23 Burst results for "Interferon."

What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

Science Talk

04:58 min | 5 months ago

What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

"It's a really important moment to look back at our very different reality just twelve months ago. In december twenty nineteen the first infections were just emerging inside of china sars. Covy two didn't have a name yet and no one could imagine the global effects that the virus would have on us all but it was also clear that this novel coronavirus lit a fire underneath the seat of science so my question is how far has our scientific understanding about the biology and the behavior of the virus. Come since then yeah. We have learned some really critical things. About how the virus works and also importantly about how our immune system responds to it and how. This virus sars cope chew. Essentially causes our immune system to misfire in cases of severe covid nineteen and miss misfiring really centers on the very early immune responses that. Our body mounts. These are called innate immune responses this innate immunity is a part of our body that really uses sensors that detect pieces of pathogens. Like the co two virus that are not from our own body in once. These factors are sensors detect these viral bits. They sound out an immediate alarm system. That operates through molecules called cytokines and interferons. These are important for activating those later. Immune responses like t cells and antibodies. That we hear about and what we think is that. It's likely that people who sound this innate immune alarm early upon exposure to the virus and induced early in high levels of that interferon alarm system. Go onto pretty rapidly and effectively clear the virus so these might be the individuals with a symptomatic or moderate or mild disease however what scientists have learned. Is that people who go on to develop severe covid. Do so. Probably because in them. The virus causes a misfiring of that. Immune response so like the wrong sets of immune cells may be brought in and they might not deuce that early interferon alarm system. Quick clear strongly in they can't control the viral load. The virus amplifies to really high levels in their body so their body responds to this continued presence of the virus basically by increasing production of factors. That are involved in inflammation. This is an over exuberant inflammation or inflammatory response. And that's what leads to the lung tissue damage which is really a hallmark of code pathology. So what we've discovered. Scientists over the past year is that there are biomarkers. That can give clues about who ultimately goes on to get severe disease. Scientists have also discovered genetic. Differences are mutations that some people have in those innate immune genes that can contribute to poor initial control of the virus. I think that this understanding that there are essentially two phases of covid nineteen disease that initial phase that's dominated by viral amplification in a second phase that in severe cases is dominated by a misfiring of the immune response is really important is important because it ill. At they're two types of therapies. That are probably needed. Depending on the phase of the disease so drugs that charge it the virus directly to stop its replication is would be things like remdesivir that we've heard a lot about in the news or maybe treating with things like recombinant interferon. This is Something that's used to treat other chronic viral infections. Those types of therapies are probably only going to be effective at stopping nets first phase of the disease but are not going to be very effective If they're given during that second phase because it's then it's not the virus but the immune system that's driving illness so conversely drugs that damp a net over exuberant inflammatory response and decks. Methadone is one of those. These might be dangerous. If given during that first phase when you really want a rapid and robust immune response but could be helpful at dampening the damage that's caused by the immune system at later stages one of the key parts of understanding the virus itself. How find it is scientifically really about timing right. Exactly timing is really key to figure out how your body responds very early and later and you know the timing and dose of the virus that you might receive understanding how that timing or the kinetics of infection response are essential and we've made a lot of progress on that over the last year

Mild Disease China Chronic Viral Infections
"interferon." Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"interferon." Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Mass makes you sick and and nobody's Mass. He's doing anything except spread covid-19 twenty Twenty-One. So when we take off that mask when we refused ever because these viruses have been injected into most of us off and anybody that you know, I the flu shot, you know, they know the data from the wolf study and others the flu shot drives the disease the flu shot makes you 36% off or likely to get a coronavirus infection that seems because what what are you doing when you go after the influenza? Oh, you're using up that type 1 interferon that glutathione and what do you do age? Get a flu shot and wear masks the immune suppress even further so that you're just a walking megavirus and all of a sudden you get a sore throat and all sudden you get a headache and then they put that Q-Tip up in your nose and break blood-brain barrier and spread meningitis. And God only knows what because it's not sterile either so hated until people wake up. Absolutely. The real world that has is clearly showing a than any audience out. There. Are you today my audience is what we've been screaming about the mass studies forever. So they're nodding along with you right now. We all know this stuff because their studies actually show that before but in and be please let me know if you're short on time and have to go I have two questions from some users that were very interested to hear your take on a couple of things that I would be interested is 12:30. So I got a but another 20 minutes. Okay fantastic. So one of the ones that I got a lot from people and this is also something that I find very interesting is they wanted to know what in your mind how you see what's causing the oxygen loss with the rest respiratory problems and what time Are ventilators killing people? Well, so so the oxygen loss, you know, the again the mass depletes your oxygen. It's very clear 21% in 16% out of oxygen are metabolic processes. It uses it for every process in our body. We know that the viruses and that's mitochondria. Remember that's what that's what makes our ATP and our energy so mitochondria viruses go after mitochondria, and so virus is crippled your ability to make energy. So the more infected.

influenza interferon
COVID-19: ‘little or no’ benefit from remdesivir: WHO

UN News

01:45 min | 7 months ago

COVID-19: ‘little or no’ benefit from remdesivir: WHO

"Results from a UN coordinated international trial looking at four cave nineteen therapeutics have shown little or no positive impact on preventing death in patients infected with new corona virus, the Solidarity Therapeutics Trial, overseen by the world. Health Organization who found that REMM disappear hydroxy chloroquine, Lapenne Aveer. Rootin- and Interferon. appeared to have little or no effect on twenty eight day mortality or the hospital course of covid nineteen among hospitalized patients. The study involved more than thirty countries and investigated the effects of the treatments on mortality ventilation and length of stay in hospital. It did not examine other uses of the drugs such as preventive treatment, which would. Require further trials in a related announcement. The WHO said that Covid nineteen had also highlighted the increased vulnerability of people with high blood pressure to the coronavirus. The warning is based on data for more than one hundred twenty countries showing significant caveat related disruption to treatment for people suffering from chronic health conditions with findings showing these patients make up fifty to sixty percent of all deaths through covid. Dr Bent Mickelson director of WHO's Department of noncommunicable diseases said that more than one point one, billion people around the world suffer from hypertension mainly in low and middle income countries when it comes to call it nine, thousand, nine, hundred, hypertension, one, hundred and twenty two countries that has reported. US that in over fifty percent of the country's the healthcare services disrupted fully or partially fifty percent of the country's, and in addition we see a high number of is we don't have global figures yet, but we see in the rain show fifty, sixty percent of the people that are severely ill and died in hospitals from code have hypertension diabetes, and so forth and the working on the global targets.

Covid Solidarity Therapeutics Trial Hypertension United States Dr Bent Mickelson UN Rootin Lapenne Aveer Health Organization Chloroquine Department Of Noncommunicable Director Interferon.
Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

Coronacast

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

"While we're still keeping social distancing mommy made up with people when will it be Arcada? Say Hug out all the parents when we visit them. Look I think this is a hard one and I think that we're taking away autonomy from older people here. To be honest I think when the viruses that low levels in the community and families are being responsible. Sofas a cough for cold or a sniffle any doubt or anybody's been tested. You simply don't go to visit your parents at all but if everybody's well I think it's up to the parents if there's a small risk but how long do you go without hugging your kids. You're so what are you doing here? You're T you're making a decision on the part of your elderly parents that you're not going to hug them to protect them but they might be prepared to take the risk. And if so why not so? I think this is a conversation. You need to have in families because it's not so much about spreading the virus. It's more about protecting them against serious illness. And if they're prepared to take the small risk you know why not but families have got to really be responsible about. No coughs colds. Sniffles slighted symptoms maximum testing particularly families. Their parents so that you know that you're you're as much as you can know that you're safe as you can be. It's funny because we've actually got quite a lot of questions along the same lines of just elderly people trying to know how to take care of themselves and rub its asking He sort of pointing at people. Seventy are at greatest risk of covid nineteen. But he saying he's feeling like this little advice that specifically for his generation he wants to know Kenny sees grandchildren. Can they visit his hyman eight with him? Can they drive them to and from school? Can I go back to work? How do these people know how to protect themselves? If they can't be informed. I mean I think it's a fair comment. The answers aren't easy because just like the previous comments have a risk based discussion and decision. So if you're over seventy and quite on well and you've got lots of other problems and you are worried about yourself. Then you wouldn't want to expose yourself very much at all. You probably want to wear a mask when you're outside even though a mask doesn't protect you as well as other people protecting themselves from spreading it but nonetheless you might want to wear a mask lots of hand hygiene and so on so if you're seventeen really healthy the still an increased risk of dying if you get covered nineteen but it depends on whether you're prepared to take that risk as an individual if the rule is in your family just repeating myself is that nobody comes to you with a call a cold. If there's any doubt toll the family gets tested then it should be no reason why you can't come round and have dinner with you at home assuming this basic hygiene driving to and from school where you probably put the kids in the back of the car anyway. So that's that's going to be okay. And you disinfect surfaces. And you have you have hand sanitizer with you and going back to work. That's a risk based decision. And if you maintain a reasonable amount of social distancing when you can if it's felt well-ventilated workplace then the risk is probably going to be relatively low but again if you've got lots of other problems if you're obese if you got diabetes heart disease and so on you've really got to think this through whether or not you're willing to take the risk. The risk is low at the moment because we got very low levels of virus. But it's there and I think now is the time when you can start easing back into things but with a lot of care a lot of care by the people around you. I think people feel like they may maybe getting mixed messages because we have another question from Lennon's that are going for kids to go to school because statistics show. They haven't been getting the virus and transmitting it to adults as much but at the same time we're being told died visit elderly grandparents for fear of spreading the disease. So he's kind of going like which one is it? Well it's it's not one size fits all here so for example residential aged care. The problem there is that as you go into the residential care facility. Your elderly relatives might be perfectly fine and well but there are other people in the facility. Who ARE REALLY SEEK. And therefore you don't want to bring in any disease or infection and that's why residential aged care facilities are being super careful. You just don't want an outbreak like the one they've seen short contact outdoors is pretty safe. Indoor contact that's prolonged. Even with social distancing can be risky. So you've got a balanced these things out but essentially grandparents in the current environment was not allow around with hand hygiene sensible disinfecting surfaces particularly in bathrooms and nobody coming close. Who's got any hint of illness and people are getting tested in the family. I think the we're getting to a point was pretty safe. So do you think that maybe it sounds like the theme? That's coming through. The what you're saying is families should be having conversations and deciding what their rules are going to be for their family. That's right and giving some autonomy to older people. There's no reason why they can't make decisions about their own lives themselves and the fair prepare to take a calculated risk. Why not it's just. He can't take a calculated risk in a residential care facility. Because you're taking a risk for other people who are not your relatives who live in the same facility so residential care. You're going to have to follow the rules of that residential aged care facility but when it's your elderly grandparents living separately from you then you should make the rules together. So Norman. Last week on chronic cost we were talking about measures that people could take to be able to basically go back on public transport. And you recommend will. You were making the comment that if ever wearing a mosque and if everyone had the carpet Saif App then maybe we could have more people in public transport. We had some feedback on that from a couple of people including Helen who says that not everyone has a smartphone especially all the people she can't actually use smut fine. Because of a hand impediment she has and she says that your suggestion is discriminatory and presumptive. Take that one on the Chin Teagan and say meal Copa. That I hadn't really thought that through in terms of order people's access to that I was kind of assuming that smartphone access was broader a shooter through. But they're still might be a way of doing it which is particularly for young people who are spreaders so for example forty percent of infections that are causing spread between twenty and forty now they will have smartphones so the question is. How do you administer something that this understand that but you could have somebody asking? Do you have a smartphone is it. They're encouraging it. You might have a washing period for example so I think even if you got that twenty to forty year old age group with the covid safe APP with high density than that would be a big step forward for what it's worth. We actually got other feedback from people who have oldest smartphones and even those people with smartphones but all the models are finding that the site. That doesn't actually work on them. I think it's quite a lot of work to be done on the covered safe at which I think I did say last week. So it's not. This is not a straightforward exercise and I thank Corona Kastner's for keeping me right on this one. Well let's talk about some research now. We are learning more way. Scientists are learning more every day. About how the virus is working in body including how to fix our immune system this new research into these which also has some implications designing treatments. Yes this research looks at how the virus gets attacked by the immune system or not as the case may be and broadly speaking. There's there's a to phase response to There's an earlier response of the immune system. There's a slightly later response of the immune system to a viral infection and viruses. Incredibly clever getting round this. I mean for a little thing of that doesn't actually live by itself. Just a little bundle of irony doesn't by itself needs our bodies to replicate it. Devises fiendishly clever ways of getting round our immune system and so what what they're discovering with this forest and they've never seen it seen it to the same extent with other viruses. Is that when it gets? Into the cell it really inhibits the chemical messengers alert the immune system these are called interferon so these are the chemical messengers that tell the immune system. Something's going wrong here. Come on guys and gals get in here and start attacking and whistling the army so it suppresses these interferons and then the second response is actually an over an overactive response but it's a dysfunctional one terribly. Clever response on the part of the virus but it is a serious respond. Swear it interferes with the jeans in the second wave of response. These are called site kinds and some people that have heard of the site. Kind storm that you get. Which is what largely kills you with the COVID. Nineteen seventy makes you seriously ill now. What this means is there's an opportunity in this first response. So for example there already finding indications that interferon treatment for a covert nineteen does seem to be helping particularly in combination with antivirals or other medications and this makes sense when they started using it own with covid nineteen. They didn't know the results of the study. But this was study shows. The interferons are very low. So in fact you're replacing them and then also now that you know more about the site of kind response. There are some targets there that you can use to block that response which again. They're already trialing but it allows you to do that more effectively. So you get a sense. Where if you really do attack the virus and its effects in that first episode you're going to help minimize the reaction the second episode as well because it won't get a chance to whistle up. This overreaction

Covid Interferon Hyman Kenny Viral Infection Lennon Corona Kastner Norman Helen
"interferon." Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"interferon." Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Barren it's a privilege all up I actually have a question for you George and started down he's not a doctor though he's not a doctor just a pharmacist but the promise is spent all four months up and saying we should doubt set up mobile laboratories with electron microscopes we can actually get a visual on the virus sentimental songs and maybe spend a month at post office or a school so that people can actually get a visual on the virus in the other thing is interferon nobody's talking about it George I know you're familiar with that a question for you charge should be cut did she know Dr Mary I've been meaning to ask you the call log I do not know that mark if she knew ingo Swann very well but I don't know if she knew the person you just mentioned you're you're familiar with Dr Mary monkeys yes the story yeah right she would center biological files so I believe and would it be alright to plug a block for Tom if it's okay it was a father Malachi Martin and wind swept how yes recall that Porky my father father mark used to be on all the time on the program with our two years ago what what a shame what a shame what a man I would say a very enlightening up the bat wings swept house will open a lot of heights and Dr Ben pharmacists pharmacist I'm at this time sorry the pharmacist band are you familiar with interferon interferon is a class of proteins a calm signaling molecules they turn on the immune system and and they got some really interesting facts and I actually there are being looked at isn't used to fight hepatitis C. all of ours they help your body fight fire they don't doing themselves a signal this whole idea signaling is really fascinating there's there's molecules in the body that signal they call it basically they communicate to the south to get going the the interferon communicates to special immune cell called a macro files that has tremendous tremendous anti microbial properties macro means Big Five means eating and if you ever played pacman you can see exactly how a macro files work interferon activates the apartment can you imagine the store to talk with the missiles earlier the new system also have eaters like pac man like the Chief Justice did you did you know toward that amount why did god create a virus well by you know ten percent of your genetics are virus viral viruses are everywhere George does do you still plan is what's their purpose the bankruptcy of all things they move things a big work genetically their pieces of information yeah but have you ever heard of.

George Dr Mary mark ingo Swann Tom Malachi Martin Dr Ben interferon Porky
Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

Coronacast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

"I'm health reporting tyler. Journalists Daughter Norman Swan so norman. There's been a lot of talk recently about people not taking the pandemic seriously and people that interested to talk about how to talk about it with the people in their life. Who are still wondering around too much. Do you have any tips on how to convince that person who just doesn't want to seem to get the message yet road depends through the are probably more often than not but this preaches coming here being a younger person who feels that they're invincible and they'll just go out and get it and they'll be over it and after all they'll say isn't it just like the flu and so here's the argument one is that yes. It's true that younger people are not as likely as older people to die from it but there are plenty of younger people who die for from it. So if you think you're steel belted. You're actually not thirty to forty percent of intensive care. Unit beds are taken up with people who are relatively young and some of them die and there are no known risk. Factors for why those people died because it's not like elderly people with heart disease and diabetes and so on the no other particular risk factors so you are actually playing. Russian roulette by going out and doing it and the second reason you need to actually be serious about this is do you have family so parents and grandparents you're contributing to the spread to the community and actually could kill them and then the third thing is is when you were at school. Did you have friends that we're on to do nursing? Did you have friends who went on to mid soon or work in healthcare physios and so on because if this gets out of control they will actually die because twenty percent of people of healthcare professionals will get this. They'll get a big doors and many will get it severely and there are doctors and nurses dying of this. Is that what you want? If that isn't enough to convince people I think there's something wrong with them so I do it for yourself but also do it for the people around you people that you love. That's right because it's not guarantee you're going to get a mild dose of it so David's asking if we can clarify what the differences between nineteen and size cough to SARS. Cov too confusing SARS. Cov Two is the virus that causes covered so covered. Nine thousand nine. Is the disease so flu? Like symptoms runny nose fatigue loss of taste loss of smell sometimes diarrhea. That combination of symptoms is the disease and the disease can go for a week. And then you get better or can go for a week. And then after a week you fall off the cliff and you get really seriously ill. That's covered nineteen SARS Cov. Two is the virus that causes it and it's called SARS Cov too because this conversion over related virus to SARS which affected people about fifteen or more years ago in various countries of the world. So it's kind of a second version of the SARS virus not really. The SARS virus was the second version. People say it's the corona virus really what they should be saying. It SARS Cov Tube and the reason why you separate the two is that some people are infected with SARS Cov two and either have very very mild symptoms so mild. They don't know they've got it or totally is symptomatic and sixty percent of infections of SARS COV which leads to covered nineteen are from people who are asymmetrical very minor symptoms and therefore the don't know they're spreading around so speaking of spreading it. We're also getting a lot of questions about testing and testing kits and people are asking. Why can't we being Stra? Just manufacturer testing kits. If there's a shortage there are labs that can produce the reagents and which is the chemicals you need to analyze the genes on the virus. So we do have those reagents around and we can manufacture but we don't have many facilities left in Australia which actually can do that so over the years. We've lost industries in Australia. Which have the tooling which allows you to produce these kits at mass-scale so we can produce the kids but not in the quantities. That's required us as why we're having to import them but we do have some machines around which can actually do this. Sort of testing on mass. They're taken up with other work but we do have those machines to so we would have to create a manufacturing facility with over controls there that we just don't have at the moment so that's some questions from grownups but we're also getting heaps of questions from kids and we've covered a few over the last few episodes but let's keep doing that. Clara has sent this in from isolation at home she and her family have called symptoms. And they don't WanNa make other people seek Clara an league in Adelaide. Five two more. Why IS CORONA VIRUS? Started a really good question Clara and the reason. It's so bad. Is that first of all? It's very contagious. And by contagious. We mean how many people would spread to so if I've got the infection or let's say you had Clara. How many people could you infect around you and on average you in fact two or three people one for the time that you've got the virus that's actually quite a lot so if you've got the flu it's under twos maybe one and a half people but if it was a pretty mild infection then you wouldn't worry too much and eighty percent of people eight hundred ten people? It is actually fairly mild but in twenty percent of the people it gets severe. And that's because it locks into receptor in your long. That's a lock and key mechanism in your lung and can create a really bad lung disease. So it's not a smash a lung infection as your whole long reacts and almost go solid and you lose the ability to take air from the atmosphere breathe it in and get oxygen going into your bloodstream. And that's why people die of this. We have you feel better soon Clara. We've also got a question for six year old. Ezra get virus when you already have a different virus while we'll happen mix or something else. That's a really good question as a really clever question really no but if you were to get influenza if you were to get the flu at the same time as covered nineteen that's the disease caused by the virus. Sars virus then the likelihood is that they will add or multiply together and damage your lungs and damage your body much more than each individually and maybe much more than each so. It's not multiplying by to the effects could be multiplying by four or six. Because they work with each other to actually make your body worse. That's if you get the influenza or say the common cold it could make everything much worse with other things like say for example if you've got cancer diabetes and so on usually means that your immune system your ability to fight this office weaken so you're more likely to get an infection and more likely to be able to resist it very well and so your body if you like is distracted because it's taken up by fighting the cancer or fighting the diabetes then your body's distracted and you're more vulnerable more open to the infection. Hope that explains in language that Communicates Clearly Ezra but really good question. Sorry research groups all over the world looking for different ways to treat and KUA card. Nineteen and the W. H. O. The World Organization has just launched a mega trial of four of the most promising corona virus treatments. Norman what are they testing? So they're testing a variety of drugs testing this anti-malarial co Corcoran related drug called Haiku. Hydroxy chloroquine which may be a bit stronger. They're looking at HIV drugs which are anti viral anti retroviral drugs. Ones Le Vian routine over the has been some disappointing results. I think from those two. But they're going to have a look at them as well and maybe add an immune stimulant called Interferon Beta which helps to which helps to attack viruses. So in other words you might get three drugs working together which might affect the immune system and love noon system to attack. The virus in interferometer has got some nasty side effects which would probably have to monitor it. And then there's this other drug called Rim desert here which is a recent drought produced by a drug company called Gilead for another purpose for another virus and go to try that because they think they might get an effect with the SARS Cov too. So what they're going to do. It's it's not a randomized controlled trial they're gonNA allocate people to one or other of the drugs or the or usual care drug combinations registered as a trial and watch what happens to them as the go through so that it's not going to be a perfect trial but we don't have time for a perfect trial. We just go to be able to get people. On these study drugs we know on average. What percentage goes on to develop serious disease and needs to be ventilated and we know roughly what percentage will go onto dine. Can we developed from that and then we'll do comparisons between the different drug groups. How do they know that these drugs are ones that might work? The don't really so some of it is a bit theoretical but there have been some small pilot studies which suggests that there may be ineffective anti-malarial the not very good studies. But they're not good enough to say to everybody let's get onto Corcoran and there are side effects from from these drugs as well so you don't want to recommend them because it distracts from what might be the cure and your door to real mess out there. So you really want to know. Divided all up. There's some indications from small studies uncontrolled studies relatively uncontrolled studies. These drugs may have an effect. And I were GONNA do scale up the trial and see when you compare them in a reasonably scientific way which one standout if any because non may but we gotta get on and find out.

Influenza Clara Norman Swan Ezra Diabetes Australia Lung Disease Adelaide Corcoran David Le Vian Cancer Chloroquine W. H. O. The World Organizatio Stimulant Interferon
"interferon." Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"interferon." Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"A child with ear cancer and the funny thing about the story is it announces that after just a few weeks on the treatment the child could see again. Well yes because he had cancer not I. I can't say no. It turned out the cancer had spread throughout his his head and actually did he actually had been blind to and he did have site return in one eye and And his ears improved as well and of course this is. This being Britain does enough for the tabloids to just start screaming magic drug miracle in Scotland Blend. And he's not. A child is not receiving any other treatment. I think it's I think this is used in initially last ditch cases. See and this. Is You see this today with cancer. If you've ever known anybody WHO's fighting cancer it gets to a point where they've tried all the stuff and then they and their families were just clutching at straws. For what's what's the new experimental stuff right. We read that. There's I read on the Internet. There's this one guy in Minnesota. There's this one guy in Pakistan or rubbing crystal. Can we try this. Yeah this is why Andy he goes to Mexico has some guy con him with cow intestines But that's exactly what happens. In this case these headlines Trump at this amazing using development and suddenly tens of thousands of England alone has one hundred thousand people with cancer at the time all these cancer sufferers and their families Ktar now just storming hospitals. Can you imagine the that desperate feeling of awful. Yeah and you see yourself in it like if that was you oh you would absolutely be grappling. It's the stages of grief bargaining as well or your child right. I will do anything and so. These people are weeping and literally offering you know what their care providers. What can we give to get on this interferon? List and three thousand dollars doesn't seem insurmountable but that three thousand dollars is is not no. That's that's a little vial like you can just go buy it for three thousand dollars. These are just anecdotal reports. Nobody has actually done a study yet. Around there's some anecdotes about the same time of doctors who happen to have someone hand who see what it'll do on cancer and they get encouraging results one small surveys done on with people with OSTEO genetic sarcoma but apart from this kind of run on the Bank of the Interferon Bank. Nobody's actually published work on what this stuff actually does. And and it's not until the very late seventies that a British company in Kent called. Well come what it's welcome but it's two L.'s. I hope it somebody's name well. We'll come no. It's a play on the word. Get well they ask you to come. There could be a nail will could be welcome. I don't know they have. I found a way to culture to make interferon in a lab with by cell culturing. Basically they've got these 20-foot-high tanks where they've they've got some stem them like embryonic cell lines that they've preserved in some way to immortalize them. It's just a more. They've still got to figure out how to stimulate it and how to purify defied the results but finally there's an industrial process to start to make this stuff in quantity and it's still expensive but now there's interferon on on hand to start testing. It's given to one lucky patient. kind of this test best-case some patients zero type and it kind of sad ironic twist the patient immediately goes into respiratory arrest. Because they're using it turns out that too. They're allergic to the binder. Know to this day. Something that wasn't known because Interferon and only existed in small quantities. All of these but to this day we now know that one of the primary problems with Interferon not hinted at in my third grade textbooks is that it has flu like side effects. I assume because is you're you're treating this stuff with with D. H.. It's now believed that. So there's some toxicity to it far from being a cure all actually the body reacts badly to it because it inoculate feel flew at least we now believe the interferon is the thing that your cells cytokines like interferon art secreted created by sales when exposed to viruses like flu. And in fact. That's one of the reasons why flu accompanied by these aches and pains and fevers like that's the medium through. It's the symptom appears so if you're just going to isolate the stuff and give it to the patient you're just GonNa get some of the benefit but you're definitely getting it. All the aches and pains and fevers. I having the flu. So this is a natural process of cells to combat viruses. Not a thing that human technology just just to software the first time I guess I guess we had. We certainly haven't seen it and I don't know if that means that it had not been isolated did or your body different parts of your body your squirting different fluids at different other different parts of your body all the time so it might be something that science had to concentrate and isolate in in order to actually know what was going on but yeah if that theory is correct like that's that's part of. Why being sick makes you feel awful? Your cells are making interferon. It's it's interfering with your good mood and your ability to get out of bed and eat solid food. And in a couple of these early high profile profile cases the patient actually later died in some cases after making encouraging headlines died of cancer or of something unrelated of flu flu I think the the patient with respiratory arrest did survive the patient. That could have killed that patient. The Interferon could've killed in that case. He survived but many of the cases of promising progress. We're actually followed by a a quick downturn and death presumably from the cancer but it was definitely eating into the miracle drug reputation of Interferon and again. It's a problem of this kind of story story that the breathless advances reported all over the world right. It's the it's it's cold fusion all over again. Yeah as we saw with cold fusion when you know the then there follows confused period. Where nobody you know? People are more excited to write the breakthrough story than they are right. The the bummer. takedown down story. Well and that's one of the problems of media particularly media. That isn't the media that's up to to the minute right rather than slow media. We talked about this when we talked about cold fusion. It's the same problem. Today is that when actual science reporting according gets filtered through many many layers from between the time somebody writes an academic paper to the time you hear a local newscaster talking about it or it shows up buzzfeed logistical right and as its gone through those many many steps it gets less and less reliable like a game of telephone because the you know the academics because we saw in the cold fusion segment are certainly incentivised to make their trumpet their breakthrough the biggest way possible but at least that's tempered by their worries. This is about their reputation. The media this point knows there's no reputational downside sure tomorrow is a new day right. Media cycles are now ten seconds Hey there it's Jonathan Strickland from tech stuff. Be sure to tune into a very special episode of tech stuff that was recorded inside a Mazda Mazda. C X thirty at the L. A. Auto..

interferon cancer flu Interferon Bank respiratory arrest Mazda Pakistan Britain Scotland Blend Minnesota England Andy L. A. Auto Jonathan Strickland Kent L. Mexico Ktar
Pompeo says he told Russians election interference is unacceptable

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Pompeo says he told Russians election interference is unacceptable

"The American intelligence community says Russia interferon Donald trump's behalf during the twenty sixteen race on his first visit to Washington in two and a half years top Russian diplomats Sergei Lavrov again called that baseless no one has given us this proof because simply does not exist during a joint news conference before coming here to the White House Pompeii says he made the U. S. position on election interference clear unacceptable saying the trump administration will always work to protect election integrity soccer mad Donnie at the White House

Donald Trump Washington Sergei Lavrov White House Pompeii Soccer White House Russia Interferon Donnie
"interferon." Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on Z104

"All the hit. What's going on? What's going on guys? Own way. Okay. Guys on Bruno Mars e one four. Run around run around. Actor on money because he knew that on. Call you. You can go around go around going down. L because he knew that. No that's dresses. Matt. Big news for lady Gaga interferon. Say we've got it. Coming up..

Bruno Mars Gaga interferon Matt
"interferon." Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

Side Hustle Pro

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

"Enjoyable when you're cooking. And developing these recipes, you know, you want it to all come from a place of love and for us. It was just a lot of stress. I guess we put a lot of love and work into the recipes that we created, but we were under such tight deadlines that it was like we had to really push through it. And I think like if we were to do it again. We would definitely yeah. We would definitely space it out just to a home process more enjoyable because it was so stressful. And it was just like we were doing a million things at once. Okay. And you know, one of the things that have always out I've no experience with this. But I just always assumed about recipe books. It's like, how do you you have to go back for some of your favorite recipes and figure out the measurements. Because I know a lot of us who like we have our favorites, which is at this point just can eyeball. Right. Right. So that's one of the things I always wondered like man, you really have to sit down and figure out that precise everything so put into this. And yeah, that's why. A lot of work. So I personally if I'm doing a recipe for food heaven, or for cookbook, maybe the first time I'm just kinda like playing around with a deals, but then once I'm like really like series about it. I just have my laptop out and I kinda right? As I go because I don't do that. Then it would be like when he said, it would it would be a nightmare like not even not enjoy a dribble. It will be a nightmare because it's like, okay. What did I do at our ember? But if I'm just going to doing it as I go it's a little bit easier. But it also think it's important to have people to taste task the the recipes. So I know per Wendy like she had all brands of family for me. I would have like my mom there was one weekend where I did a bunch of recipes in had my mom didn't her house because at that time I was living in two hundred square foot studio with a like a mini kitchen. So it was kinda hard to do all these recipes. But I went to my mom's house, I did a budget had her taste them. And she would give honesty back like, oh, it's not. Enough for the healthy enough. She has a really like her pallet is a little different or I would have my like now has been then I think wiper interferon say like he would have all the rest easy. Give me his honesty back is while so yeah, I think it's just kind of figuring out process it really works for you. But it is a lot of work. Yes. No, let's get into months Asian. So we touched on it a little bit. We talked about how you know somethings are just for brand building. And as a fellow podcast. I know for me coming into this world. There's a lot I had to like dig and learn on my own and just through trial and error figure things out. How did you tackle monetization and working with brands and figuring out what to charge?.

Wendy interferon
"interferon." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Let's talk about a bit of a scientific breakthrough. Scientists have for a while now being able to genetically modify goats rabbits or chickens so that the animals produce protein therapies in their milk or their eggs now. Researchers at the world famous Roslin Institute in Edinburgh inserted a gene into chickens. So the chickens lay eggs which contain a very important extra protein, or too which could be used in drugs to boost human immune systems. One of those behind the researches started. Lisa herron. Delighted to say she joins us. Now talk the Herron first off. Did I get that? Right. Pretty much is fair introduction. Thus far. I just wanted to avoid the the correction from the expert. So tell us what Jean did you insert into the chickens where and how we have a couple of different genes, actually. So we inserted one called interferon. Alfa two a the super team is presence in most animals, and we put in the human version. And this can be used to treat viral diseases such as hepatitis and certain cancers, and we put another protein called CSF one which boosts a particular cell in the immune system, and we have both a human and a pick version of we should say, you're you're not just sort of putting listen to feed. So it comes out in the egg. You'll actually inserting this somehow into the genome so what so the it gets reproduced replicated. So we we use a special non replicating virus to insert the gene into the DNA of the chickens said that it expresses permanently. But we also use a different part of the gene called a promoter, which is a bit of DNA that tells that protein exactly when and where to express so that protein only comes out in the weight of laying hens right fascinating. So then you have the eggs, and obviously chickens lay eggs how much protein is in the eggs. I mean, how scalable practical factory is this. It depends on exactly what we're talking about. But our best one can lay between one point five and three grams of protein per liter, and that's quite a lot for this particular protein. That's quite a hefty dose. So we're right. So that's like the equivalent of a part of a dose Hoffa does a dose is that big. It's yes. So about three eggs would probably be enough for a normal adult male. Oh, right. Okay. And as I understand it they lay, you know, two hundred and fifty three hundred years. So that's really quite low. What what's the what's the eventual result of this? Are you going to see factories full of chickens producing eggs, which have usable proteins in them. Is that way you're driving towards yes, potentially? So we don't believe that the chickens are going to ever completely replace the current systems that use cells, but there are certain proteins, which the cells can't make as effectively as the chicken. And so we look to particularly target those proteins which have therapeutic potential, but have maybe been a bit too difficult to make himself is it expensive to make this stuff. Normally for the pharmaceutical Jeff choice cheaper to use the chickens to do it that could be a way to go. Yes. That's what we're looking at fascinating. Lisa. Thank you very much. Indeed obsolete Saharan of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh. You're listening to Newsday from the BBC World Service with Lawrence Pollard, and Alex Richardson, the main headlines this hour caught in China has jailed prominent human rights lawyer who defended some of the country's most. Marginalized groups and the UN has renewed warnings about the threat of famine in Yemen. As a ceasefire between the government and the rebels comes under pressure. Let's get the sports news now, Matthew Kenyon ally. Aleksei Chelsea assistant manager gem Franco's owner is still hoping eighteen year old Callum Hudson. Avoid will stay at the club despite handing in a transfer request. And despite by Munich having made a bit of around forty five million dollars for the young star. He scored in Sunday's SRI nail FA Cup win over Sheffield Wednesday in England that send us the hold is through to the last sixteen. I suppose it could have been his final action for the club's Spurs out of the FA Cup. They lost to nil to Crystal Palace. The draw for the fifth round is later on today. You can get all the details in sport today at nine thousand nine hundred thirty GMT will also tell you about the first of the semi finals at the Asia Cup that Japan taking on Iran later and LeBron James once again, Mr. L LA Lakers game. This time against the Phoenix Suns at sixteen games in a row is Mr. the groin injury. He is practice full training. The Lakers didn't need him. They want it yesterday. Matthew kenyon. Thank you. Can you believe neither of us made any jokes about chickens and eggs with so serious where we do? So everyone else was it'll cracking up behind the glass, but we didn't wish good Goodyear extraordinary. Let's move on. It's sixteen minutes past the if in doubt in a time check, that's always the actually we're going to talk about glamour, the Screen Actors Guild awards in LA, this is because we are, of course, moving up towards Oscar's time actors celebrating themselves, what could be more noble the awards are a good predictor of where the Oscars might go. At one of the big stories was Black Panther, the superhero film, the BBC's John Johnson was there, obviously we still have a ways to go. But in twenty eighteen highway did manage to get few things. Right. It says a lot that host Meghan Malala. I was comfortable cracking jokes about diversity cast black people and Black Panther. That was good. He.

Lisa herron Roslin Institute Matthew kenyon Edinburgh BBC Black Panther interferon Crystal Palace FA Lakers hepatitis Phoenix Suns Meghan Malala UN Hoffa Jean Screen Actors Guild LA
"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

"You were mentioning before about almonds, which I'm eating sure you mentioned their bid for viral. Yeah. They're really high in arginine. And so the L arginine it can be a little bit tricky. But you know, you just there's so many other nuts out there hazelnuts. Walnuts. Cashews? They're not they're not high in arginine say just make a switch. Okay. So get away from the. Almonds and walnuts. Yeah. Walnuts. Are great. They're not going to be as high in Geneva. I mean, you got a bigger fish to fry with hep C the foods themselves. Remember, very very slight on how it can affect things like viral infections. It's all about now. You know, getting the immune system settled down. Get the virus to go dormant as much as possible. Are you taking any medication in treatment? No, I was going to go on. Oh interferon. The doctor said I balanced myself out pretty well. So they called that off now on doing. Well, I take a lot of vitamin I take vitamin c. This garlic. Those are all good. But no medication. Good. Well, and just keep in mind that, you know, just like we talked about L Argentine being an amino acids found in foods that can stimulate viral activity. L wising is the opposite. So L Y S I E. Leising will actually come in and can help. I mean, he's a pretty big animal, but L wising he come in and help create kind of calm things down chill things out and help it to go a little bit more on the dorm side. So that might be something you want to look into as well, but your foods, of course, are going to be important. I would look at vitamin d levels. Make sure your numbers of between seventy and ninety on a blood test. It's kind of like one of those things like even you can feel the effects of fatty liver and all is don't let it get you down keep pushing through try to keep your normal routine daily routine. And that does a lot just for your mindset. But it also does a lot in dealing with any kind of health challenges, especially like NFC, triple eight two eight three seventy two seventy two lines are open questions about your health..

E. Leising fatty liver Geneva interferon L Argentine
"interferon." Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The investigators performed a comprehensive analysis of samples from patients who had a relapse of acute myeloid leukemia AM L after he a poetic stem cell transplantation to define the genetic. And epi genetic alterations that allow leukemia cells to escape the graft versus leukemia effect and to determine whether the dysregulation of known immune related genes is a common feature of relapse after transplantation on Exon sequencing the spectrum of gained and lost mutations. Observed with relapse after transplantation was similar to the spectrum observed with relapse after chemotherapy, specifically relapse after transplantation was not associated with the acquisition of previously unknown AML specific mutations or structural variations in immune related, gene. Enes. In contrast, RNA sequencing of samples obtained at relapse after transplantation reveal dysregulation of pathways involved in adaptive and innate, immunity, including down regulation of major histocompatibility complex m h c class to genes to levels that were three to twelve times lower than the level seen impaired samples obtained at presentation flow Saitama tree and immuno history. Chemical analysis confirmed decreased expression of m h c class to at relapse in seventeen of thirty four patients who had relapsed after transplantation evidence suggested that interferon gamma treatment could rapidly reverse this pheno type enamel blasts in vitro. Overall survival with value MAB after chemo radiotherapy in stage..

relapse leukemia interferon
Bat Interferons

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Bat Interferons

"In spite of being hosts for a multitude of different viruses, bats don't display any signs of the resulting diseases. What is it that keeps these creatures of the night, so healthy? This is innovation now protecting humans from deadly viruses. Like Ebola has immunologists working overtime. And a group of scientists in Australia are turning to bats for answers all mammals release a group of proteins called interferons to block replication of invading viruses. Although humans have a large number of these proteins one Australian mammal the black fruit bat has only three unique interference and the bat uses those proteins to offensively fight disease in humans our immune systems kick into action in response to infection the interferon defense for bats is switched on all the time creating an upfront attack again. Disease without causing the toxic reaction to tissue and cells that same twenty four seven response would cause an humans manipulating the immune responses of other species to work in a similar way could be just what the doctor ordered to safeguard the human population for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulling innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Disease National Institute Of Aerospac Interferon Jennifer Australia Nasa
"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

"I was going to go on Oh interferon The, doctor said I balanced myself out. Pretty, well So they called that off now on. Doing well I, take a lot of vitamin c This'll garlic Those are, all good but. No medication That's good well and, just keep in mind that you know just like we talked about l. Argentine being an amino acids found in foods that can stimulate. Viral activity l. wising is the opposite so l. y., s. i. e. Leising will actually come in and can help I mean hep. Sees a pretty big animal but L. wising can come in and help create kind of call things down chill things out and help it to go. A little, bit more on the dorm that, side So that might be something you want to look into as well. But your foods of course are going to be important I would look at vitamin d levels, make sure your numbers of between seventy and ninety on a blood test it's kind of like, one of those things like even you can feel the effects of it fatty liver and all Don't let. It, get. You down keep pushing through trying to keep your normal routine daily. Routine and that does a lot for your mindset but. It also does a lot in dealing, with any kind of health challenges especially like hep c. triple eight two. Eight three seventy two seventy two lines are open with questions about your health Tom you're next, with us hi Tom How can. I,.

Tom interferon fatty liver Leising
"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WLAC

"No I was going to go on An I o interferon The doctor said I balanced. Myself out pretty well So they called that off now on. Doing well I, take a lot of vitamin c This'll garlic Those are, all good but no medication now it's, good well and just keep in mind that, you know just like we talked about l. arginine being an amino acid this down in foods that can stimulate viral activity l. wising is. The opposite so l. y. s. I n. e. Leising likes to come in and, can help I mean sees a pretty began, animal but l. wising he come in and help create kind of calm things down chill things out and help it to go a little. Bit more on the dorm at side So that might be something you want to look into as well but, your foods of course are going to be important I would look. At vitamin, d levels make sure your, numbers are between seventy and ninety on a blood test it's kind of like, one of those things like even you can feel the effects of it fatty liver and all Don't. Let, it. Get you down keep pushing through trying to keep your normal routine. Daily routine and that does a lot just for your. Mindset but it also does a lot, in dealing with any kind of health challenges especially like hep c. AAA. Two eight three seventy two seventy two lines are open questions about your health Tom you're next, with us hi Tom How can. I, help My daughter has got what the. Doctor calls this Pepsi Okay Nexium and I'm wondering if you have any suggestions for something besides. That How old is she twenty to twenty one A lot of stress. Is something brand new? It just got diagnosed It's recent in. The last, several months she is in college. Fulltime and working fulltime so yeah she's got a lot of stress she's got a. Lot of honor is she overweight initiate a. Lot of junk food No she'd been eaten healthy for probably a year or so Pay more attention to her diet When, you're under a lot of stress just couple things reactions. That can happen in the body one or two. Things can happen in the stomach we produce. Hydrochloric acid helps break down proteins it also helps breakdown and is just really important if you, don't break things down very well Because you're lacking hydrochloric acid due to, a lot of stress then you can a couple of. Things one is apple cider vinegar has been used. For a long time and it can help. Stimulate more hydrochloric acid with the meals so kind of the old home remedy if you will Has always been to take. Like apple cider vinegar with. Your meals with their suspenseful of it or whatever the bottle will say whenever, you go pick it up. At a health food store that's been known to help and. It does, work it does stimulate that it, hell's breaking the food's down and all that but here's a little. Trick and, a lot of times we think it's lack of, acid, or too much and we don't really. Know so you start using Nexium and which is standard of care I mean they're. They're doing the right thing but I. Know you're wanting to. Look in the more natural side so typically what you do is when you take apple cider vinegar vinegar. Wanted to things will happen either she. Will feel better Or she'll feel worse if she falls worship too much acid so there's a whole different protocol for that but if she doesn't then you, can, look at things like potato hydrochloride they can get, it in supplement form their approach. The Olympic enzymes that can be helpful and this other several types.

Tom fatty liver interferon Leising apple Pepsi l.
"interferon." Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"She woke up and it's called a waking dream where you're dreaming but you dream that you woke up and she walked out into the backyard and there was this big silver spaceship that lands in our backyard and these little people get out and they walk up to her and they say you need interferon and she goes why is it interfere on remember this interferon tell your doctor you need interferon they turn around walk back into their spaceships and the spaceship picked off so the next day she goes to a doctor and she says i had a dream last night at this point she has nothing to lose right that doesn't matter she goes i had a dream last night and in the dream these aliens from spaceship told me i need interferon now just a alien spaceship should have done the dachshund she said he turned totally white when she said i need interferon do you know what it is and he said well it's a new chemo this out it's not really available yet but i think i know of a research group that's using it let me see if i can get you into it so he did and that was twenty years ago she recovered the interferon worked and she'd never heard of it before knew nothing about it and neither did most of the rest of the medical industry i think one of the most important things that your book brings up cannot is that it shows the unity of the mind and the body and the spirit all working together as one and that we all have these abilities if we just open up and allow what do you hope the readers take away from this book how important it is for them to self advocate you'll see that that thread throughout this book some of these patients got down right obnoxious and if you can see through the phone line you see my arm at my hands is up waving i was one of them you know they didn't take no for an answer they would not be dismissed they were that squeaky wheel that re that that just refused to be ignored and that's what you've gotta do when your life is on the line you've got to be all of that more and i'm hoping that this book will show you how absolute pleasure having you on and again everyone the book is called dreams that can save.

interferon chemo twenty years
"interferon." Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Did beginning about two thousand was with drugs like interferon so there's this interferon alpha which was used somewhat in cancer but a great deal for many years to treat hepatitis c and it it's it's a chemical your body makes that basically turned on inflammation again if i were to take you in inject a bunch of interfere alpha into your arm within an hour you'd be feeling sick he'd have a fever you'd fill you know crappy and you'd want to lay down and it activates all these inflammatory chemicals in your body turns out that if people do that to themselves on a repeated basis for something like curing hepatitis c very significant proportion them become depressed many become like really clinically depressed suicidal hopeless helpless oh well longterm while you're getting the treatment the interesting thing is that the vast bulk of people recover pretty much completely within a couple of weeks stopping it so it really is sort of dragging if you're constantly exposed to inflammatory stimuli at a high level you know people get exhausted depressed or sleep gets messed up yeah unfortunately there there are actually a number of data points suggesting that some people do have long term you know sort of mood disturbances after a chronic bout of inflammation from interferon we know from other studies sort of population studies that that if you have episodes of inflammation earlier in life so for instance if you have an auto immune condition or if you have bad infections of the kind of infections atlantic hospital you're significantly more likely to subsequently develop significant major depression but significant schizophrenia and other disorders to right so it looks like there's something about chronic inflammatory activation that induces changes in the brain and body the t for depression in fact we can talk by this we know a lot about what those changes are so there was this convergence of data suggesting that that yeah that inflammation the sorts of of.

interferon cancer fever
"interferon." Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Getting unichem situations we owe inducing information in a human being that is not a fasting at the level of the brain as stress sick for instance we know we know with niger longtime just to give you a picture of inflammation at its effect on the mind the mood and so on we've ninefoot long time that winstons interferon outsized the treatments is one as a treatment option in session disease crudely things like hepatitis c incessant types of cancer and so on and when you gimme interferon alpha treatment one of the side effects his anger is in policy the teed frustration a change in mood and brilliant coup was in effect demonstration where your increasing rebels interkorean alhut in the bloodstream redid he see you manifestation in patients mood and that's a very clear human paychex so we also have thus ended toxins in it took seem yeah so whittingham patch shia but again equivalent effect page of available patchy own inhuman well but it is a grouping by two day studies accumulating so rapidly higher on just wanted to take this moment to thank you all for your support of the podcast over the years as good a real privilege will do this podcast free all for over the past three and a half years spinner a real labour while for me if you'd like to further support the podcast i wanted to you know a few things you can do to help make it a better experience for y'all first and really appreciate it if you could subscribe to the psychology podcast nine tunes this would help make the show more prominent anay tunes and increase our listenership i believe you can subscribe both on your iphone and on your computer second it'd be great if you could give the shore reading in review and i tunes i definitely read all the reviews another thing you can do is doing some money to the show by going to the psychology podcasts dot com and click on the link support the podcast at the bottom of the page that's the psychology podcast dot com.

niger interferon whittingham ninefoot two day
"interferon." Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Four lines that are conscious by day often get through in our dreams because we don't have to pay attention to all our our band of consciousness pretty narrow compared to everything going on in their brain so by day we're we're focused on you know everything we're looking at and seeing in processing visually at sounds conversations were having and you know in your brain just has to be keep you up writing balanced and everything and at night there's no visual real stimuli coming in your perception of sounds is stamped way down you're not having to deal with any balance movements stuff so a lot of the things occupy by day are just not there as brain areas are are quiet at night so things like if something is subtly pressing on a nerve in a way that you don't even feel was pain or or you do have a lot of aaron interferon running around your body time make you feel vaguely sick just things that we wouldn't notice by day because they're being crowded out of our attention i think often get through into our dream content just because they don't have to compete with all the sort of basic visual input that makes sense i definitely here a lot of stories about people who especially the kind of longterm illnesses i do not put any kind of psychic attribution to some people tell these stories is oh this means my dream was knowing i was gonna get cancer knowing i was going to get this neurological disorder but it's very striking to me that it tends to be the disorders that a rather slow in farming in the body where the processes their long before you we usually clinically notice it where somebody has a dramatic dream that.

interferon neurological disorder aaron
"interferon." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The immune system that we usually use only when fighting off a vitamin fiction award fighting off a tumour who's called the interferon response interference of molecules that our cells produce when they have been infected with the virus to alert the neighboring cells in the immune system that they survived is the can also be produced in response to the presence of a small tumour and then that alerts the immune system to come to the side and start attacking either the vital infected sale or the incipient tumor still sadat is always on in people with on syndrome that's no good immune system you should be led the national guard inner being quietly in times when he's not needed then have been deployed only in on a case of emergency and then be coming back to the barracks when you have the new system costea today the iraqi becoming to programs like an attack of the self and that's why people within syndrome have so many will team conditions when the immune system attacks attacks in the fight or you can have hypothyroidism reitox the i'm chris you've got type one diabetes when eat attacks your hair follicles sills you can have all the b share yaitah a loss of her she's very prevalent people with down's syndrome you're gonna have attack of your pigment pretty soon celts in the scheme that leads to be liable all conditions that we see more off in people's at syndrome solve coming back to your initial question come we learned from these about casino therapy yes what we sin in people with on seemed him is that they have elevated numbers of the cells in the immune system that attacked to mars on this episode of the immune system that are too much when they are successful have been tumors fool prevent that attack what catching you know therapy thus unblock those restraints up the immune system to the immune cells can calling an attack include a tumor so the.

immune system chris interferon sadat hypothyroidism
"interferon." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New neurons which assist admitted the province in about seven hundred new noodles for they may be the crease and you will looking at this particular protein interferon and there's also a drug interferon that sometimes used for certain types of cancer could this explain why it is that some patients who are having chemotherapy become depressed you know people tents thank all they've they've got cancer and they're afraid and that's why that depressed but could actually be a sideeffect of the treatment that yes i the feudal misuse for cancer and he's also you'll using in cases of five type of hepatitis and these spacious keiper bush and with them and up developing the pressure and could this still account for wi with some people who develop depression they develop depression after you know something very terrible has happened in their life was something very very difficult with that be happening by different price s completely oakwood that still involve inflammation could all these things be linked they could be link and in fact stress stressful situations cycle socialist racists one reorganize scores of depression and customers will be linked to a disruption in the immune response so on the basis of this research could you try to look for a drug which blocks this particular protein interferon to try to help reestablish this at least is the idea it's not just in the field there are many molecules are where they defy four other molecules that they're activated in the system and the idea is that if you could target the one that these alter ukel goto was personalized medicine or what we call precision psychiatrist because you can measure cells to fight out measure if you good measure and if you could note exacly the delivers that are normal and abnormal you could tweet them there are clinical trials people have use antiflemish diplomacy directs in addition or out on their own to treat depressions and.

interferon cancer hepatitis keiper bush wi depression
"interferon." Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"interferon." Discussed on 790 KABC

"Really started um reading a book called the people like handy while we became friends or fit to boring fly chose for people that they have a black clinical trials are now that some really struggling and i know that interferon is gonna make me even lord oppressed enough already end or you're not just the physical part oh yeah if said she your brain at kidding out at all because any disease good enough securing air chemicals you're you're a peptide asking but are also knew the my faith and grace it's gonna be the people a new go ahead you see your myself out because that's what i do that i teach others true what up her i'm not going to tell you something i haven't already track so i actually went to the people scheringplough who are doing it here on at the time and first it and and i hit how dare you are you crazy you're not making any money because nobody can finish interferon because it gives that affect their off the chart a fifth decided to say it we want to help people he'll quicken affair i'm listen to cure at that time right now we have hardly old town area of her voni which is a rapid cure naomi are you able to stay with the across the commercial break course okay we really appreciate some on the army jr the book is river of times shoes talking to us about her experience with depression and chronic hepatitis very serious life threatening condition back in those days particularly now we judge the book of river time my dissent in the depression and how i emerged with hope and she's gonna tell us for story of hope after this talk radio seven down to keep saying oh yeah i'm a tbone man with at t bone play hanson craig it's the.

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