35 Burst results for "Insurance Coverage"

Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

Morning Edition

06:26 min | Last month

Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

"Nursing homes have gotten special legal protections during the covered 19 pandemic. That means in most cases, families can't sue. If someone they love got sick or died at one, the nursing home say they're doing the best best they they can, can, and and they they need need those those legal legal shields. shields. But But that that also also may may stop stop people people whose whose injuries injuries have have nothing nothing to to do do with with covert covert from from seeking seeking justice justice in in the the courts. courts. No. No. Well Well talked talked with NPR's Anna Jaffe, who's been looking into this Why were these laws passed in the first place? You remember that the Corona virus outbreak started as far as most people were aware in a nursing home, and currently long term care facilities account for more than a third of all deaths from Copan 19. Nursing homes for caught scrambling for personal protective equipment. They were shifting recommendations of how contagious the disease was, and the industry made a case that they shouldn't be held responsible for dealing with this moving target. Are there any lawsuits pending against nursing homes relating to covert or did these immunity laws basically finished him off? Well, there is one in Durham, North Carolina. It's question whether it's related to cope. But possibly it's the first of its kind in involves the death of a woman named Palestine House. Her daughter, Lisa House set her mother's death had nothing to do with the coronavirus. Her mother had a pressure ulcer or bed sores. They're commonly known. She had it since December of 2018, and it just got worse and worse. It became infected. Lisa how was said she begged Trey Burke Rehabilitation Center to send her mother to the emergency room. But they assured us that they could handle it. Lisa House and her three sisters had their doubts. And their experience Traber and Rehabilitation Center didn't seem to be able to handle much on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. The federal government gives Traber in just one. It also gets below average ratings on the ratio of nurses to residents. The government has find Traber and almost $190,000 in the past three years. We were there a lot, and we found ourselves having to bathe her just general things they were supposed to do. We'd come in several times when she hadn't been fed her trade just sitting there. The House sisters hadn't had a lot of luck with nursing homes in general. Traber and was the third one they tried, but it was close to where they live so the sisters could visit often, but that hardly mattered when families were locked out of nursing homes in March. Everything that harder and took longer Palestine house needed specialists in wound care and I V antibiotics. Lisa House had her mother's power of attorney Again. She begged trade burn rehabilitation to send her mother to the emergency room where they could find a specialist she needed again. She was turned down. Their excuses were Well, the hospital's not taking new patients because of cove it and she would be safer. She stayed here and the facility is equipped to take care of your mother. And none of those things turned out to be true. Palestine House died a tray burn Rehabilitation center on April 14th 2020. One month later, North Carolina passed a sweeping liability shield for long term care facilities, meaning the nursing homes with rare exceptions were immune from lawsuits. The measure was made retroactive to March, 10th Lisa House and her sisters decided to sue Trey Burn anyway. Elizabeth the Todd is their attorney. Palestine House did not have to die in that way or at that time. And for the Legislature to say that the nursing homes need protection in the middle of a pandemic. Not the nursing home patients is outrageous and It's unjust North Carolina's immunity law less until the pandemic is over. Todd is especially worried that the law gives the free pass to nursing homes with low staffing like Trey burn, and so literally, the nursing homes can take their own understaffing their chronic understaffing and use it as a shield. To prevent any liability at all. During the cove it pandemic through their attorneys. Trey Burn Rehabilitation Center declined comment, but for many in the long term care industry His immunity measures are welcome relief, says Day vocal CEO of the Arizona Health Care Association. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey was among the first to sign an executive order granting nursing homes and assistant looking facilities, legal immunity. And for that we applaud him because that just takes a little bit of pressure off vocal says it allows facilities to focus on what's most important. We need to worry about keeping Cove it out of the building. But sometimes that cuts into the bottom line says vocal Take, for instance, 100 Dead building and they really have 50 rooms, two beds per room. But to keep infection from spreading, those double rooms may have to be converted to private rooms. So revenue is cut in half. It really takes its toll on the business side of the ledger. Long term care facilities face a crisis of existential proportions, says Mark Reagan, the attorney for the California Association of Health Facilities. That's because liability insurers are excluding all things Cove it when they renew policies, which would mean that any claims made Regarding covert infection would be subject to exclusion and no insurance coverage. Congressional Republicans wanted a national immunity law but dropped it. It's part of the deal for the latest coronavirus relief package. Reagan still has hopes. What we're merely asking for is that caregivers and their employers don't get punished for doing the best that they could under the circumstances. I imagine that the family of Palestine House doesn't in fact, think the nursing home was doing the best I could for their mother. Well, right there. Attorney Elizabeth Todd points out that One of North Carolina's immunity criteria is that a facility must be acting in good faith, and she doesn't see how trade burn can argue that they did that. So where does this case stands now? Well, Elizabeth Todd is now waiting to see if the case will be dismissed because of the immunity law. Or if Lisa House and her sisters will get their day in court. MPR's Aina Jaffe aina, Thanks So much for your reporting. Thank you.

Traber Lisa House Palestine House Anna Jaffe Trey Burke Rehabilitation Cent Rehabilitation Center North Carolina Copan Tray Burn Rehabilitation Cente Trey Burn Elizabeth The Todd Shields NPR Durham Trey Burn Rehabilitation Cente Arizona Health Care Associatio Doug Ducey Lisa
Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:27 min | Last month

Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

"You listen to podcasts. In twenty seven states nursing homes have gotten special legal protections during the covid nineteen pandemic that means in most cases families can't sue if someone they love got sick or died at one the nursing home say they're doing the best they can and they need those legal shields but that also may stop people whose injuries have nothing to do with covid from seeking justice in the courts. Noel talked with. Npr's jaffe been looking into this. Why were these laws passed in the first place. You remember that. The corona virus outbreak started as far as most people were aware in a nursing home and currently long term care facilities account for more than a third of all deaths from covid nineteen nursing homes were caught scrambling for personal protective equipment. They were shifting recommendations of how contagious disease was and the industry made a case that they shouldn't be held responsible for dealing with this moving target. Are there any lawsuits pending against nursing homes relating to covid or did these immunity laws. Basically finish them off. While there is one in durham north carolina. It's questioned whether it's related to covid. Possibly it's the first of its kind involves the death of a woman named palestine house. Her daughter lisa set her. Mother's death had nothing to do with corona virus. Her mother had a pressure ulcer or bedsores there commonly known she'd had it since december of twenty eighteen and it just got worse. It became infected. Lisa how said she begged traber and rehabilitation center. Send her mother to the emergency room but they assured us that they could handle it. Lisa house and her three sisters had their doubts and their experience traber and rehabilitation center. Didn't seem to be able to handle much on a scale of one to five stars. The federal government gives traber and just one it also gets below average ratings on the ratio of nurses to residence. The government has find traber. Almost one hundred ninety thousand dollars in the past three years. We were there a lot and we found ourselves having to bathe her just general things they were supposed to do. We'd come in several times when she hadn't been fed her just sitting there. The house sisters hadn't had a lot of luck with nursing homes. In general trae burn was the third one they tried. It was close to where they live so the sisters could visit often but it hardly mattered. One families were locked out of nursing homes in march. Everything got harder and took longer. Palestine house needed specialists in wound care and iv antibiotics. Lisa house had her mother's power of attorney again. She begged trae burn rehabilitation to send her mother to the emergency room where they could find the specialists. She needed again. She was turned down their excuses. Were well the hospitals not taking new patients because of covert and she would be safer she stayed here and the facility is equipped to take care of your mother and none of those things turned out to be true. Palestine house died a train rehabilitation center on april fourteenth. Twenty twenty one month later. North carolina passed a sweeping liability shield for long term care facilities. The nursing homes with rare exceptions were immune from lawsuits. The measure was made retroactive to march tenth. Lisa house and her sisters decided to suit rayburn. Anyway elizabeth todd is their attorney. Palestine house did not have to die in that way or at that time and for the legislature to say that the nursing homes need protection in the middle of a pandemic not the nursing. Home patients is outrageous and it's unjust north carolina's immunity law lasts until the pandemic is over. Todd is especially worried that the law gives the free past nursing homes with low staffing trayvon and so literally the nursing homes can take their own understaffing their chronic understaffing and use it as a shield to prevent any liability at all during the covid pandemic through their attorneys train. Rehabilitation center declined comment but for many in the long term care industry. These immunity measures are welcome. Relief says dave voelpel. Ceo of the zona healthcare association. Arizona governor doug ducey was among the first to sign an executive order granting nursing homes and assisted living facilities legal immunity and for that we apart him. Because that just takes a little bit of pressure off. Though paul says it allows facilities to focus on what's most important we need to worry about. Keeping covert out of the building that sometimes that cuts into the bottom line says bubble take for instance one hundred bed building and they really have fifty rooms two beds per room that to keep infection from spreading those double rooms may have to be converted to private rooms. So revenue is cut in half. It really takes its toll on the business side of the ledger. Long term care facilities face a crisis if existential proportions says mark reagan the attorney for the california association of health facilities that's because liability insurance are excluding things covert when they renew policies which would mean that any claims made regarding covert infection would be subject to exclusion and no insurance coverage congressional. Republicans wanted a national immunity law but dropped as part of the deal for the latest coronavirus. Relief package reagan. Still has hopes what we're merely asking for is stats caregivers. And their employers. Don't get punished for doing the best that they could. Under the circumstances. I imagine that the family of palestine house doesn't in fact the nursing home was doing the best it could for their mother. Well right there attorney. Elizabeth todd points out that one of north carolina's immunity criteria is that facility must be acting in good faith and she doesn't see how can argue that they did that. So where does

Traber Lisa House Palestine Trae Burn Jaffe North Carolina Noel Elizabeth Todd NPR Durham Trae Rehabilitation Center Dave Voelpel Lisa Zona Healthcare Association Doug Ducey Federal Government
Health Connector continuing open enrollment for Mass. residents until March 23

WBZ Morning News

00:59 min | Last month

Health Connector continuing open enrollment for Mass. residents until March 23

"The provost. Massachusetts, giving residents more time to sign up for health insurance through the state's health connector, where open enrollment Woz originally set to close yesterday. Really busy Sherry Small with more details on the extension. If you're one of tens of thousands who lost their commercial health insurance last year, you still have time to sign up for coverage through the Massachusetts Health connector. Open enrollment was scheduled to end Saturday. But at the last minute that enrollment period was extended by two months, giving Massachusetts residents until March 23rd to sign up. For health and dental coverage. Many people may qualify for tax credits or free or lower cost coverage like mass health and connector care plans. The connector reported a 6% drop in new enrollments in late December compared to the same time in 2019. They say that's likely because more people are qualifying for Medicaid under the federal public Health emergency in response to the pandemic, the connector estimates about 56,000 people in Massachusetts lost their commercial health insurance coverage between April and

Massachusetts Sherry Small Federal Public Health Emergenc
Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:24 min | 3 months ago

Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

"From the outside. We often know autism through observation of behavior. but are there biological markers for autism. Despite an average diagnosis at four years old stamina biomarker discovery has developed a blood test for autism spectrum disorder for as young as eighteen months. Beth tonle is its ceo. I want you to tell us if you could about autism so much has happened over the years. People have forgotten about what this means to be on the autism spectrum. What this exactly means today. Well i'll tell you the prevalence of autism is the first issue. We now have one in fifty eight kids in the united states that have autism and that's a new statistics from the cdc previously. It was one in sixty nine so almost everyone knows someone or has someone in their family. That has autism Obviously autism is a behavioral disorder. sometimes characterized by social shoes. Repetitive behavior cognitive issues. We're actually looking at it from a biological perspective and trying to sort of peel back the onion and understand What is the biology. That is autism and their multiple. Biology's that manifest then and the behaviors that we see. Well we should say right away. The your the mother of someone who is on the autism spectrum. And he's in college yes. He is so the idea that the these are not functional. People put them in some special class and not deal with them anymore. It's just not true. There's so much that can be done but you have to have knowledge. That's true and autism spectrum disorder. It's a spectrum disorder from cognitive behavioral and biological perspective. Jack is pretty high functioning. But he's had a lot of interruption over the years Lots of behavioral therapy ot pt speech. Language you know tutoring We've tried modified diets and dietary supplements and vitamins. Attention deficit medicine three kinds I think your study and your cell we are. We are like many parents. You go to the internet and you read about these things and There isn't any precision around how they're applied so parents. Try everything And that's what we're trying to bring at stamina. Neuro point is some precision about what's different about the biology of these kids. And how do we order our thinking around how to intervene. Obviously behavioral therapy. Every child should get. But how do we prioritize some of the other choices to address the biology. So there's a major study out there. Eleven hundred children. what have you studied. And what have you available still to continue to study So the children's autism metabolism Project or camp took place at eight sites across the country led by our head of our sab. Dr david amaral. Who's at the mind. Institute at uc davis. We recruited eleven hundred and two children to be specific Children with autism typically developing children and also children with developmental delay but not autism and we collected i of the morning plasma. It's important to have a fasted sample when studying metabolism as we do because just like you don't need a sweet roll before you go get your glucose or cholesterol tested. We can measure that to. This is an enormous resource. That's allowed us to identify the first set of biomarkers that Show a dysregulation in amino acid metabolism. That may be addressable through a supplement. it describes about seventeen percent of the kids and we publish that in biological psychiatry back in september of two thousand eighteen We have a second paper in progress which we hope will be submitted by the end of the month which looks at mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. And this is an area that's been known in the literature in smaller studies of thirty or forty or even a hundred children. This is an opportunity to look at an eleven hundred and two kids and so we really get a chance to kind of dissect some of these hypotheses and bring forward some additional biology. That could be addressable through specific treatments if we know this. Can this become a diagnostic. Do we know enough that it will be. Yeah so that's a great question. We are going to start offering this as a i would call it a prognostic so it will screen for whether or not the child has a metabolism subtype that we've seen has highly associated with autism. And then they would be referred to a developmental specialist to would screen them using traditional behavioral assessment that will be necessary for insurance coverage for. Iep's at school for behavioral therapy etc. But we hope it will do because our kids are eighteen months to forty eight months. Is that child. Re- referred sooner right now. The average age of diagnosis is over four years. My son was seven in fact when he was diagnosed with pervasive developmental delays not otherwise specified. Pdd s which used to be a form of autism. That's been rolled up into the regular autism diagnosis as part of the dsm. Five and we didn't. We were not told it was autism and we knew he had pervasive developmental delays. So a lot of time is lost. Where if we can diagnose as young as eighteen months with our test and get a child referred they can get into behavioral therapy and that can be critically important to the outcome In addition the insights into the metabolism that we can give as i mentioned. We'll give opportunities to sort of prioritize all those different different interventions that parents try and take the most innocuous one first and see if you can make a difference

Autism Autism Spectrum Disorder Beth Tonle Dr David Amaral CDC Uc Davis United States Jack
Amazon opens online pharmacy that delivers prescriptions

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

03:51 min | 3 months ago

Amazon opens online pharmacy that delivers prescriptions

"Amazon launching an online pharmacy customers will be able to buy prescription medications through a new store on its platform code amazon pharmacy. So now when you're at the doctor you can ask them to send prescriptions to amazon pharmacy. Just like any other retail pharmacy. Like you did before. It accepts quote unquote. Most insurance plans poll amazon launching. An online pharmacy was the points. What could possibly go wrong. There are two aspects of the recode article that used santos marcus that i thought were interesting. One is the fact that a lot of things that we didn't anticipate buying through amazon. Now we do so routinely. So i think that bodes well for prescription drugs being part of that but the other part that concerns me quite a bit is the just the number of knockoffs and how unregulated the amazon marketplace. Seems to be at times mock I would never bet against amazon in anything possible. Hitch in this. Is that the prescription. Drug markets skews toward older consumers. They they're the ones who who need this stuff more and that on average somewhat less comfortable with ecommerce younger people had the a lot of The pandemic learn to deal the e. Oh so that that's favor. But i'd be astonished if this flops blake yet had mark's got it exactly right. It's sort of the logical next step for amazon. Now that the pandemic has gotten older generations. Used to shopping for essentials online so sort of the next step beyond grocery in every other day household essentials and this is the age group that they're going to need if they want this to be successful so i think the time is right. Context on this story is comes about two years after amazon com susan company pill pack for seven hundred million dollars is also made other moves into the health space. Health insurance space amazon. Berkshire hathaway and j. p. morgan chase in twenty. Eighteen launched a joint health care venture code haven. We've yet to see where that's going to go. I'm was prime. Members will of course be able to save money paying for medications generic and off brands without using health insurance which is interesting. that's just chace took hit following the news. Drugstore companies like cvs and drug distributors like cardinal health. This will no doubt as well as vice out of walmart target costco's pharmacy businesses to joe this album praying and sharon tell up the wall street journal noting quote. Most americans still prescriptions at the traditional drugstore. Us prescription drug sales at pharmacies was over three hundred billion dollars in two thousand eighteen coins health research firm. A via nearly four billion prescriptions filled each year in the us in march. Mail order prescriptions. Mail order prescriptions. Were up twenty one percent from the previous giving them a six percent slice of the prescription drug market. Hi shannon lost two years. According to suntrust robinson humphrey. Wasn't there a time not long ago when there were a lot of rumors about amazon getting into not the prescription drug business but healthcare coverage insurance coverage. Am i imagining that. Or i might be the time with the two companies haven joint venture with halfway and j. p. morgan chase. So they got together to basically trying to put together some kind of umbrella coverage for all three companies. And somehow i pulled on everybody's sources provide coverage for all of their employees. I think that might be the thing. Maybe i i guess. I was on the impression that it was more comprehensive than just those companies and that they were basically going to try to roll out like you know obamacare. You know amazon care but yeah whether they were going to roll the roll that out to other companies as some kind of a model yet to be seen but i think with their own folks

Amazon Morgan Chase Santos Marcus Berkshire Hathaway Blake Chace Suntrust Robinson Humphrey Susan Costco Walmart The Wall Street Journal Sharon JOE United States
What Should Small Businesses Do About Coronavirus?

The Small Business Radio Show

06:35 min | 3 months ago

What Should Small Businesses Do About Coronavirus?

"What should small businesses do to take advantage of this time of year. Which is really important. Their overall sales. I think you hit the right point there as much as covid. We'll bring some challenges. This is always an important time of year for for small businesses Some small businesses may see after their sales come from right last know forty five days of the year. So the the things that i think about. Our inventories attended be maxed out at this time of year roles and staffing can be stretched. And and you know whether it's seasonal workers or have you people work overtime certainly here. In the northern part of the country winter weather arrives and that can Throw challenges in as well now. I know i agree. It definitely will be It will definitely be a transition so with all of these types of things. How can small business owners prepare. Well as always we recommend that Small businesses work with an independent agent to to help them because in every small business is unique even when they stay within the same industry. So things that you know we like to have businesses think about our our their basic insurance coverage so that when something does if something does go wrong that they're they're protected So an inventories are staying at the teams Making sure limits or adequate their coverage With these being some of the most important sales days of the year making sure their business income coverage that protects them throw unable to conduct their business mixture their limits are adequate There can be challenges From hiring seasonal workers so whether it's training these employees for workers compensation or Making sure that you you hire the right people not forgetting to do background checks and and the like and then sort of just thinking about all of the you know the christmas traffic that comes in and all of that. You know before you add kobe done. So let's talk about a few of those because you talk about business income coverage but my understanding is is that this is something would happen besides cove it like if there was a fire or another natural disaster. Spit your fire seems to be. The you know the most dramatic but you know water damage can be you know. Got a very common one. Whether it's a a pipe break on the street out in front of you. A neighbouring tenant as high frac- or an apartment above you has frac- there's all sorts of different things that can happen. And when when any of those things happen and they cause you to have to close your doors Hopefully not for long period but even just a few days at this critical time of the year Not only are you losing sales. You're losing your profits. You also mentioned season the workers. I think a lot of folks don't look as seasonal workers as being covered by workmen's compensation but they are right. They absolutely are whether you're Whether they're coming in as a volunteer all the way to somebody that's you know part time You know even even you know potentially companies on a staffing agency Were you hire them. You know honest you know as staff is a regular staff. Just for the next month and a half. They are covered by workers compensation which protects them. But it also means they affect your experience and your prints it. It's interesting to me because a lot of small business owners they hire sometimes even more than their regular year ran staff. But they don't take a look their workman's comp limits. Yeah so Limit limits with workers comp or so much of it is statutory but there is an employer's liability limit. Which really gets it. Whether you're running a safe workplace and so Independent agents and insurance companies typically recommend that Businesses carry a half a million dollars players liability or sometimes even a million coverage but that At this point has become again once you're working with an independent agent has become relatively standard. So what happens when you hire some of these people and of course many of them may not be at your office or retail location. What if they're working from home had he protect yourself there. Yeah well the cupboard. Whether they're doing work for you they're they're covered so It becomes important to set out some standards of you know if they're working at the computer making sure they have appropriate workspace We certainly see repetitive. Motion claims because somebody has not set there The the table a little bit too high for them and so the way. They're reaching for their keyboard put stress on their on their wrists as an example. So it's important that A business sets expectations For both their you know regular employees but there is an employee as well that they set up safe business practices to Allow them to do their job to do it. Safely and one of the business practices of course. Is this idea of cyber threats because we know that small businesses are really a target of that. It's a lot easier to protect yourself from cyber threats when you're using a computer in the office but what happens when people are using their home computer. It really does add an extra challenge because then sometimes the corporate firewalls and ask corporate. Antivirus software doesn't extend to a personal home computer. So you're now Creating a potential exposure For your company where somebody you can access your system through a less protected source so there are You know guidance that we would give and independent agents would give to make sure that people are have You know antivirus protection on their personal computers. They're following safe practices. Not opening emails from sources of that are unknown. Sort of those suspicious Emails that are out there It's very important. People update their passwords and make their passwords complex. Those are those are sort of the basic things that are there And and i. And i think back to sort of sort of one other which we may want to get into which is the importance of companies you know even keeping their firewalls their System safe with through patches

Small Business Saturday: How to Survive and Thrive in COVID Times

The Small Business Radio Show

03:24 min | 3 months ago

Small Business Saturday: How to Survive and Thrive in COVID Times

"Small business. Saturday is quickly approaching. He'll probably look a little bit different than last year. Here with the vice and i take advantage of holiday. Season is chip haman. Who's the deputy president small commercial of the hanover. Insurance group chip. Welcome back to the show. Thank you. It's good to be here so everyone's excited about the holiday season but it's gonna be a little different than last year. I completely agree. Coach changes everything. So what should small businesses do to take advantage of this time of year. Which is really important. Their overall sales. I think you hit the right point there as much as covid. We'll bring some challenges. This is always an important time of year for for small businesses Some small businesses may see after their sales come from right last know forty five days of the year so the the things that i think about. Our inventories tend to be maxed out at this time of year roles and staffing can be stretched. And and you know whether it's seasonal workers or have you people work overtime certainly here. In the northern part of the country winter weather arrives and that can Throw challenges in as well now. I know i agree. It definitely will be It will definitely be a transition so with all of these types of things. How can small business owners prepare. Well as always we recommend that Small businesses work with an independent agent to to help them because in every small business is unique even when they stay within the same industry. So things that you know. We like to have businesses think about our our their basic insurance coverage so that when something does if something does go wrong that they're they're protected So an inventory bursting at the teams Making sure limits or adequate their coverage With these being some of the most important sales days the year share their business income coverage that protects them throw unable to conduct their business. mixture their limits are adequate There can be challenges From hiring seasonal workers so whether it's training these employees for workers compensation or Making sure that you you hire the right people not forgetting to do background checks and and the like and then sort of just thinking about all of the you know the christmas traffic that comes in and all of that. You know before you add kobe done. So let's talk about a few of those because you talk about business income coverage but my understanding is is that this is something would happen besides cove it like if there was a fire or another natural disaster. Spit fire seems to be. The you know the most dramatic but you know water damage can be you know. Got a very common one. Whether it's a a pipe break on the street out in front of you. A neighbouring tenant as high frac- or an apartment above you has frac- there's all sorts of different things that can happen. And when when any of those things happen and they cause you to have to close your doors Hopefully not for long period but even just a few days at this critical time of the year Not only are you losing sales. You're losing your profits.

Hanover
Trump’s justice department to argue for end of Obamacare at supreme court

John Williams

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Trump’s justice department to argue for end of Obamacare at supreme court

"Supreme Supreme Court Court is is considering considering the the possible possible repeal repeal of of the the affordable affordable care care act act or or Obama Obama care. care. The The key key issue issue involves involves whether whether mandating mandating insurance insurance is is constitutional, constitutional, since there's no longer a penalty for not buying it. Chief Justice John Roberts Questions California Solicitor General Michael Mangan on the Affordable Care act is someone who does not follow the mandate and purchase insurance violating the law. Not on our view, Your Honor. We think that this is a An operative provisioned and there is no legal command. If the court strikes down Obama care, it would end health insurance coverage for more than 20 Million Americans. Protections for people with pre existing conditions would also disappear. The landmark health care law is now 10 years old.

Supreme Supreme Court Court Chief Justice John Roberts Barack Obama Michael Mangan California
Should we support the individual mandate?

Medicare for All

06:38 min | 4 months ago

Should we support the individual mandate?

"Today we're going to be talking about the individual mandate, which is a very wonky policy term for the the requirement that you buy health care, which was included in the Affordable Care Act Now to me like the individual mandate is one of the most bizarre and like fascinating Windows onto American politics, which one that will explain like the strangeness and bizarreness of it. But it's also like timely because of two big things like there's basically two major events happening in politics right now, right? There's Supreme Court nomination the Supreme Court could potentially be tipped way to the right and then we have this you may have heard. We have an election coming up like news news alert. There's an election coming up and the many ties into both of these things. Cuz a lot of people are wondering will this new conservative Court overturn the Affordable Care Act and it turns out the individual mandate is like at the center of that legal wage. And then there's also the issue of what happens if Democrats retake Congress and the presidency, what are they going to do? Because essentially the Mandate was eliminated off or they pulled the teeth out of it a couple of years ago when they're still Republican Congress and you know are Democrats going to reinstate it. What's going to happen either a good or a bad thing. Let's get into it. That's what I introduce Our Guest sure. So we're welcoming to the podcast today. You can camp our old friend Egan who is the health care policy Advocate at public citizen. Happy Halloween again. Hey, thanks so much for having you guys. Can we get you a better like sexier tighter than helpful? Yeah, maybe Health Care policy Champion something like an upgrade. We're going to work on that. Yeah, exactly. So my first question on this episode about the individual mandate is what the hell is a name. No, mandate and specifically how is it different from a text? Yeah. So an individual mandate at its most basic is the idea that you have to have health insurance. And if you don't have health insurance, there's some sort of penalty and so it's it's different from attacks in that. It's it's what you would end up paying if you didn't actually get health insurance. So if you have a health insurance, you know your page whatever your health insurance is, but if you don't have any health insurance, then it's whatever the taxes which is generally going to be less than the cost of your health insurance. But it means you're also not getting anything and you don't actually have health insurance coverage off. Yeah Best of Both Worlds really is being uninsured and then being fine on top of it. So a lot of people who have been, you know, following this at all, the Affordable Care Act may know that at this moment back in general the Republican party is opposed to the individual mandate considers it this tax this requirement to buy insurance is like an infringement on our personal Liberties and in general the Democratic party has wage. In favor of it saying it's you know, what makes the Affordable Care Act work. It's personal responsibility out of data, but it was not always so is the can you give us a little wage of like where did this idea come from? How long has it been kicking around for? Yeah. So an individual mandate is is sort of a conservative way of getting people health care. I mean as you know, we're on the way better care for all health care. Now, that's a much more sort of progressive guarantees access to health care for folks. Whereas just an individual mandate really the idea. There is that you want people to have health insurance and insurers are scared that if folks wait until they're sick and then just buy coverage. That means that they're only going to get the insurers are only going to make money while people are sick, which means they're actually going to have to pay out more and so they want them to be paying all those premiums ahead of time so that they're making their their their profits as they go we would hate for insurers not to make enough profit off. Yeah. Yeah, I mean that's it's something that appeals has appealed to Republicans and Democrats over the years and the health insurance industry gives pretty pretty heavy handily to them both. And so it's not it's not surprising that both parties at different times would would be in favor of it. Yeah, so we're from Massachusetts Ground Zero for ObamaCare actually, as you may know the first real life iteration of Obamacare was of course the Massachusetts Health reform, which was passed on a sort of a bipartisan basis under a republican Governor Mitt Romney who pioneered the idea under what is sort of a Democratic Leadership. If you're familiar with Massachusetts state politics, you know that it's just Democrat has used lightly hear President Bush, of course also expressed really strong support for the idea of a mandate a coupled with the marketplace. So if you think about the ACA as being the three legs two of those legs and Marketplace for health care, and then the idea of the Mandate are like major conservative ideas right there and then you know Obama, you know running for the Democratic primary to be John Edwards and Hillary Clinton. He probably thought he needed to be at least a little bit to the left of the Republican Governor, you know, Romney's Health Care policy although both Clinton and Edwards. Endorse the individual mandate in the primary. So they're apparently cool with running on the Republican policy. I guess the question is how did the Democratic solution you know, we have two of the three major candidates in the 2008 primary running on a republican Health reform. Like how did that Democratic solution become like a personal responsibility? Yeah. It's a great question and it's one that sort of speaks to some of the challenges that I think we're going to face under a potential Biden Administration the idea that if you ought to have sort of a National Health Care system that medicare-for-all that's much easier for folks to sort of get their heads around but if you have right now our system is sort of based on various fragments. There's your basic Private health care. There's Medicare for seniors. There's Medicaid for low-income folks. And so this it felt it seemed like Democrats were less afraid of sort of tinkering with it. System trying to make some way of expanding coverage. They were more afraid of sort of taking on, you know insurers and hospitals directly. And so they figured the the easiest way out was to sort of take personal responsibility option try to attack on a new private insurance system and hope that it ended up covering people as we saw there were some coverage games but the gaps in the system that made way too many people still falling through

National Health Care Governor Mitt Romney Republican Party Massachusetts Health Conservative Court Supreme Court Democratic Party Massachusetts Hillary Clinton Congress John Edwards Egan Barack Obama President Bush
Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

News, Traffic and Weather

04:08 min | 5 months ago

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

"The pandemic, There's been been an an increase increase in in substance substance abuse. abuse. It's It's also also had had significant significant impact impact on on mental mental health health and and is is impacting impacting communities communities across across America. America. ABC ABC News News producer producer Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstein has has more more on on some some of the steps being taken and is part of the ABC News turning point. Siri's were focusing on how addiction affects communities of color. He was Jenny. September is National Recovery Month an entire month dedicated to educating Americans about substance use disorders, mental health treatment and services. I am a woman in long term recovery from alcoholic drug addiction. Paddy McCarthy is the CEO of the organization faces and voices of recovery. I have overcome challenges with my own alcohol and turkeys and now then in recovery for over 30 years this year marks the 31st anniversary of National recovery Month. This year's theme joined the voices for recovery celebrating connections. Recovery is a journey. We want a path to a better future. Martine Hackett is an associate professor in the master of public Health and community health programs at Hofstra University. She says, the first step to recovery is acknowledgements. You really cannot attempt to solve that problem or to even begin your recovery until you acknowledge that jacket says racial disparities exist in the process of recovery. This is in part due to the barriers that hinder minorities in particular from getting the help. They need some of these barriers that minorities face when it comes to identifying help. Have to do with the even their perceived need for treatment, Recognising that they might not want to have help from official means and might be more comfortable seeking help from family or from religious institutions. Another obstacle, health insurance coverage or access to behavioral health services. Trauma and racial stress can make minorities more susceptible to miss using drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism. Some of this has to do with concepts around trauma. And the the experiences of trauma clearly in an early age people who are exposed to stressors there's research that talks about the stressors of racism. And how those stressors can cause behaviors that you know people reach to to be able to deal with those stressors. Hackett says. Native Americans are the most affected by these disparities. They have a higher rate of addiction, but they also have a lower rate of recovery and being able to seek recovery. As for national recovery month McCarthy says Connecting in 2020 will be a little different than previous years. You know that we can't do it alone. So that's why the theme of celebrating connections is so important, especially right now. During Koven 19 when connecting with people has become a whole new challenge when we're not able to visit people in person or tender, usual gatherings to support recovery. McCarthy also says the language and terminology we used when referring to those in recovery is an important step. No longer use words like addict. We no longer use the word drug abuser. We have to remember that these are family friends, sums of daughters we have shifted. Two person first language such as a person with the substances disorder, Hackett says the stigma can make it more difficult for those struggling to seek help. This is especially true for minorities, the idea of stigma that there are certain Ways of different cultures view addiction and that people might not feel comfortable being able to even admit that they have a problem. Faces and voices of recovery has a website where resource is accessible both during Andy on National Recovery Month National recovery Month that order so visit the website you can find out where the events are happening and stay up to date as the month of September comes to an end the fight for recovery and dismantling research All barriers continues. Ending the stigma and making resource is available to all is a step in the right direction.

Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstei Martine Hackett America Paddy Mccarthy Abc News Producer Siri Hofstra University Andy CEO Associate Professor Official
The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 5 months ago

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

"The fight over who will replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be fierce because supreme. Court decisions are so high stakes among the highest decisions on health care and abortion, and this morning we're GonNa talk about both starting with healthcare the quarterback in session on October fifth several state attorneys. General are challenging the affordable care act they want it thrown? Tens of millions of people would lose Medicaid benefits and more than one hundred million people would lose protections for pre existing conditions. So very high stakes duly rovner of Kaiser, health news is with us now. Good Morning Julie. Good morning where do things stand with the affordable care act? Well, things are tenuous Congressman 2017 failed to repeal and replace law but it did eliminate the penalty for not having insurance as part of its big year end tax bill just a couple of months. Later, a group of Republican attorneys general and governor sued they said that without the penalty, the law was now unconstitutional. That's because the law would they say was only upheld by the Supreme Court in two thousand twelve because the penalty was a constitutional exercise of Congress's taxing power. So no tax no affordable care act. Now, most legal experts didn't think a lot of this case including. Some scholars who had argued to strike crippled the law in cases that went to the court in two, thousand twelve, and again in two thousand fifteen. But a federal judge in Texas bought the argument in late twenty eighteen and in two thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred appeals court panel in New Orleans agreed although it's case back to the lower court to see if the whole really had to go democratic attorneys general who are now defending the law because the trump administration is not we're worried about leaving the helpful in limbo for as long as that would take, which could be years they asked the Supreme Court to step in right away the court. But. It didn't agree to decided before the election. Okay. So without Justice Ginsburg, what the possibilities for how the court might decide this case? Well, there are several if they're still eight justices, it could be afforded four tie that would mean that the lower court ruling would stand, but it might just apply in that circuit. So Texas Louisiana. Mississippi or the court could ask that the case be re argued when there's a ninth justice, the court could also decide that the. Individual Mandate the requirement for people to have insurance even though with no penalty is unconstitutional, but the rest of law might be able to survive It's worth mentioning that even limited decision could strike down protections for pre existing conditions a very popular because those are considered tightly linked to the mandate or the court could strike down the entire law which seems unlikely with only eight justices but you never know and possible of president trump manages to fill the seat right away. What happens if the Supreme Court does strike down the entire law? Well, the word most health experts I've talked about this is chaos not only could more than twenty million Americans immediately lose insurance coverage popular provision like letting young adults stay on their parent's health plan guaranteeing coverage of pre existing conditions expanded prescription drug, and preventive benefits for. Seniors. On Medicare would all be eliminated it would also impact healthcare providers, hospitals, and insurers and doctors who's the way they are bill in are paid is intimately tied in to the law. So the court hearing the case in November, but we likely won't get a decision until next year anyway. So if Joe Biden is elected, could he drop the case? No because it's actually not the administration's case it's the Republican attorneys general but a Democratic Congress under Democratic president could make the case mood they could put the penalty back at a dollar they could eliminate the rest of the language about the mandate. Or they could pass a bill saying the change in two thousand seventeen was not intended to impact the rest of the law. All of those however would be big fights on their own. Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News thanks Julie.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Julie Rovner Democratic Congress President Trump Joe Biden Texas Kaiser Health Congress Congressman New Orleans Donald Trump Medicare Mississippi Louisiana
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court's Feminist Icon, Is Dead at 87

AP News Radio

01:06 min | 5 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court's Feminist Icon, Is Dead at 87

"Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves a legacy as a champion for women's rights even in her final months eighty seven year old Ruth pater Ginsburg was fighting for women's rights arguing in favor of insurance coverage for contraception despite religious objections from the little sisters of the poor this was the court session in may held online because of the pandemic with Ginsberg in the hospital that day with gall bladder issues yes Austin currently through the wound what was so it was essential that women be providing the service services and with no hassles another significant opinion on nineteen ninety six ruling that ordered the Virginia military institute to accept women Ginsburg was nicknamed the notorious RBG for her defense of equal rights for women and minorities her cause of death was listed as complications from pancreatic cancer Jackie Quinn Washington

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Austin Virginia Military Institute Jackie Quinn Washington Supreme Court
Getting More For Our Healthcare Dollar with Jill Yegian

Outcomes Rocket

06:10 min | 6 months ago

Getting More For Our Healthcare Dollar with Jill Yegian

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here and the privilege of hosting Jill the again she launched Gigi and help insights in two thousand eighteen providing consulting services to clients and healthcare and philanthropy. Dr Yan has held leadership positions in a variety of health care organizations in each she has focused on applying expertise in health policy payment and delivery to problems and opportunities most recently she served as vice president for public policy and strategic initiatives at Brown and Toland physicians. A large independent practice association in the San Francisco Bay area her background and PhD is in health services and policy analysis from. The University of California Berkeley and prior to the work that she's done she also served thirteen years with the California Healthcare Foundation where she worked to improve the California's financing and delivery system for healthcare, which is what we're going to be talking about today. We're GONNA BE TALKING ABOUT ACCESS WE'RE GONNA be talking about rising costs and things that we could be doing and thinking about US healthcare leaders and making it better. So with that, I want to go ahead and open up the microphone to jail and really give you a warm welcome and thanks for joining us so glad you're here Jill You saw it's great to be here. I really enjoy listening to your podcast and I'm really happy to be a part of it. Oh. Awesome. So glad you're here and and so you know one of the things that I love asking and I'm curious about is what inspires you. With your work in healthcare. So so from my perspective, it really what gets me up in the morning is collaboration to improve outcomes and increased value. I just feel like there's so much opportunity to make the system work better for patients for practitioners for those who are paying the bill and for taxpayers to, and that could be in terms of higher quality. More access lower costs more equitable, a better a patient or even provider experience lots of different aspects of improvement that are possible in our current system. You know, I've always been really interested in systems and interdisciplinary approaches to solving problems both undergraduate and graduate degrees are interdisciplinary bringing together economics political science and sociology ought to inform US systems perspective in. So now I have an opportunity to work. At the intersection of delivery finance and in policy and I think that's really important because changing policy may not result in the change on the ground. For example, changing expanding health insurance coverage won't create access to care if there aren't enough providers in a rural community or if reimbursement is is too low. So it's really important to think about a systems perspective that brings together different aspects to solve problems. Yeah I really think that's a great approach in a great way to think about this is you're right. You know if they increase access, there might not be enough people in the delivery aspect but then there's the financial piece that I think a lot of people are are concerned about in this country a lot of employers a lot of the even policymakers right where the concerned about it We'll touch on this folks. So don't worry about I'm curious from from your end Jill. What's the thing that's held you back in the past that you've conquered. That's a great question. So I would say that. It's really most recent related to starting again health insights. I've been an employee for most of my life and the transition to having my own company really required taking some risks So there's a lot less security and predictability. It's not always clear. What next year is going to bring and sometimes even next month earlier in my career I would say I probably wasn't as comfortable with that level of of uncertainty and I also didn't have the same level of confidence in my abilities and and I feel like all that is really come together at this point where I have a breadth of knowledge and experience I have confidence I'm comfortable with the uncertainty. And the variety in this world is fabulous being able to work with a whole array of clients on a whole array of issues and and make contributions in an array of different areas. No. That's A. that's a really great thing to share Joel I. Mean I know a lot of people listening today have had that. Challenge or are currently experiencing a and and so what is it? That got you to to make the move? It was an array of different circumstances that really lead to things falling into place. So I'm at a point in my career where I really have a pretty long checklists for what would really make me very excited about getting out of bed, and so the ability to make contribution is really a significant part of that and on the combination of flexibility autonomy variety and mission was best when in in the with creating my own company. So that's the path that I've taken and and I have really enjoyed.

United States Gigi Jill California Healthcare Foundati San Francisco Bay University Of California Berke California Marquez Dr Yan Toland Vice President Strategic Initiatives Brown Joel
Online therapy is thriving now, but can it remain viable?

Business Wars Daily

03:21 min | 6 months ago

Online therapy is thriving now, but can it remain viable?

"If you've ever been in the market for a new therapist, you know the drill I ask your doctor or a trusted friend for some recommendations next search online to verify they take your health insurance. Then when you finally find someone hope that there is don't get wide with horror once you start talking about your childhood otherwise he gets weird and you have to start the process all over again. But like most things. These days a combination of technology and covid nineteen have disrupted mental healthcare. Only this time that disruption may have actually made things better now that in-person counseling is largely lockdown online therapy. APPS. With their simplified pipelines and virtual options are looking more appealing than ever in May popular option talk space told The Washington Post that it's volume was up sixty five percent since the beginning of the pandemic rival better help told Mashal the business has doubled during the shutdown and that more than ten thousand people per day sign up for it service. Deciding which services right for you depends on what you're looking for better help offers unlimited therapy sessions while talk spaces offerings while not unlimited include psychiatric help in addition to traditional talk therapy, the online therapy landscape has changed significantly from the beginning of the year in March. The federal government issued waivers allowing insurance programs like Medicare and Medicaid to cover telehealth services for a variety of treatments including for mental health care and many private insurers lined up to allow coverage to the combination of lower cost online therapy sessions, and. Expanded Insurance Coverage helped more people afford the help they needed during an anxious time but success is not without its obstacles. The companies that create these APPS aren't just altruistic healthcare providers. Their tech companies to that means they need to be able to scale their software for growth and they need to do it fast for that they need funding talk spaces raised one, hundred, ten, million dollars to fuel its growth better help was acquired by Telemedicine Tele Doc in twenty fifteen even so each company is facing some growing pains. First, there's the issue of the industry's uncertain future. The relaxed regulations in Medicare waivers that allowed this growth may not be long-term wants the pandemic has passed will the regulations remain in place maybe Maybe, not the other issue is finding enough therapists to keep up with demand. Each platform is actively recruiting mental health professionals through its website and employment advertising. But the hiring bar is high therapists must be licensed in their state and have at least three years of experience. They're paid as independent contractors by the platform verge reports and the competition is tough. There are dozens of online therapy. APPS now, competitor Ginger has raised one hundred, twenty million in its latest round of funding secured in August CIGNA ventures. In Kaiser, permanente ventures both participated giving the startup, some important insurance and healthcare provider muscle in the Mex- online therapy does make mental health care more affordable and accessible, but questions remain about how the highly regulated world of Healthcare Meshes with the grow grow world of technology companies. One thing is certain demand for mental health care is only growing between the pandemic, the recession social unrest in a slew of natural disasters. Now, there's plenty of anxiety around.

Healthcare Meshes August Cigna Federal Government Ginger Medicare Mashal The Washington Post Medicaid
Mass Attorney General Issues Advisory To Small Businesses

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Mass Attorney General Issues Advisory To Small Businesses

"More Healy here in Massachusetts is putting out some new gardens to small businesses about the protections they have. Under the state's eviction moratorium. That moratorium forbids landlords from evicting small business tenants during the duration. However, it does not relieve the tenant from eventually paying that rent or restrict a landlord's ability to evict the tenant for failing to pay past due rent after the moratorium wraps up so, the ages, office says. Right now it's providing ways to connect. These businesses with important resource is like information about grants and loans, ways to cut their costs and insurance coverage as well. 7

Healy Massachusetts
Georgetown Professor Judy Feder Discusses Long Term Care Policy

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:34 min | 7 months ago

Georgetown Professor Judy Feder Discusses Long Term Care Policy

"With me again to discuss long-term care policy is Georgetown's Judy feder. So with that as background judy, let me begin by asking why did the fifteen members of the thirteen commission differ on financing? The commission David was a something of an afterthought poorly prepared poorly set up by the authorizing legislation and lacking in backing in terms of congressional support or where administration supports a move forward. and it was treated I. Think. We've behaved as the kind of of after thought it was the members were was a bipartisan commission. The charge was to develop a proposal to finance long-term care but the the leadership and the Republicans on the proposal were really looking for I'd say lowest common denominator of agreement on anything and there were five Democrats on the on the commission who. WHO WOULD NOT PREPARE? Didn't want to go there really wanted to address the charge didn't necessarily agree with what others. Were coming to agreement on and so it really I thought was pretty useless. Okay. Thank you for that. So I asked about financing obviously because that's really the crux. Or has been the frustration here in getting policy. Let's go to. The details of your twenty eighteen paper that you co-authored. This was partially funded by H S. it lays out in detail a long term care policy, and let's start with WHO's eligible under this proposal and What and how benefits are triggered. That eligibility for public benefits on this in this proposal is constrained in two or defined in two ways the the first definition what we wrote about was we developed was a proposal that would operate very much like social security so that you would have to work to something some number of quarters and paid in along with some additional financing and the. So that would be a first criterion for eligibility but then the trigger for the benefit would be based on your impairment level which we tied to what we refer to as the hippo level requirements, the the. Level of impairment two or two or more. Impairments in activities of daily living with some level of cognitive impairments. Those are the requirements for tax preferred private, Long Term Care Insurance that were in the law that was called hip. and so that that that's the the the level of impairment you would have to demonstrate and we have in addition can. Listen for eligibility, which is rarely the innovative aspect of the proposal. We created a a waiting period period between when you experienced that level of impairment and when you would receive benefits and the length of that pair of that waiting period was would buried with income so that if you were had low in relatively low income, you would have a shorter period and if you had a high income, you would have a longer period. The rationale for that design was to find a A to define a public benefit. That would not eliminate individuals responsibility for preparing as it's often said, preparing themselves for long term care needs. The now, when people say people ought to prepare for themselves where we have no viable insurance mechanism to prepare, it's nonsense because people can't save and shouldn't say that kind of money but with and insurance public insurance plan back 'cause a waiting period that based on income. would. Give people some idea of the gap that they would be expected to fill with either their own resources or with private insurance coverage and private long term care insurance which has failed as an industry has is not willing has not demonstrated a willingness to take on truly catastrophic benefits, the tail and of need that's what the public plan was doing but it is not implausible that if the public program were there at the back end that private insurers would come in and to offer a meaningful product at the front and. That product would be more desirable more understandable wants a public benefit also existed. So the idea was to create a public benefit and to design that benefit in a way that would also stimulate a viable private market

Judy Feder Georgetown David
Why the Covid-19 economy is devastating to millennials

Ric Edelman

03:33 min | 8 months ago

Why the Covid-19 economy is devastating to millennials

"The cove in nineteen crisis is an unprecedented health and economic and human challenge for investors and we really wanted to delve deeper into learning more about how employees were handling that crisis and what we found out was that nearly fifty percent of American employees indicate there have significant financial stress related to the crisis while and when you look deeper at the data what you see is that there are certain groups that are even more impacted people who are not saving today people who do not have a financial plan which you know we all know is so important non white workers are more stressed than white workers and millennials are caring the most draft of any of that demographic or tell you and I aren't surprised that millennials are the most stressed but I think many of our listeners might be surprised to hear that one of the findings in the survey confirms something that that you and I know very well because of the work that we do but I think would be surprising to a lot of our listeners that millennials are struggling with stress and and other aspects of their finances more so than workers or even younger than that yeah that's right right we're staying that millennials are very concerned and feeling a lot of financial stress across the board they're the ones that are most interested in talking with an adviser right now and I think it's a lot because you know they are starting their career at the beginning of the last quite that we had and are now looking at another potential setback so we shouldn't think that they are kind of in that group that is less affected they're actually at a at a really important point in their financial journey and will need to pay special attention to them so talk about the the nature of the stress of the what is it that they're stressing about isn't that they are not able to pay their bills are they you know tells tells what the sources of stress are yeah so I think the biggest area of concern was really the stability of their household income eighty five percent of workers told us that they had some level of concern in that area so what you see a lot of concern around their employers the community one area that we all we know is of concern to individuals is the value in their savings and investment accounts the cost of healthcare is top of mind and that something that you know we know is that a big factor as someone looking at their long term goals the level of stress that they're facing is that has it increased since the pandemic started or have these levels of stress you always been there there's definitely been financial stress for employees echo that but we have seen a significant increase and it's really impacting productivity absenteeism and the overall health of our American workforce and the crazy thing here is that this is a survey of those who still have their jobs because clearly among these thousands of employers there have been layoffs and furloughs winning survey them these are the folks who have jobs and they're the ones feeling stress they're fearful that they are going to suffer a furlough or a pay cut for reduction in employee benefits such as perhaps health insurance coverage or the employer match in a four one K. X. cetera and so if they're feeling stressed and they still have jobs imagine the stress among Americans who are now had to file

New Sanders/Jayapal bill: the Healthcare Emergency Guarantee Act

Medicare for All

08:15 min | 10 months ago

New Sanders/Jayapal bill: the Healthcare Emergency Guarantee Act

"The the next biggest thing obviously in healthcare is going to be this phase. Four relief bill which they're calling the cares to act which is likely to start moving through congress in the next week or two and the big question for us at least is. Is there going to be any healthcare relief for the millions and millions of people who are losing their jobs and losing their health insurance coverage right in the middle of massive healthcare crisis and there are now three bills that Democrats have different? Democrats have proposed in the house side And there's one on the Senate side It's not entirely clear whether anything will go through the Senate at all democratic leadership on the Senate side has not really made much noise about this But let's let's go back to the we've already talked about two of the house bills. We talked about A bill that Senator Sanders and reptile Paul are going to introduced. Actually not yet filed. This is called the Healthcare Emergency Guarantee Act. But what it really is it would cover everyone with Medicare It would have no co no deductibles and even if you have private or public insurance already than this bill would Medicare would cover all of your co pays and deductibles so basically it would achieve all of the access goals of a Medicare for all system. It would just temporarily believing in the private insurers and kind of providing wraparound and then but it is the like it is the Medicare Gateway Bill. Oh no doubt no doubt. Yeah I think so. We're going to be getting behind this bill. Most of the Medicare for movement is going to be supporting this bill. I think our feeling is that you know if you can get the experience of Medicare for all even if you don't get all the financing and limiting the health insurance company that it'll create real momentum to just do the full thing and because really leaving the health insurance companies in there. It just makes it much more expensive to do. It's hard to afford universal health. Care if you don't kick them out And you have to deal with them continuing to deny coverage and using the system just for their own profits so the other two bills. We already talked about this shitty bill that a democratic leadership is pushing the well the Worker Health Coverage Protection Act And this would obviously be good for some folks it expand. It basically subsidizes Cobra. So this is if you happen to have good health insurance in the job that you left. Then it would subsidize you staying on your previous employer's plan but a lot of people would not qualify for that Especially you know if you work at a small business. This is only Kober only works if you were working at a place that has twenty or more employees and it only works if your health. Your previous employer still exists and if their their health plan still exists. It doesn't work if your previous employer just went under or if they closed down their healthcare plan and obviously for many people who didn't have health care coverage previously. It would do nothing so just to give some numbers to illustrate the differences between these two bills the giant Paul Sanders Bill. The Healthcare Emergency Guarantee. Act THAT BILL WOULD COVER EVERYBODY. Who's currently uninsured? And that number is between thirty and forty million and rising as people are kicked off their their jobs and then kicked off their health insurance and then of course it would also because it would provide that wrap around coverage Basically it would basically affect everybody in the United States hundred plus million three hundred million whereas the Cobra Bell the Cobra for some ish. Bill that Nancy Pelosi is pushing would cover at most four to five million people so the scope is really different. Yeah I hadn't even seen that projection but that is shockingly inadequate for sort of what's facing us and we now have a third bill if you weren't confused already this is This is a bill introduced this past week by Reps. Chhaya Paul and Reps Kennedy who are both Medicare for all supporters in called the Medicare Crisis Program Act? We we might need to rename all these bills down and their bill would Instead of I mean the other thing about the bill is that it's just throwing public tax dollars at private health insurance companies but this plan that Kennedy introducing would expand Medicare extend Medicare to the recently unemployed so basically people who have become unemployed due to You know in the period of Corona virus would be allow- allowed to enroll in the Medicare program But the thing that makes this it's not nearly as good as the sanders giant. Paul Bill Because it leaves all of almost all of the cost sharing and copays and deductibles Under Medicare would still be there They did eliminate some like the premiums that you have to pay but you'd still have A part A. Part B. deductibles. You'd still have to buy a drug plan if you want to have any drug coverage you'd have the donut hole all that all those limitations that Medicare unfortunately comes with And then if you did not become recently unemployed then you also wouldn't qualify for the program So in my opinion it's it's better than the Cobra Bill. it would cover more people But it's still. I think totally inadequate for what's needed in this crisis and it makes kind of arbitrary distinctions about who gets in and who doesn't so I don't know our current system Yeah but yeah it would be better. It's like a gateway light right so we have like the the sanders dry. Paul Act which is like improved Medicare for all ish improved Medicare for all gateway drug. We have this the Reps Scott. Dingle Pelosi Bill which is like Cobra for some ish like you should have been a Republican bill right. They may be actually and I mean this. This is what I thought. The Republicans were going to push would be like. Let's subsidize private insurance but it turns out. There's been some like trading places going on over the decades so and then we have this new job. Kennedy Bill Medicare for the recently unemployed. So now we've got these three bills but none of it is really important. The distinctions between the bills. If nobody's actually going to fight for any of these bills and Pelosi for example they introduce this bill but she hasn't really been talking that much about it. I'm not sure if there's been a lot of discussion about whether it's actually going to be in the next phase of relief and and I think that there's a reason that the Democrats haven't really tackled the UN insurance problem. Which is there's no good solution for them. I mean insurers want them to expand Cobra which would be massively expensive and then as we were talking about cover only a fraction of the newly insured newly uninsured. The other option is of course you either expand private or public insurance and so the other option is to temporarily expand public insurance which would cover more people and of course be far less expensive but would also piss off the industry. Not only because they aren't going to be receiving those subsidies Cobra but because it would just be difficult to claw back you know expansion of public insurance and it would also demonstrate a way for us to transition away from employer based insurance so democratic leaders are just Kinda stuck between these two forces I think and I think that maybe they're just hoping that all these people who had insurance these are the ones they sort of have to worry about the the people that they think make up their base they. They hope that maybe they'll get their jobs back soon. And then they won't have to deal with this whole problem.

Medicare Kennedy Bill Medicare Bill Paul Bill Senator Sanders Paul Sanders Reps. Chhaya Paul Senate Nancy Pelosi Congress UN Reps United States Dingle Pelosi
"insurance coverage" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Also everybody who still has health insurance coverage we'll see their premiums spike because of the republican tax bill cbo analysis found that repub republican plan will add one point four trillion dollars to the deficit in terms of who it helps send who had hurts well you know exactly who it helps but it will actually represent a tax increase an increase for most people at the lower end of the income spectrum the smaller your income the worst she will get hit by this bill and for the middle class this republican bill will raise your taxes it will raise taxes on most middleclass families now no matter how fast you're trying to vote on this thing those are bad numbers that looks really bad and republicans like the idea of getting something passed because they've pass no legislation since trump has been president but this this thing they're getting past it is quite radically unpopular people really hate it until the republicans have been hoping that new better shinier numbers might come out about this the congressional budget office isn't the only nonpartisan government office that crunch the numbers on things like this for tax bills there's also something called the joint committee on taxation and we've been waiting to hear from them and republicans have been really hoping that they would put out their report on the bill and the joint committee on taxation their report would be better they wanted that committee to to do their analysis in a way that would reflect the republicans greatest hopes their their greatest optimism about all the good things that might happen because of this tax bill they should score without me.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And their insurance coverage for the vehicles that we toe none of uh folks would be l l c a typical ten ninety nine my show that these kind of individuals make sixty seventy thousand dollars but going to your cpa and itemising the as they and all the things that have save per every trip brings you down to not much in in the form of wages um our concern was an and we're doing everything we can as individuals politically too could try and stop this but if if if it would occur said it hasn't um are we can't find anything in the literature that meeting if this is going to affect the taxes that we try to put forth for two thousand seventeen or would this go into effect for the for next year for um that i mean if this were to in fact y you know they keep talking about so you know you're going to get this this christmas present blah blah blah if it's worth two gov facts or the year we would be finished and along with thousands and thousands of others subcontractors who do this type of workers to exhume the corporate young factly though mmos of slow down realize fees rvs get to the dealerships this way this is valid nature all over the country and we also do it up canada and also transport boats for people who want their both from point a to point b this is how it's done and none of these folks would be an llc are incorporated and they would all be subcontractors um i i can indian in fact uh because your ten.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Insurance coverage for millions of americans and drive up their premiums the proposal is being reviewed by the senate finance committee officials in northern california say five people are dead including the gunman in a shooting spree yesterday police say the government tried but failed to enter an elementary school because officials there locked down the building it's npr from kqed news good morning i'm brian watt after the deadly northern california wildfires plenty of claims for disaster relief are legitimate but the number of claims suspected to be fraudulent is higher than officials thought he kiwi these devin katayama reports when kqed checked in with the federal emergency management agency a couple of weeks ago fema estimated there were thousands of false claims being submitted for disaster relief now they say they're a tens of thousands in exact numbers hard to pin down since some claims could just be duplicates but fema officials say there are numerous red flags that may tim believed these are scams fema is warning people a fake mail they calls even in person visits from people claiming to be from fema i'm devin katayama kqed news san francisco supervisors will take at least two more weeks to hash out regulations for the sale of recreational cannabis supervisors were expected to pass some sort of legislation yesterday so the city would be ready when pot sales become legal statewide on january 1st supervisor jeff she had hoped to pass a temporary measure to meet the deadline saying san francisco is risking its leadership in an emerging industry i think it's absolutely crucial that we have slipping up and running on on january for us i do believe that the world is watching us and i do hope that we can get it right supervisors are divided over where recreational cannabis should be sold with some push for limits.

Insurance coverage california brian watt cannabis jeff san francisco senate finance committee npr kqed devin katayama tim supervisor
"insurance coverage" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"The way from prescriptions last year because they could not afford the copay or the painting uh the question your question is how you know how are we getting good value for those dollars i would argue not always there are more generics than ever available on the market uh lowcost generics but people have access to some of those prices have gone up insurance coverage has gone down so would be an what an insurance company coverage for a consumer maybe less than what was even several years ago so people are paying more for the same old thing and i think that's where we get into trouble i'd like to talk a little bit more about some of the more ordinary drags drunks for heartburn or high blood pressure and things like that we know is it appropriate to trying nondrug approaches yes so that was part of what our story it looked we identified twelve condition for which we and not with concern reports but also in agreement with medical standard medical guidelines e nondrug approaches are sometimes your very best bet and we encourage people to try those first and everything from as you point out high blood pressure high cholesterol over active blatter insomnia mile depression even joint pain the research is solid enough and there's enough of it to demonstrate that for example back and joint pain um instead of rushing right away although over the counter medications actually can be very effective but instead of rushing right away to those things other options like yoga stru gentle stretching massage physical therapy have incredible benefits that are actually welldocumented and in a number of studies and that they have much longer term benefits with no downside of a of a drug side effects.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"So are you saying that if you if you just have your own healthcare coverage and you don't have a job they're not going to cover you or only if you are working under the table they're going to deny you i suspect if your hurt on the job at working under the table and you just go ahead and tell them hey i work under the table they're like hey you're compensation plan isn't foreign employees it's for just somebody abdu and whatever and you weren't doing that so you're not covered and then you're going to have to fight them you may or may not get some coverage and you may or may not win but you dot com you're not gonna want the trouble let's go to michael in virginia beach listening to w n i asked maybe if somebody out there knows a thing or two about health coverage while working under the table died appreciate somebody clear in us up on this because i i guess i shouldn't be surprised at insurance would companies would be so awful to people anyway michael go ahead oh yeah my topic but i will just briefly say that well or work under the table provide their own insurance coverage thirdwicket kennedy did and you know how serious uh uh uh uh and the md covered part uh mr uh warren buffett made that clear that terry secretary paid loren income tax an idiot that's not my topic uh but it is related and it we have i've brought this big europe who were mark once before when uh here hosting ear look uh seventy four point seven percent of the national cared is entirely.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on WLOB

"Reduce insurance coverage for millions the cbo analysis of the earlier version of the bill though incomplete due to time constraints confirm arms the bill will have a substantially negative impact on the number of people covered by insurance said senator collins a missing banned or a woman who was last seen sunday was found dead yesterday from a car crash lies a parker aged twenty six was reported missing after she failed to arrive in holland sunday night to meet her exhusband with her two children the children survived the crash and were found in their car seats they were pulled from the car by first responders and are being treated at e m c c 4 minor injuries state police say parker's car went off the road on a curve launched across the median going airborne an overturned several times before landing on its side troopers said all indications show the crash took place on sunday evening ajay woman is dead after losing control of her motorcycle and crashing on main street in livermore falls on monday morning police chief ernest steward said the driver bryanne humans age forty lost control after speeding around a corner near the old benz variety store on main street no other vehicles were involved in the crash and police don't know whether there were any contributing factors other than speed newest in police are investigating an early morning shooting that sent one man to the house but all with a gunshot wound to the abdomen the man who was shot is expected to survive state police have joined the lewis in police investigating shooting.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Health insurance coverage for those of you who decide to retire before the age of sixty five brian is it ever an option let's say that you do retires you said it sixty three and 65 you can get medicare visit ever an option justice say okay i got enough money i'll be self insured it's an option i one i would recommend health insurance costs but a good sign no to that question would be i have a lot of people that come in that are very wealthy they have literally millions and millions of dollars of investible assets and they're not big spenders often and they're just really really concern i don't know if i can retire at age sixty one sixty two or sixty because this healthcare staff and i remind him well you know you have plenty of money to afford whatever the cost of obama care or a group plan or whatever it is it's kind of a drop in the bucket for you in particular so you don't really i have to stress about aeges make sure you have it right and you may be surprised at sticker shock to you know if you do get a serious illness how much those illnesses can cost you if you've got a couple of million dollars i mean that could be gone very very quickly he added to get in my licence pulled if i ever said yeah you don't need you can itself yourself out of a problem that would not be would i would reckon man i make very few recommendations specific recommendations i'll make wind up please have health insurance you out your life absolutely and ryan some parttime jobs you can even opt into health insurance with to be a lot of people want to have their health insurance supplied by an employer so they they go out and get a job and something that's maybe not as you hard is the job they were in not is demanding change of pace something like to do better primarily for the healthcare they don't even care how much their costs they just put so much value on the healthcare savings but i don't want you overestimate that i've had people say well i'm gonna take a job he knows something really minimum wage and i'm going to work all these years citing have healthcare coverage and i.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

Call Your Girlfriend

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

"A spiral of surgeries which is a thing that too many women do with tellvik problems as well that there are less invasive things to try first and it is worth it to try because the less invasive the less likely art have side effects and problems dumber up as well that's good i mean so in terms of way going to physical therapy is there like with my insurance my insurance coverage and major referred me but is it like without new england league everybody's insurance attrition it's something that's like fairly accessible or legions nada it felt like you hazardous to summons lick it a and the operation no though it's not wilt talked about is definitely a growing sealed y you can find pelvic physical therapist in a lot of places there are a couple of panic key websites you can go to to find people who have gone through that two specific training schools that i mentioned before his website if you search for a signed at t t the the ap ta which is the american physical therapy associations section on women's health if you look at their find a p t r p t finder function and then the other main school is called herman and wallace and that way you know you are finding someone who has gone through these specific addiction draining cats in terms of it being covered by insurance generally the way insurance works is medicare sets the rules and medicare does cover this to a large extent a lot of times insurances zillow the physical therapist legally don't require referral from your doctor a lot of time insurance wants a referral from us physician before you go to a physical therapist so you might need to go through that pass anyway but those are kind of the things to keep in mind you can find someone who is you know abundantly trained to do it and you might wanna get a referral even though the physical therapist might not necessarily require eight you so much for joining us this was really awesome i am so happy that we got to talk thank you so much thank you for treating my incontinence and age of my other main issues.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"This is the thom hartmann program is my friends patriots lovers of democracy truth and justice believers in peace freedom and the um american way arm and you're with you the police in in cobb county georgia i used to live in cobb county church we lived in marietta for five or six years and we lived in roswell for five or six years and uh it was the ice suburban atlanta suburban experience uh it was also newt gingrich's district and it was cata no rednecks central and apparently one of the police officers there i you know ah won't we'll we'll give this guy cut him a little and assume that he met a joke but it's a it's the kind of joke that really uh demonstrates white privilege if nothing else white cop oh we don't have we don't have the video yet okay i'm gonna i'm gonna come back to this one that are a little bit let me let me start oh you're something else down in texas the hurricane is ongoing and uh little surprise if you're listening to us right now in texas in your thinking that you need to file an insurance claim or the damage to your home assuming that your insurance coverage this most people down there do not have flooded insurance typically flood insurance it's something that people live by rivers were oceans get um andrew a lot of these people who are wiped out in texas right now are living in areas that have not flooded before haven't fluttering i mean this is a 500year flood right so which means that in any given year the odds are one of five hundred that it'll happen but you know it's the third 500year flood in the last three years i should tell you something global warming is changing the nature of our storms there's more water in the atmosphere and when it comes out it comes out faster at makes wins more fierce added it makes rains more destructive but back to texas.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on WRVA

"A big deal we've we've seen unfortunately big nest egg saved up for retirement eaten away at sixty seven the eighty thousand a year because of longterm carry there goes the all the great planning we did can suddenly disappear in a few years and that's sad right right and so the bottom line is the insurance coverage that you need is out there you do need to get an insurance tune up i guess taking a look at everything that you have or maybe don't have so give us a call at nine one nine eight five six 1968 and talking that longterm care greg i dealt with the situation recently where the white qualified for the life insurance ice longtime camp at the husband denton and so we looked at and annuity in a situation where if he turned on income and the um he goes into a facility that income doubles so you know there's all kinds of ways to to take care of it so that was built in to just two regular traditional annuity rife here yeah and the that's right there are clever people out there that have develop strategies and a lot of these strategies came from reality the lord something real happened to certain clientele and and the companies get together in their think tank and they go what can we create that would fit that lead so there's a lot of things that were created that way and maybe you feel like you have a financial need and there's no hope but but you you don't know that and to you ask my and one of the things wanda in bo nicholson our other young advisor and i do we we call it a radar we always have our radar approach looking for good investments different kinds of investment we're always looking for insurance annuities unique ideas for instance we're going to a conference next week an annual coffers so we're gonna spend three days hearing speakers learning.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Health insurance coverage and health what the recent evidence tells us a sounding board article by benjamin summers from the harvard t h chan school of public health boston the national debate over the affordable care act has involved substantial discussion about what effects if any insurance coverage has on health and mortality the prospect that the laws replacement might lead to millions of americans losing coverage has brought this empirical question into sharp focus for instance politicians have recently argued that the number of people with health insurance is not a useful policy metric and that no one dies from a lack of access to health care however assessing the impact of insurance coverage on health is complex health effects may take a long time to appear can vary according to insurance benefit design and are often clouded by confounding factors nonetheless over the past decade highquality studies have shed light on the effects of coverage on care and health these authors review and synthesize this evidence focusing on the most rigorous studies from the past decade the body of evidence indicates that coverage expansions significantly increase patients access to care and use of preventive care primary care chronic illness treatment medications and surgery these increases appear to produce significant multifaceted and nuanced benefits to health the data also suggest that policies that reduce coverage will produce significant harm to health particularly among people with lower incomes and chronic conditions supporting women's autonomy in prenatal testing a perspective article by josephine johnston from the hastings center garrison new york.

Health insurance coverage benjamin summers insurance coverage health insurance josephine johnston new york harvard t h chan school of pub hastings center
"insurance coverage" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"The the student loans attracted a firm as long as i could and i just didn't have any extra money so if i got sick i kinda like you know i grinded it out and then finally when i had a i was starting to get some work in my third 30s then i got my insurance but you're a union guys you've had have you had insurance the whole your whole working life uh no i i was thirty five equal even got insurance myself goes that's when i started working for the union yeah and it which basically insurance coverage you know i couldn't afford looked crisis per family plan i couldn't afford that then either yeah and when i grew up i was like i was like yeah okay ibom's sick the doctor i kept telling me why are you come here when you all over being sick because you're better now we you know either you guys do though don they waited men wait they wait and it's fatal and then they go to the doctor right exactly if darcheville beaten you go to the doctor if you will allow yeah but also it sounds like you like of look you like all the major provisions of obamacare so should we just leave alone are you saying like forget about this repeal and replace stuff not really because one's going to say well we want our thing you want your thing and let's try and agree on the basics and then we can give me two of major cost which is a tax you can't duck additives either you really get it or you find yourself would in fact sbrocchi end of the year because you didn't we wanna get ya nfl sprayer you know if you don't want insurance you shouldn't be forced to cake with somebody else's insurance and because if you're not going to the doctor why would you want to pay the doc you said that just before nijad wowed as right on the money yeah not abate although don't mind helping the people who can't afford it that's great because you have to that's what we have what we help one another we to one another and.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"I mean you could say that yes images to talk about that case because it it's kind of bizarre an incredible really this is not just any cool this is the supreme court and it was a landmark ruling i mean the the actual quote was fatty split in the end it was five for the decision but basically yes the the christine owners of hope it'll be led by the president steve grain basically objected to having to pay health insurance the included basically a family planning or contraception included in that and the colt the supreme court ruled in the fiber basically saying that family owned corporations don't have to pay for insurance coverage that includes a contraception on the affordable care act it was a huge this is not the time because of cement the inner certain companies got our delegation to pay for health insurance from so i'm oversee this company back in the limelight one as you said before the first time standing for its principles now being exposed perhaps as as having slightly shadia a principles they're obviously the company itself releasing a statement saying that it complied and gone along with the investigations throughout the whole process oversee had no knowledge of these artifacts being a over rocky origin so wasn't just the owners would just collecting them i mean i know a lot of them were religious artifacts role bibles and things are they were they just collect kingdom because of that.

steve grain health insurance insurance coverage president
"insurance coverage" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on Trumpcast

"I think really uh looking at what people were pushing for back then looking at an expansion of community health our word i click on the dow hit with obamacare as well as part is still in the process of of being implemented expanded a rural health centers expanded uh opportunity for health export for other people people in other health professions who are physicians are safer nurses on getting more physicians out into the country out into black communities these are all things that has to happen in addition to whatever health policy reform at in insurance coverage humbling pylon and they also have to fix insurance coverage in a i don't think people without insurance insee texas are really care about what you call thing uh yeah they they they need coverage and i think the policy analysis of whatever comes next will be judged should be judged on whether it allows those people access and that i think remains to be seen on everything me nuts that they can a gets to miss i tell you this moving away a little bit away with the healthy competition that can give to this idea about policy thinking that i've been tossing in my head for some time which is you know people get in these these debates and have especially among people in last since the election you know resources class blah blah blah and in in my head it seems like the proper starting place for making a policy of political analysis is dry dennis five at uber people who you think are sort of a worse afflicted by society's cross went and then say to yourself what can we do to ameliorate their problems and so if it's you know lowincome black women in the role south what can we do to make their lives better and.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Our health insurance coverage ever trunk in a row critical our hey sydney that's a great question i my name's al the that that certainly something that has been floated and it's something that the legislature could do so so the legislature i believe in i'm not a lawyer but they probably could just disband the uh the small group market probably be could not the large group market i i'd have to look at that the the issue though is is not an issue of public policy it's an issue of politics and there are there are uh employers out there the would hesitate they would oppose at now there are some that would love it and and we we solid in two thousand fifteen there was seven thousand small groups in maryland just with care i were the small employer made the decision to disband that small employer group and send they're twenty one thousand employees want to the exchange so they could take advantage of subsidies and that type of thing however a back then the individual rates were actually lower than the small group rates until now we've we've see the the result but there are employers that of like benefits because it it gives them the ability to attract and retain employees if uh if they could not do that in maryland.

health insurance coverage sydney maryland
"insurance coverage" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on WCTC

"Because they know they're the winners with this bill obamacare did exactly nothing putra put off of healthcare which is where the real sri hardcore and the house bill is you know i analyzed you call it might an yeah i actually move were were too hard to believe but actually true senate attempt by characterized it will do the same the pommel insurance coverage off and because off corner tra about why you thought from drug stop and hospital fact cope one two three percent insurance industry loved to to so they're they're very significant differences between the two go and with obamacare but at the end of the day for what offering a truth accorded been made you're not getting a new food you're getting a pack put on here and there to keep the system going as we seemed to want it to be so the the the effort was undertaken this way because mcconnell believes that you can't do the real reform in this reconciliation processes that is that what he's claiming or i'm i'm trying to follow why it is that noone wants to do the things that are obviously going to bring down the cost of of healthcare except that they probably get a lot of money from insurance companies pharmaceutical companies and i don't want to think poorly about everybody here but it seems like this is kind of obvious at this point how you get this done i know this is exactly right it's all about money about how corrupt or system oh there's there's a a remember reading when i was younger coming called the iron rule of and who were even a hutu from collapsing player power players who institution won't change their behaviors to provide and that's really what were thing now of the pharma industry gives huge amounts of money the insurance through three huge amounts of money to look at the scheduled for these gentlemen are and i say gentleman because as i com the senate committed in timi women on that committee prepped would make a lot of difference but and who on their their work guttural insurance through the farm industry they're not putting together anyone who think.

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"insurance coverage" Discussed on The Strong Stance

The Strong Stance

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"insurance coverage" Discussed on The Strong Stance

"Where does i think i wasn't that because it is important it's important to take a look at why we are where we are when you take a when you look at something like 14 million people losing their insurance fight lewis truly next year literally that's jeff next year so uh i i and we have to take a look at why that's happening there oh i'm sorry sleep go ahead oh no i was i was just like to dovetail them on what you were saying i think what's what's interesting you said something about that any time at that mortality rate because at that's never the number that you want to see i think that not only for me is beyond just quote unquote the right thing to do in the best thing to do for society and the people that live in it with it it's the elderly or or or anybody that falls into that realm of falling off of the insurance coverage table is if you don't care enough about other people if you own we care about yourself let's let's just say that that's how you want to live your life fine then why don't you think about itself because guess what's going to happen to you once all these people are covered when folks can't get coverage for their health care and studies have shown this and the number show this that eventually you just show up in an emergency room whether you've got coverage or not and somebody's going to pay for that somebody's gonna pay the hospital eat bill well but not only that but it eventually gets passed on right so all of us right is icty peynado's prices and so it's like why are you going to risk if you really love your own money so much then why don't you protect it and make sure more people have an actual adequate coverage so that you're not in the long run all of us in the long run aren't paying these bills because taxes is going to be nothing in comparison to what you probably end up paying now that is only if you wanna think just about you because personally i'm just like i don't want to live in a world.

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