper to science of the characterization the modulation first-ever isolation and characterization of a new family of disease-causing human retroviruses. That is AIDS like viruses HIV deadly viruses from that stay with your families for Generations because retroviruses integrate into your DNA and stay there can be transmitted verbally as well as horizontally to the children. So The Who and why in that picture in that slide we see Tony falchi with Harold varmus Nobel Laureate Harold varmus, who was the at the time in 2009 the NIH director, he's he's he's the gentleman standing too long. Left of Hillary the the other two they were at what I called at the time and still do the NIH criminal Center. That's right there on the NIH campus off. You see next to Tony. Bauchi. Of course Hillary Clinton you're out. Now this this picture was 2011. She Secretary of State. What is she doing the NIH criminal Center and then D and and to Tony finau cheese immediate left is the NIH director Francis Collins, and we offer and all three of these men who we politely refer to as the Unholy Trinity were involved in the cover-up of the what they were called XM RVs Z know because it's foreign it was from maust issue, but it wasn't in Mouse. It was in home. And isolated from humans with aggressive prostate cancers, Leukemia Lymphoma ITP. And of course the the big nail in the coffin for my career choice was we Associated it with myalgic encephalomyelitis, which Tony found she had all the way back in 1980s in with my first month and I did not know this at the time. I did not know this till I first saw chronic fatigue syndrome, you know, and and chronic fatigue syndrome is the subject of you know, Peter forsberg's work Charles or leaves work the AIDS activists at the time and so the problem with chronic fatigue syndrome and Bobby Kennedy jr. Does a fabulous job of describing this in the forward of our book plague of corruption, so we don't need to belabor that but the the big cover-up is there are other retrovirus family dog. Causing similar similar immunologic all deficiencies acquired immune deficiencies AIDS causing viruses in the blood supply fly and and and and almost certainly entered humans through contaminated vaccines and in our book we showed in our first book playing chapter five shows you the first cases of autism and m e c f s going all the way back to the polio vaccines in the 1930s. So the home of this chapter was when the government saw our data at the level of the national centers for cancer research. They called it wasn't just our data but some general other investigators of the investigators who first described the presence of sequences of this virus, not an isolation in prostate cancer and in that bears extreme Play have heavily on the on the events of today. But also on the with autism m e c f s and and and this was the big. Oh my God, so long that July 22nd invitation-only Workshop. We showed children. We showed cancers. We showed neuro immune disease. We showed bleeding disorders ITP and that I T P is on the Merc in package insert of a risk factor for MMR vaccine. We had no idea on July 22nd 2009, but the government called a secret invitation only meeting to look at the data and you can see in the insert in this is detailed in both of our books. You can see that they were concerned with now because the negative controls in our paper that healthy the so-called healthy people with evidence of xmrv infection a new family of em. Cages contagious was what we found in that July 22nd invitation-only what was happening? The lab workers were seroconverting. The lab workers were testing positive in a PCR test sound familiar asymptomatic carriers covid-19. The virus would had never xmrv had not been sequence or isolated. It only been a PCR and then it was cloned in the laboratory where the virus was clearly of the wrong sequence them the test for the detection the the serology test was patented by Abbott so we can start bringing in Abbott Tony falchi all the way back to HIV AIDS and the big kicker is the blood supply was heavily contaminated 4% in every study our this was the name. Was most conservative in that science paper published four months later on October 8th of 2009. So the government knew for four months that our data were right and true. We shared every single sample. We I so we gave them the patients. We sent the patience to NIH a number of the most diverse diseases and diverse range of the virus to NIH. They took all the samples and they they began at that time as soon as they realize the gravity that these viruses in two thousand and ten thousand when Harvey Alter now Nobel Laureate Harvey Alter then Lasker Award winner, when his laboratory published a confirmatory study, which is also in that slide deck, which I have no problem. If you post the confirmatory study was from samples taken in the eighties and nineties and and put in a box in the freezer and call log. On HIV AIDS because it was women it was children with chronic fatigue syndrome. It was lab workers. It was doctors. It was nurses. It was surging it was no Saucony all spread and it was clear by July by March of two thousand 29th of 2011 when I gave a talk on it. It was clear that the blood supply had been heavily contaminated for 30 years because Tony found out she said these women were crazy Tony found. She moved chronic fatigue syndrome out of the National Institute of allergy and infectious disease into the National Institute of Mental Health. Now, it's in the National Institute of neurological disease and stroke with Alzheimer's disease with multiple sclerosis, and it's clear all of these diseases are acquired immune deficiencies from Mouse month. He and all kinds of viruses transmitted into humans via contaminated vaccines and a heavily contaminated blood supply. It's it's incredibly alarming this stuff is incredible. It's very obvious why this is the stuff that they really don't want people to hear about and it's I think very clearly what's happening today with covid-19. As you were sort of touching on there. In addition to that is is vindicating a lot of what they were talking about a lot of this stuff that's been disparaged from the past and it's I love some of those connections you made with covid-19. It's very very obvious now in the interest of time since I know we're limited you had mentioned some some emails that you get your watch came out with in regard to falchi. I'm going to go ahead and leave that for another day for us to discuss. I I will definitely, probably talk about that in my show in this coming days, but that's something that you took with me before we went live, but it's it's a very interesting discussion. But what I wanted to ask you in regards to that, I think ultimately I think the point is it's very clear that these emails are just elaborating on some of the things that we're talking about. Now and some of the criminal activity and working with the Hulu in regard to China specifically it's very interesting. But if you if you can make some comments on that if you'd like, but I don't like to not to get bogged down in that too far. Did you have anything you wanted to note on that? I just wanted to I just wanted to corroborate that because in the case of the XM RVs Tony found out she was always back here. He wasn't at that. May I showed you in the entire attendee list? So he's the puppet pretending like he has nothing to do with it and yet he with Tony bauchi. I mean living with Francis Collins and and Harold varmus our behind-the-scenes puppeting and and covering up with the journal science and covering up everything in the Washington Post and the New York Times They Are spinning this story to make it go away and and we and with the confirmatory study that was done in 11:00 and 12 a.m. And in eleven and twelve it becomes very important. Everything happened in 2011. Why because the confirmatory studies showed we had a really big problem. So the the plan this is Antoni. Bauchi emailed Frank crosetti Tony found out she was calm was copied on the emails that said I could participate in the in the in the confirmatory study and yet I was portrayed in press conferences as saying it wasn't there. Well, what was the it girl was the synthetic vp-62 and yes, it goes right back to so this infectious molecular clone was transmitted in Vero monkey. Kidney cells in polio vaccines along with many strains of poliovirus. I mean of of XM RVs at least five different strains as our original paper showed it was dead. One new virus how many old diseases it was how many new viruses have we created in our in our Laboratories and directly injected into humor in it weighs exactly on covid-19 because I also sent you the paper that dr. Yan sent out last week from October of 2011. Oh, I'm fired on September 29th. My lab is locked down to offices within seconds from Harry Reid ohoo. Ohoo was Harry Reid. He was the Senate Majority Leader. Oh, he loves Whittemore who was the the owner of my Institute had illegally is now convicted felon for illegally having Harry Reid elected in the last time, so you can go 2008. Mm. So you could ten you can go through the plague of corruption and see how Tony bauchi paid off confirmed in emails. It is granting agencies forgave the whittemore's for misappropriation of federal funds and many others that and they're still getting tens of millions of dollars of Grants. Just like Ian Lipkin the you know, the paid hor. Dr. Ian Lipkin who's been in the news though. He's got covid-19. 2nd 2009 would cover up by the government began and Tony bauchi is the one that had me arrested. It's you know, it was a federal agency when I went to NIH page that says felony fugitives from Justice. So they they covered up the the crimes and made the data go away just as they fabricated SARS Cove to change the causative agent of of covid-19. It is not it's it seems very clear. I think to anybody even barely paying attention that there's something there's there's a whole thing is an illusion now, that's I think anybody can see that we will get more into this in a minute with the numbers and all this different stuff and there's so many reasons why we have questions with this and to what you're saying right there seems to answer those questions, right the idea that this just something that they've done before they're doing again and a lot of people have made similar claims and it's interesting that we're not allowed to have these discussions now where we get into more stuff. I wanted to ask you something. Because it's so clear why they're afraid of what you're saying. So I wanted to ask you something because there's been so much going on a lot of attacks and things in the past knowing what's happened to you in the past. Are you right now, or any duress or experiencing any threats for speaking out again, but I'm absolutely experience threats and death threats and I've absolutely suck, you know been put under duress and that I'm not allowed on flights are booked our books that case against the masks which came out in August has been heavily censored. I can't buy that New York Times bestseller plague of corruption. I can't travel to meetings to show the movie plan demek to talk about anything else. I'm currently in a hotel room as I will not be deterred. So I literally drove to health Freedom Idaho conferences from October 14th through the 17 so long I don't consider it duress because you know, I'm I'm here to tell this truth. And as you probably know I'm a Christian so it's like hey, you know, there's only one authority over me in this land and that's God and I and I reiterated that I I showed an email in its entirety on page 90 of leg of corruption that I wrote to the head of the national heart lung and Blood Institute on August 31st, 2011, when they were trying to perpetrate this fraud against the Emmy CFS community and say that you know, that study was is the blood supply contaminated and do we have a test to detect the virus and the answer to the first question was heavily. Yes 10% of the blood supply on March 29th of 2011. So so because these women have been considered crazy for 30 years by Tony falcon See they give blood they have children. They transmit the virus within their family on glasses exactly the way covid-19 is and if they wear a mask, they literally activate the dormant viruses and and recombine them again and again and killed themselves. So the master killing the XMR be infected with the flu shots, which also have Gama retroviruses contaminating and coronavirus has contaminated when the people with the XM RV store to 6% off of America Harvey Alter study showed 6.6% of the controls and it was New York City. It was San Francisco. It was the original AIDS outbreak in life. Are we seeing what they're calling long-haul kovich, you know, just keep changing the name. So we're all stupid. Don't eval G. It's m e c f s and it's been a job. Created with retroviruses including the XM Arby's and HIV zanden Delta for four decades and you can't get it this time in regard to the isolating discussion because this is a really important one that I know that you have opinions on that. I think we all should and it's been one that's been one of the most oppressed parts of this discussion, I think because there's more at least two examples I can find of them admitting wage that this hasn't been isolated. So what are your thoughts in regard to this virus supposedly being isolated and and and ultimately, you know, really the more pointed question would be has been isolated in patients or just basically seen in a lab culture and then patented by this biosecurity state correct. It has not been isolated and characterized in sequence in its entirety from patients. That's what dr. Yen said, but from the virile monkey kidney cells remember when you make our polio vaccines in Bureau monkey kidney cells from the attack Iraq. Newest cell line. It's a manufacturing plant for viruses. We made Ebola there we've done the XM RVs have heavily contaminated them for thirty years. It's been isolated from them. But the sequence in a monkey cell is not the sequence any human and dr. Yan showed last week. They admitted they made the synthetic sequence literally, they pull the pieces from the PCR and they do things called Janome walking where they take lab enzymes and and then finish the sequence and add more Prime repairs, but in in nature these viruses don't have what's called editing function. They can't fix the typos can't fix the typos. So what do they do? They make a new strain all the time. What's wrong with Vero monkey? Kidney cells? Why is it such a great manufacturing plant of these viruses? These are in a viruses a.m. Cuz it lacks type one interfere mm. So it can't stop the virus from becoming a particle. So these PCR tests are testing only wage percent and because your audience is wise and they understand the story of XM RVs. That was vp-62. So VP 62,000 means virus prostate cancer number 62 was the patient and what we well we described in detail this Frankenstein virus never existed in nature because what Bob said she did and he was the co-author on our paper who was the one who committed fraud and kept this information for us. Is he sequence he made that clone infectious molecular lab clone from three different patient isolates with no editing and repair functions like those three different patients almost certainly had Different strains of viruses because we have type 1 interferon Pathways the patients that get the viruses are crippled in their immune responses. They're compromised. That's what Bob's paper said. They lacked a type 1 interferon pathway. Gene function called RNA cell. What was wrong with the little black boys in the Thompson study? Why are little black boys more susceptible to getting autism and disease if given MMR before they're three years old they lack the editing function of RNA sell. So do the women and men with more aggressive prostate Cancers and we did this work in the nineties when I was the that had the chief of the lab of anti-viral drug mechanisms. We were trying to understand why AIDS patients got more aggressive Cancers and we thought The identified the immune Pathways that they do so vp-62 is what's ours Cove to is never isolated from a patient with the disease and shown to be infectious and transmittable in causative of the disease in another person. This is exactly what our paper did and one member of the National Academy of Sciences who was in that invitation only meeting and reviewed that work said it was the best ever first isolation in characterization of a new family of human retroviruses off. There were many strains there always were Harvey Alters team confirmed at six months later and that's when the attacks began. Oh, no, we created this nightmare. And how many people is 6.6% of America? Yeah, a lot of any twenty to twenty-five million Americans what was HIV at the height of AIDS in nineteen? Ninety one 1 million Americans eye disease able to affect the economy of Nations. Where did we do one of our blinded confirmatory studies that that was presented at the invitation-only workshop in 2010 where Francis Collins ordered more study? We did it in the UK. We did it in London. Where did we get the controls which was the only question I asked in the entire meeting the blood supply of London. What was the data 4% So we universally have a huge problem. Where is the biggest place of corruption against m e CFS patients against these people who were injured London, Ireland, Ireland. They have other genetic differences that make them more Staffing. Vegetable we so we did many many studies and showed that the different strains of the people who were susceptible and in we show this in our books. So it's it's clear off that the virus has never been isolated. They're they're doing the exact same thing that with the PCR testing was never used. Remember when used in Iraq a quick question. If you could give me a brief answer on your your opinion of other perspectives in this regard held by people such as dr. Kaufman who was seemingly challenged the entire Theory idea of germ Theory. Do you have any just kind of quick takes on that? We're talking about Andy Kaufman and I don't disagree. We did an interesting show a few months ago. Probably right after you and I am so the idea of EX and exes. Ohms and what those what those electron micrographs showed. He's correct. They showed a bunch of cells blowing apart dead. Surrounded debris. Well a virus and enveloped virus buds out of your cell. So the the virus encodes has only an mRNA just life piece of sequence your your blueprint for how to make the virus. But you're it's an obligate parasite. So yourseld your cells are are forming the envelope and so do you have those Spike proteins that the that the virus mRNA in codes and translates and those are popped into the envelope but it is human cellular material cholesterol membrane material that bugs out of the cell. So in those electron micrographs you do not they do not ever show you a budding particle as we showed in our papers. So I agree with them exactly exosomes are when pieces of RNA and DNA that and and micro rnas. We now know is Regulatory and a and a commute home. Haitian Factory for ourselves. Well RNA that's in your bloodstream is a danger signal and we'll start an inflammatory process. And what is the disease? The disease wage is the inflammatory of process. It's not the infection. It's what happens why can AIDS patients walk around today where millions of people worldwide because they do pre-exposure prophylaxis prep. Oh, you know do we just took all the terms so they can buy the drugs and yet the the NIH and Tony pouchy has denied the children with autism just the the people with Jacob Perez with Cancers associated with these retrovirus with multiple sclerosis. Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's disease Lyme's disease. What is he done the same thing? Oh, you can't use hydroxychloroquine a half a seventy-year-old who essential medicine? Well in the in two thousand after work came out, they said you can't use sermon the hundred-year-old egg. And she'll Medicine of the WHL that bear owns no patent on a hundred-year-old drug for African sleeping sickness. Oh does African sleeping sickness sound a bit like chronic fatigue syndrome, you know and and again so who stopped the studies, you know, so it's like the FDA. It's the if the top All The Who and why who stop you from using the drug? Why cuz, when you have a treatment, you know the cost so Andy Kaufman's exactly right because they didn't show the data, but he I also agree with Jon rappoport all the way back to HIV again HIV was isolated from a few people by Luc montagnier from the earliest patients who were in we confirmed that work much like Harvey ultrasteam confirmed artists. I was the technician on Frank rossetti's team that confirmed from the exact same patients. This is what you have to do to be a true confirmatory study because anybody with another disease almost certainly dead. A different strain or a different immune pathway destruction that we don't understand the genetic Kirby genetic susceptibility. So from the same patients the the airline flight attendants out from from Paris and several of the other of the initial AIDS patients. We did isolate and do the electron micrograph confirm from saliva from blood. I'm Luc montagnier work. And so that was the confirmatory study. But what did Tony pouchy and and Bob Gallo do in the eighties? Oh, they're like, no it wasn't that virus look over here. So this is why Mickey was in plan demek indoctrination was just brilliant everybody saying, oh look over at this coronavirus. It's a common cold. It doesn't cause coagulopathies. It doesn't go neuro on you. They don't get into the brain but XM RVs do HIV is due. And so the little the little look over here. We got some HIV sequences. That means the envelope this Spike has Kathy. Fact white blood cells so that's a gain-of-function as we've discussed. So the g p 41 is transmembrane the envelope. So how the virus what it encodes what bugs found that sale most of the viral particle is human cellular material because that's what viruses do the provirus is just a piece of RNA DNA DNA sitting in your cells waiting for the immune activation event to divide yourselves and replicate it from your cellular machinery and and the gain of function being there in general is an obvious example of manipulation, right? And that's and I'm going to ask you some questions about that in a moment. I wanted to ask you about stemming from the isolation discussion you and you you touched on PCR test and I think this is a really important point four people out there right now trying to make sense of all of this. They're currently using the PCR test ubiquitously around the world for covid-19 specifically despite a very high prevalence wage. Documented false positive results and to your point you were just basically explaining part of that and why so what what do you see as being the most effective test? Let's say for determining if someone is infected with a virus. Why is that not what's being used right now? Well, I would use serology testing meaning do you make an antibody and then I would back that up with functional immune testing that that part of your immune system is being damaged that you that you have functional T cells and so it's really a functional assay. And so if you have a piece of that virus in a PCR test remember, it's only 10% in order to get the whole virus. They take it into the laboratory and they used an enzyme again a good no editing function that just right and it's Frank and signed buyers just like vp-62 and and so it was it was Bob Silverman who lied and said that was the sequence of our virus. Yep. We sent samples one way and then they said my lab was contaminated know the blood supply was never contaminated would be be sixty-two. It was contaminated with lots of mouse a monkey viruses. So in the PCM test, you know, this is a case demek as as the term that everybody's you they're not cases those men with the prostate cancer from Bob Silverman's first paper, the the the young women in the military the blacks that the children if they just have those sequences in their DNA and that isn't immune activated Express made into a viral particle proteins or what are measured by antibodies the viral envelope protein not a sequence. That's not a virus. It's not infectious. It's not transmissible as a sequence in your DNA that it's it's only a virus particle you would isolate from your saliva. And so that would be a protein test. That would be either serology tests for IGG or IGM, but we understand dog. People don't necessarily make antibodies to some of these viruses. So you would look for a T-cell response. You would look for an Adaptive response and you can do both of those right knee was functional test. Do you make type 1 interferon? Do you make those proteins to degrade the virus? That's a true infection. That's a true infection. Did it see your immune cell not do we have a piece of RNA in our nose? We have millions of pieces of RNA in our nose and mouth which never become a virus unless you wear a mask and immune deplete yourself off if you get a flu shot and activate the immune system and cause the replication of the pro viruses that are all just waiting to to make new viruses immune activation. That's the intention of every vaccine and it's clear that the flu shot and the mass are so for instance a paper came out last week eighty percent of the people testing. ECE are positive that means expression because this is an RNA virus. So you have to have expression. So 80% of the PCR job people testing PCR positive wear masks. Most of the time are all the time and all cases, but they'll still aren't viruses those still aren't cases. So other people that the people that never wear a mask bath don't test positive Kauai we don't suppress our immune system. We have CD for immunity in our mouths. We have type 1 interferon in our mouths what Bureau monkey kidney cells don't have C. This is just simply molecular biology, but they get away with it because people don't know, right so my Doctor Kaufman and doctor and Charles ortlieb and millions of people lived this with the XM RVs and and with the Delta retroviruses that we weren't the first to associate of Irish with with Emmy CFS, but all of the careers of all of the people off Whoever tried to fight this were destroyed by Tony falchi and it's it's so frustrating to you to what you said at the end that these are people that are like bleeding about trusting the science when they're not actually even pointing they want you to trust what they tell you is the science why people like us that are pointing to Siam like in regard to the mass discussion where I'm going over scientific studies and being censored for it. It's so obvious how long it's it's almost the reverse of what they're claiming but speaking of the PCR tests and their unreliability as you wrote quote in 2010 xmrv related viruses were found in 86% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and only 6.8% of healthy controls. As you are touching on earlier. Now, this is this clear and important relationship was attacked and suppressed as many of them you can you briefly note on the situation that situation that you maybe haven't touched on yet and how a virus culture test was done at the time to reach those findings. Not a PCR test and how those dead. Things were attacked while findings a PCR test today with their obvious false positives are simply not allowed to be questioned. Right? And so yeah, the false positive soaked PCR was part of the test thing that that was what the original discoverers of this virus. They identified only sequences in men with aggressive prostate cancer with a r n a cell r46 to Cubit you tasted I'll say that for fun pack any rate. So in only the immune-compromised in only the susceptible, you know, and and so PCR testing was what Harvey Alter did but we did because we were us because it's Frank machete the father of human retrovirus is because we are the ones who first isolated and and confirmed Luke Montanez work because this is what I grew up doing from nineteen eighty-three, June sixth nineteen eighty-three was D-Day on was isolating retroviruses and understanding who's susceptible to getting disease so our paper isolated them. Yes, we use PCR is a guide but we but we use proteins. You have to make the proteins the entire rest of the paper other than what was partially retracted because it was clear. It was clear from the beginning but Bob Silverman insisted the PCR be in the test because he was being the paper because he was conflicted. He had the patent along with Abbott. So we didn't we weren't the first to describe it but we were the first to isolate it in our work proved him wrong. And so that meant the patent was owned by Judy mikovits in Frank crosetti and nobody else and if it literally and you know, the National Cancer Institute if you're Frank was steady, theoretically my Institute if you're me, but I didn't have a written contract with my Institute Club. I made these discoveries before anything. And so that's why when they jailed me and locked out my lab. They fabricated a contract and they said I stole intellectual property and that's why in our book we said, yep. She stole her own brain, you know anybody that reads that that's why they silenced the whole thing. This really is about money. And so again, this was the the fraud in the beginning. So we need the isolation. We showed the EMS not from one person. But from people worldwide, we we confirmed it in many blinded studies using all three techniques using PCR or confirming it with approaching. That's what we need to be doing with every one of these PTR tests show the antibody we had a serology test which was a conformational epitope. It wasn't a sequence off and so that we are paid for showed all of that. But you see when when you test the blood supply you can't afford isolation you can't afford anything but a PCR test so what they do in in in testing the blood supply and that fraudulent paper, which was published in that that the subject of that page ninety email I wrote down National Institute of heart lung and blood then then the director was seemed on Glen. She should be in jail for fraud so should for for commission broad. So should Michael Bush who's at the blood system that research institute in California. This is our blood supply the blood supply was absolutely contaminated and confirmed by more than one blinded study. But what they did is they turned the page that was published stepped down on or about September 22nd First online of 2011 as a failure to confirm the association of xmrv home with CFS. That's fraud. The paper should have been we don't have a test because the PCR doesn't detect every strain because there are many many strains in a we got a big problem for which the government is liable just as they were when Ryan White and Arthur Ashe got HIV and we realized it was transmitted through a contaminated blood supply, but now they've Bigger problem because when you inject the provirus in a vaccine in your polio vaccines in the immune-compromised what didn't those little black boys have? Oh a developed a r n a cell pathway. Oh a developed detox pathway have to wait till they're three years old will the relative risk goes down from 4.4 fold to to fold the game Risk in black boys goes down two white boys, which is bad. It's still tilt to fold. It's still highly significant that MMR is associated with with with them is a mineral of neuro immune diseases. But but all they had to do was wait till black boys were three years old and why did they do they covered it up since two thousand and one and destroyed Andy Wakefield soja lives matter know that they don't just Tony bauchi have no no they don't because you deliberately killed the black families and you know it one of the things that really stands out to me there is how clearly there are. Overlapping. Between what you're talking about then and what they're doing now including using the PCR test is a way to make it seem like things are solid but really knowing they should be doing a more more, you know, the larger breadth of their testing. It's just it's it's the corruption is very very apparent. But let's let's take this into vaccines seeing as how that's obviously a huge part of this agenda. So first of all, what are your thoughts on on vaccines, I guess as a science in general and what they put in them today what's called think a lot of people have issues with and maybe you could clarify or or make your comments on and then how would one of these current genetically genetically modifying covid-19 vaccine actually work for people to understand. Well, the first thing is they don't actually put it in them the manufacturing plant for most of the live viral vaccines are ourselves. We have to grow virus wage host sale. So all these animal tissues so because of the 1986 act because all liability was removed. They don't clean them up. They don't have to make them better job. They don't have to make them safer sorrowful. What was what was our big problem? And why is 2011 a big deal and I would encourage your audience to watch the movie 1986 the app. Is where you can stream it live from nineteen eighty-six the app because it goes in great detail in to this cover-up. And and so one of the problems with the ACT is off if there was a manufacturing defect and you could make the vaccines safer then pharmaceutical companies and the federal government is life. What did Judy mikovits in and our work with xmrv prove by 2011 that that that mixing Animal Human tissue in jetting the blueprint injecting mRNA injecting DNA injecting nucleic acid in proteins from other animals. You're you're you're literally in dead. To the immune-compromised. You're literally making them a virus Factory. What was the so what's the manufacturing defect the Factory The Factory to manufacture of like a live viral vaccine are animal cells are continuously growing cancer cells and and I think Bobby Kennedy does the best job for your audience in the in the forward. He shows off vaccines the shingles vaccine T show, you know varicella he shows how different investigators over the year have eight years have shown that these are incredibly dangerous. If you inject the genetic material the DNA RNA and protein of other animals directly into the bloodstream. That's not how we see the virus is it we see it by inhaling a few thousand articles if they're even made because of all the enzymes in our nasal for enjoy. I can't even figure out how to sneeze hard enough to get that RNA out when they put that Twinkie or what that Q-Tip up my gnome. I can't figure that I've tried I've tried to get a loogie going. I just you know, and I'm infected with the XM RVs. They loaded up the lab workers. That's the oh my God in chapter eight all those sequences. We saw the eighties were real sequences aren't viruses. So the big cover-up cover covid-19 is a cover-up of forty years of doing this to people so no vaccines ever known call back scenes ever again until they clean them up. We can make a safe one, but there's no incentive and that's what happened in 2011. So when we discovered the manufacturing defect not sure on back scene, but all the vaccines that these things are causing chronic disease AIDS cancer the nightmare of illness in our country and and they'd have to stop Thursday we get and they become liable. So what did they do? The Brewers schuett's decision and we have a to copy a chapter on the corruption in vaccine Court as it's called the corruption off. National vaccine injury Compensation Program that comes from the highest levels of the government including Tony Falcon in niaid so you can follow the money in that one. We detail and Chicago the the corruption there. So this is this is the this is the the problem. So if if people don't wake up don't take off the mass don't refuse a vaccine don't insist on all the data, you know, I've called Tony found she had debate me. I've got all the data and all you show or the models and all you do is lie in all you do is Sister me and you say oh, yeah, I don't care what you say in the Washington Post. Oh, yeah. She stole that stuff back in 2011 know you know that, you know, you paid off you paid off the criminal whittemore's they're still getting the grants. Hey, I got a statement from him. I got a quote from him you're paying people who misappropriated federal funds and what did the science journal due on September 1st, 2011 when that when when that correct? Paper false positive with a thing blaming us blaming the Institute threatening them with jail. Why is it not false positive now, It's the same argument folks. So this is where our news media and is is part and parcel and this plague of corruption. I think everybody saw clearly with the brilliant. Dr. Martin and Tony fouches involvement indoctrination part two. I had no idea, you know, if we if we know, I'm not sure if I'd be quite so brave if I knew how long will this was trying the beginning what the big part of this for me, which is something that you have real world experience in is this discussion of gain a function and how this is something that's being done now and as you said a moment ago that the idea that with what we know that this this should be we shouldn't be allowing anything new to be happening knowing what you just laid out for us. So do you think that bsl-4 Labs which is the dog? You maybe can explain the level of the severity of what they're dealing with should be allowed to increase The lethality of a virus using the gain-of-function. Should that be something that's just off the table today or or or you know, how long do you think it should be allowed or should it be something in the line of chemical weapons the way that they treat those today? I think it should be all off the table right now and not just bsl-4 but biosafety level three thousand and and really we know now these aren't safe. So one of the things in that chapter of oh my God, we can't afford to protect the lab workers from the invitation. Only meeting is they just downgrade the boss should say unintentional spread of a biosafety level 2 virus know they're not biosafety level too if the lab workers in the animal caretakers who work with mice. So this is the big problem. It's not just vaccines. It's all our biologics there. Isn't there isn't a University campus anywhere that doesn't have a mouse. Facility that doesn't you know, we don't work with monkeys are too expensive. But yeah, all of these Labs should be shut down. All of this practice should be shut down cuz gain-of-function is when something wouldn't happen in nature, right? You know, so that's why they are trying so hard to make us feel it's happening. No, it's not increased the severity the the virulence the the contagion aspect of it, right? So I mean this why do they do these how what the argument that they're making even today if it's supposed to defend against future outbreaks, which is all we get that's why we do the same function we're told is to defend against future things and it's supposed to help us be prepared. Why are we never prepared or able to fight these at least as we're sold in the narrative? Right? What do you think their argument is for that? Well, I mean the argument is we have a really big problem. So who are the first people to die with the MRNA vaccine who are the first people to die with a flu shot the people you've already injured and are you going to do autopsy? Season isolate the virus like we did know you're not you've already proved that you're going to autoclave them. That's what we do. You're going to burn them you're going to cremate them. That's what we do in biosafety level three and four facility way. We're going to burn them in big pits and make it think it's because they're not transmitting. Well, why aren't they transmitting and what do we know about this SARS code to even with the Gate of function? Hey when they get into humans off the healthy ones have the interferon Pathways the hump healthy ones to grade them the healthy ones have glutathione. The healthy ones have adapted to cell responses 99.8% of the time people. Don't get sick at all in the virus is gone. That's why the 8% of our genome is a viral that is unexpressed viruses cuz our immune system cripples them cuz we have a choice, you know, we're wonderfully and fearfully made this is the common goal. We make a very quick immune response when we see a virus and so that's why people are healthy. They're not cases. They're healthy people. Irish has gone. The disease has gone. There is no disease and only the compromised you're going to die and they're going to cover up that it ever was XM RVs that it ever was vaccines Mouse monkey care mold. Think about the chronic lyme disease. Oh were made to think just ticks. Oh tick-borne diseases know you inject those in the animal cells just like you inject. Do you think we use antibiotics and antivirals my Cottage when we test these in our Laboratories in these cell lines in these cultures. Oh because we can't grow all this other bacteria. Mrs. What song and said very clearly, you know, it's infection by injection, but it's coming from within so that's why all we do is keep our immune system strong with vitamin C vitamin A zinc hydroxychloroquine. I'm sure we can use great drugs that we've developed over the years to to project the immune suppressed, but we don't and that's, you know, the type 1 interferons have been taken out of our of our practice of Veterans Day Off. Very medicine for for for decades the minute somebody finds out something works and it costs fifty cents to spray that in your nasal cavity as I do every morning and remember I'm fact that I'm heavily infected with XM are beets and that's the big help because we know how to fix it buddy and I'm not going to wear a mask cuz you didn't kill me. You know, if you trying to kill me for the last decade and I'm not going to wear masks and I'm not going to get a shot and that's what I'm trying to tell that 6.6% of America. Yeah, people are going to die and they're going to be the ones they already injured and and and that's why I am. So any I know you're I know you're short on time to end here. I only have a few more questions. I want to ask you and I wanted to give you an opportunity to speak on I mean considering and bite. I've got two questions. I wanted to ask after this from from users may be interested in getting your take some people that were very excited to see what you were going to be on the show again considering False positive doctor death records Financial incentives. It seems pretty clear. This is not what they made it out to be and when we first met on the round table in the beginning of all this you made very clear statements about the issues with the way that they were using masks and I found that so interesting that that was that was at least as laws this whole thing seems to be every day seems like a year such a long time ago. Now since you've been heavily censored essentially removing your voice not allowing you to even speak out in defense of yourself. Do you feel in a way Vindicated now on the topic of mass as well as a lot of this other stuff? Well, no, we publish the book case against the mass ten reasons. Why mask use should be limited August 18th. And and so it's been heavily censored even even bookstores won't allow you to buy it and put it off the shelf and we're no we're now New York Times bestselling authors from plague of corruption and it's being censored from everybody. I can't even buy it. I'm allowed to buy one copy or four copies from Amazon and they use Different Search terms, so that ends up just saying I'm this bad person. So no, actually I I won't feel Vindicated until every person in America takes off that mass and and burns did because it's contaminated. It's a biohazard. It's making you sick. So it's making you sick. My mass makes me sick. Your mass makes you sick and and nobody's Mass. He's doing anything except spread covid-19 twenty Twenty-One. So when we take off that mask when we refused ever because these viruses have been injected into most of us off and anybody that you know, I the flu shot, you know, they know the data from the wolf study and others the flu shot drives the disease the flu shot makes you 36% off or likely to get a coronavirus infection that seems because what what are you doing when you go after the influenza? Oh, you're using up that type 1 interferon that glutathione and what do you do age? Get a flu shot and wear masks the immune suppress even further so that you're just a walking megavirus and all of a sudden you get a sore throat and all sudden you get a headache and then they put that Q-Tip up in your nose and break blood-brain barrier and spread meningitis. And God only knows what because it's not sterile either so hated until people wake up. Absolutely. The real world that has is clearly showing a than any audience out. There. Are you today my audience is what we've been screaming about the mass studies forever. So they're nodding along with you right now. We all know this stuff because their studies actually show that before but in and be please let me know if you're short on time and have to go I have two questions from some users that were very interested to hear your take on a couple of things that I would be interested is 12:30. So I got a but another 20 minutes. Okay fantastic. So one of the ones that I got a lot from people and this is also something that I find very interesting is they wanted to know what in your mind how you see what's causing the oxygen loss with the rest respiratory problems and what time Are ventilators killing people? Well, so so the oxygen loss, you know, the again the mass depletes your oxygen. It's very clear 21% in 16% out of oxygen are metabolic processes. It uses it for every process in our body. We know that the viruses and that's mitochondria. Remember that's what that's what makes our ATP and our energy so mitochondria viruses go after mitochondria, and so virus is crippled your ability to make energy. So the more infected you are with the latent viruses once expressed when you compromise then your immune system has to turn all its attention over there and and go here so the ventilator so what we should be doing which is what we used to do is we give oxygen you put oxygen in your nose in the plane when the when the when the oxidative stress when you're above the ozone layer if the cabin loses pressure you put on oxygen you don't deplete birth. Oxygen with a mask. So that's the important thing and what the ventilator does is it in and you can do this in a pulse Scimitar on your on your finger and see how much oxygen is in your blood and below a certain level ninety some percent or so. I'm not a clinician but the eighties this is where you're at a level where you acutely immune-compromised you. Okay, honey. Okay, sweetie and where you're hugely immune-compromised. And so this is you know, putting the ventilator in literally paralyzes your lungs. It's down to your breathing and and and this is not the defect that that people have so they can't get they do so much damage in the process of of stopping your natural breathing when they really needed to do was put in a cannula or hyperbaric oxygen therapy or or intracellular glutathione. So this these are and we've known now, Distance again since the days of HIV AIDS and how these viruses crippled our mitochondria in our ability to make energy and oxygen their metabolic diseases. It's just really frustrating how it seems and this is perspective my perception, but that every action they take is actually making all these things worse, right? I think we need to know what on that and ask whether that maybe something that's intentional one of the other questions that I'm getting from from some of the users that wanted to hear your opinion. And this is something that I've talked about a lot in the beginning of all this have you seen any indication since the Courvoisier candle began that there are genetically tailored Faith viruses out there tailored to maybe specific Nations, which might explain the different levels of severity according to the narrative. Well, I I think they are a genetically tailored already talked to people of color. We we know that we've known that for decades because again different so consider and then and then even even people like from home You know Sweden Ireland, you know where you don't have a lot of sun think about your vitamin D receptors. So vitamin D is so critical to 300 or more immune responses. So a person near the equator people of color have vitamin D receptors polymorphisms single nucleotide changes that make their receptors act like resistors. So one molecule looks like point zero zero zero one molecule cuz you don't want the flame to get too high in a nation in immune responses. Now people from Sweden from other parts of the world where it's dark half the year. They're they're they're receptors there vitamin D receptors act like amplifier in one molecule of sunlight acts like a thousand. This is how nature designed and again our our microbiota are are are indigenous. So for instance when when I go home The water in Mexico my my gut bacteria give me diarrhea because I wasn't raised with that communication between my Dodge and it's j my microbes I own and and what is in my environment so our environment is critically important to the expression of our genes and the expression of these viruses. So as we pollute our environment is Stephanie set up with glyphosate. So again, what is glyphosate doing but robbing you that glycine with a phosphate molecule is critical to intracellular glutathione your job intracellular antioxidant you want you don't want reactive oxygen and nitrogen species too high. So it's all a biochemistry. And yes, the intention of pollution of our own soil. Our soil doesn't have minerals. So we're missing our zinc's so so our food is GMO. Our food is contaminated. So all along the line we see how certain job. Population. So if you have to go to the grocery store and eat processed food with GMO instead of buying healthy food. This is this is the you know, the wonderful world of doctors act Bush know. You're far more don't know your doctor who cares because it's it's how contaminated as your food how contaminated is your water? How contaminated is your soil and then that becomes, you know the health of your immune system in your Endo cannabinoid system. And of course, they took the most sacred plant cannabis out of our diets in the nineteen-thirties. So we've been getting more and more sicker and sicker because the endocannabinoids system is the dimmer switch on the immune system. It tells you the planes do higher-level. It keeps you in balance. And this is what we're losing. So interesting to me I've been to I've been writing about the endocannabinoid system and and, you know cannabinoids in general for a long time. You mentioned I forget was in your book or something else, but you mentioned in regard to a mother's milk house. Very prominent aspect. I recommend people include some of my articles about that in the show notes as well as your discussions cuz that's a huge like the idea of such as a cannabis being used in water to remove them heavy metals. I mean the things that are very very relevant to where we are that are just removed from our knowledge but leads to the last one of my last questions here that I find is exactly what you were touching on right there in your opinion. How long do you think this whole biosecurity state of Georgia has been in the works? Well, I think the data show since nineteen thirty-four, I mean that's chapter 5 of our first book plague and of course here in America forty years, they started and set 1976. Remember the implant demek indoctrination you go all the way back when our media wasn't quite so corrupt and they started what was it swine flu or bird flu, I forget which one back in nineteen Seventy-Six and where the vaccines injured so many so what time? We've done we've done zika we've done Anthrax within you know, we tacked Anthrax on to 911 and blamed and killed an interest an innocent scientist friend of ours from the national from from Fort Detrick Bruce Ivins, you know again, I escaped that fate. I don't know if mine's any better the last decade but this is what the the system's tried to do. And I think I think this is what what Bobby Kennedy does so well in that forward he shows you this has been going on since the thirties and every time we get a way with the we being the government these evil people at the top who been there since nineteen Seventy-Six and you know, we see these same people it's not a political thing. It's not found. She it's not, you know, you know about she stands next door bomber with zika and Ebola, you know and Obama gives more and more money to the Chinese and and they they see how far they can get away with. With you know, they release zika on the Brazilians, you know on the poor at the same time. They did a mosquito a weaponized mosquito release in a DTaP vaccination program. So on and on and on I think we've seen this plague of corruption play out over the last four decades. Yeah, then you've made that very often and I hope people will take the time to do your work and blog and your books. Oh, sorry, if I cut you off. I think we lost the connection will just to finish it off here if you if I still got you just if you need to leave us here. Where do we go from here. Where do you see this going? What do you think should be doing? Well, well really what we should be doing is is really exactly what President Trump's been trying to do and and World Wide Open Up Our Country wage, you know, you know close the FDA close the CDC and the plague of corruption that is our Federal grant system in our scientific journals, you know and the media which is direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals kind of end the media corruption and and and change I'll put a five year moratorium on all vaccines not every single vaccine. Cuz what are we going to say take off the mask? Cuz and and what are we clean up our environment clean up our soil, you know, stop the demos, you know, our food is not dead GMOs cause cancer. It's very clear Roundup causes cancer glyphosate causes all of these diseases, you know is associated, you know, the more toxins dog. Our world the the more susceptible you are to covid-19 and and the vaccine program, you know, because it's clearly not working bring back natural medicine wage. I have President Trump can right now and health insurance because it's sick insurance and it's bankrupting our country just to close all of the NIH because our our health and human services are are killing our our country our economy. It's a third of our entire economy is Health and Human Services. We we could end all the damage covid-19 is done tomorrow by closing and starting over give every single American $500 a month for their own health care tax free. I don't care if you spend it on clean food. I don't care if you spend it on cannabis your naturopathic doctor your at your acupuncturist your chiropractor, whatever you do for health bring back Health Freedom informed consent birth. Everything absolutely and we'll said I mean there's so many things that need to be changed now and and I may I don't share necessarily I I question whether this is what ultimately will happen from this or any other Administration, but I truly hope that that is what plays out and anybody should be hoping the same regardless of how they feel about politics right? It's not about that. It's about the direction we're going thank you so much for being here and taking the time to speak with me. Jacob. It's I mean, there's a lot of important things we talked about today and I hope you'll come back and talk with you soon. Anything else you want to leave for us before you take off. Well, absolutely come back and talk with you soon. Thank you for having me back as We Know A lot's happened. And as you said, it seems like forever ago an attorney ago, but but I think the most important thing you just said is is what I tried to say, you know, this isn't politics. This is five five to seven decades once we understand the problem. Let's let's design a solution in stop making it about politics cuz it really has nothing to do with anything else. Then our very basic human rights to health freedom and the choice of what happens to our bodies and those of our families I couldn't agree more. Well, thank you for being here and everyone out there as always question everything come to your own conclusions. Stay vigilant people should not be walking around with masks. You're sure that cuz people are listening really know closely to this right now people should not be long. There's no reason to be walking around with a mask.

AIDS government chronic fatigue syndrome interferon NIH Tony HIV covid-19 New York Times Harvey Alter fraud Judy mikovits prostate Cancers Tony bauchi Francis Collins America XM
Larry Shushansky -122

On Mic Podcast

27:46 min | 1 year ago

Larry Shushansky -122

"Hello and welcome. This is on Mike with Jordan rich and we are expanding the coverage range of conversation to include artists of all kinds actors musicians writers scientists. Pretty much anyone with a fascinating story and that's a lot of people out there. I WanNa thank those who listen to this podcast and also go to our sister podcast. Which is on Mike Jordan rich late night classics highlights from over twenty years doing the overnight show at Boston's WBZ powerhouse fifty? Two Thousand Watt radio station. You'll find many celebrity interviews as we head down memory lane together it's featured on all podcast platforms including iheart simply. Download the IHEART TAB for easy access. Today I'm with Larry Shoshefsky. He's a therapist and has been for many decades who is pioneering his own work in a book called independent didn't enough Larry shares with his readers and he'll share with us today his own story of struggle with addiction and battling the chronic disease hepatitis C.. For years through these experiences variances and his own work with so many people. He realized a lot about himself. And the human condition as you here we believe our unhappiness is so much about what's going on on outside of us. Independent therapy offers a practical solution to improve the quality of your life and your relationships can't wait to find out more to Larry's your Sanski Author of independent enough. Let's go on my a real pleasure to welcome Larry to on Mike Jordan rich. The book is again called Independent. Enough off we'll get into that. It's all about relationships. But we're forming a new relationship. You and me right here at very nice to meet you sir. Nice to meet you too. George turns out that You've had quite an interesting life yourself and before we get to your premise. A lot of it is based on becoming independent in your case of simply call. Hep C.. Right exactly right. Can we start there because you edney before restarted. You're had a battle over many many decades that is now yours in the win column right tell us and my Early Twenties look towards my late twenties. It was late sixties and early seventies. I did a lot of alcohol and a lot of drugs and I became addicted so I carried it around with me in known as a chronic disease hepatitis. C. For forty years I got back from my old drug days when I was in college. And in through the years in nineteen ninety when I applied for a life insurance policy. I found out HEPATITIS-C now I'd carry that around with me since college like I said and it I never knew I had it. Our fatigue does tired hours actually depressed. I did a lot of sleeping and I think a lot of naps but I just Kinda felt normal for me because I'd had it ever since I was in my twenties so I had gone through a couple trials of treatment with Interferon Rob Aaron at just knocks. You out I mean it's just it's brutal stuff. At one point. My platelet count dropped so low. It almost one was killed me and they had to take me off the medication Three years ago I was in Stage three trial. I have doctor Doctor Dow L.. WHO's at Beth? Israel Hospital Stage three trial and with the two weeks house. Clear it that there is a cure. Yeah there's absolutely now. It's on the market well. Congratulations so glad you're well and vibrant and that brings us to what we're talking about independent enough in a way. You became independent back then when you were given that drugging developed a whole new way of living a my idea was to once. I learned about the diagnosis. My idea was to eat better exercise. Chris is more sleep. Do what I needed to do. Stay alive long enough so I Until they found care When I was initially diagnosed I had a friend? WHO's a lawyer? He's doing now practice at a law and he had a bunch of our eds nurses who working for him and they gave me this packet of of research had done on Hep C. and before I'd go to sleep at night I'd redes- packet and a lot of research tells you the worst of the worst. Tens of thousands of people were dying the year from Hepatitis C.. And not even knowing about it and and all the side effects of the difficulties people are having and I found myself waking up in the morning just depressed. It's not couldn't figure out why so I put the reading aside on so I figured it out and just lived as healthy as I could and journey. It was it was I was just. I can't even tell you the difference. It made for me that once I cleared and I could think clear and I had energy and I can engage. People people like I'd never engaged before it was really like unlikely said early as like known myself for the first time in my life there. Is that sense in reading your book which is very easy to get into understanding that. It's all about US and relationships but it's unlike a lot of quote unquote helped books. self-help book you're just is telling your story throughout it which is very honest and very revealing and I could identify with a lot of things you had to say and I appreciate that. Well you welcome. Yeah it's not. It's not so much about the drug addiction addiction or no no no recovery from the The FCC it has more to do about the relationships. I've had with my friends with my family with my wife with my kids. Yeah that that kind of thing so the title is right off the Bat something we need to talk about independent enough. Those two words taken separately have pretty distinct meanings. Put them together. It's a little little different different different. Take and what does that take so most of us in psychology and In our society generally we all strive to be independent ended. That's the word independent become more independent. You gotTa Problem Become More Independent. My perspective is at all relationships. You're in all relationships. Have a certain amount of dependency. You just can't do away with it. It's a part of what binds us together and most of that dependency is healthy. It never causes a problem. What the book book is about is when is when the dependency creates conflict? My perspective is that all conflict. All conflict from CA comes from dependency but not all dependency creates conflict. And that's what this book is about. You can keep your healthy dependency right and when you walk up against somebody when you have conflict or the tensions. Are there problems. It's all because you're too dependent when I depend on you for my well being and we get into a conflict. I'm trying to get used to do something that will make me feel better. There is an up personal life who cannot identify with what you're saying exactly right the ends and as you say the back of the book there's very important line and there are a lot of important lies the most meaningful and lasting changes do not come from pleasing others exactly right that's been my mo for a lot of years until I've tweaked it and when you tweak it you and you get that sense of independence and it really makes you. You have various steps. And I I know every book like this would have steps to take. I WANNA run through them with you. 'cause they're very easy to think about an easy to apply. Sure the the interesting thing about the steps as we do it naturally if you or anybody has a certain amount of functionality you have done these steps but it's unconscious we we don't realize it and what the steps are. Is that when we enter into conflict with somebody or we come up against a wall and we're trying to accomplish something it's all about taking king step back and getting the noise out of our head about the world about the other person particularly in our world. I mean look at the politics where constantly constantly constantly blaming other for our unhappiness and so we ruminate we obsess we blame over and over and over again the other the person and we never get anywhere so that first step is taking a step back the old expression stop take a breath but it really makes a big difference right at by the way I put this into practice and it's amazing how much off I just stop and not react. Let me just take a breath right and that breath. That breath is taking a psychological step back and in getting your thoughts about the other person of the world out of your head taking breaths counting to ten. You're doing all those old cliche kinds of things. Were exactly that it's about getting some distance so you can get the thought out of your head once you do that. Once you get the thoughts out of your head it's about self reflection not self responsibility. This is not about responsibility. It's going deeper into our psychological makeup. And not about analysing. Why we're we're doing something or our mothers and fathers did this or or the trauma did that or that kind of thing but it's no more about who am I? What am I doing in in this conflict in this problem in my being too passive my being to sort of in my being too aggressive in my being depressed and my being withdrawn my my being this that or the other thing is all about looking at ourselves so it was like looking in mirror at ourselves and seeing what are we doing in the president proper but that is challenging for a lot of people? Isn't it Larry. It requires objectivity right when we're dealing with ourselves. We're very subjective right right. I think it's hard because of that. Absolutely we become very subjective about ourselves and the situation. The other reason is hard is because we try to analyze analyze. What am I about? And it's not about analyzing it's about self reflection and it's not about the other problem is that we often either critical title or judgmental about ourselves. I can't believe I'm so depressed or I can't believe I've become passive. I hate myself for doing it. We get into those kinds of talks hawks in our head and it's not about that it's about okay. I was passive would need to do about my passivity. which is the next step right? We make a decision and according to that self reflection we have not just in general but it's tied to that self reflection you focus of course on the F. Ford fear which is the big stop. Sign that right keeps us where we are and critical at this point when you have to sort of take action to deal with. How do you recommend people in general deal with the F. Word well I'll give you an example about fear I just between you and I sure before? We went on the mics before we went on on on show. We had this talk about the help. See not felt comfortable back and forth as soon as that might turn on. I went into. Oh you know what I got a little nervous and I got a little stilted and I said okay. Calm down. Just relax have the conversation with Jordan like you did before you took. You took a beat. I took it to do that right. Exactly exactly right. I stepped back from all of this in the studio and I went. Okay this is what you need to be. More measured and be more engaged with Jordan like it in the beginning and that was an instantaneous. Quick Thought Nanosecond thought that allowed me to calm down and gauge more with. who were you know what I love? You mentioned you. You got an into shape. Since you're you're cure out and you look like you're in great shape. I love about this concept. Independent enough is it's like exercise. The more you do it the easier it gets or eating healthy and it's a lot of people are struggling. A lot of people are struggling with you. Know moving one step forward and it's that first step if the toughest threat does get he doesn't get easier. Yeah yes I somebody said to me the other day the difference between Amer turned professional an amateur practices to get better a professional practices. And that's what this is about. This is just about practice. Noticed over and over and over and over and over again would jumping one step ahead. That's the next step after the one I'm going to bring up reengaging in the relationship inch right okay and we know that we need to take some action. There's the person there's the boss whoever might be. What's your advice in that regard? So what happens is after we've done the self reflection and we make a decision one of these advice I would say is it's never gonNA work out like a habit in your head. We have these great decisions we make and then we follow it with a picture of how that's going to turn out never does because the other person is not going to play the role or the action that we picture in our head so it's going to fail not a problem. It's just not an issue so as you take a step back back into the relationship. Let's say my wife and I and part of the book have difficulty going to sleep together. I wanted to come sleep with me. She stays up late connor thing so as I do the self reflection I enter back into that conflict and ice and I interact with my wife in a different way than I did before right. She may not intimate a May like for example may think well maybe I need to tell her how I feel. Sorry go back and go honey. I feel really rejected when you come to sleep with me. And she goes big deal. Okay some variation on your theme right it often times we give up. We go well. That didn't work. I try to or we get resentful right Zinger. We get more angry and then we go back into the thoughts about the other person. That's exactly right. You didn't. I said how I felt. You didn't react the way that you needed to react. So darn it and then we go off kind of thing so it's matter about when I say how I feel and it doesn't work then I go back into myself right and I figure out. Well what what is this really about what are really need to do. And this trial and error this back and forth it most the time the issues we have in life issues we have with other people never resolve themselves. We your that's out the window and when we make those decisions step back can we expect. Resolution doesn't happen. What happens it evolves Over time as Wiz volve his people and and our relationships evolve. Let's say this issue with my wife and I go into sleep together. It doesn't look the same same as did the first year the Tenth Year The twentieth year. or The thirty fifth year it evolves over time. We still have the issue but it. It doesn't look anything like it used to look. Well it's so true Larry that people will say no matter what I do no matter what I say I get that reaction but I think you're right. I think over time and I've worked for bosses when I've worked in various radio stations. Who I learned to play like a violin? Yeah I got it for survival and there isn't a person out there who has been an employee who hasn't done this APP stand and after a while you realize that worked. The difficulty for me was always adapting that to people really cared about not. I could tweak my responses to get what I needed it to survive in the workplace. I had more trouble one on one with a loved one or will the dear friend exactly right because I don't know with feared hurting them or hurting myself off. What happens is that the closer people are in our circle? The more dependent we become so becomes harder to do the work. You talking Work colleagues are are. You're less dependent on acquaintances. You really less dependent on so becomes easier to do with the guy at Dunkin donuts than it is to do it with your spouse but if you practice with the guy at Dunkin donuts exactly right ultimately that might exactly move you to exactly. Sometimes it's easier to practice with the guide Dunkin donuts than is practically partner or your kids or whoever it happens to be. That's very close seriously. It's much easier to so you're counseling ruling families and couples and individuals. Yep Now you doing this. I really like the fact that you're self deprecating and your guy like me who can admit go my God. Did I say something thing silly or did I trip over my own. Absolutely I think. That's I get. I get the sneaking suspicion that a lot of people are so darn afraid of messing up. They don't explore. They don't have the adventure of relation. Exactly right we're F- we're scared. Were afraid of losing relationship I one of our greatest fears is lonely or being alone And so we jump through hoops. We do whatever we need to do. We don't explorer. We don't play we don't Take the risk. We don't grow Out because as you grow in relationship there's potential that that relationship might not work and that's what people were afraid of or they're afraid of getting swallowed up you you hit it on you hit the nail on the head it's like fear is so motivating moss and we don't even realize it. But it's so inhibiting at the same same time it's amazing has the pace of lifestyle made it more practical to try these things more. I'll say why it brought that up my wife and I we all have phones like everybody else. We have the cell phone and the IPHONE and we have a calendar and it's an outlook calendar we've end. It's her idea because I can never figure this out. It's a shared calendar. She has her calendar. I've got mine. We don't interrupt each other during the day. But a shared she calls with the wet calendar what does confer weekends evenings and Pretty Good Great Vegas to read market that. What's what's really cool about? This concept is took me a while to get I used to it. You know because I was sharing everything everything here. This is where I am all day long. She said I don't really care where you are exactly but it worked out that we've set. Ah Guidelines that we mutually agreed to end it really became. I've got my independence. She's got hers perfect right and that's better situation that trick. Trek is to have maintain your independence maintaining the connection at the same time. Yes and a lot of people what we do is we either overly independent ended where we're distant And not connected or were totally enmeshed with somebody or anywhere. In between. What you've just described is a perfect example of are being independent but yet still connected at the same time and using the tech if you will? That's available because people always complain about the highest speed pace of life but there are ways you can. You can use these technologies tire advantage. I think if you take the time and take that step back from the technology take the step back from your hurried life. Take the step back from all the responsibilities and everything that we do. You take that step back and you look at the technology gin and figure out what you're doing in relation to that technology and my being overly dependent in my in my becoming addicted to it. I mean there's tons of articles about addiction. And how am I using this technology and how is what is the best way for me to use it in my relationship. It's not just the human connection it's also the connection. We have to say work to WHO Internet to all of these absolutely in a sense. Independent enough could apply to anyone who might be looking to have a new relationship with their our own body. Oh without question absolutely everything becomes a relationship We don't realize that we don't think of it like that but yeah we have a relationship relationship with self with WHO I am. I mean how many times do I talked to myself about me and all of us do we have that relationship with self and a lot of times. uh-huh it's important to look at that so we can grow. There's a David Brooks his New York Times columnist. He wrote a book called. I can't remember I'm sorry but but in this book he says that One of the ways to build self esteem and confidence is at when we set our own goals in our own mind and we work towards accomplishing those goals. Right now. This is internal. This is with self right. I want to be a better spokesperson. I want to be the better on the radio. I want to be a writer. Whatever it happens to be as we set those goals and we move towards those goals? That's how we we build confidence and self esteem. So that's the relationship with Larry so it's one thing to write a book. It's another thing to get to the point where I can come here and have a radio show with Um you know our podcast. That's not easy. The first few shows and podcasts. I did were horrible absolutely terrible and so I had had to go into myself until Larry and figure out what Larry needed to do. I will say this and I'm totally upfront. Honest with anybody about this therapy to me has been all about stepping stepping forward after reflection and taking action absolute You know the idea of just talking to myself is great. I love the sound of my own voice. 'cause it's made maybe a lot of money but I needed somebody else. I've needed somebody else to bounce off and and let's talk about the the power of positive therapy the kind of work you you do A lot of people are stuck and the book's going to help. But why is it that somebody else can crack that egg. Shell the head. How how does it work in your estimation so what happens is often times when we have a problem in our lives from depress Mejia's having problems in relationships relationships or whatever it happens to be I I come up with a solution in my head and I try that? If it doesn't work. My Tennessee is to continue to do that. That same solution over and over and over and over again and with without any results definition of insanity right. That's exactly I only to be flipped. No no exactly right. So what happens. Is that when you when you open into the world and it could be. It could be fiction. It could be self help books. It could be therapy. European could be podcast. He could be Youtube cons of things move. I mean it can be all number of different things retreats Yoga Meditation. I mean there's so much out there in the world that we can reach out to where we're so busy in our own heads that we can't see the fourth for the trees we're too close to ourselves. Basically basically so therapy with good therapist by the way is good. And there's bad other Louis but when you get into good therapist that person they don't have the answers. There's all they're doing is they're trying to play back as a mirror of who you are and then you can figure out what you need to do. Well no that's not not to go up to forty in here but it's about bringing yourself as the l. f. out right so that you can examine it and then and then like it and and then get to be right yeah head. It's too close it. You're just too close to the problem and you need you need. That's a perfect way to say you need to get it out so you can Z.. Self right and it makes them determined fascinating. Let let's do a little bit on. Repeat Repeat repeat because We talked about the muscle memory. That is so part of the human experience experience but you talk about short-term and long-term learning etcetera etcetera any tips on your way of repetition how it worked so I'll get into the general idea about if that's okay There's this thing called Neuro plasticity and I'm not a neuroscientist by any stretch of the machination but the way that did I understand it. Is that with certain steps. We can actually change the physiological makeup of our brain that's called neurogenesis this where you're actually creating new neurons which then create other new neurons which create new pathways. We used to believe that we were hard wired now. The new science says we're not hardwired. It's like plastic. Where we're pliable but in practice over and over and over again in your mind line actually creates these new neuro pathways? What usually happens is when we first learned something right we go? I'm I'm done but the neuro pathway basically lays her is that it's not strong enough so when we go I'm done that chemical goes off in the headset. You've accomplish it. We laid back but we don't have enough up in my head yet to really habits solidified. The other thing that happens is when we would try new things. We've talked to people and when we talk to people they say to us Nicely done you going back to school good for you when we get that kind of Kudos and cheerleading We're we're trying to accomplish something the chemical that is emitted in our brain that says you've accomplished something is also lamented in our brain when you're congratulated about something so you take your foot off the pedal and you're not as engaged in the change so it's very important net as you're doing things over and over again to find a small amount of people who can challenge you and push you forward not raw rye. You explained so beautifully and that's the kind of work in the book too. It's again I read it in two sittings because it was fascinating. I knew you're going to be here but it's so practical. It's so I hope so so basic so. Where do you see this going from here? You've got the book you've got your website which will announce again and use to me? Your goal all is now to outreach to the world as well as to individual clients right. That's it the idea is to do more of these podcasts. Do More radio shows and more speaking engagements. I love to do speaking engagements because when when you talk to people and you can see people and becomes more of a conversation than a presentation tation it. Just it's what it's what it's all about for me and I. That's where I hope this will go. Well I would assume Ted talk is in your future if not already i. You know I couldn't even get into the audience of Ted talk a little. I'll change after this podcast. I'm hoping so Jordan and I have one more question. It's got nothing to do with independent enough and it's only because I study voice and all that and I know you came in you drove in from Rhode Island but you do not have the typical Rhode Island accent. You don't say I parked my car and GonNa Coffee. So I'm not sure where you from. But it's not as Philadelphia Pennsylvania Virginia. Okay all right you had to ask. I didn't ask you that before. It's interesting because when I go back to Virginia I start to talk like this really accent. It's unbelievable okay. And I and I come up north and James of Acton to more of a mix of. It's fine either way as a matter. Well Larry Thank you so much. It's called independent enough a book about relationships and what is the website once again. Independent Dot Com. That's pretty easy to remember. And it's a wonderful concept that's laid out very clearly and highly endorsed awesome. Thank you so much for coming back Jordan. Thank you so much I appreciate and you're more than you're listening so much. We're building our audience every day and you can help out by writing and reviewing this podcast on all major platforms including apple and subscribing. And telling your friends about if you'd like to reach me Jordan at chart productions dot com C. H. A.. RT JORDAN CHART PRODUCTIONS DOT COM on twitter. It's at Jordan. WBZ and on facebook. It's Jordan rich show until next time we sign sign off by saying the well you can do some good take care

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Footsteps to Heaven - God's Radical Love Part 2

Footsteps to Heaven

25:25 min | 1 year ago

Footsteps to Heaven - God's Radical Love Part 2

"<music> the following podcast was made possible by the sponsorship of theresa leong lee and by catholic digital resources. That's where you can find downloadable. Faith formation resources and evangelization tools visit catholic digital resources at catholic d._r. Dot com to build did your own faith and the faith of others. That's catholic d._r. Dot com hi. I'm terry modise and i want to welcome you into into a retreat that was recorded live at saint patrick catholic church in fayetteville north carolina in two thousand thirteen entitled celebrating god's love in your domestic home church if focused on god's designed for family life and vocation of marriage in part one. We we look at what god's radical love means. It's the root of all successful christian living. It's the root of our joy. It's the root of our connection to god end our connection to each other including loved ones who have gone home to heaven. Do you need more of this and your family relationships today. Listen in the handouts given to people who attended this retreat are available to you on our website to find the link. See the show for this podcast or go to our website. I g n m dash media dot org and select video on god's radical love. Let's begin now with a prayer to open yourself self to all that the holy spirit wants to reveal to you. Pray with me. Come holy spirit renew me. Come holy spirit silmi come holy spirit. Teach me come holy spirit. You have my permission to change me anything that works against arbi with each other sin because this connects us now our intelligence violence is that dies and the good guys pack them to be rothley stocking bowl so what is seen as something that you don't wrong with you say autopsy tv. It shows as now realize today. He had a sexual encounter with you in the hallway. You're on a date reshaping. What hits think is normal so what else houses view shaping our messengers in the future and respected. We have gone that nestle we have gone a father says the stupidest and confidently i guess it's upside down his found the parents to do stupid things so that we all have and we as parents have now oh that's not reality but where our kids to get their mind as they're watching it anything that's not reality that's all for the parents of the grown ups and then when my living finally get away from us us college or whatever i have no kids thirties were raised as i say on the holy spirit every time there was a regular issue. We robin replay until we got the answer. We had what's wrong. Prayer lies that we'd sometimes it's hot sobbed freight. We just had the spirit of his news situations nations. We didn't do it perfectly. We were pretty good parents and yet both of our kids leading off traum brown award that happens all the time. I mean even happened but we were writing off r._o. Thing is now there is so much other influence working against our hearted even even colleges that they go-to when my son in college professor said my job is to program you for way you're raising uh tension to that you get good grades and everything will offer back. That's not the truth is on the war and he said yes but he was still rationally. Bradley being infected with the lives that that were against radical love and it's a very of the set eventually round pick warmer than others the role of the race parental role of parents whose gets ever mouse you should go to church with our knees who are lease church raider live october's experiences or you with the year that usually people go to retreats have have some free information relies motivate them one more lower in your allies and we've all taken some kind <hes> ownership of the racing or maybe ownership tip of the faith assistants missed file and every child we have through getting older ships some bigger bigger than others was hard because of the will of the media is so hard day right now do psychological her for the in the early nineteen hundreds i'll until then the child basically grew up after they maybe they got raided occasion in england had farm order and it was after we had not industrial revolution and not suzanne their heads off college that the the children begin to finish high school and during that period you of a finishing school of becoming a goldline vilis that were lessons. He needs to be in a teenage rebellion phenomenal. That's alice <unk> bellies sit late. The inner by life who are saying is i grew up but i can't. I still a new condition when he reached coffee how they also are taking another decade to take on responsibilities in cases and so hello this is such a widespread phenomenon i thought at first it was just like it's there by you and then i talked about it it's everywhere in our culture and it's us so prevalent that the sociologists have her. Are you merging the gulf. South is power is so infectious francis recently now these calling special year for now us. Let me read you a little bit of what he says about that and why he's doing this the is you probably know yes all bishops around the world together to study issue and develop pastoral plan as what about this issue paul francis he said the family the domestic church is in such from what we need to call on this call very often. He says concerns were heard until two years ago have arisen day back and as a result of different situations from the wife <unk> access cohabitation with not married and sometimes even excludes the idea uh of it you save sex unions between persons who are not infrequently removed over the many situations required purchase attention and pastoral pastoral care and i'm gonna read everything it's your the single parent family culture of non commitment that marriage to be temporary for the venues of this awesome <unk> lewis of the media on popular culture is understanding of marriage vanderlei and sexual new interpretations wasn't center <unk> right within into church that remained halloween of marriage and yield power of zapping pennants which is as soon so many hours. You're scientists weakness or total consequently. We understand the urgency. It was which oh i disagree with dress. These challenges brazil why simply calling and as a result of the current situation natty ed children young. You'll never seen parents receive the sacraments interferon just how urges are the challenges to evangelization arising from the current situation just ministries we had served that we needed to really get a saw russ you you vandalizing those after west cypress who read washington. I said our reach pass. I think you really help you understand god radical and how that empowers us the route so the vote came out with this always right on he it wasn't for commemoration from god that what we had discerned in my office is truly regard as columnist you through jani mommy odyssey right spread disease. I really feel like guys called me and my step u._b. Designing athletes rogge walk up a raffle up ready to you. Anyone else board says is to help you understand your mission me <music> out and helping to restore the family created the it doesn't matter whether you've been divorced family were being name or are <unk> functional family with radical ball is not be manifested way as line because you know what those of us who are earning become the powerful instruments for the people got because we see the dark side when we you get us then he become a power with a passion we go with that dr side you. Do you have any more groundwork. We kind of package with nuts desire in us to help make the world better place to help them store the way guideline. Some of the most powerful against the rotation of marriage is designed to be are those who have suffered divorce. Worse is the healing process and become aware got random calling hugh spread that robin i i've been married for eight years and there was a time robin's real-life rices ryan brian why people get worse because haitian of the sacrament polly wants a sacrament. You read the baltimore and your the point is is the presence of fries freely giving yet confession. It's not a time of shane time healing because it's not the priest uses apple <unk> jesus in the <unk> increase. Your gate brees is in persona christi. When greece is concentrating hubris on offer is not the band rate is jesus one on yet proudly for years ago when i last saw marriage is jesus's this is presence freely giving us supernatural power to make the marriage work no matter what bought aw vo <unk> and when one does it neither <unk> charger power someplace aretha tabei health mutate route and i had a friend who founding years of business very the report was even a friend for twenty years and the joint team this board members and we didn't touch missions yeah but this friend was now called and because we work together with the enemy was the reloaded the talks about us and our friends this trial what he was the child to audience is the actual childhood and the dysfunction of being active alcohol. It was in denial about it. No matter what we did back to june go to casler button was not convinced the game win a sack and and so we did finally remove our lives because he did not want who were on his side of arrival of the relationship was less fair and when that they were his eyes wander to other people and it was this is not good as ministries is about and when we hear people saying i'm not going back to the vet that either you know that was flew do that that when you grasset so we sat in this i'd recommend. Is it doing spiritual direction for so you were wounded marriages helping where some kind of abuse go ahead draw lines written by christmas all this whole boundaries in marriage marriage. I highly recommended for marriage is because it helps avoid conflicts. It's very against this were due to avoid scandal and when he started a treating france and ours of friends in this lustful way we have removal ministry aw walk <unk> help me and when casper says that were with us then wrote back. He's zeevi progresses first time why we welcome back time. Now we know you're playing the game is if you have made any progress in all all the time and i pray we dropping on and every step of the way it was four the show you guys rack love teaching the difference between that and i was a day another day up. I'm sitting beside somewhere else somebody else prior year. That wiki died without ever recovered reconciled rewards so you're going to draw on as a way to get help me for the love. Never saw rattle wall is loving enemies rival love <music>. I feel so sorry. This person is like this not for my own sake but for his own internal say one time when early the process friend worldwide where i was like laura i quit now. Can i draw ghana's this period. Now i gotta sit below the help you supernatural apratment and in my first time i feel you need and imagination vision asians. He showed me any to the gym about this big record front are and it was very fast like dramas and there are different colors hues. The light kit different unique in outlets got that this is who we all are inside creating audience. You are all yes useful and will my ears greg. You're still beautiful factors. Your this yeah i i said it is janice who created when he raises raw aw dealt with with people who sued against us route wise at anytime rationalize someone suit against us or did you see in the press that was throwing up but on our jim allen we we're adding onto and aggravated confession please off are up and the healing light the passwords at the eucharist then over russian and whatever tools maple out there from where we will uh sleaze off off the shine to be really designed as the date so so he asked me if i really to look beyond the love in my friend's senior member agenda there that kerm <unk> figuring law rag love is loving loyal but he had our own we need supernatural race of gods lope and do that is we are not spending time getting war <unk> lover us otherwise revert out we now we lose our patience because we're not getting smyth love and we me paul was we're not be up because no one can love us bullied perfectly all really drive time villanova gas the lack of other people love when we feel so sorry who are the other person who's been hurting us effort whether they're cylinder where we use. Oh sorry desert about jerry souls. We are what we are loving radically. Call us to have users in our lives. Call us keep trying with somebody who doesn't want for ice. He calls love them. In whatever a way you can judge for firing for that concert prayer of not more with you change that the person is rather is a more than your rival off so that i hey spending turney with you joy presence her while they're hurry. He will send we we all sin because we are not hot at the moment of impatient. Your husband got radical love for us and solutions us thought this is available. Permit is we're. We're trying to solve refined view of it. You know when i sitting in argument gets <music> out because i tried to do something my wife. Our able guys is varies from having regard way. Stop right up gary and i'll give you the words the visa words this hard issue at eighty two right away those working for me and says that oxford never returns to wait. It always has some powerful so i like to note and when we come back we're going to go hello early. The questions that are fin that that as we war saying about how to in this podcast was made possible by supporters of good news ministries who hoped to strengthen and build your faith. If this episode speaks to your heart then i ask you to pass it along to your family and friends share it on facebook and twitter forward it by text and email meal and let us know what the holy spirit is doing in your life. How has this episode made a difference. You can contact attacked me through the good news ministries website at g m dot org or by texting me. If you are one of our subscribers on what's up. May i ask favor of you. Please covers this life changing podcast ministry in your daily prayers and if you can help me continue making these podcasts by becoming a sponsor any donation is helpful but we are specially seeking seeking sponsors for upcoming episodes. You've been listening to teramo deka of good news ministries for more or faith builders or to learn more about this ministry. Come visit our website at g n m dot org you'll find online resources and lots more to help you know the father's love and grow closer to christ and be filled with the holy spirit visit g n m dot report today.

paul francis theresa leong lee north carolina saint patrick catholic church terry modise professor ghana facebook interferon Bradley brazil washington brees gary shane baltimore greece jim allen
GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 202: Interview with Larry Shushansky

GSMC Book Review Podcast

57:36 min | 1 year ago

GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 202: Interview with Larry Shushansky

"Golden state media concepts bring you book review podcast by a haven for bookworm of all ages and the whitest genres from the mystery to memoirs romance to Comedy Fantasy Scifi. If you love to read this is a podcast. It's the Golden State the concepts book review. podcast the hello and welcome to the G. S. emceed book review podcast brought to other. GMC podcast network. I am your host. Sarah era and today is Friday the thirteenth. I just like to say it. 'CAUSE ooh Spooky I know I'm very silly. Sometimes most of the time time at any rate we are not going to talk about Friday the thirteenth. Today we are going to talk about relationships because I recently had the opportunity to do an interview for the GMC relationship. PODCAST actually With author Larry Shanansky regarding his book independent enough a book about relationships. And I don't do a lot of self-help books on the Book Review. podcast not because I have anything against them. Just you know depends on what I'm being sent for authors author interviews at any rate Like I said I had the opportunity to do this for the relationship podcast and thought. Hey It's a book Ido Booker You podcast. Why don't I go ahead and do this on the book re podcast as well so like I said? The book is called independent enough. A book about about relationships and the cover says our happiness and well-being is determined by the quality of interactions. We have with others. The back of the book says in our culture being independent is highly valued but being totally independent is impossible. We depend on the many relationships in our our lives. Not Because we rely on other people but because through relationships we become aware of changes we need to make the most meaningful and lasting changes ages. Do not come from pleasing others. They don't come about by what others do for us. They come from a taking a look at ourselves within the context of our relationships ships before deciding what we need to do to improve our relationships. Independent enough is about creating the relationships we want regardless of what someone someone else is doing. It's about becoming happier by maintaining enough psychological distance to remain intact and staying close enough to have meaningful interactions. It's being strong enough inciteful enough and persistent enough. We can lead a relationships in the positive direction. We want them to go. That is the description scripture of Independent enough by Larry Shanansky. Larry takes the experiences that he's had in his own life not only his personal experience but also his experiences as a therapist and brings them together in this book to talk about what it means to be independent enough what that means for our relationships that you might hear that sentence on the front of the book or happiness and well-being is determined by the quality of interactions. We have with others. That doesn't mean that our happiness genus is dependent on others. It's dependent on Are being able to recognize the quality of our interactions to be able to. I don't want to say control but be able to know ourselves well enough that our interactions with others reflect are knowing ourselves well realizing that relationships can be about our about dependency codependency but being dependent on one another. We are always dependent in some way on our relationships. So Larry's going to explain it much better in this interview. Go ahead and get to that again. The book is called independent enough by. Larry Shanansky Hi Larry. Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi Sarah thanks for having me I appreciate that. Thanks for being here. I'm excited to talk to you about your book. It's called independent enough a book about relationships before we get to the book though so if you could share a little something about yourself so our listeners can get to know you. That would be great. Sure I was born in the South in Norfolk Virginia Virginia actually and we spent every summer down at Virginia beach and it was just a wonderful wonderful wonderful experience in lots of fun. We'd be water walker from eight in the morning until dinnertime and I think my upbringing had just stopped. There would have been pretty good But my father. It was abusive Particularly to me Fact I remember once where he thought. I'd lost at twenty five cents screwdriver and he was beaten to death that one one time and so I I quite a lot of beatty's yeah. I took quite a lot of beatings and as a result I think as a result I mean there's probably a combination of a lot of different different things but when I finally went off to college I was really immature and really had no idea of how to navigate people in situations and relationships and I was just an an absolute wreck. And by the time I was twenty hours actually sticking needles in my my on I can actually remember the first time in my dorm room. And they stuck a needle. My army the rush was just so intense. And and just That's the best way to just so intense that I ran to the sinking my dorm room and I threw up and from there. I just did a lot of alcohol on a lot more drugs and became addicted and eventually when I got drafted because I failed out of school and My student service back to school or back to graduate school and became really interested in family systems. Because that's my I guess. I had such a hard time with relationships ships. I just wanted to see what that was. All about and I've actually been trying to write this book for about thirty five years. It just And I've never had the wherewithal we're all to get it off the ground thousands and thousands of pages and it's just it never coagulated and it never just culminated and then in nineteen ninety ninety one. I was diagnosed with hepatitis. City which stemmed from my drug years and that was my almost When I was about forty not at that point or close to being forty at that point? She's the and that was tough. I went to two trials of Interferon. Robert Barron one. One of them was killed me so they had to take me off. My platelet counts dropped so much then. I stopped treatments literally. They just couldn't find something that that was working and I made a commitment to go straight. I haven't had a drinker any kind of drugs for about thirty years now. I made a commitment to my spirituality made a commitment to eating better exercising and kind of just being eastern person and I did Dat and about three years ago I was in a stage. Three trial for A new medication for the Hepatitis C. and when the two weeks it was gone it was truly like a miracle I didn't realize that all these. Yeah yeah it was something it was like it was like I'd known myself. For the first time allies I had energy. I didn't have to take naps. I wasn't depressed anymore. And that all that work is done for so many years Kinda just just coagulated Waigel late in my in my head and it was just sharp and that's when I was able to write the book and then since then I've written a book they don't podcast and radio stations and my purpose is to get the the the ideas behind the book out as much as possible because I think Eh One of the cores Issues in our lives that contribute to our wellbeing and happiness or relationships. And most of us don't do it very well and I'm included in that. I've gotten a lot better. I can tell you that since getting cleaned and since being cured of the Hep C. Just I I've been able to do the work that I've wanted to do for so many years. So that's my story in a nutshell. Wow that is that's quite the journey. And it's it's pretty amazing that led you to this place and to writing this book which one thing that I really appreciate about. The book is that the chapters are Not terribly long so you can just kind of sit down and taking a chapter and and go through it at your own pace right. I think that's really good for people in this busy world right now to be able to just kind of take it in pieces. Yeah it was meant to be written simply There's a number of People who've really appreciated that and and it's kind of like how relates people is pretty simply and that's what we wanted the book to be and that's what it came out to be which is really nice and people say they can either read it quickly or they can read chapter by chapter or story by story because as you you've read the book and you just feel my own personal stories relationships and all paws I've made of the now doc down relationships in my work and with friends and my marriage of my uh-huh sons and daughter and it's just It's it's I don't know entertaining is the right word but I think a lot of people have told me that it's it's pretty engaging while being simple after same time so now you have a bit of a better idea about the the premise of the book and the way the book is structured. When we come back we are going? Well we're GONNA take Acre for spring of the podcast. Obviously and when we come back and talk a little bit more about the structure of the book and the way Larry's writing is approachable and relatable so stay tuned you're listening to the MC book review. PODCAST and I'll be right back on the search that one true true love on the limbo in this crazy world dating marriage relationships. Well listen to the golden state media concepts relationship. PODCAST your one. Stop podcast for everything about relationships Welcome back to the. GMC Book Review. PODCAST I am speaking today with Larry Shanansky about his book independent enough and before the break Larry was speaking about the structure of the book. The book is written. How it is made to be very approachable and relatable and we are going to continue talking a bit about out that structure of the book? So let's go ahead and get back to the interview. Yeah I think it's It's really relational not too. I mean not to use a pun. But it's very. It's very relationship relational so that well it's not like you're right. Entertaining might not be the right word. But it's very a relatable and you can you can see where the stories are coming from and It's easy to step into into those stories as you tell them. Yeah you know I. I've learned that you know being therapists or in an author speaker that I'm really nothing special There's I I've got the same flaws and and difficulties and struggles as everybody else has and it's it's what really connects me with everybody. They and it's what enabled me to write the book in the first place because it's a lot of us have a tendency to think that we're neurotic or we're we're just not doing things right or you know. Life is too much of an effort but it's just who we are as people and hopefully that comes across in the book as well and and hopefully it comes across wanted you speaking engagements to yeah so give us kind of your a brief overview of the premise. The book the premise of the book. One of the core ideas behind the book is is. I believe that that all conflict I mean it's all conflict and all relationships stems from dependency. But not all dependency creates creates conflict. I think every relationship there were in. There's a certain amount of dependency that's involved in. That you know are are short relationship here in terms of our talking. I'm depending on you to kind of lead me and to Get this podcasts out. You're dependent on me to due to be somewhat stable and logical and reasonable about the way I present try to have the best quality podcast as possible so we have a reliance. It's red dependence on one another and The closer we are the people. The more those dependencies grow In our society hiding in our culture. There's this strive towards being independent totally and I just don't think that's possible to do dependency is an integral part of any any relationship. And it's it's what creates the bond we have with other and the longer we're in relationship the more dependent we become on that relationship generally speaking. That's fine the problem is is when we run into conflict. That actually stems from that dependency. which is healthy which which has turned unhealthy so basically anytime we rely on someone else for our wellbeing and that person and does not carry through the way we want them to carry through? That's oftentimes for creates the conflict. Rather it's something simple from being late to WHO Being messy to to you know intimacy needs sexuality and just across the board is our disappointment in other are and are trying to get other do what we want them to do. and that's what creates most of the conflict Again it's when we depend on the other person for our wellbeing well-being and expectations for that and generally speaking. We can run fine with fat but when that doesn't work that's what creates the The conflict so the idea behind the book is that when we enter enter into the conflict. It's important to and we do this. What I'm about to describe bribed is what we do? Anyway we if we have any level of success in any kind of relationship work relationship or even doing this podcast together other or or friendships or long term intimate relationships or family relationships if we have any levels excess wondering about to describe is what we do unconsciously anyway. We just don't know it. And so what what it's about is that when we enter into conflict. It's about taking a step back away from the relationship and getting colder noise that means getting all the criticism and judgments and all that fuzziness about the other person out of our heads as well as getting criticism judgments about ourselves out of our hits and that's an important step and most of us don't do that. We live in a culture. That's constantly constantly blaming others. If you look at politics ticks. I mean it's what it's all about. It's all about this. They did this. They did that kind of thing and we. It's almost nature. We must learn it from the time. We're yeah very very small that I didn't do it. It's their fault kind of mentality. And so with this first step is is taking a step back in giving all of that stuff all the judgments all the criticisms all the thoughts about the other person ourselves out of our heads and a lot of times you can even physically collusive yourself to get that kind of distance not withdrawn though but it just. It's just enough distance to calm our minds down and that once we tom on our minds down then we go into self reflection and self reflection is not about taking personal responsibility. It's about who an I in this conference. What part am I playing in this calm my being overbearing being to pass it is me and my being progressive in my being a victim in my being? You know whatever it happens to be. What is my part of this being overly overly dependent my expectations? -tations too high do I Just it there's there's so many different parts of the self reflection that we can get into but once we do that self reflection and we ourselves up. This is who I am in this conflict. Then we can make a decision about what we WANNA you. Do that's tied to the self reflection for example. If I think I'm being to passer in a conflict then I can decide to learn how to be more assertive curtis in this conflict so I I get the noise out of my head and I look at myself and I go you know. That's pretty passive stance in relation to the other person. So I'M GONNA o'byrne assertive in relation to this person so then. I do what I need to do to do that. I could read. I go to therapy. I could just come up with more assertive statements. It's in my mind I could work on myself. And that's what relationships healthy relationships do. It's about personal growth and that went when I find what I need to do in relation to the other person which by the way is generally what I need to do in life. You know it's not just with our intimate partners partners. The people that were having the conflict with these characteristics. Let's say with the servants that I've probably had developed my whole entire life so I start to to learn. I think in my mind what I need to do. And then once I make that decision about what I WANNA do. I stepped back into the relationship. And I practice practice my assertiveness now. The last step is that we have this image in our heads. Anytime we make a decision like this and and we we kinda played out without even knowing it of what is going to look like what are parts going to look like. And what the other person's parts can look like Very very seldom. Does that ever work out like we planted in our heads so when we step back in probably real probably probably it's not gonNa work like we wanted it to work out so then we have to repeat the steps all over again and this process of taking a step back self self reflecting making the change we wanna make stepping back in relationship. What self growth is all about? And it's that self growth that creates healthy relationships. We often think that we're at the mercy of other people. If they would just be nicer they would be kind of. They would be more loving if they would be more understanding. We often think our relationships would be better. What we do is just empower ourselves? But when we follow this process you naturally or consciously watch asli means either unconsciously or consciously we we take control we can create the kinds of relationships. We weren't regardless garlic of what somebody else does. And that's a pretty novel idea from those people again. Most people think it has to be the other person to change them for our my relationships. I do WanNa see but I can actually lead a relationship. Not In a domineering way. Not In a controlling way not in Yousef way but in a self growth way as I grow. That's how my relationship can grow as well. So that's it in a nutshell. Okay well thank you for that one thing that I appreciate about this book is that You know the tagline is a book about relationships and I think often when people hear the word relationship they tend to think Romantic relationship and this book can be used for any kind of relationship. Romantic platonic a tonic. Work et CETERA. Absolutely correct absolutely correct because if you think about the worst situations that we're in that's we become dependent on them as well. We could come depend on our boss and middle management. We're in our colleagues and you know. We depend on them to do what we want them to do to make our work situations better thing so yeah it can be friendships. I mean I'm constantly disappointed. My friends so I call my buddies last last last weekend and it was on Sunday and I it was during the Patriots game and I didn't realize it was during the Patriots game. He's just looming moved out of the water for having the nerve to call and during the Patriots game. And so I have to deal with that. This is my best friend you know. I don't WanNA knock him out of my life kind of thing but it. It's it's dealing with that kind of conflict because I'm dependent on him and he's dependent ordinary and so we worked it out. Well good what do I worked at out. Is it today the Patriots game off at four thirty so I won't call him tonight note to self check the Patriots scheduled before the phone. Exactly right and you know that's pretty simplistic but when when we get into those kinds of situations as as as minors that really is when we get into this kind of situation we get hurt you know we take a step back we we get a little tweaked around this and our Tennessee see again. What's the matter with him? It's only the stupid patriots game. I'm his best buddy. Why can't you talk to me kind of thing so we do all the stuff that our heads and ah over time that erodes relationships that ran even even a good relationship like this unless we do the work of personal growth that we need to do it? I feel like all of us. Maybe have that one friend that we should know that we can't call during. Maybe it's not the Patriots game. Maybe it's dancing with the stars for my parents parents it's ncis we all have that one friend you know. They have different levels of politeness as to how they reply or respond. When you call them? But we've we've probably all had a similar experience since we're going to go ahead and take another break when we come back we'll be talking about One of these specific examples of the first stories that Larry shares in the book about Situation and that he encountered with Israel in his relationship with his wife so stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC book view. PODCAST and I'll be right back. Tired of searching the vast jungle of podcasts. Now listen closing and here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching. The golden state media concepts podcast network is here. Nothing less than podcast cast lists with endless hours of podcast Hubbard's from news sports music fashion looking entertainment fantasy football and so much more so stop blurted around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to build. That podcast is whatever whatever it may be visit us at. WWW DOT MC podcast dot com. Follow us on facebook and twitter and download on Itunes uh-huh self cloud and Google play John. Welcome back to the MC Book Review Podcast and my conversation with Larry Shanansky about his book independent enough before the break. We were talking about his friend and that fateful call during the Patriots game We're going to talk about a different example. This time an example that happened in his relationship with his wife. So let's go ahead and get back to the to the interview in fact the first story that you tell in the book You talk about the the simple fact that you and your wife have different sleep patterns. One of you goes to bed early. What if he goes to bed late and you know it was bothering both of you? So you tried to compromise and that didn't make anyone happy and that's often how we come at relationships. Well what are we going to. How are we going to compromise? And that doesn't always work. Sometimes it can but you went through a process of your own self reflection. Why am I upset about the you know that she goes to bed later than I do? and and you figure that out but you didn't just figure it out and pull everything was perfect. 'cause relationship we we are. We are imperfect perfect human beings and we backslide all the time so a for me. That's one of the things that I very much appreciate about your book is the Th Reminder Reminder that we aren't perfect and we aren't going to get everything right just by. Oh Wow I. I figured that out that that made sense. Now everything's right right in the situation And and you even end the book with you. Know with repeat repeat repeat right exactly right. That's what it's all about route repeating repeating. I believe that in long term relationships again. Work relationships friendships intimate partner relationships chips that there are three or four key issues between me and other that never get solved like this thing about going to sleep together other. I mean my wife and I have settled pretty well but even this weekend. She's sick and she wanted me to sleep with her. But I didn't WanNa get sick and so we had a little little back and forth about that because there's I think those three or four key issues they never get resolved but what happens ver- example the that you just gave about going to sleep together it. Our our disagreement around this are conflict around this look differently. The first first year it look differently the Tenth Year remarried the twentieth year remarried and the thirty fifth year year remarried. We evolve the issue shoe along. It didn't stay stagnant and a lot of relationships estate issue stay stagnant now. I don't expect to ever solve this. I mean probably to the day we die. I won't solve it. But it evolves along and as we evolve this issue we evolve as individuals and as a couple and that's where I love really really deep and tender as we were making a commitment to each other and to ourselves to evolve the same issue over over and over and over and over and over again. And that's a lot of our expectations. Are exactly what you say. If I do this this warrants or we've talked about those ten times why do we have to keep talking about it. Well because there hasn't been the personal growth and it hasn't been the evolution people get tired of talking talking or dealing with the same issues but it's just I don't know I don't remember if it's is it even in the book or not. But when my my father was dying of prostate cancer he had gotten down to about eighty some towns. He was like half his body weight and it was a couple of days before Excuse me as a couple of days before he died and he's lying in the hospital bid and my parents had argued about the way he ate for years 'cause he'd had a heart attack and For example example Early on when we were younger. My mom we didn't have a lot of money. So my mom would buy these DEL Monaco stakes like for real treat and she she cooked vegetables along with it and when she turned her back my father would slip into the refrigerator and Dallas it with ketchup and they would just be Often running from there just 'cause he just ate horribly just never really took care of himself much when it came to eating so two days before he died. There was this Plate of hospital food for dinner in front of him that was across the trade and standing trade and He finished most of the dinner and the woman came and took took the dinner away. My mother picked up this puking Green Jello and put would it in front of him and she looked at him and very softly and kindly and with a lot of affection. She says to him hyman tie you have have to eat the Jello and his soft voice. He goes I'm not gonNA eat eat the Jello and in a little strong voice she says you're you're going to eat the JELLO and in a little stronger voice he goes. I'm not eating the GEL. She takes us through and she dips into the Jello and she moves it towards him and with as much energy as I'd seen him having week he sits up in bed and looks at it. Goes I got the Job Jong. Leave me alone and I say to myself. Oh my God. He's dying kids. You leave him alone but that that kind of commitment was a commitment to the even to the day he died. They were committed to one another to keep this issue on the table and two so he dies. Two days later he died somewhere between five and seven o'clock in the morning so they call my mother they wait until about nine. They call my mother her and she's just beside herself They were married forty seven years. She's beside herself. She calls my nephew to pick her up. She collects herself. She's takes shower our. She asked him to keep his body in the room so she can come say goodbye. She gets there about noon. Now you can imagine he's. He's rigor mortis certain. It's been seven or eight hours. He's probably the death Pale wipes his eyes are sunken as cheekbones or high is what I imagined and she said to me she says Larry. I've walked into your father's rum and I looked at him and he looked as handsome as the first day that I met him and I walked walked over to my kissed him other with so I said hi I will never love another man like hey look you even that brings tears to my. You're my eyes because because that tenderness when along with their conflict around that issue and a Lotta Times what we try to do is cut out the conflict in our relationship but when you try to make it to perfect when you cut out that conflicts you've cut out a significant part of relationships and I'm not talking about abuse and I'm not talking about like yelling screaming and or any of that kind of stuff but I'm talking more about issues that repeat themselves over and over and over again and making a commitment to those as an integral part of the relationship. It's almost like a tapestry. You know. If you ever look at a tapestry like there's Moreau wrote tapestry up in the Smithsonian in Washington years and years and years ago and you look from afar and it's just it's like three stories the thing is huge and you looked at it and it was absolutely gorgeous and as you got closer to it you noticed all the flaws in the tapestry. You know all the all the ends that were that were torn. That were not completed. That was not properly done kind of thing and you go yes. That's what it's about. It's not about a perfect. It's about learning how how to take those flaws. Take those conflicts. Take those difficulties and I mean if you think my wife wakes up every morning looks at me. 'cause my Momma. Ah what a handsome man glad. I married him doesn't happen. She and I both have to learn how to deal with the parts of the relationship that don't work for us. And that's that's what my parents did for forty seven years some mornings I wake up and look at my husband and think. Oh maybe I'll just put a pillow over there and ignore or you know you know we understand. I'm not I'm not going to smother them with bill. I'm just GONNA move it so I don't have to look at him and another warning and it's like Oh look at him. He's so he absolutely cute and Wonderful Sarah. That's exactly right and to do away with those mornings when he's not as particularly attractive to you is a mistake because it's just not perfect but with a lot of people do. Is they wake up on this morning. And they'll look at their husbands emo go. Now I just and there were draw or or or they'll take those kind of moments or those kinds of conflicts where the tensions are the things that they don't like. It begins to erode the relationship and and part of self growth that we need to do is how we do not let that erodes the relationship how we can look at those times and have that become an integral part of the love. Love that we have for somebody. That's a terrific example here In addition to the book at the end there's also so A workbook that you provide so In terms of that workbook what what do you hope readers will take from that. What I've learned is Is that this takes. This takes practice. I hate to call it work. But it's more like practice to continue to self growth to continue to look at ourselves. Self reflect continue make decisions and stepping into relationships. It's a practice daily practice. I do this almost every day in in my mind. One way or the other I saw a terrific movie last night by the way is called. It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. It's about Mister Rogers and a magazine writer who interviewed him And he was really wounded and it was about about their relationship and how it evolved over time but one of the striking parts about it was that they his wife in the movie and I know this because also the documentary matter. This is a this is a fictional story based on on a true story but the documentary which was put out eight months ago about Mister Rogers is he practiced every day being the kind of person he wanted to be. He would prey he would Read Scripture He. He would work out he would think about things differently. He would practice on a daily basis who he wanted to be as a person and then every day I'm trying to think of the man's name I can't remember his name now. New York Times Well Alexa his name in the movie is different from the reporters name in real life. I believe I think I read it Oregon but So okay so I mean I'm out there. I think his name was Lloyd in the movie. Kind of but the issue that struck me is how much work Mr Rogers I had to put in to become the kind of person he wanted to be in relation to everybody he met through his days. And that's what this is about. It's making that kind commitment because we're not. We're making a commitment to the relationships that our allies but we're also making a commitment to ourselves to be the happiest and to be as balanced as we possibly can to have a picture of who we want to be in different relationships in our lives and then to practice And that's what the book is about. It's about practice and what I try to do in the workbook. Because there's there's what I've learned doing. Forty years of therapy. Is that people earn in a at different paces and they learn the learning styles of different difference. So what I try to include was was as many different ways of working on the same issue as possible and it's. It's a tough task to do that. And I hope I covered covered most learning styles or at least enough that people can get what they need to get through. The workbook is about. It's about the daily work we need to do. oftentimes sometimes when I do readings in the morning I I I come across something that I'm reading and there's a shift in my mind mind you know like an a Ha moment kind of thing like a little tweak. In my mind I stopped reading at that point. And I carry that phrase that word that that paragraph or that concept with me through the day and I may even carry it through a couple of days because that's what I know I need to work on. That's what that shift is. All about. That shift tells us what issues we need to work on. or how or more specifically that shift tells us what we need to do to grow due to become who he wants to become. And so. That's what I do and I may practices every fifteen minutes every half hour or an hour and if I forget for four or five hours I'll pick it back up in my mind and that's what I do daily. That's what the workbook is about. You know trying to incorporate growth on a daily basis. That's where it's the man. Okay thank you so much for that You also do speaking engagements You mentioned that earlier so when you do speaking engagements Are those usually in larger groups. Are they smaller groups so you get one on one interactions with people. How do those normally work? They're both I do small groups. I do with clubs done book clubs ten fifteen people and and then I've done. Compasses of one hundred and fifty people and I try to make it as conversational as possible as informal as possible. It's hard to do with larger groups But I usually leave time for questions and answers and back and forth and people who challenge me and and and I love to be challenged and and so what I try to do is speaking as making informal as possible and use a lot of storytelling And a lot of examples and ask for for examples from people in the audience as well and it's a lot of back and forth kinds of it's it's almost like a co it's as much of conversations like possibly make it because that's that's the best learning tool for people and my idea is really not to make money from this Because a lot of the books I just give out for free free at a particularly with speaking engagements that I do. But it's more about trying to get this idea out to more people you know I've been. I've been a therapist just before two years and I see a lot of couples and a lot of individuals who are struggling relationships either work or they personal relationships and what I what I've tried to do once. I got cured of Hepatitis C. I had the energy to start to think into start to move out from behind closed doors into the community at large. And that's the purpose of what I'm trying to do. Now that's what that's what this podcast is about trying to reach as many people as I could possibly reach. Let's go ahead and take our third and final final break of the podcast and when we come back the conclusion of my interview with Larry Stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC Book Review Podcast. And I'll be right back the GMC live in happiness. PODCAST takes you journey of exploration. We'll discuss tried and true methods the alongside the latest trends. How best live your life to its fullest happiest from psychology to meditation science to self help books the GMC live in happiness podcast? We'll help you to discover what makes you happy and how you can live like being the best possible download the GMC life and happiness. PODCAST on I tunes down Lau who play or anywhere you find podcast. Just tie in the search bar and welcome back to the G. S. MC Booker View podcast. Am speaking today with with leary. Shanansky about his book independent enough a book about relationships and we've been talking about a lot of different topics and a lot of different experiences experiences that he has had and has been able to share in this book. So let's go ahead and get back to the conclusion of that interview with Larry in addition to to speaking engagements I know you written articles you've written blogs Do you plan on writing another book. Do you think. Well I WANNA try like I said I want to try to get the word out around this as many people as possible as opposed to writing the book I write a weekly blog and Articles Sporadic I. I just read an article for for Web page in England and periodically. I write blogs logs for Nami which National Alliance for the mentally ill But basically I want to try to get this idea that the book presents out to as many people as possible so before writing another book people have encouraged me to write a book composed of the blogs. I've been writing a blog for about three four years now and they think that that would make a nice addition to this book. A Nice follow to this book but I really WanNa concentrate on on trying to get I Dunno statement other than the word out. I want to try to get the word out around this book Other than that. I do the weekly blocks. And the weekly walks walks pretty much follow the format of the book in terms of personal stories. I don't like telling stories of clients I feel that that's a Not a breach of confidentiality. But it's awkward if I tell a story about a client That they've told me in confidence so I try try to keep it as much by myself as possible and trust me. There's enough interactions. I have with people places and things that I've got plenty of material to work with because like perfect really. It's it's amazing. How much work I've done myself and how much work I still have I think in this day and age? We often want that quick fix. We want to pick up a book like yours and just read read through it and be like okay. Perfect I can do that and everything will work out fine but you know. Life doesn't work that way right and neither do relationships jobs and as much of a mentality we have that about trying to find the answer in a particular book. We also try to do that in relationships as well and I think it's one of the myths behind relationships that if I do the right thing if I find the right answer if I find the right one of the missiles if I find the right person then in my life will be blissful Member relationships will be exactly what I want him to be. I don't think it's about finding the right person I think is about being the the right person rather be sexual rather it be out of the bedroom rather wherever you go with. Whatever kind of relationships were talking about? It's really about being who you need to become to make the connor relationships you want. So that's one. I think that that that is really really hard to dispel. Because like you're saying people WANNA get really quick staff asked. Let's do it. Let me get on with my life and so I don't have to struggle at all but I don't think that's realistic Listrik. which is which and this is off topic a little bit the other myth what you brought up earlier which is about compromise? We are often taught that confidence. You need to learn how to compromise in order to have a good relationship. I don't agree with that. I think that compromise is a shortcut. We're cut to self growth and moving relationships. Further compromise is basically. I give up something that I don't WanNa give up you. Give up something that you don't want to give right in order for us to minimize or do away with conflict. The problem with that is that I'm giving up something I don't want and you're giving up something you're don't want I'm going to be looking at you to make sure you're doing your part and you're going to be looking at me to make sure I do my part. So in a way compromise actually create the seat of mistrust as opposed to establishing averaging more trust and deeper sense of trust. So That's another myth. I think people work with. It's it's better to hash out. Workout Self Gross. Oh smooth through. Continue moving the relationship forward by moving ourselves for individually. That's the big. That's the bang for the buck. As opposed to a compromise which I don't compromise more legal thing. I don't know if you've ever been in any kind of lawsuit or any kind of Any kind of Accident Dan or any of that kind of stuff or a plumber. That doesn't do what he or she needs to do. And you take them to court trying to thing. It's all about compromise and legally when win win parties. Walk away from a compromise. They feel very unsatisfied. Because it just it just doesn't it doesn't do what you wanted to do you think. That's another Myth that we live with. That's really unhealthy you know and I I hosted to be booker. New podcast here on the podcast network and you know one of my favorite Genre Romance and I love the happily ever after because I like to read books that that have a happy ending you know no but I know That's not you know the the happily ever after is a great way to end book. But it doesn't really you know you don't don't just write off sunset and never fight again or why you're so what you're saying is true if the end of the book so yeah. There's there's there's you know what happens next kind of thing right and it. Yeah and so I- right. It's not the end of the story and we buy that through movies. Movies are the same way television romances in the same way Blogs research that we you know even even therapists will to try to imply that if you do certain things your life is going to be so much easier and you're going to go off into the sunset happily ever after and I think you may make a tremendous point. It just doesn't work that way. Now that doesn't mean we have to be unhappy the rest of our lives. I'm not suggesting that but to think that we can be in relationships personal relationships A work relationships any kind of relationship that we're in and that's GONNA run smooth far entire life. I I think he's just a setup for all of us here exactly right. That doesn't mean you can't ever manic love. Book called The road less traveled put out by a man named Scott Peck. And this was On fifteen years ago or so twenty years ago so and one of the premises of that book is that all all of dies. All Romantic loved is and then what you do it. It takes work to create real love instead of that shifts. That's from romantic. Love to real which is often so disappointing in our lives and we often say to ourselves. Well this must not be the right person for me. It's it's not true. It's just that that romance always slips away and then it's up to us to do what we need to do to build that real deep deep love I mean I I feel closer to my wife now than I ever had in my life fact feel close to my wife and I have ever. I felt anybody in my life and I still feel and yet I feel more of a sense of independence from her and I've ever felt in my life it's like you can't can't love somebody to close. You have to love somebody at a certain distance because I think that's real love and the and the more and more independent. We can become in conflict or in general. I think the happier and more loving. You can be 'cause then you're truly loving somebody for who that person is. It is as opposed to what they can do for you and I even sexuality romance it just becomes so much more tender and so much more soft there's so much more meaningful and so much more Let me just ease into this and again. That doesn't last because of the issues the things that we've been talking about but over time there's more and more and more overall times like that and it's really Sweden it really is. Yeah absolutely I know you have a website. So tell people where they can find your website. And if you have any social media that people booking connect with you on sure the Website is independent enough dot com on that website. People can actually download the book for free and you can also access the blogs from that independent enough dot com and if people go to the contact page on independent enough dot com. I'll put them on a mailing list. It's a notification of winning. The blocks are published that the social media is all independent. Dot Com link again INSTAGRAM twitter facebook. It's all independent Dot Com. Some of it is Larry She ASCII INDEPENDENT DOT Com. If you just put up independent about the term it'll come up. Okay easy enough thank you. We talked about a lot today which has been great Is there anything that we haven't covered that you really wanted to bring up during this podcast. I don't think there is I think we've covered the essence. There's there's a lot of particulars around nece that is different for every individual. And if people want they can do they can actually go to the website and on the contact page which is confidential. Nobody else sees that they can ask me questions if they want and I can answer that on the website. I can't do therapy that way but I can answer questions particular questions or somebody might have. Because there's so and that's part of the struggle there are so many different ways as to have good really good relationships that there really is no one answer and so I don't. I don't try to have an answer sir. People's relationships are the complex of the difficulties in relationships. Were not having the relationships they want. It's all set in a process a personal growth movement and that's for a million different people. There's a million different ways of doing that. And it's a commitment to self into relationship to do that over and over and over again on a daily basis But I think other than that. I think you've covered a lot of the essentials. All right well thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me. I really appreciate it. The book is independent enough The website is independent enough dot com. So if people want to learn more they can certainly go there and Learn more about this. This really great approach to relationship. Yeah Yeah and and and Sarah Thank you so much I You Walk On for me being on the podcast but I really appreciate you allowing me to be on the podcast. It means a lot can thank you so much once again. Thank you so much to Larry for taking the time to talk to me I mean he said thank you for allowing him on the podcast. But that's just crazy talk. Of course I you know I wanted him to come onto the podcast to talk about this book to talk about his work and I really appreciate him sharing so much of himself in that process. So thank you to Larry. Thank you as always to you our listeners. If you're a fan of this podcast if you like what you hear then we would be very happy if you will well. I you know the royal we. I guess I would especially be very grateful if you would follow us on Social Media Lake Re tweet to share all those wonderful things things as well as subscribing to this podcast and leaving us a nice review A five star reviews. Great a written review is lovely. Just whatever you feel compelled to do this this holiday season. Yeah through the holiday card in there. Sorry so thank you as always for joining me. Join me again on Tuesday Tuesday when I will be interviewing author. Kimberly Be Jones about her young adult book. Our friendship matters and I am looking forward speaking with her and talking about her book. Join me on Tuesday for that conversation. In the meantime have a wonderful weekend and hope you find a lot of time to get yourself lost in a good book. You've been listening to the golden state media concepts relationship. podcast part of the good state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at. WWW DA GS MC podcast dot com download our podcast on itunes tins stitcher soundcloud and Google play just type in GS MC to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast network work from movies to music throw sports to entertainment and even weird news you can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank Hugh and we hope you have enjoyed today's program tonight. The Emmy winning phenomenon live in front kind of a studio audience is back for an all new holiday. Event heartwarming comedy. All in the family and good times we created live with when all star cast. Woody Harrelson voice browsers anyhow plus so many more and when you're live anything can happen so all alcoholic opposite. is his life log in front of a studio audience tonight at eight seven central on. ABC Tonight the Emmy winning phenomenon live in in front of a studio audience is back for an all new holiday. Event heartwarming comedy. All in the family and good times we created live with with an all star. Cast Woody Herald choice browsers anyhow plus so many more and when you're live anything can happen so all alcoholic opposite is live live in front of a studio audience tonight at eight seven central on A._B._C..

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