35 Burst results for "Intelligence"

John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on the Iraq Invasion

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:48 min | 2 d ago

John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on the Iraq Invasion

"There are certain things you can't make up. I mean, I want to frame this again for people who aren't paying attention because maybe they're not, they're not tracking, I was for the Iraq invasion back when. You were against it. And I remember talking to you and not understanding, I thought, aren't all conservatives for this isn't Saddam Hussein, a monster. And by the way, of course, he was a truly evil monster. There's no doubt about that. But it didn't occur to me at the time that there are reasons not to attack Saddam Hussein and so on and so forth. So I was for it. All these years later, thanks to not just John's mirac, but Donald Trump, we have had a reevaluation. And I think that people now realize not only was it wrong, but it was a disaster on many levels. And then we start understanding that all the people who got us into the many messages in which we are today also got us into the mess of the Iraq War. It's the neocons. It's not magga people. It's not people who want to put America first. It's globalists. It is really tremendously wicked. And so here you have George Bush, do the ultimate Freudian slips of all time. So wonderful. It's the sort of thing that Will Ferrell would make up on SNL or something. But no, no, this actually happened. It's so great. I mean, the underlying reality is grotesque. We are, we killed between 507 100,000 civilians in our invasion of Iraq, which was based on false intelligence and made up junk intelligence that the neocons were shoving past the FBI and putting straight into The White House. There were hundreds of experts saying there are no weapons of mass destruction. The UN inspector said there are no weapons of mass destruction. Nobody had any real evidence of weapons of mass distraction. Colin Powell gets goes in front of the UN with doctored photos that don't represent what he says they are. Condoleezza Rice says, we don't want the next smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud in Manhattan. They use our trauma over 9 11 to make us think that Saddam Hussein is building nukes and is going to smuggle them into America. They make us think he was involved in 9 11, which he wasn't. They make us think he was getting uranium, which he couldn't. I mean, it was just this for rago of lies. And I guess Eric, you're a nicer person, maybe because you grew up in Connecticut, you didn't think your own political leaders of your own party were lying to you to get back. No, of course I

Saddam Hussein Iraq Magga Donald Trump Will Ferrell George Bush SNL UN America John FBI Colin Powell White House Condoleezza Rice Manhattan Eric Connecticut
Congress dives into UFOs, but no signs of extraterrestrials

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last week

Congress dives into UFOs, but no signs of extraterrestrials

"Congresses congresses congresses congresses held held held held its its its its first first first first hearing hearing hearing hearing in in in in half half half half a a a a century century century century on on on on unidentified unidentified unidentified unidentified flying flying flying flying objects objects objects objects I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with what what what what the the the the Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon is is is is saying saying saying saying reports reports reports reports of of of of sightings sightings sightings sightings are are are are frequent frequent frequent frequent and and and and continuing continuing continuing continuing but but but but deputy deputy deputy deputy director director director director of of of of naval naval naval naval intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence Scott Scott Scott Scott Bray Bray Bray Bray did did did did not not not not suggest suggest suggest suggest there there there there evidence evidence evidence evidence of of of of extraterrestrial extraterrestrial extraterrestrial extraterrestrial life life life life but but but but rather rather rather rather the the the the result result result result of of of of quad quad quad quad copters copters copters copters and and and and unmanned unmanned unmanned unmanned aerial aerial aerial aerial systems systems systems systems that that that that are are are are in in in in our our our our airspace airspace airspace airspace identification identification identification identification of of of of what what what what we we we we can can can can classify classify classify classify as as as as clutter clutter clutter clutter mylar mylar mylar mylar balloons balloons balloons balloons and and and and other other other other types types types types of of of of of of of of your your your your trash trash trash trash and and and and improvements improvements improvements improvements in in in in the the the the capabilities capabilities capabilities capabilities of of of of our our our our various various various various sensors sensors sensors sensors to to to to detect detect detect detect things things things things in in in in our our our our airspace airspace airspace airspace the the the the Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon has has has has picked picked picked picked a a a a director director director director for for for for a a a a task task task task force force force force on on on on what what what what it it it it calls calls calls calls unidentified unidentified unidentified unidentified aerial aerial aerial aerial phenomena phenomena phenomena phenomena lawmakers lawmakers lawmakers lawmakers from from from from both both both both parties parties parties parties say say say say UFOs UFOs UFOs UFOs are are are are a a a a national national national national security security security security concern concern concern concern in in in in which which which which case case case case brace brace brace brace says says says says much much much much needs needs needs needs to to to to remain remain remain remain classified classified classified classified we we we we do do do do not not not not want want want want potential potential potential potential adversaries adversaries adversaries adversaries to to to to know know know know exactly exactly exactly exactly what what what what we're we're we're we're able able able able to to to to see see see see or or or or understand understand understand understand or or or or how how how how we we we we come come come come to to to to the the the the conclusions conclusions conclusions conclusions we we we we make make make make Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas Washington Washington Washington Washington

Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pen Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Naval Naval Naval Naval Intell Scott Scott Scott Scott Bray B Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Washington
Massacre video reopens wounds for missing Syrians' families

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Massacre video reopens wounds for missing Syrians' families

"A a a a nine nine nine nine year year year year old old old old videos videos videos videos smuggled smuggled smuggled smuggled out out out out of of of of Syria Syria Syria Syria appears appears appears appears to to to to show show show show the the the the country's country's country's country's military military military military intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence agents agents agents agents killing killing killing killing dozens dozens dozens dozens of of of of people people people people and and and and dumping dumping dumping dumping their their their their bodies bodies bodies bodies in in in in a a a a pit pit pit pit how how how some some some unis unis unis a a a Sweden Sweden Sweden based based based researcher researcher researcher looking looking looking at at at a a a wall wall wall crimes crimes crimes committed committed committed in in in Syria Syria Syria has has has identified identified identified thirteen thirteen thirteen of of of the the the victims victims victims seen seen seen in in in the the the video video video which which which was was was taken taken taken in in in serious serious serious Damascus Damascus Damascus on on on April April April sixteenth sixteenth sixteenth twenty twenty twenty thirteen thirteen thirteen and and and condom condom condom houses houses houses the the the city city city and and and see see see if if if each each each day day day in in in an an an interview interview interview with with with the the the Associated Associated Associated Press Press Press Minnis Minnis Minnis says says says government government government loyalists loyalists loyalists regularly regularly regularly committed committed committed mass mass mass killings killings killings in in in the the the custom custom custom on on on area area area of of of the the the city city city with with with the the the video video video we we we shot shot shot randomly randomly randomly arresting arresting arresting people people people the the the state state state passed passed passed through through through security security security checkpoints checkpoints checkpoints Eunice Eunice Eunice adds adds adds the the the killings killings killings what what what part part part of of of the the the Syrian Syrian Syrian government's government's government's strategy strategy strategy to to to suppress suppress suppress an an an armed armed armed uprising uprising uprising the the the AP AP AP has has has interviewed interviewed interviewed the the the parents parents parents of of of one one one of of of the the the victims victims victims who who who were were were able able able to to to identify identify identify the the the son son son in in in the the the video video video I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Taylor Taylor Taylor this this this month month month

Syria Sweden Damascus Associated Associated Associat Minnis Minnis Minnis Government Government Governme Eunice Eunice Eunice Syrian Syrian Syrian Governmen Ap Ap AP Charles Charles Charles Taylor
UK: Belarus troops on the Ukraine border

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

UK: Belarus troops on the Ukraine border

"British British British British military military military military authorities authorities authorities authorities say say say say the the the the presence presence presence presence of of of of the the the the Russian Russian Russian Russian forces forces forces forces on on on on the the the the border border border border may may may may force force force force you you you you crane crane crane crane your your your your troops troops troops troops to to to to stay stay stay stay in in in in the the the the area area area area instead instead instead instead of of of of going going going going to to to to support support support support operations operations operations operations in in in in the the the the eastern eastern eastern eastern Donbass Donbass Donbass Donbass region region region region Belarus Belarus Belarus Belarus a a a a close close close close ally ally ally ally of of of of Russia Russia Russia Russia said said said said last last last last week week week week that that that that it it it it planned planned planned planned to to to to send send send send special special special special operations operations operations operations troops troops troops troops to to to to three three three three areas areas areas areas near near near near the the the the Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian border border border border as as as as he he he he complained complained complained complained about about about about the the the the buildup buildup buildup buildup of of of of NATO NATO NATO NATO troops troops troops troops in in in in the the the the region region region region now now now now the the the the UK's UK's UK's UK's ministry ministry ministry ministry of of of of defense defense defense defense says says says says in in in in an an an an intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence briefing briefing briefing briefing Belarus Belarus Belarus Belarus has has has has also also also also deployed deployed deployed deployed air air air air defense defense defense defense forces forces forces forces artillery artillery artillery artillery and and and and missile missile missile missile units units units units to to to to training training training training sites sites sites sites in in in in western western western western Belarus Belarus Belarus Belarus the the the the ministry ministry ministry ministry adds adds adds adds pollution pollution pollution pollution forces forces forces forces haven't haven't haven't haven't been been been been directly directly directly directly involved involved involved involved in in in in the the the the invasion invasion invasion invasion of of of of Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine though though though though the the the the Russian Russian Russian Russian ally ally ally ally has has has has been been been been used used used used as as as as a a a a staging staging staging staging area area area area for for for for attacks attacks attacks attacks on on on on the the the the cities cities cities cities of of of of kia kia kia kia and and and and Cheney Cheney Cheney Cheney I'm I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Charles de de de de Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma

Belarus Donbass Donbass Russia Russian Russian Russian Russia Nato Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian UK Ministry Ministry Ministry Min Ministry Ministry Ministry Min Kia Kia Cheney Cheney Cheney Cheney Charles Charles Charles Charle
Project Veritas: Whistleblower Troubled With the Direction of the FBI

The Dan Bongino Show

01:16 min | Last week

Project Veritas: Whistleblower Troubled With the Direction of the FBI

"Here is the FBI whistleblower talking to project veritas after they got a hold of Ashley Biden's diary and had an FBI raids at their homes after that Alleging that this was political And he also says that the vast majority of FBI agents are troubled by the direction the agency is taking Gosh I hope we're going to hear from more whistleblowers than coming up here Check this out Going down to sentinel tags This was chosen by the people who opened up this case They had to specifically list the threat tags that they wanted to identify The intelligence investigation is meant for information That doesn't require that you've done anything wrong with dialog That's the governing dynamic for the FBI One paragraph justification for spying on anyone It's one of the few parts of the entire public document that you see that will be redacted It's truly an incredible amount of power If used wrong What do you hope comes from your endeavor to be here and say all this I would hope that we could end up with a nonpartisan law enforcement agency in this country that's not doing things that seem to be inappropriate Just you doing the job that you're told following those orders is to maintain your paycheck and your pension that gives you the Holocaust So then you end up with somebody who's willing to do something that maybe compromises their ethics Yeah Yeah you're right And thank you to that whistleblower for speaking up

FBI Ashley Biden
Judicial Watch's Chris Farrell Describes His Credentials

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Judicial Watch's Chris Farrell Describes His Credentials

"Is the director of research and investigations for that superlative organization judicial watch. Chris Farrell, welcome in studio. Great to be with you, Seth. Thank you. You've been on the show multiple times. You've been on my newsmax show for those who are just accidentally tuning in now or have found us on Salem TV. Would you just for a couple of seconds talk about your national security credentials, what you did in uniform before you joined your judicial watch. I was commissioned as a military intelligence officer in the U.S. Army, specifically as a counterintelligence officer. And I served in that role doing mostly counter espionage work, investigations, running double agent operations and also commanding the army's surveillance team. We did physical technical and aerial surveillance of counterintelligence suspects, but also in support of clandestine human intelligence operations. I then went on to actually cross strain and besides being a can respond to case officer. I became a clandestine human intelligence case officer. And so I have a foot in each world in the world of human intelligence, both countering bad guys who are trying to spy against us, but then also in their field of human intelligence, which is us trying to have persons from foreign countries provide intelligence to U.S. to U.S.

Salem Tv Chris Farrell Seth U.S. Army Army U.S.
US Spy Chief Warns Putin Is Preparing for 'Prolonged' War in Ukraine

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

US Spy Chief Warns Putin Is Preparing for 'Prolonged' War in Ukraine

"News. Vladimir Putin gearing up for a prolonged war and will not stop at the Donbass, according to the telegraph, the Financial Times hits the same note. Vladimir Putin preparing for a prolonged conflict in Ukraine, both of these are based upon statements by the director of national intelligence Avril Haines in the United States. The DNI is Avril Haines. He said we have assessed that Putin's just going to consolidate his gains in the Donbass and then push on. This has prompted his well, the prime minister of Poland to issue a statement, his name is Mauro weki, that Vladimir Putin is quote more dangerous than Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin because of his ideology and because of the weapons that he possesses.

Avril Haines Vladimir Putin Donbass The Financial Times DNI Ukraine Putin Mauro Weki United States Poland Adolf Hitler Joseph Stalin
Russia pummels vital port of Odesa, targeting supply lines

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Russia pummels vital port of Odesa, targeting supply lines

"U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence officials officials officials officials believe believe believe believe Russian Russian Russian Russian president president president president Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin Putin Putin is is is is preparing preparing preparing preparing for for for for a a a a prolonged prolonged prolonged prolonged conflict conflict conflict conflict in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine national national national national intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence director director director director Averell Averell Averell Averell Haynes Haynes Haynes Haynes told told told told the the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate Armed Armed Armed Armed Services Services Services Services Committee Committee Committee Committee potent potent potent potent likely likely likely likely feels feels feels feels he he he he has has has has a a a a greater greater greater greater ability ability ability ability and and and and willingness willingness willingness willingness to to to to indoor indoor indoor indoor challenges challenges challenges challenges he he he he is is is is probably probably probably probably counting counting counting counting on on on on U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. N. N. N. N. E. E. E. E. you you you you resolve resolve resolve resolve to to to to weaken weaken weaken weaken as as as as food food food food shortages shortages shortages shortages inflation inflation inflation inflation energy energy energy energy prices prices prices prices get get get get worse worse worse worse defense defense defense defense intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence agency agency agency agency director director director director lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant general general general general Scott Scott Scott Scott berry berry berry berry ace ace ace ace assessment assessment assessment assessment the the the the Russians Russians Russians Russians are are are are winning winning winning winning in in in in Ukraine's Ukraine's Ukraine's Ukraine's aren't aren't aren't aren't winning winning winning winning Perrier Perrier Perrier Perrier was was was was asked asked asked asked how how how how many many many many Russian Russian Russian Russian generals generals generals generals have have have have died died died died in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine I I I I think think think think the the the the numbers numbers numbers numbers between between between between eight eight eight eight and and and and ten ten ten ten he he he he says says says says because because because because Russia Russia Russia Russia lacks lacks lacks lacks a a a a non non non non commissioned commissioned commissioned commissioned officer officer officer officer corps corps corps corps its its its its generals generals generals generals have have have have to to to to go go go go into into into into combat combat combat combat zones zones zones zones and and and and end end end end up up up up in in in in dangerous dangerous dangerous dangerous positions positions positions positions at at at at Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahue Washington Washington Washington Washington

Ukraine U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vla Averell Averell Averell Averel Haynes Haynes Senate Senate Senate Armed Armed Armed Armed U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. N. N. Lieutenant Lieutenant Lieutena Perrier Perrier Senate Russia Corps Corps Corps Corps Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahu
Russian Space Chief Dmitry Rogozin Apparently Threatens Elon Musk

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Russian Space Chief Dmitry Rogozin Apparently Threatens Elon Musk

"The head of Russia's space agency threatened Elon Musk. Now I don't know what Elon Musk. I don't own any Tesla stock as far as I know it might be in a mutual fund. But I'll tell you what. He's an American who's been threatened by the Russian. So I asked national security adviser Robert C O'Brien to join me this morning to talk about that and big tech generally. Good morning ambassador O'Brien, how are you? Good morning to you, great to be with you. First of all, do you work for Elon Musk? I know you consult for a bunch of big companies is Tesla, one of them, or a SpaceX. No, we don't work for Elon, but Elon feel free to call us. We want to help you. Well, first of all, tell me, what did you think of a Russian official threatening in American citizens? Well, this is a very serious issue. Especially in light of the fact that Russia has a history of assassinating its opponents and so the FBI is almost certainly consulted with Elon. There's a duty to warn that the FBI has for American citizens who have been threatened by foreign governments. And unfortunately, it happens more and more with China ran now Russia getting into this game of threatened Americans. So Elon, I'm sure has great security. You can certainly afford it. But the U.S. because of Elon's role in the Ukraine crisis and the great work that these companies have done really ought to be thinking about supplementing his security, at least giving them daily intelligence feeds and potentially giving him government security to work with his private folks. I mean, this is a very serious threat. Very

Elon Musk Elon Robert C O'brien Tesla Russia Spacex O'brien FBI China Ukraine U.S.
A Teaser of the New Groundbreaking Film '2000 Mules'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

A Teaser of the New Groundbreaking Film '2000 Mules'

"Check this out We have put together I think the most extensive and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics Let me say it again The 2020 election was the most secure Election in American history Let me begin by asking a very simple question Do we know the truth about what really happened in the 2020 election Fig millions of Americans know something went wrong and they have little pieces and no one's really put it together I'm agnostic on this question And I am awaiting more information If I believe the president were Nazi I might steal an election Bold accusations require bold evidence And they haven't seen it We had been working on something big Show me the money Can we meet I've been working with Greg Gillis He has a deep background in election intelligence True the vote has the largest store of election intelligence for the 2020 elections in the world No one has more data than we did We identified in Atlanta 242 mules that went to an average of 24 drop boxes that Philadelphia alone We've identified more than 1100 mules What is immune Person picking up ballots and running them to the drop boxes This is not grandma out walking her dog Bad backgrounds bad reputations They are interested in one thing That's money In a no shape in no way in no time is that legal This is organized crime Do you have video evidence 4 million minutes of surveillance video around the country What you're about to see is disturbing So this is 1 o'clock in the morning Don't we all vote at 1 o'clock in the morning One night this person this mule went across 6 counties to 27 different drop boxes

Greg Gillis Atlanta Philadelphia
The Response to '2000 Mules' Has Been Electric!

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

The Response to '2000 Mules' Has Been Electric!

"Wow guys, the movie is out. We are right in the throes of the premiere week. In fact, we've completed the theatrical showings Monday and Wednesday and response has been electric. It's been fantastic. And so as of right now, you can't go see the movie in theaters because the theatrical is the limited theatrical. It was over for now. Now the demand has been so great that what considering a later theatrical in which for a day, maybe on a weekend, we'll get a whole bunch of theaters and sort of do it again, but we have to organize that through some of the theater companies. So we're going to work on that, get back to you. But for now, if you haven't already, sign up for the virtual premiere, it's coming up. On Saturday, may 7th. And 8 p.m. eastern, and it's going to be just a marvelous fantastic same price as a movie ticket. And it's going to be out of a spectacular studio in Vegas. I mean, he's going to sing, play the movie, so it includes the movie screening, of course, and followed by a live Q&A with some of the prominent Salem media hosts who are in the movie, as well as Catherine engelbrecht and Greg Phillips with the two principles of the intelligence election intelligence organization called true the vote. So this all begins 8 p.m. eastern on Saturday, may 7th. So

Catherine Engelbrecht Greg Phillips Vegas Intelligence Election Intellig
How Geotracking by 'True the Vote' Might Have Solved Two Murders

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:19 min | 3 weeks ago

How Geotracking by 'True the Vote' Might Have Solved Two Murders

"I talked last week about geo tracking, which is one of the key themes and technologies. That is discussed and deployed in the movie 2000 mules. And in the movie, we talk about the power of geo tracking, the first of all, how it is commonly used in law enforcement. It's used by intelligence, agencies, we all have some experience with it because you travel somewhere, you land, you get a notification from the weather channel about the weather, not where you live, but where you just arrived. And obviously that's because they're tracking your phone. That's how they know where you are. And I mean, the only other option would be someone's following you, which is obviously not the case. Now, to validate geo tracking, truth of vote, the election intelligence organization that we've worked in close partnership with. They are the research foundation for this movie. They had a very, well, kind of a brilliant idea. And that was, and they were having this idea in part because they had presented their findings to the GBI, the GBI is the Georgia bureau of investigation. It's kind of the Georgia version of the FBI. And the GBI was a little bit, they seemed a little bit at sea like, you know, what do we do with this? I mean, not they don't know about the technology, but it is obviously being applied in a new way. And so truth of what thought, well, you know what? Any law enforcement agency uses this kind of technology to solve crimes. What about if we pick a couple of high profile crimes that could have occurred in Atlanta at the very period that we were looking at this geo tracking data? In other words, sometimes between sometime in the weeks and months leading up to the election. That's the body of data we have. What if there were some high profile murders that occurred in the area that we have covered that we have data for? Can we help to solve those murders? I mean, this is an audacious idea because think about it. You have private group doing this. Now we have one case. The case of a young black girl, her name is Sakura Turner, and she was shot in the backing out of a parking lot of a Wendy's. This was during a kind of BLM race riot. And we show in the movie, Greg Phillips is talking about this and he talks about how when you look at the location of the van, the little girl was shot in a van and when you look at the direction and trajectory of the bullet and obviously you look at the time, there are only a handful of cell phone devices that could have, well, that are likely to be the shooter. And remember, the true the vote has those cell phone IDs. Now they don't have the names of those guys, but law enforcement can get the names of those guys like that. How do they do it? Well, they go get a warrant. And then they go to the provider, the cell phone provider and go, who are these guys? And they get their names, and there you go. Those are your 5 suspects. So true to vote then turns this information into the GBI. And guess what? Shortly thereafter, do arrests

GBI The Weather Channel Georgia Bureau Of Investigatio Sakura Turner Greg Phillips FBI Georgia Atlanta BLM
Former Acting Atty Gen Matt Whitaker on the Durham Investigation

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Acting Atty Gen Matt Whitaker on the Durham Investigation

"Now that Durham has sort of revealed how fusion GPS, how Perkins cooey, how the Clinton campaign, how it all worked and exactly kind of how they were pulling this DNS server information, somehow intercepting it from the Trump Tower and essentially they saw spam emails going from Trump org, which essentially is marketing their winery, their golf clubs and whatever. And going to alpha bank and then saying that that was a back door for communications. I mean, the whole thing is farcical. And I think those that the intelligence community knew better. And so this to me is, you know, there are several people that need to be held to account. And explain, knowing that this was created, that this rumor, these facts were created by the Democrat committee, how was this allowed to turn into a criminal investigation of the president of the United States? I got there too late and there's going to be people that hear me say that and say, well, that's just an excuse, Matt. Well, I mean, so you're running the Department of Justice and the Mueller investigation is already going and you're trying to get it landed. You know, this kind of this original sin is so far away and there's people that know it and nobody is telling you the truth. And maybe you're not asking the right questions, but my God, you know, how do you get to the right question to ask the right person when there's just so much muck to dig through?

Perkins Cooey Trump Org Alpha Bank Trump Tower Democrat Committee Durham Clinton Golf Department Of Justice Mueller United States Matt
Can You Imagine the High Achievers We Lost Due to Abortion?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Can You Imagine the High Achievers We Lost Due to Abortion?

"I want to thank the lord for this day If this holds You know I was in a church just past weekend and father Marty who we've had on the show before He came up to me and we were chatting a little bit before the mass I got there a little bit early And we chatted for about two three minutes or so And abortion came up I mean obviously we had no idea this was gonna happen What a bombshell leak out of the Supreme Court But we got to talking about abortion and he'd said to me you know can you imagine how many potentially Nobel Prize winners and engineers and scientists and people who may have come up with cures and new versions of antibiotics and artificial intelligence and materials technology and things that could have changed the world new potential energy systems right Can you imagine how many of those people have been wiped out due to the abomination of abortion And I said you know what Father Marty you are absolutely correct and I've thought about this often How many of these lives snuffed out that would have gone on to change the world for the better

Marty Supreme Court Father Marty
Biden's 'Ministry of Truth' and FBI Surveillance

The Trish Regan Show

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Biden's 'Ministry of Truth' and FBI Surveillance

"All right, turning to this concerning news, the office of the director of national intelligence revealed in its annual report Friday that the FBI conducted as many as 3.4 million searches of U.S. data that have been previously collected by the National Security Agency. Now already, there's pushback on the number. They're saying, you know what? This could be a little bit misleading. That's according to the administration, the Biden administration telling The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, but the actual number of searches is likely far lower and they're citing complexities in terms of counting in scoring of the foreign data versus the I should also point out that the report does not suggest the FBI searches were improper or illegal, but nonetheless, it does sound like a lot of searches, right? We'll see what the really the final number may be works out to be because as I said, there is pushback on this. The FBI should also point out can collect the data thanks to a section of the foreign intelligence surveillance act and from 1978, it actually governs some foreign intelligence gathering and enables us. Now more than half of the reported searches nearly 2 million were actually related to an investigation into a national security threat involving attempts by alleged Russian hackers to break into critical infrastructure in the United States. So that's super concerning and don't forget, it's a big part of what people are worried about right now given everything that's going on. So the search is included efforts to identify and protect potential victims of the alleged Russian hacking campaign.

National Intelligence FBI Biden Administration National Security Agency The Wall Street Journal United States The New York Times
AG Garland Doesn't Care if Title 42 Expulsion Attracts More Immigrants

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | Last month

AG Garland Doesn't Care if Title 42 Expulsion Attracts More Immigrants

"So here's what I'm talking about Here's a short clip of our attorney general and aim only Merrick Garland the most corrupt human being to ever sit in the attorney general's office This guy makes Eric holder look like a choir boy I mean this guy is a train wreck on top of a train wreck Really Here he is yesterday He's asked the question about title 42 which is the health provision we're using at the border right now to turn a legal immigrants around right away because of the pandemic and send them back Well the pandemic the COVID hasn't ended I mean they're still trying to force you to wear masks on planes but it's weird they're telling you it's ended at the border So the border no coronavirus pandemic But anywhere else in the country flying definitely coronavirus pandemic That sounds to me like not a scientific argument That sounds to me like a political argument Or as someone said to me a political science argument not a science one Here's Merrick Garland admitting if they don't enforce title 42 at the border and send people back home who come here illegally Yes there will be a flood and yet they're going to do it anyway Here check this out I think to answer the other part of your question I think all intelligence suggests that there will be a large increase in the border Yes Folks folks Folks This is the adeno The man is testifying under oath the attorney general enabled only that quote all the available intelligence indicates if we do this we will have an unprecedented flood of people into the country illegally and they're doing it anyway

Merrick Garland Covid Eric Holder
Russia's war heats up cooking oil prices in global squeeze

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | Last month

Russia's war heats up cooking oil prices in global squeeze

"One one one one of of of of the the the the many many many many food food food food costs costs costs costs that that that that is is is is risen risen risen risen in in in in recent recent recent recent months months months months is is is is that that that that of of of of cooking cooking cooking cooking oil oil oil oil due due due due in in in in part part part part to to to to the the the the war war war war in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine it's it's it's hitting hitting hitting many many many households households households around around around the the the globe globe globe and and and also also also restaurants restaurants restaurants and and and street street street vendors vendors vendors to to to fry fry fry their their their food food food vegetable vegetable vegetable oil oil oil prices prices prices hit hit hit a a a record record record high high high in in in February February February and and and then then then went went went up up up another another another twenty twenty twenty three three three percent percent percent last last last month month month agricultural agricultural agricultural analyst analyst analyst Stephen Stephen Stephen Matthews Matthews Matthews with with with grow grow grow intelligence intelligence intelligence says says says the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic labor labor labor shortages shortages shortages and and and poor poor poor harvests harvests harvests set set set the the the stage stage stage for for for this this this surge surge surge in in in cooking cooking cooking oil oil oil prices prices prices forty forty forty percent percent percent and and and some some some cases cases cases in in in some some some vegetable vegetable vegetable oils oils oils and and and in in in case case case of of of sunflower sunflower sunflower oil oil oil we we we can't can't can't even even even get get get it it it even even even if if if you you you wanna wanna wanna because because because of of of the the the the the the Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine or or or Russia Russia Russia and and and Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine are are are the the the top top top exporters exporters exporters providing providing providing more more more than than than half half half the the the world's world's world's sunflower sunflower sunflower oil oil oil this this this fish fish fish and and and chips chips chips vendor vendor vendor in in in London London London says says says he he he doesn't doesn't doesn't know know know if if if he he he can can can stay stay stay in in in business business business very very very very very very scary scary scary and and and I I I don't don't don't know know know how how how our our our industry industry industry fish fish fish and and and chips chips chips industry's industry's industry's going going going to to to cope cope cope hi hi hi Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn

Ukraine Stephen Stephen Stephen Matthe London Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Qui
Hunter Biden is prime target if Republicans win Congress

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Hunter Biden is prime target if Republicans win Congress

"Under under under under about about about about his his his his business business business business dealings dealings dealings dealings become become become become a a a a bull's bull's bull's bull's eye eye eye eye for for for for Republicans Republicans Republicans Republicans as as as as they they they they prepare prepare prepare prepare for for for for a a a a possible possible possible possible return return return return to to to to power power power power with with with with the the the the mid mid mid mid term term term term elections elections elections elections the the the the DOJ DOJ DOJ DOJ is is is is already already already already investigating investigating investigating investigating president president president president Biden's Biden's Biden's Biden's eldest eldest eldest eldest son son son son but but but but Republicans Republicans Republicans Republicans pushing pushing pushing pushing that that that that inquiry inquiry inquiry inquiry want want want want him him him him to to to to be be be be a a a a prime prime prime prime target target target target and and and and are are are are beginning beginning beginning beginning to to to to lay lay lay lay the the the the ground ground ground ground work work work work earlier earlier earlier earlier this this this this month month month month Republican Republican Republican Republican representative representative representative representative Elista Elista Elista Elista phonic phonic phonic phonic tried tried tried tried to to to to turn turn turn turn a a a a house house house house intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence committee committee committee committee meeting meeting meeting meeting into into into into a a a a hunter hunter hunter hunter Biden Biden Biden Biden inquiry inquiry inquiry inquiry according according according according to to to to information information information information privately privately privately privately shared shared shared shared with with with with the the the the AP AP AP AP asking asking asking asking about about about about the the the the possibility possibility possibility possibility of of of of Russian Russian Russian Russian involvement involvement involvement involvement in in in in the the the the release release release release of of of of his his his his laptop laptop laptop laptop to to to to news news news news media media media media she she she she was was was was told told told told that's that's that's that's a a a a question question question question for for for for law law law law enforcement enforcement enforcement enforcement I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

DOJ Biden President President President Ap Ap Elista Elista House House House House Intell Biden Biden Biden Biden Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"That democrats until joe manchin couple of days ago. Basically said look. I'm willing to accept alternative forms of voter. I d by accept the principle of to be some voter. I d. I think the democrats argument but reid. E is untenable to the average person. When you say look we only vacation all because to do so is to basically discriminate against people who don't have conventional wars of. Id are the average person doesn't buy that or surely. The person who skeptical results don't doesn't buy that One thing i think it would tremendously. Enhanced legitimacy of the election is if we at least accepted the principle variety. And we're gonna agree that you know your your utility bill or some other of ide- can substitute for having a driver's license or something else. I think that's one example where you would diffuse a lot of attention. Because that's what people are angry on immigration. The reason people are angry as a people jumping. They jump over the line and they come You're illegally and that's what we've been arguing about for decades but most people in america are for legal immigration and it's the violating the rules part. That people look show about or worried. Short take trump on immigration. I think there are certain public policy issues. Where at least the two sides to agree. Look if we can solve this problem. A lot is anger will go away. Would be a much better place. But i cannot song the crazy stuff you know the Legitimate upper worry. Because there's no way to rebut that You're not gonna change your mind. There are some people that no matter what you do. How maturity show is using our j. shore portion. I wish i were as optimistic. Robert as you are in that there are data sets that were policy changes that would kind of alleviate a lot of magical thinking and i think it goes it shows up in different places on the political spectrum but for instance not cunanan per se but save republicans feeling like the election was a fraud. Because they're guide lost. Know i think that a lot of the times. These anxieties zaid is underlying. It expresses itself in different ways. And i think what we're really focus or what we're what we're seeing in american society. There is a major restructuring going on of the economy of the demography of america. It's very it's very similar to me of the nineteen twenties and where the economy went from being kind of rural to being industrialized and urbanized. There was a ultimately cap put on immigrants but there were You know the the popcorn population of the united states reached its its peak there is about a world that seems to be beyond control and so people you know they will latch on the move onto the next thing if you say okay well. It's not voter fraud or it's not legal versus illegal immigration. And i'm i'm part of me is not worried about that because i do see it as a triumph of an america where people are able to participate more fully in their subjective. Experience is more powerful. I mean a lot of. There's the whole remember in the eighties and nineties. When spike lee would wear t shirts saying it's a black thing and it was this primacy put on subjective experience which i will not and cannot communicate to another person but you better live as if my subjective experience matters as much as yours. Some of that is good. Some of that i think is a fulfillment of american ideal of kind of individualism and experiments and living. But i you know. I worry that we are not dealing with this. Larger question of what is the broad narrative that knits together. America's society for a while you know in the in the post war era was we were an immigrant nation Now we don't have what wesley yang-ho successor ideology that that knits us together. And so i think until we until we forge that at the highest level. It's going to be hard to really expiate. The most bizarre and potentially destructive kind of conspiracy theories however we define that term. Our hope is to able to where the two sides can you know have something productive and walk away with the solution so you know. Hopefully that's what we're striving for in this next year and through the upcoming debates that that will be mounting and look forward to nick and robert you know having both you involved we'll tell them of you listening I we've you a good sort of glimpse as i said behind the scenes in both how we had to pivot this year. And the way we think about these things in the way we are continuing to think about these things. And i really mean it. We would love to hear from you after. You've heard this conversation just to get your thoughts on some of what we've talked about. We really take a thought out outside. Suggestions and perspectives. Really really seriously. And i i'll say once again That we really value your financial support. Where our nonprofit. The end of our fiscal year is coming up. June thirtieth and we really hope you'll consider donation which by the way is tax deductible. And it's going to help us get our next year going we to do more of this. We want to bring more debates. We want to keep things going like the newsletter that we launched this year And we have our new One on one debate series where we will be talking about news in the headlines it takes money and people like you value our content and one others to have access to it as well. We have a membership program. I mentioned that where you get inside access to our events and all that's available at our website iq to us dot.

Robert america nick June thirtieth joe manchin robert eighties two sides this year trump republicans both one example united states democrats couple of days ago next year reid. nineteen twenties decades
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

07:03 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"And i win there now. What let's just do it. Let's meet this thing head on and you were. You were in it to win it talking about an education and like this and then that's the guy and he's our dad and we can get all the answers in the truth. Wow winning i mean. It's worth giving pause to say like. Are we now taking. Choose from a sitcom actor who was in the middle of a vastly public nervous breakdown and whatnot. We need to have clear terms of engagement. I mean in terms of you know. Okay what are we arguing about. And then what is acceptable and at the same time. We need to be able to pull back. I think into those broader conversations versus debates at as a culture not necessarily intelligence squared. But how do how are. We constantly toggle back and forth from points. Where no we need to there needs to be clear winner or loser in the circumstance like an election and then maybe there needs to be a broader inclusive conversation where people get to air their anxieties and their insights and their concerns But not necessarily in a way like you. You're the weakest link. Get out you've lost. We no longer want to hear from you on this top. One one thing. Nikki were just saying and i wanted to add in there. Maybe it'll work or not is. Is you know when you were talking about the election results and winning just now. I'm kind of wondering is it. Not why is there this this insane distrust now in traditional media specific lights on all time. Low Something like sixty percent of americans think journalists are they are just to give bias sources. They don't trust what they're hearing only eighteen percent of republicans trust traditional media. Now and you think. I'm just curious part of our campaign. This year has been talking about that because we we construct these debates to really be about being able to trust what we're doing and the people were bringing to the stage and the insights that they're they're sharing with you but if there's inherent distrust in media for so many different reasons how do you break through that and i kind of feel like nick. You started to talk about it. Which for me is kind of like people have to trust the process and that's seems to be where people are getting. They don't trust that. The process has integrity of the current election results. That the process of developing the vaccine. It's almost like there's there's you know. I'm not sure how we fix that. But you know that's the part we can control is is public trust in the process. Now i am a big fan of kind of showing your work and i think the most persuasive arguments are those where you know. You're not just doing your conclusion And especially if you're in the media to some degree but certainly in politics where you can issue your conclusion and then enforce it kind of at the in the most extreme forms in the at the point of a gun it is always better and this is something. My predecessor at reason virginia pasta pro. Really this in all of us. Who were brought in under her. Tutelage is that in order to be persuasive in public policy debates. You need to be showing how you arrive at your particular conclusion. This goes back to a you know a basic enlightenment. Ideal of we are in a shared search for truth with a cap with a small t. not a capital. So you share your work because that way other people can pick through it and see if you've made a mistake if you've made a category error a data error. Whatever and i think that. that's you know. A lot of my work at reason really looks at the long term over the past half century at least of and ongoing persistent decline entrust in authority whether we're talking about the government or business or the nonprofit sector and it's because increasingly you know people are just issuing diktat rather than actually persuading and convincing people so i think And claire you had mentioned. There's a kind of death of expertise there that's happening in a couple of ways one. Is you know outcomes from things like the vietnam war and the iraq occupation. We no longer believe in the best and the brightest that we can leave it. We can just kind of outsource how we live. Our lives to the smart boys who went to the right schools and you know have are good at math. I think that's great. I think it's a. It's an improvement in american society. But we need to replace with legitimate authority. And we've been slow to do that. And i think one of the ways you build expertise is by explaining how you're thinking and how you come to conclusions but the other thing is generational and i see this. A lot in millennials in Jen's ears and i realized this. It's just an old man who spent a lot of time gaining expertise. But there is an almost categorical rejection based on personal proclivity to expertise. I'm sure we've all had experiences where we're talking about something we deeply and then somebody is. Just like yeah. I don't think so and you. You know. I've i've backer. In literary studies. I'll talk to people about american literature. Who clearly know nothing about the topic and they're not interested in engaging and more kind of inform perspective so it's complicated but i think showing your work is the beginning of of all of this. That's that's in an end. Robert kinda you know you were talking about using evidence and facts and debate. Obviously i mean. That's that's what both sides are presenting a case for us to really understand and consider the facts and evidence on both sides. But how does that work in this moment. Where you hear this phrase of post truth world bandied about constantly. Oh we're in a post truth world. We can't find the truth. I mean i feel like that's the function of debate is to try and get to that. Truth is a synthesis of the ideas on both sides. Ultimately roadshow show A couple of concerts. Everything nick says is true but it doesn't address the problem. You know the on believers who believe you know crazy stuff And they they were debate. They would present. You know sure stuff that has no basis in reality. reflects the fact that You know people don't trust any source at all And i don't know how to fix that problem But he's right that in general showing your workers great and i'll give you one practical example on the voting thing which i actually think would make a huge difference. I think it all comes down. The voter i d really. I think that the people are questioning the results. Just believe that our tone of people who showed up who were frauds right and even though we have no evidence of that the.

sixty percent Robert claire Jen Nikki vietnam war republicans eighteen percent both sides One This year nick past half century american one practical example one thing iraq occupation reason virginia one americans
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:51 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Post office again unless of course that's your thing. We often had the experience when wanting to book debaters on a given topic of people refusing to get on a stage with an opponent. I think sometimes it's because they're afraid to lose But i think there's another issue in that. They don't want to concede the idea that there really is another side that there's a valid argument on the other side and we've had that come up in a number of issues that we wanted to debate and and by the way we can see that there are topics that we won't touch that there are propositions that we think are beyond the pale and i think you know there. There would be broad agreement that there are some things that are simply off the table to that. End john robert has a an area in the book about that sometime and should not be debated. And i believe robert. You called it something a bright line. Now there is a bright line that can and should be drawn and worse coming back to that idea because it's something that we all apple with your but john to your point. Yeah there are things that we're just not going to do but line moving that line beginning to move in a way that make anybody uncomfortable. I'm wondering nick. Do you think that we're in any way reaching into reaching a stage in national discourse where there are more topics that are off. The table can't be broached. The perhaps you think should be broached or you comfortable where things are. I am a good question because you know when it gets to the idea of of terms like cancel culture or things like that where you can. We discuss certain types of topics that people will say to even engage this manger indulging in you know racism sexism homophobia hetero normativity a wide range of things. I tend to be on the side that we should be debating more things more topics rather than fewer. But i also like the idea that this is a place where maybe a winner and loser. Con- concept isn't necessary but it's helpful because one of the ways that you kind of. I believe very much in light mankind vision of marketplace of ideas and that in general you know good ideas drive out bad ideas but the only way that good ideas get to achieve that status and get actually good is by debating and engaging people you disagree with so there's certain things i'm not interested in re revisiting. I think it's been settled. But i think as a society were at a particular point where people are more willing to talk about more things there that brings with it. You know intense attempts to shut down conversation on all sorts of topics and we have to. We have to push back on that. I think we need to be more willing to engage. We have more more way. More people learn franchise to kind of to to present their reality and that is both incredibly liberating and it's incredibly You know kind of it. Risks becoming a tower of babel type situation and one of the best things we can do is to create spaces where people can engage. I think having certain rules of engagement that can be civil discussion. It can be you know it can be a kind of rant culture that you see in many social media platforms and things like tap more of that rather than less of that should always be the goal. I'm thinking a few of the topics that the people sometimes urge us to do that. We haven't taken on a direct within in the direct way that they would want to phrase it would be for example Climate change is not real People we've had people say you really should be debating whether climate change is real or not and they feel very passionately They're a minority. But there's a community of people who also have would sign of Versions of science that they adhere to believe in vaccines is another one. Where you know people want would want to debate. The vaccine caused great harm. And we've not gone to those And again i think that's frustrating for people who hold the position that vaccines are are causing enormous causing large number of casualties across the and i think by the way the jazz oh when you introduced a new concept which is a vaccines caused climate change that's my takeaway neck if you're if you're in our seats would you. Would you avoid these debates or juice saying well you know. I may not agree with it. It might sound crazy but Let's debate it. Let's see what they got. You know in which we have not made at this point. Yeah you know with something. I would also think about rephrasing some of these questions. Because i for instance i believe in vaccines and You know and. I availed myself of them whenever i can. You know. it's more than heroin. I'm a junkie for vaccines. I suppose it might be. Why are people afraid of vaccines or the a frame could be. Vaccines have done more good than harm because even epidemiologists will acknowledge that you know. Every vaccine comes with certain types of risks. And you broaden it so you allow people to express whatever anxieties. Whatever worries are involved for instance. I think it is arguable. That joe biden one. Two thousand twenty twenty presidential election but it might be worth saying Having having a discussion of why do people feel you know. Why do people feel that. The two thousand twenty election was unsettled. And you might be able to get to an airing of very different world views on a topic that has to be settled. We need to declare a winner in the presidential election. You know as an absolute that has to happen 2016. A couple years. After that hillary clinton was still grousing in her memoir that the the election had passed but you know the russians through to donald trump. She couldn't fully admit donald trump took that to an extreme insane position. One at odds with basic reality. But if you talked about why are we. Why are we debating the outcomes of presidential elections. We might get to a conversation that could have a winner or loser but more importantly would air a lot of a lot of why people are anxious or frittering on these issues. That seem kind of stupid to to me on a personal level. Robert what would you think of that one. I'd like to hear your take on that robert on on on a debate on on you know when when a significant number of the population is absolutely convinced that donald trump won the election Would it would it. Would there be value in intelligence squared. Saying let's just ring your evidence..

donald trump Robert robert 2016 hillary clinton john robert both two thousand twenty twenty apple one russians nick One thousand twenty john couple years Two election
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"There's a majority you know. There's actually like usually in virtual debates and in live debates. There's majority that feel a certain way. And then there's the swing voters that actually changed their minds. And that's how we calculate the impact of the persuasiveness of the arguments. And you know so. So maybe there's something to be said for there. There's a way most people are thinking but then there's this variable where you actually are you know influenced enough to say hey. Maybe i was wrong. Maybe i need to rethink this or these. These arguments were so compelling actually changed my mind on this topic. I didn't re- i realized i didn't know that much about it or whatever. The reasons are Which by the way are the most rewarding things for us to hear as producers. But you know this this moment in time is just different and you know i do have concerns about what winning means especially on these topics that are pretty critical public policy issues Robert you use the word persuasion. Before i say that i actually think client. We would love to hear from people who are listening to this. Podcast do you does. The vote is the vote for from your point of view a critical part of an intelligence squared debate. If we had the debate and didn't declare a winner or loser. Would you think that that's better or would you think hey wait. Where's the ending so kind of like to hear your views on that robert. You mentioned the word persuasion and claire. Just use word persuasion persuasion in substance or not. Exactly the same thing. An argument is an argument. Debate involves persuasion. Involves other things like being charming being funny Make reducing your opponent to to looking helpless. So so you're you therefore intellectually dominate And sometimes using unfair tactics I'm i'm wondering about that. Aspect of debate particularly in the public place in to the highest level. There's room for demagogues to use persuasive techniques etc. Do you do you consider is persuasion. The right word for what we would be talking about. Or is it a word that has Some built in pitfalls actually question in on unthinking as you talk about two different modes or or or kinds of debate in competitive debate in school. When i talk about persuasion. We're not talking about on the shafted rules of the game so to speak You know you throw out an argument. If it's not rebutted you lose points in in competitor bay. You don't look at the speaker. Their jokes etc look at the quality of their arguments so they're very central dislike playing basketball football and they're very very distinct rules when you graduate to the world adulthood and the audience that you guys are reaching We all wanna reach persuasion then brings all these are non argument related factors like how you will are charm. You are at sarah and you get the personality mixed up with the organization. That's just real why that's wait. That's what happens in the workplace which what happens in politics you know with all those years that we've seen in presidential debates governor reagan again typically is against such proposal governor. You go again senator..

Robert reagan robert two different modes sarah most
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

07:13 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"The competitive juices or something that do give people an interest in debating And and we can't ignore that but the main purpose in the classroom is pedagogy goal is to have students teach each other and They all learn from that and they do a non threatening way because one of the things of us. Remember from school with the sage on the stage as we all know. The way classrooms. Were even teachers especially teachers user product. Nothing they started on kids. Your right and left. The kids are intimidated. The one the talk the most vocal. We's upfront who always waging her hand and the rest of the classic georgia were makes fun of them We know that's what school life. That's not the best way to learn the best way to learn as i be able to speak at him understand and an an and try to persuade somebody. And we're a new that you have to understand the tory sell secondly listen And you're more likely to remember things that you've talked about yourself. Plus you're more likely to learn things. I went on the if they're coming from other schools and what the function of a teacher in a classroom is doing this to make sure the kids. You're saying civil that the thinking of all the arguments they should've could've raised and the teacher becomes more of a mentor and facilitator rather than just a lecturer now not advocating do this every day. If you can do one day per unit or maybe two days pregnant it would. I think put some spice in the classroom and and help his learn and as point out of the book this technique is being used in some schools in boston and chicago with great success and i argued. It ought to be spread throughout the country. Klay i'm wondering what roberts comments make you make you think in terms of what we do where we do put a premium. We set it up. So there's a premium winning the the the audience. We have the audience. Vote Nick you you might think about giving the winners a cash prize. If you're serious legal representation. I don't know nick. Let me start with you. And then and then i would like to go to klay with a knick how important to you. I think you've won every debate. I think you're one of our few on record four. Yes yeah all right. Mike tyson mike tyson before buster douglas. That's how do you do you care. I i really wanna know. Does it matter does it. Is it the debate and the opportunity to present the ideas that matters more to or do you actually really care about the winning. You do care about the winning and the way you guys frame it you force us in our prep and whatnot to to go for the win and to you. Remind us to remind the audience that we want to win this particular vote and i think that's a helpful Kind of spur to do your best work and to present your best case. I'd i do think that the the main function of something like intelligence squared. And i take it very seriously is to model for a broader society particularly broader public intellectual society or public discourse about serious ideas. It's a model of how do you. How do you take contentious issues and come to some kind of shared understanding of either their importance or what is to be done and i think it functions in that way so i do care about winning robert. Unfortunately sent me. We'll talk you about high school and big in high school and doing extracurricular activities like my entire existence in high school. What being on a soccer team. That couldn't score a goal. An season taught me was like how to lose with grace. And so i'm happy to hear that some people participate in things like debater or high school sports and learn how win gracefully but my experience was different but it does focus. You know having it it it you know in the end more. I'm more satisfied. When i feel like i've learned a lot from the other side whether or not i've won something. You very gracious winner. I should say because you have always said at. The end of the debate congratulated the other side. And you've conceded that you learn things from them you've found things that they said persuasive and that's kind of our gold standard for being a a sort of not a sore winner a gracious. Well i if. I may just to extend your i say again you know in this might be more of a meta commentary but i think one of the profound difficulties with contemporary american culture. Is you know we have more opportunities to engage each other to convince each other to see realities that we normally ignore or don't want to consider arguments from people's experience and people's knowledge that we normally see and you know it being able to kind of stand in the glare of things that you don't understand don't agree with or don't want to watch is super important and i think you know that's part of what debates do is they force you to rethink your basic reality and know. God that's like we need more of that rather than less of that. You and i have had a lot of conversations about the the winning the win-lose aspect of the of of our program. What are you. What are you thinking about it. These days. I vacillate between you know. Do we need it to. It's crucial There there are times where i think in. And maybe i would love to hear what nicotine and robert thank. You know The construct of winning in our society right now in post trump era Where there is there are still parts of the country contesting the vote of who won the election and winning in in this kind of. I don't know when i think about winning now. I'm wondering if it's more divides if the idea that you have to win. Something is is making discourse more toxic and more divisive. And as i as. I've looked at our work. You know. We're starting to roll out some programs that aren't about winning. Actually john. you mentioned the agree to disagree program which is two perspectives. You know there's a lot of daylight between these two perspectives so that you can kind of make up your mind be informed an- and not influenced by an outcome because winning also comes with it. I think in in debate. Maybe a right or wrong. You know if your side loses it you know. Let's look at it from the perspective of the losing side. You know that is less likely to say. Share the debate with their community less likely to advocate for listening to this and engaging with it. Because you know they're they're they don't have that validation of having changed the most minds a lot you know and also the way that you know. Our fans know exactly. How do this but if you don't know how we calculate a winner for the debates. It's the side that changes the most mines is declared the winner. There's not an absolute sense. But in percentage point terms yes right right in percentage point terms but what that often means if you look at the two hundred debates we've done is there's kind of two winners way..

Mike tyson boston mike tyson two days chicago Nick one day nick two hundred debates john buster douglas trump nicotine robert two winners Klay two perspectives one roberts unit
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:56 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"What you were just talking about. I think is a perfect opening Debris to bring robert lighten into the conversations. I said robert has given a great deal of thought to what debate is the role of debate. The consequences of debate the future of debate his book again. The title is called resolve. Debate can rely revolutionized education and help save our democracy robert. If what's really interesting is that. I think we're in an era where we're hearing people question. Whether debate is is in itself a valid and positive force in society. That we're we're we're you write in your about There's a sort of argument about debate. Called the critic argument from the german word critic and it suggests that debate itself is perhaps elitist It's it. It serves an as an as an serves. The interests of The the powerful against the week of because of Issues regarding money and education etc taking all that into account and i. I also wanna get to your these about the role of debate in the classroom. But i'd like to do the big picture for the moment. Where where do you think we are in the respect. That debate gets as a as a form of discourse these days or talking about it in the school setting competitive made is still very much alive in fact as we speak or recording today. the National high school championship is currently underway and people could actually livestream And watch it in fact. What are they useful exercise. I would suggest audience members. That on youtube were where events are recorded whether the college or the national championship and they could watch Kids Or college students Debate things very intelligent Eloquently all right so let's talk about my case l. Are you ready. Judges awesome so we agree on justice. What she says to. Societal welfare is that it doesn't give each do because we have to protect rights. I agree first of all rights. Come into conflict. You can't protect everyone's rights at the same time that means you have to protect as many people's rights as you can but also recognize literally the only way we protect rights is with the criminal justice system remember. Driving in itself is not illegal. It's only when you take the action harm. Somebody else when it actually becomes a legal. The same here is that is the same thing here with illegal drug usage version to stay off right away when i call the fast debate kind of thing which is a whole quarter of bay where A certain former debate called policy debaters degenerated. Do who can talk fast. I actually think that's destructive talk about my book increase to about a quarter of one percent of the country's not not an option students that whole recession prices differently than you did. Fifteen years ago tend to go up. There also used to fight field. We have through discovered the united states overcome their more conventional invasion the kind things that we adults normally engage. And you can see examples of bows and you can draw. I think a lot of inspiration encouragement from those for most students. When you see this Show clearly competitively it's It's debate is very big deal. But the reason i wrote my book we can transition into the classroom thing in a second is that i want the virtues of the bait to be embedded as a pedagogical school in the classroom in middle and high school as a way to train students. incivility in reasoning In has reporter arguments with Literally being able to talk and why that benefits them not only in their civic life after they graduate but also in in the flesh will you. You're your when i read your book. I came in made reference to a new york times column that i had not caught when it came out in october of two thousand nineteen but it was by a philosophy professor in a law student. Jonathan analyst francesca hovaguimian who challenged challenged competitive. High school debate On grounds that i found really quite interesting and it had not been something that we had discussed inside of the walls of intelligence squared but it argued that debate It it made the case. That competitive debate has some serious negative consequences And the it it it. It said that School debate reinforces a motive reasoning in which the point is not to find the truth but the point is to win. And i'm quoting here by celebrating. Those who are most adept at schools. Hold it up as a model form of thinking. Interestingly mostly article is making a case for the virtues of debate but the idea that That a debate is set up to have a winner and a loser is ultimately destructive and any sort of Effort to find truth and to find to find reasonable reasonable actionable common ground and is a really interesting critique and it's not one that we just want to dismiss out of hand and i'm sure you've thought about it. I just want to hear what you think about that. Okay so there are critiques to be level at at at competitive debate but Kind of understand that the purposes competitive bay is very much like playing football. Play basketball it is to win But it's also to develop your skills and I interviewed over one hundred people for this book forward evaders into a person. They said that their lives have been radically changed by debate. In a positive way on an example of one of them. I used to start a very badly educated debate. Brought me out of my shell And i can't explain it as i say in the book how it transformed but sort of like throwing a baby into the water and watching. See the baby's saints swim. I eventually swam and learn how to talk without stuttering. Elise spoke to the time. It changed my life and it did for every single person that i talked to so called. Game of playing debate is sort of why the virtual are participating in competitive athletics Torkham on your among your competitors. I mean the promo people in your school by it. Also builds all kinds of life skills that benefit you so. I actually that that in the classroom. The point is not to win on the point in the classroom is to teach and to help everybody else along So that people understand and by the way if you're debating in front of a class there are various ways you can do this break up the crash of debates one big debating for the class and have the rest of the class for kika if you're seeking a away that's not persuading your you know your schoolmates you're doing something wrong.

robert Jonathan youtube Elise new york Fifteen years ago National high school champions kika today german one percent each over one hundred people one october of two thousand a quarter single person francesca united states
"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:27 min | 11 months ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"You're reconstructing south. That's that's a wonderful story though. Yeah if i may say. I think part of what's happened over. The past year is that and as somebody who considers themselves. A postmodern libertarian. I'm somewhat comfortable with this. Although a little bit frightened you know what we've learned is that reality itself is really up for grabs in a way that i don't think we had felt in our guts until we were all locked locked into our houses and every everything we were consuming was a vastly intensely mediated experience of what might be going on outside very interesting way to put it nikki. I mean you've debated with us on the live format situations live stage in front of a live audience which is which is how we we. We did it since two thousand six until twenty twenty and then you participated in the The virtual version. I'm wondering how how. The experience differed from one to the other free. Oh yeah and congratulations on you guys for changing. Because i know a number of organizations that basically their response to the pandemic was. Let's keep doing what we're doing. And until we all wake up from whatever's going on right now that i think has always arrested for failure. That's you know. That's why a lot of businesses some of which tried to adapt a couldn't so i think it was great that you guys shifted into different mode because you're what you're i suspect and you know what you're selling is the debate. The discussion the information flow. And the the kind of positive i think Socially a good clash of ideas so that different people can watch and learn and come to new understandings of things. I think that's really good. There's no question you lose that sense of energy and excitement in a big room when you guys and i've attended far more of your debates in person than i've ever been on the stage for and there's that buildup of this is a live event and people are really going to be going all out to convince people of their point of view. That's an excitement that i don't think you'd get online having said that the ability to pull in so many different people from so many different places to participate in debates because all of us who do live events now the hardest thing is figuring out logistics of getting the people you want in you know into the tiny stamp of postage stamp of space. You need at a certain time for an event to happen by opening that up. You guys preserved. I think the most important function of what you're doing which is making people think about topics that are important to all of us from a wide variety of points of view. So i love the. The virtual debates made that easier. And i hope you know to be blunt and i obviously i have no stake in this. I hope you keep doing virtual debates because it's a different environment. It's a different experience. And i think it allows you to get across different Different sets of people talking about things in different ways clay. You know one thing. We we did not do was put the debates behind a paywall and again. This is something. I i share often in our podcasts. That intelligence squared is a nonprofit organization. Where at five. Oh one c. Three we're funded by our audience. We are funded by our listeners. And we really really are always asking for your support But we did not do was was was changed the model of charging we we have never charged debates and we continued not to even though we were now fully in this virtual world. Why not thinking there. While we're tried and true to our model has been a philanthropy and were sustained by the support of the rosencrantz foundation. Robert rubin are founder The individuals that listened to our programs institutions and sponsors whether those are academic organizations or corporations and for us you know part of this is really building a community and we want to engage people around the idea of the role of debate in society You know really kind of trying to elevate public discourse return to civility respect in the public square which we may have seen reach a fever pitch in january during an insurrection on our capital and that was a that was a moment for me having worked in run intelligence squared for a couple of years and ben with the organization for many years. That was really kind of. Wow this is this is a moment that this is a crisis that may be the result of so many intersecting things whether it's social media and filter bubbles extreme partisanship. There's the lowest level of trust in the media all culminating in at one time and of course there's many other factors but you know that was for us a moment to to say. Wow we really to just open this up and and make reach as many people as possible with this program and putting it behind a paywall defeats that purpose so we've actually been rounding up and advertisers and creating new opportunities to have more sustainable funding to make sure that we can keep this as a public utility. Ever.

Robert rubin january two thousand rosencrantz one time past year six one thing intelligence squared five twenty twenty Three so many years
"intelligence" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"So Ben will start off by talking about the idea of centralized governance globally there's pros and cons. . People argued that past a certain threshold of AI, we , may require it for certain topics. . We will certain topics we won't. . When you think about centralizing, , we're not centralizing a governance. . What do you think those important distinctions are where do you stand? ? The funny thing is when you set it off with the phrase governance I, , immediately was thinking about is doing the governance. . Out. . A hours that. . I've been that is in the end. . Where we're going to get to with the advanced technologies that humans are rolling out. . Human beings are not gonna be able to coordinate human society. . In effective way, , we're GONNA need a gradual transition. . <unk> APP powered. . Governance of humans but. . Together, , they're certainly in the early stages we will need wise and judicious in agile human governance of of a is end because initially the is aren't generally intelligent enough. . To govern themselves in the rather uses tools by humans. <unk> . human institutions enduring during the government is are mainly being tools. . I mean governance of AI, , is mostly about governing how various humans and institutions are using a I, , which is a very important in difficult problem right and then the really interesting thing will come in the transition between these two phases of justice got great like. . So in the long run, , which could just the couple of decades coming in the long run we're looking at a is doing governance yet. . End In immediate term were looking at. . Okay. . What regulations do we make? ? Stop people from doing? ? Nasty things with the I in military Jordan positive uses of. . But then in the intermediate stage between assume phases, , you got a eiser gradually getting more and more autonomy gradually getting more and more general out right and how how the regulate things in that context against quite interesting and and Saga Roy and some countries, some , legal systems are trying to take. . Modest steps in that direction already, , but there's a tremendous amount of on those and so if we think about the state of affairs today <hes>, , there are folks who say, , well, , you know when it comes to privacy of data, , you know maybe that should be done within individual countries. . Well, , when it comes to you know win facial recognition can and cannot be used well, , that's gotta stay within countries. . There's other folks that argue that other things may be a lethal autonomous weapons or. . Some facets of kind of human rights or maybe to some degree privacy fits in there. . I know some people feel very strongly about facial recognition globally that there's some threshold where even with today's tool like a I ben that there should be some broader set of standards that humanity can kind of play by for the sake of our aggregate wellbeing in both peace and prosperity other people really think everything as far as today goes is a country decision in that stat would you agree with that of see certain thresholds where it does make sense for global standards to fit in <hes> or are we too early for that or is it never a good idea? ? Where to list. . We have now in the commercial sphere is concern. . Regulation of AI is not especially different from the regulation of many other types of of software or hardware tools. . The boundary is is quite difficult to draw right like weather Cambridge Jan Letica with crunching people's facebook profiles know using basic statistical analysis in an excel spreadsheet or using a machine learning algorithm. . It doesn't really matter on the dozen hundred <unk> of manipulation. . Let people using their day that it's. . It's the same thing right I mean. . With face recognition I, , mean whether you consider that a higher it is what it is. . If you have something more complicated than sunlight recognizing who someone is from. . From. . There Gate up from the other people walking next to them or something I mean you may need more general intelligence directing those people from more indirect cues but in the end the. . They had to go on regulatory issues are. . About the same right it's more about the the pet optical were building. . About the the degree of. . Intelligence. . That were embedding in different parts of it. . I think once they is get more autonomy as agents and are you know making their own? ? Choices in the world without humans tightly in the loop. . Then you get into a fundamentally different class of of ethical and end regulatory issues than we. . You know we made some small engine number of years away from that. . The commercially rollout software. . We're not there yet right. . We're talking about. . Is. . In terms of national versus global regulation or In US become state versus federal <unk>. . Allen, , stay on a pragmatic basis. . This is GONNA be national. . Regulation. . For the immediate future because the international community can't even regulate nuclear weapons effectively right in that. . That's very clear. . What is a nuclear weapon in what isn't a nuclear weapon? There's ? not a fuzzy dividing line there. . And also, , there's not a lot of humanitarian and lucrative commercial uses for nuclear weapons that are very very similar to the Nazis is one avoid right? So ? even in the silver clear case like that. . The international community is doing a pretty bad job, , but I mean in a case where the nasty things. . are a few lines of code away from highly lucrative commercial things are highly beneficial humanitarian things I mean how? ? How. . Is International Community? ? Impact is going to cope with that very very uselessly would be would be

Ben Ben Disagrees Ben Gerstle Nova Mente founder singularity net US government Google facebook Chinese government Ai.
"intelligence" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"intelligence" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"So Jerome got a lot to talk about here in terms of artificial intelligence governance, , artificial general intelligence. . The reason I think this conversation will be fun is because you've thought through some future scenarios with with very large organizations for many years. . Very High Level and you've learned a lot in the process of what is the process for pulling together different stakeholders imagining, , what will the future be? ? What should we do I? ? Mean very complicated. . You go about it. . Of course, , one of the first things you do is you gotta find out the state of the art of whatever it is you know is there is, , let's say five elements to it or ten elements, , and you know was the state of the art on this element on this element, , this element, , this element. . Now myself I won't know enough to do that. . So we have a global network of networks sixty five nodes. . Return Network himself within countries, , and so I can say, , here's where we are so far and they tell me what else ought to be considered. . So there's so as global sort of a state of the art assessment finger. . Yeah and then within that <hes> with take a look and say what questions were not asked the authorities have been asked. . and. What . questions were as but answered, , superficial. . That gives us questions to as in a Delphi study, , which is a questionnaire goes around the world. . And the results of that then becomes guts content to create draft scenarios. . We send address narrows back out and everybody hasn't at Pat and presides over, , and then we can say, , okay, , what do you do about this scenario? ? What did you do about it? ? You'll see a good action as well as scenarios this sort of a general approach <hes>. . So you talked about the Delphi study I actually recall you bringing this up the first time you and I chatted I don't remember who has five years ago or something wild like that. . Speak briefly about wooded Delphi study is so I like finger on the pulse what are we missing? ? Pulling, , those ideas together and then there's this kind of dispersion to generate even more. . What is the Delphi study. . Delphi questionnaire. . Whose second round. . Is. . Determined by the results of the first round. . And third round is determined by the results the second route. . <hes> the reason for it was that there were generals and admirals and experts that don't always the same room with each other at the Rand Corporation.

Jerome Glenn Millennium Project Daniel Fidel AI Red Cross founder Korea
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"America loves to celebrate polish. Dr truck the truck driver has long been immortalized in songs like this one by Dave Dudley. Through as a kid. I dreamt of driving eighteen Wheeler who doesn't want to get paid to see the country. I moved on eventually to other aspirations but America still revels in the joy of trucking and increasingly taken kind of new form. This song truck union by surgeon. Sing is a him to the success of truck drivers who are members of the Sikh faith. Wherever seeks go. He exults they never looked back. They achieve success through dedication, hard work. Good ethics. And it's not just songs all along the west coast. Now there are truck stops run by people of Indian origin selling butter chicken, and Kashmiri lamb and lentil curries sometimes there are spaces for seeks to worship usually do from like LA to Washington Krige Inder Singh is one of many drivers at this stop who is seek and who comes from the Punjab region in northern India. He started off working at a truck stop and now has his own company. I have trucks trucking was familiar work for a lot of men back home. I think it's the background because lot of people back in back home. They regret having. And so there are used to it. There are stimulated about hundred and fifty thousand six trucking in America grinner sing, Kelsey is the head of seeks pack a seek political group. It all happened. It has very is related back to it is lot of six youth Muthu US there had been a spasm violence against Sikhs in India, the CQ that can't US the most of them very close in the faith. Specially the beard and turban, and they were getting hard time getting entry level jobs where Dicker the same time get a job and. Religion having beard and turban. So they looked elsewhere. That was easy for them to become truck drivers. And that's how they got into it. Because there was industry where they would not acquire take off their turbulent here. Mr. Singh says most every Sikh family, he knows has at least one person working in the industry, the trucking magazine overdrive this year, put a Sikh on the cover for the first time it reported that the older trucking community is now more integrated with the Sikh subculture after seeks joined in protests against an unpopular new rule about electric logbooks and even as they're making the trucking culture their own revamping songs and food for a more diverse generation trucking has also made its way into see culture, Mr. Singh says no wedding is now complete without a trucking song. Listen to this one Pucca truck in Wally by Nissan Buhler in it Amana singing to his new wife that with his job in trucking. He'll be able to buy her a beautiful house and a car. An American dream if ever there was one. That's all for this episode of the intelligence, you can subscribe to the economist at economist dot com slash radio offer, twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds. See about your tomorrow.

Krige Inder Singh America trucking magazine Dave Dudley India Wheeler Pucca US Dicker Nissan Buhler Kelsey LA Washington Amana twelve dollars twelve pounds
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Company serving its customers, and if the Chinese government ever asked why way to give improper information about its foreign customers, they would call so no. But then on the other hand, you have the Chinese government at the highest levels going berserk in defensive hallway to use the technical term and really interesting language around among one Joe who is the daughter the head of unfound. Hallway, some of the language that the foreign minister uses makes it clear that they see this as an entirely political test of strength will. I mean that raises the question, then whether this is simply a bit of bluster and posturing, or whether there is an actual if there's a reason to believe there's actual strategic link there. I mean, do you get the sense that there's any debates within the political elite in in terms of how much the state should support the company? No, I think look this is this is not bluster tool, and I decide it's deadly serious on both sides one of the things about this is that when the Americans say that a Chinese company as large and powerful as hallway involved in the highest technology cannot be separated from the communist party, the Americans. Right. But when the Chinese say that the American government under Donald Trump is also using every aspect of American state power. Whether it's. Encouraging prosecutors to go after hallway encouraging intelligence agencies Goff to hallway or using American diplomats. To twist the arms of allies because in part America wants to ward off a national security threat. But also just does not want a giant commercial rival, the Chinese are also, right? This is a game in which both sides are playing for very high stakes and and it blurs all of the lines between what is knowledge what is industrial policy, and what is a straightforward commercial fight for the commanding heights of high-technology in this century. But talking specifically about the the sort of intellectual property theft. I angle of this. My my understanding the has certainly been known among Chinese companies for a long time, but has been tapering off as China has come into its own as a as a technological power. Do you think this story tells us anything about Chinese companies approach to to intellectual property and trade secrets now? It's another piece of evidence that optimists who was saying China would soon have converged with the west are probably being disappointed. So the story for a longtime among high-tech businesses was yes in the past China, stole a lot of American technology. Just like, you know, if you go about far enough the Japanese did in their day and every rising so steals from the top dog status quo piles, but the idea was that China would start developing its own high-tech intellectual property so fast that it would sort of go from being a poacher and become a gamekeeper that it would be one of the countries that want to generally to protect tech some of the evidence in this indictment handed down by the Americans point to always still being actively engaged in stealing stuff. I think that the mood among western businesses here in China is that China is still not behaving as they had hoped. It would be by. Now, it is still more of a kind of scrappy get there by any means kind of player than. And the kind of responsible stakeholder that some people hope to see by twenty nineteen David. Thanks very much for your time. Thank you..

China Chinese government America American government Donald Trump unfound Joe Goff theft communist party
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Equipment under a special arrangement to check that tech in a purpose built lab in the UK to stray which banned twat away from supplying five G equipments last year and New Zealand. Stephanie Studer is the senior China business correspondent for the economist. These countries rule possible. What's known as the five is an intelligence sharing alliance. And so as American fears mount about whether China could be using qualify gear to snoop naturally wants to make sure that this network isn't being compromised. So it seems there is increasingly concerted effort to contain hallways. Global growth led by America. It's worth noting though that so far none of these spy. Chiefs have presented publicly evidence of hallways rumored ties to the Chinese army nor to the government qualify continues to deny all this stuff. How much of an impact will this indictment have on way as a company the charges certainly are blow. The pair of indictments don't show the Temerin Merican. Prosecutors have direct evidence of spying or of government ties. But other negations are pretty explosive in particular one alleges quote, we had a bonus. Plan that rewarded employees who stole trade secrets from competitors. The big of the secret the big of the bonus that the FBI says it found out from internal Email sent in twenty thirteen and the second big charge is sanctions evasion and a few weeks ago. A bipartisan Bill was introduced in congress to ban the sale of American technology to any company, which violates sanctions this. This Bill clearly has Chinese companies in mind if that passes and always found guilty, the company could be crippled by the ban, and it very much needs that access to US components. It's not just the company that has been stung by the latest charges officials have been vocal to I'm joined by our Beijing bureau chief David Rennie to talk through how things look from there. David, what's what's the response been in China from the very top of the Chinese government, including full statements from the Chinese foreign ministry? The. Very angry. And they presented absolutely as the United States using. It's what they call national power to try to strangle China's lawful and the gist desire to be a technology force around the world. Okay. It seems clear that the US suspect the company of being very close to the states. And it seems that the state intern denies that link and and back to the company completely do you have a sense of how close the two really are behind the scenes is a bit of a double story, isn't it? So while we the company, including its president Renzhang Fe gave it into the reason. He's Vince national press service just another.

China United States David Rennie Stephanie Studer Temerin Merican Chinese foreign ministry Chinese army UK Chinese government New Zealand FBI national power Beijing government congress intern America Renzhang Fe president bureau chief
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Who can afford to pay your prices, which are going to be twice as much as this where you live who can who can afford that. Okay. Let's area and many people enter follow. The other place. I went to was we went to Petar one of the biggest slums in the whole of Latin America almost everyone. We spoke to just sort of desperately trying to understand how they would be able to survive this month on the minimum salary, and for example, Berta meta pensioner fifty nine. She survives by government. Handout says a government food handouts system. The clap system that most people say is enough to survival for perhaps ten days others, sell some of the things that they might receive in that government food pack and buy something else that they want. So sounds like a lot of people are just managing to scratch out a living. Is there any room for occasional luxuries anything beyond just surviving? Oh, I mean without question people are still trying to find a little happiness in their lives. I mean, for example, the baseball league is still happening here. A few months back. I went to the opening of the winter league. This isn't like it. Once was the stadium was perhaps only a third full a couple of beers. There may cost, you know, more than days minimum salary. But there were plenty of people there that say, look, I'm a big fanatic of baseball. Despite everything I wanna have some fun. Let's let's little. One of the most notable things about Venezuela. Is that ten percent of the population has left, but the majority of people are still here. They're eking out a life as best they can. And I say one can generalize. Almost everyone is hoping for change. Now that change is working a little bit more imminent in the last few days that plenty of people who are worried about that. But the majority think almost anything is going to be better than this. Even thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. Okay. today. America begins delicate trade talks with China in Washington shockwaves are still reverberating from a slew of charges brought by America's Justice department against whoa away. Chinese telecoms firm as the indictment charges the alleged fraudulent financial schemes used by alway and it's chief financial officer. We're not just illegal but detrimental to the security of the United States on Monday. The homeland security secretary cures to Nielsen announced charges the company had stolen technological trade secrets from American companies. And that it had not been truthful about its business in Iran. They willfully conducted millions of dollars in transactions that were in direct violation of the Iranian transactions and sanctions regulations, and we will not as a country tolerate efforts to circumvent US sanctions to support an odious regime that sponsors tear and threatens the United States and our allies the company vehemently denies.

United States Petar Latin America Iran America chief financial officer winter league Berta telecoms secretary Venezuela Nielsen Justice department Washington China ten percent ten days
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Line eleven kilograms. The average amount of weight reportedly lost by Venezuelans in two thousand seventeen because of poverty and food shortages, and yet somehow people go to work get groceries. They either families what they can how do they manage Stephen Gibbs who reports for the economist from Venezuela capital city Caracas spoke to solve its residents to find out. It's sort of inexplicable. How people even bother going to check into a doctor when Dr earning perhaps ten dollars a month, and one reason for that is people like going to work, even if they're an almost nothing for a sort of sense of pride and a sense of identity people do what they always did. Not only people earning almost nothing. They're also wasting hours and hours of that day queuing for something that just a few years ago. They pop into the supermarket and buy. Wherever you go in Caracas, you see queues usually it's because one of the supermarkets here is selling something at government, regulated prices, which are still just about affordable to most people just the other day. I was incorrect in Los Palos Grandes, which formerly was sort of more wealthy part of the city went there with my producer. Andrea, and we talked to a few people who accusing for Raina pan, which is the cornflower that Venezuelans us to make their absolutely staple bread cooled the rapper, and we spoke to newbie Palanca. Now, she is in her mid fifties. She's a freelance accountant her story, very typical of many stories of middle class people in Venezuela. She works several jobs. Previously. She'd be working nine to five now, she's working eight to ten. No, no medicine. I'm only go going to hear your. She was very clear about just what a waste of time. All of this is so you describe this as a formerly wealthy neighborhood. And how this strikes middle-class people? Normally, it's it's the poor people who get the even shorter end of the stick. But this sounds as if it's kind of the the pain is evenly spread it's completely evenly spread. I think that the poorest are being hit the hardest. It's a sort of Hobson half not society. And it's really if you have access to the dollar or if you. In venezuela. As hyper inflation has spiraled and the local currency. The believer has become nearly worthless. The importance of the US dollar has soared those who remain in the country have become increasingly dependent on dollar savings or on money sent back by family and friends who were among the two and a half million people who fled the country since twenty four teen. But what's another way to get dollar rich in Venezuela? Get some good government connections. The other pick group of people who have access to dollars of those close to the government. They are often describes into Fatah's. It's a Venezuelan slang for plugged in. Anyone who is plugged in to this huge corruption scam that the government is involved in where there are several exchange rates here. The most generous exchange rate from the boulevard to the dollar is only available to.

Venezuela accountant Caracas Stephen Gibbs Los Palos Grandes Fatah Raina pan US Hobson Andrea producer eleven kilograms ten dollars
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"The armed forces the national guard, but you know, those haven't really amounted anything and they've been easily put down so there's no real sign yet of well coordinated defection by the military to the opposition. If that happens, you know, you will see a change in the situation. You mention the the oil sanctions that the US imposed on Monday. What is what does that really mean? How how important is that in the in the calculus here and another important point does that just ring down to the people does that not just make things worse for the Venezuelan people? Well, they're pretty pretty significant. Venezuela depends almost entirely for its export income the United States its biggest customer. So basically, the US is saying, well, you know, you can buy as Waylon oil, but you're gonna have to pay that over into accounts reserve the opposition rather than for the government. So it doesn't make sense now. Under those circumstances for Venezuela to continue selling oil to the US. It's going to have to find other customers, it'll probably have to take a discount on on those other sales. It's, you know, a regime in a country that was already suffering terribly. Economically is going to suffer even more result of these sanctions, you know, the hope is in the US and the opposition has has has back. These sanctions the hope is that this will be kind of the final nudge that topples the regime, you know, the danger is that it won't do. Do that. And that you know, instead of that happening what you'll see is is even more misery in Venezuela. Even more refugees leaving Venezuela than you have now. So it's it's a very high stakes move beyond sanctions. Whether they be the best way to go about this or what options remain on the table. Well, the United States is not taken military intervention off the table that would be very very drastic step. I mean, first of all very difficult to see what form military intervention by the United States would take the mood on the streets in Caracas. I've heard is, you know, let the Greg goes come, you know, anything to get out of this situation? But I, you know, despite that mood, and I understand that mood despite that mood. I think it would be a very very dangerous thing to do second of all because it's very important that Venezuelans, and, you know, the region's hole and in the world at large see this transition as being one that is led by Venezuelans, and for the sake of as well, if it looks like an act of American imperialism than it will lose a lot of credibility that. The opposition now has so while America, and indeed others are putting pressure on the country does the Maduro regime have allies will Venezuela does have some allies notably Russia and China which have supported this government with loans with investments, you know, now that the threats to d'oro appear to be mounting the Russians in particular seem to be stepping up their support particularly political support. They've defended Madero before the Security Council there. Rumors reports that Russian private security group has gone into Venezuela to protect Madero it's unclear just how much additional financial support will be available to the regime, so while on the one hand, you know, the screws are being tightened by the democratic countries there being sort of loosened by some of the less than critic ones, and it's hard to know who's going to win. I mean with Russia backing it's man the United States backing somebody else, it's not a proxy war. But there's certainly a proxy conflict going on and that is worrying so this has global significance as well as regional significance. Thanks very much, Brooke. My pleasure. Until democracy is restored in Venezuela. Everyday life will continue as normal in. This most volatile of economies the statistics, beggar belief ten million percent. This year's predicted hyperinflation ninety percent. The proportion Venezuelans living below the poverty.

Venezuela United States Waylon oil Russia Madero Caracas Greg Security Council Brooke America China ten million percent ninety percent one hand
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Earlier this week. America's Justice department filed striking indictment of Wally Chinese technology firm, suspected of being chummy with the communist government that's going to make the bilateral trade talks that start today the more tense than the last round. And it's getting easier to get good quality Indian food in the truck stops of America. There's a demographic shift going on in trucking and with it comes a whole new genre of music. But I. Venezuela without Madero would be much better place. Brooke hunger is America's editor at the economist. He's in the country for the past six years. They've been six disastrous. Here's both in terms of what's happened to the economy, which is shrunk by something like fifty percent since he took over and also in terms of the political and humanitarian situation people are hungry. People are fleeing he's steadily arrogated more and more power to himself to the point where Venezuela know only really be described as containership but President Nicolas Maduro suddenly faces a resurgent opposition that the international community is all too ready to back new oil sanctions coming into force and as protests Savoy over window has hinted negotiations with the opposition leader, all of a sudden the opposition. Venezuela has kind of got its Mojo back the national assembly, which is legitimate elected named as its president a man named one Guido. Cook claimed himself country's interim president. On the grounds that Moore is no longer legitimate president. And what this is done is it's kind of galvanize the opposition to Madero which had been really kind of defeated tomorrow is divided up until that point and as important countries such as the United States and Canada and most of the major economies in South America have agreed to recognize Mr. Guadalupe as the country's interim president. So now, you have a focus of legitimacy and power opposition Mr. Majoor of that you didn't have before. And then on Monday, the US imposed its Titus sanctions yet on Venezuela, basically, cutting off US imports Venezuelan oil, which is their main source of income. Why though which you say, Mr. Guido is viewed as legitimate? Why can he do what he's done well under the country's constitution? If the presidency is vacant, and Mr. IDO, and the Democrats would argue that is vacant because Madeira a fraudulent election last may then the interim presidency falls to the president of the national assembly. And that's Mr.. Guido who then has the responsibility to call elections within thirty days. And what do you say about the the murmurings that this is sort of a AKU orchestrated from outside in order to argue that this was a coup. You have to argue that Maduro is the legitimate, president of Venezuela and clearly isn't the opposition done. Nothing violent. There's no attempt to seize power by force. This is not a coup and just today. Mr. Madeira has said he is actually ready to have talks with Mr. Guido reportedly. Right. Well, I don't I don't place a lot of faith in that. I mean, the government the opposition of had talks before on those past occasions. It's been basically a way for the government to kind of wrongfoot the opposition and divide the opposition. They haven't really lead to anything. You know was saying he's not gonna have fresh elections, you'll have parliamentary elections, and of course, parliament is now controlled by the opposition. So that's kind of inviting parliament to put his self election. And then Madore Tariq those elections in his favor. So I don't take that offer terribly seriously the supreme court in Venezuela. Also. Travel ban on Mr White. It's not surprising that they would do that. I think one of the interesting aspects of all of this is that you know, the government has been very repressive against the opposition. But you know, so far dole remains a free man in the national assembly remains in business, even though it doesn't have any formal power. Okay. And I guess what happens next is largely driven by the military. And and whether they continue to stand by him. Do you have a sense of whether it's loyalties might be changing. There's no real sign yet that the military is defecting on mass all the top generals came out a couple of days ago, and pledge their loyalty to the regime, you've had some isolated instances of rebellion within various units of.

Venezuela interim president Mr. Guido Madero Nicolas Maduro president America Mr White Mr. Majoor communist government United States Wally Chinese editor South America Justice department Madore Tariq dole Cook Madeira Moore
"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"intelligence" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For one hundred seventy five years. The economist has been looking beyond the headlines cutting through the noise with clear thinking now, we're going to bring you that same sound reasoning in a daily podcast with our editors and correspondents and meet your host. Jason palmer. It's called the intelligence. Every weekday. We'll bring you what you need for the day ahead, clarity and context on the stories shaping your world from politics, they say that militarily flourishing yet clinically in a bit of a funk, the reality is that the longer this continues in the longer the war continues, the more Turkish attitudes toward Syrians will harden. British solutions have been incredibly damaged. The least thing we could do is to ask people. What is your collective will to business? He then became known as the kite zoo killer cuts of being this kind of web of cross shareholdings. In fact, surprisingly for a foreign executive he actually developed quite a kind of following in Japan, the analogy that a lot of people using in China is saying well, this is a bit like Tim cook. Who's the boss of apple suppose, he was arrested in Singapore and extradited to China doubled pulls a huge Inc in the US to science and culture, there's something bones about majoring yourself. Against the universe deeper issue is how every generation makes the art of their time. That's what's happening here. Global network of journalists will take you to the places where news is being made and talk to the people making it. So I met Jamal hoagie at the Oslo Freedom Forum engaging midget economic to us for the Michigan. To myself had a chance to discuss all these problems with Shinzo Ave. Japan's Prime Minister. Funding is one of the most interesting people I've interviewed in my years in China. He is a force of nature in the flesh. And with the incisive analysis, you expect from the economist we'll dig deeply into the biggest news stories and reveal some you're not hearing. Elsewhere in news are the most interesting financial bubble that you've never heard of the whole of Legos are take yearly creative. Traffic the pillow, I roast beef. I think when I write their bit trees, I don't feel any nervousness about the audience. I feel obligation to the person I'm writing about get more than just the facts get the intelligence. Join me for twenty minutes every weekday starting on January twenty ninth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen.

China apple Japan Jason palmer Tim cook Jamal hoagie Michigan Prime Minister Oslo US executive Singapore huge Inc one hundred seventy five years twenty minutes