17 Burst results for "Institute Of Politics"

"institute politics" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

06:25 min | 3 weeks ago

"institute politics" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"The governor still shutdown the restaurants. I don't know what to even say it's so insane an asinine and lacks any foundation in science. It's time for people to stop listening. I truly believe that people should come up one point for rides in the streets but business owners i believe should not listen to orders and directives this because they make no sense and i help anybody and everybody. The same time stops doing it. Guess what there's nothing that they can do. That's my opinion that takes to another point here. Okay good news. There's a vaccine right great vaccines in the us and others in different parts of the world right to vaccine ones. By fis one by madonna right and people are getting vaccinated but of course some of the things that are happening now. In the united states are out of control people now are being vaccinated not based on like cruise most susceptible to disease. Who's going to die. Older people in my opinion to be getting vaccinated first older people. Frontline healthcare workers people who really are risk. They're trying to institute politics and racial bias. Certain races should get this more. Because they're underprivileged the introducing race into the equation. Here not who needs it most and i just don't get it to me like it's just. Some things are so stupid and so obvious that when you hear them they just infuriate. You have to believe that most people that are listening to this. You're infuriated by what you're reading a newspaper day and what you're reading online. You must be infuriated right. You're hearing about a new stimulus bill. That was passed nine hundred billion dollars so the average taxpayer gets what six hundred bucks. Maybe a few hundred more on employment and then some extra money if few hundred child right and yet we hear about some numbers here. This is just a couple of moments my step together right you ready for this insanity to this in this same bill. The sudan is getting one hundred and thirty seven hundred million to sedan a hundred and thirty five million for burma a hundred thirty million to nepal our people getting six hundred dollars a one time check and another six hundred thousand. You ever tell so. We get six hundred of the taxpayers fund. This we get six hundred bucks. And i love you in the policy but hey yo fair's fair so sudan. Get seven hundred. Million to powell gets one thirty and burma gets one hundred. Thirty five million and like the kennedy center for performing arts. Got another ten twenty million. They're actually t museums right now. A little pet projects in washington dc for the cultural ought like how is this. How is this possible. How was allowed to happen. How do all politicians do this and think that it's okay. Hey i guess the problem is that we are what is the recourse what recourse do we really have is difficult to recall someone and vote them out. That's a slow cycle. So i guess the politicians feel safe like gavin newsom year. There's a massive power movement right now to recall him right. That people want him to be recalled. They want to lose his job as the governor. I think he's done that crappy job and managing the whole virus situation. They want him out and they want to recall them. But that's again a slow process like a hail. Mary pass right. What can be done. Something is fundamentally wrong when we the taxpayers are getting six hundred bucks. Am i getting the. That's okay by the way. Because i'm over the income bracket but you get six hundred dollars if you have the child. Eleven weeks of bonus unemployment three hundred per week and the foreign governments are getting seven hundred million one thirty five and wonders. How fuck is that possible. How was that justified. Why are they doing that. I don't know because we have so much extra money. We have a budget deficit in the trillions and twenty trillion dollar budget deficits not the us swimming in money. The us is dead broken bankrupt. But if you look at the balance sheet of the us only reason we're able to get away with it. It's because we are the world's reserve currency like the best of the bad currencies so because we can keep printing money. We get away with this ridiculous fiscal responsibility now in this latest. Bill is also a renewed. Ppp program protection plan. Which i think is great right and for me. It really helped me with. That's what business owners get grants to keep your employers employees working right and you know i took that and hired a lot of people and that's a great thing as long as it goes to small companies but again watch what happened last time when the ppp's came out we've got most of the money. Large companies the biggest companies. Who didn't need it. And the banks prioritize their biggest clients that people had the ability to borrow money and get money elsewhere. It didn't need the money they would want us to cut the bulk of the money. And the little guy which bali on one of them independent business owner we got. But i was like in the third round. The people didn't need it. got it. i there's something so wrong with the government. There's something so wrong right now. I know you feel it whether you're on the left or the right. you have to be feeling what. I'm feeling that there's something there's a glitch in the matrix and this is not the way it's supposed to be. I'm so i start to wonder like is a two party system really workable. Is that the problem. I wonder because what's happening right now. Is that you know this actual package this package. Is i think what six or seven months late. why is it late. it's late. Because nancy pelosi the head of the speaker of the house she on purpose and and she said this out loud by the way she's not denying it. Oh i we delay this because we want trump to look bad so all of the people three hundred million plus people were held hostage. Because nancy pelosi wanted to make trump look bed. So if you're a democrat you feel good about that was right..

kennedy center for performing burma sudan us fis madonna gavin newsom nepal powell dc washington Mary swimming ppp Bill bali nancy pelosi
"institute politics" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:54 min | Last month

"institute politics" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"8 P.m. on the presidency, a virtual tour of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, located in Simi Valley, California. Exploring the American story Watch American history TV this weekend. On C SPAN three. Up next retired Admiral William McRaven, who was U S special operations commander. Command there under the Obama administration, discussing his life and career in the military, the war in Iraq and what he thinks of President Donald Trump. This was recorded on November 13th and the moderator is former Obama senior adviser and University of Chicago Institute politics director David Axelrod. Iran's just short of an hour. Admiral. Great to see you again. We are two days after Veterans Day and that was the occasion for for this event. There are plenty of public Issues right now that our current that I want to ask you about what I want to defer that for a moment and just talk about service itself, and I want to start by talking about how you came by service because you came by it. Naturally. You grew up in a family of service. Tell me about your Ad who was quite an interesting person. That's the first David Thanks for extending the invitation to join you here today. This is this is terrific. I certainly enjoy spending time with with you and the students of the I O P s. Oh, yeah, You're right. I kind of came by it. Naturally, my father Was a World war. Two fighter pilot flew Spitfires actually, which was a British airplane because of the time when we entered the war, the Americans didn't have a plan that could take on the German Messerschmitt. So the Brits alone the Spitfires and Dad flew that for about two years during the war, But my grandfather had also served in World War one and he served in World War two. He was an army surgeon. I remember my dad. Kind of later in life. A Zay was getting ready to join the service. He said. You know, I remember what got me in the service. It was when I was a young boy. I saw the soldiers heading off the France and World War One board the trains in his small town. He said. There was such a sense of pride and there was such a sense of duty and patriotism that it was really infectious. And that is really in addition, obviously watching his father that really kind of spurred him to join the military, and then I grew up is as an air Force brat and course loved my time in in the military families and just seeing the remarkable Dedication of not only the military members, but their families had ahead is an air Force brat end up in the Navy seals. Well, that could crush them. So I have thought about flying. And and my dad. Having better fighter pilot was kind of nudging me in that direction. But interestingly enough, I think it was my close to my senior year in high school. My sister was dating an army Green beret. And of course, this was after the movie with John Wayne had come out the green Berets and I had this fascination with the green Berets. There was young army captain came to pick her up for a date. And she was as usual kind of late s O. I was entertaining young captain. He said. What do you get ready to do? And I said, Well, you know, I think I'm gonna join the Navy. I've got a scholarship ROTC scholarship, and he said, Well, then you better become a Navy seal. You know, back in this was 1973. I've never heard of Navy seals. Frankly, nobody had heard maybe seals back in that point time, But here you had an Army Green beret. Telling me to be a Navy seal. And that really is kind of what headed me and that that trajectory and you spent 37 years in the seals. You can explain the bullfrog, the bullfrog title and special operations became more and more significant. Over telling you literally wrote the book on it. Why has special operations become such an important part of defense were also when you when you look back over the kind of a history the modern day history of special operations, Of course, we way had a little bit of a heyday during World War two. You saw these remarkable operations done by all the services on including U. S forces under both the O. S S, which was the predecessor to the CIA. Then, of course, we had Navy frogman during World War two and we had Army special operations and and then after World War two, it it kind of weighing a little bit picked up a little bit in Korea. But then in Vietnam, the Navy seals came about and they were. They were born from the underwater demolition teams, and they really earned this remarkable reputation kind of fighting the insurgency in in Vietnam. But then again after Vietnam and this tends to happen after major wars, the reliance or the expectation that we're going to need special operations again kind of declines, which you did on then, when we have the disaster of desert one, the country did kind of a reassessment of Do we really need special operations? And the answer was, Of course we need them and now we need to professionalize them. And Congress is the one that put in place the U. S Special Operations Command. And then we really began to institutionalize professionalized special operations And by the time 9 11 came along, frankly, we were bar none. The finest special operations force in the world. Now the question becomes. Why do you need them? I'm always quick to point out the folks Look special operations have a unique niche. They're not going to stop the North Koreans from coming south. They're not going to be able to keep the Straits of Hormuz open. They're not going to be able to stop the Chinese from invading Taiwan. But the things we do we do exceedingly well. We're very surgical. We can get into a country work with our allies in a way that sometimes larger battalions can't And then, of course you saw after 9 11 the hunt for terrorists. The insurgents fight in Iraq and Afghanistan. Really? Those were kind of right in our wheelhouse s o. The force has grown tremendously over the last 20 years on death. Think done a remarkable job. We ask you about the military generally way tend to draw from a rather small pool of Americans. Right now there's no draft. When your dad enlisted, Uh, all of America was in that war, both the mostly men who are fighting on everyone else who was pitching in and some other way. Um, you know, a student wrote to me as I was preparing for this and asked Asked me to ask you, Um about why there isn't more diversity in the upper echelons of the military. And does that have to do with Disparities in the American education system. That's one question and another is just generally. What does it mean for the country that such a small pool of people carry such a large burden? You know, there's lots unpacking that question. So let me kind of hit the diversity issue first. Yeah, I think we are continuing to make progress in terms of diversity in the United States military But, you know, you know we were a segregated military until 1947 1948 when? When Truman in this Created the integration and then then you began to see the rise of African Americans in firms of being a more prominent positions, but you still had the challenges of the civil rights error and Jim Crow. When I came in in 1977. There was a lot of racial tension in the military on down early on, and I'm not, I think was probably 1962. The actual term affirmative action came about, but I didn't really see it until you know the 80 sometimes and you would sit on promotion boards and the military understood we needed to increase our diversity. So we really had a very aggressive affirmative action program, and when an officer's record would come up, it would say, minority or female, and we had a quota. And first, there was a little bit of Ah, reluctance to approach it this way, But what we found was it's not that we didn't have great talent in the diverse pool, but we weren't giving them the opportunity. So once we were able to kind of prime the pump by putting great people, talented people in positions of responsibility. Then after a while, we realized we no longer needed to kind of a single out the minorities because we have built a deep bench. They were beginning to rise and promise..

Navy David Axelrod Iraq U. S Special Operations Comman Vietnam Admiral William McRaven green Berets Ronald Reagan Presidential Lib Iran Obama Donald Trump California Obama administration Straits of Hormuz commander senior adviser
"institute politics" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"institute politics" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Yes so you kind of you kind of said okay. Science can be fun and you can get excited about science. And that's that's something it's not nothing it's a and science to people that are that are upside academia in other domains appeared boring and nonsensical even at times. And the fact that you have someone in front of you who lives. Is this This Activity which is which can be frustrating. A very singing frustrating at times but leaves it with excitement and the for sure that that massive Asif that must've been very inspiring. Yeah and for my current supervise up I would say When inspires me the most about her is actually her Lucia style? He 'cause she is a very very kind person but she is definitely not a pushover. That sense yes. She's a very very kind person. One one thing that was actually my most successful tweet about that you said to me was always trump as the best version of yourself that is available to you on each particular day. So She does not get upset when some things don't work as well when sometimes I'm really really tired of stuff like that which happens But she is really understanding and I realized that one of the most important things in terms of Pushing your employees I guess at he's from my point of view is loyalty because she has such a kind person that even if I hated my project and so on and even if everything think were would be super difficult I would still continue to work on. Its because I also also hope project so I wanted to be good so Yet and I think that's people blonder estimates the value of loyalty intense of achieving goals. Anything kind of all the people who believe more in the rat race diaper reality Yeah they they I think they have. They probably wouldn't put loyalty in their in their equation. But I read that. It's it's something very important in enriching and that kind of creates a bond that's stronger than than just. Hey your employer your employees or something like that but one of the things that that This kind of brought to my mind is in Europe in Switzerland and Germany as a Woman in science How do you feel that? The status of women beaten at your institute or in university. How easy is it or how hard is it? How easy or how hard does your Supervisor have it in inner institutes and the also the the follow question is our girls that want to get into science care how much successor they have in in in in getting into the to the low main In your experience So for my supervisor in particular I think she has it quite easy because everyone likes us. Everyone wants to collaborate with hub So she also just had a big Career jump and became like also responsible for something. Nothing else again. I'm not sure how much I can give away about this. But I think part of it was also bad. She just has a lot of empathy and also has has an understanding of politics like Institute politics and so on so I think in that sense it is well. I don't know how difficult it was. Faw Aw Ha I think there has certainly some difficulties but I think she does it really well so I'm curious whether things are getting better and better with time and we we're in two thousand twenty. I hope they are and And I wanted to get your your poll. The pulse of the State of the recently my institute has been hiring hiring There were lots of open positions of and two or three went to woman Also I was as part of the hiring process because that odd different comedy so that's also PhD Student Post there's a Pi comedy. And then there's the actual comedy and everyone is kind of giving Advice I have seen a bit behind the scenes and what I know. Is that when a tie between a man and a woman then the woman will usually get the to support gender equality so right now in Switzerland I guess it is a good time to be a woman in science Yes in terms of is difficult for me to say because Still at a PhD student and Post level that a lot lot of women and it suddenly usually gets a lot less when it comes to professor nevels level. And I'm not there yet so far I didn't and feel like health bank toy I wouldn't know how a distant future I cannot really comment on that from personal experience but right now like I said I didn't feel like a tall by being a woman would just what you mentioned about Having a having a kind of a mechanism to tip the scales a little bit and and bring balances is just a great thing. If it's done by institution it's a good thing now you just said something that piqued my interest and we're almost getting to the points of the interview but which was Europe part in committee that that Has Something has some say in the hiring process process in your institute. Is that something that all the students do or something that you yourself Got Into somehow theory everyone can do it. Bats lodged in practice. Most people think they don't really have much say it is true. We don't have much say because of the end and the hiring process there are so many factors so many different different factors that not even the comedy has as much say as we think. It is really complicated though because Usually the committee then then give their favorite candidates to the university and other universities as well no but all experts at reasons. This is not a good match so I joined it more for the experience to read some Sivvy's of Some applicants and see how people will alter experience a bit like the Ten pint of someone who is interviewing because so five only been interviewed and I realize there's some people who have horrible To not do that. A one person for instance. That's what she was opposed dog and she was applying for walk position as a tenure track professor something like that and when we asked her what is a weakness what she doesn't like her response was. I don't like it when people at other nick and I feel this is like the worst thing if you want to work in an environment with very ambitious people so this was something for me. I wouldn't say this but yeah I wouldn't say there's any way but yeah. It was interesting to see the hiring process from the other perspective back very cool and and I think it's very very very good initiative because you're gonNA YOU'RE GONNA learn a lot and you probably already are like you're like you're mentioning and For sure now whenever when will have to interview beats for academia outside academia. You'll have this. You'll have all this baggage and oldest oldest learning. This is this is a very good very good takeaway from this for the listeners. Out there is she can think parts in In the different institutional mechanisms of wherever. You're you're setting where students are supposed to take part in. Do because you'll meet people. There's there's there's a network the networking aspect but also you know you learn the ropes of something. That's a little bit outside of what you do on the bench every day. So I but really Kudos for you to do this apart from all of the things that you already. I think I think it's a an example. People should follow definitely.

Europe Switzerland professor Supervisor Asif PhD Student nick Germany
"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"He can do it for about a week and then the real deal is gonna come out. What are you into for the midterm elections. I think. I don't wanna be Queen conventional wisdom, but I, I think probably Democrats will take the house. I think in the Senate. Republicans will perhaps I think I think they will keep the Senate. Maybe even add some seats that as you know, the map was historically good for Republicans, so you could look at it as a lost. The Senate mouth, the Senate mountain house map is is, is it turns out in the Europe Trump not particularly good for Republicans, especially after all these retirement? Yes. Specifically, the Senate map is very friendly, so you could look at it as a blown opportunity to pick up a bunch of sleaze seats, which is it is all the midterms are tough. So I think they'll likely be okay there partly because I do think that people underestimate the extent to which people on the other side of the Cavanaugh issue were galvanized by how that went. Because the fact is they're diminishing returns for Seattle for Democrats at the point. You can only go up so far, whereas Republicans just have to find parody. Right? And so I think they came closer and that'll play better in states versus these little these particularly Trump carried and you've got four or five senators who are in states carry by. By substantial margins, what. The one question I think that is not entirely clear whether that affect would have happened anyway, whether the states will go native at the end, which is generally what com right happens and you're absolutely right that the enthusiasm gap is needs to be closed for Republicans to do well. But the fact is one of the reasons Republicans do well in mid midterms as Democrats, ten generally low right in mid. So if Democrats are now voting at the same level as Republicans that creates some issues for them. So let's just say, plays out the way you suggest it will and I agree with you, right? That's the likely outcome. What's the next two years going to be like. Oh, Lord, if I know exhausting. Well, I think that's a given. I mean, these last two years haven't been day day at the beach in that regard. And that to me is sort of the defining feeling and look. I know that there are plenty of people who support Trump who are exhilerated by the way he tweaks pay people in the way he messes with people in the way that, but there is a, there's a substantial number of people in this country who are exhausted by the the turn of everything. And I think part of that is the symbiotic relationship of twenty four hour news cycle in from. There's reason he got one of two billion dollars of yearned media. He's genius. Yeah. So we kind of again, everybody gets spun up every stories in eleven. No story can possibly be a five out of ten here. They all have to be an eleven, and I think it just wears on people and a lot of people, even Frank. Even people who are supportive of the president sort of tune out at some point and pick up here and there what's going on. And I don't know what that means for society. I find that I have to take very serious breaks from it, and I have my family to hang out with and and separate by going to children's museum or something. But but yeah, I. I don't mean to give you zero predictions, but that that strikes me as what animates the Trump era for me almost more than anything else is the sort of frantic pace of everything. Well, it's going to be interesting that we can be sure because as soon as the curtain rings down on campaign two thousand eighteen campaign two thousand twenty will be in full swing and off to the rest for the weary weary voter, but but it'll be interesting really. Well, Mary Katharine ham. Thank you so much. You haven't been here at the institute politics. We didn't get to the issue of diversity of opinion on campus, but we believe in it here and and you are adding to the discussion and we appreciate thank you so much. I appreciate you guys doing awesome job of that. Outside of me. Thank you for listening to the ax files part of the CNN podcast network for more episodes of the x files subscribe on apple, podcasts, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app from our programming from the university of Chicago institute of politics, visit politics, dot EU, Chicago dot EDU..

Trump Democrats Senate Senate mountain house Mary Katharine ham Seattle Europe Cavanaugh university of Chicago institut CNN Chicago president Frank apple two years two billion dollars twenty four hour
"institute politics" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Three things. I think you need to know. You see this story even talked about it Nancy Pelosi. You wanna talk about keeping it classy? This is what happens if Democrats win. If you choose to not vote for Mick Sally because you just don't like her, and I get it. But you gotta vote for because if cinema gets in there, we're in trouble. And when it comes to the house, we gotta gotta keep the house. Nancy Pelosi was at Harvard boy, she called the the the wall ready for this. She called the wall the worst way to protect the border the worst way to protect the border. By the way, she is a bowl of expertise. Let's put it that way. Maybe we can find the sound bite. She actually said. She actually said one of the best ways to protect the border is to cut the grass. Remember that? Do you remember that? Yes. I do. We gotta find that. One literally cutting the grass could be a great way because then you could see people, and I mean, she actually said that mowing the grass is a great way. But a wall is stupid. Wall is dumb, cutting the grass is smarts. We'll get that sound bite Ryan's on the hunt. We have so many Polisi soundbites. They're all classic. They all they all are good. They all are good five white guys. Yup. We have it all not the burger place. Right. But she tried to make that joke, which is which is even better. So anyway. She said, she also said the only reason maybe one of the reason Trump wants the border border is his manhood. She literally said that. It happens to be like a manhood issue for the president building a wall. And I'm not interested in that said during a discussion Harvard Kennedy School of institute politics us Arbor Kennedy School in politics. It's a manhood issue manhood. Yeah. There you go. This is Nancy Pelosi on border security. Here we go. But again, let's sit down and talk this through.

Nancy Pelosi Democrats Wall Harvard Kennedy School of inst Mick Sally Trump Arbor Kennedy School Ryan president
"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"I'll put it that remember you, you were a kid, but the race for that elected Mitch McConnell to the Senate. He knew Roger Ailes. Did these bloodhound commercials, where's d Huddleston? That's McConnell and bloodhounds looking all a. For because he had missed some right? Miss votes. Yeah, Roger, Ailes specialty was making someone less someone else less electable. Yeah. Doug Bailey's specialty was to make you more electable and more likable. Probably the most famous race in a Senate contest, maybe in Illinois would be what he did for Chuck Percy. And Chuck Percy to this day was just actually I had flashbacks of it because the current governor of Illinois, he essentially tried the Chuck Percy approach, which is this idea, but may occur well, the may help at yes. And the first time that a candidate Sammy eight. I made a mistake. I let you down worked in it. It did work, but you know what? In eighty four hired Rodger ales Percy goes from Doug Bailey and seventy eight because the party had shifted and he thought he needed to shift to. I, I know this because I ran the campaign for Paul Simon against Percy, and that was when I first met Roger Ailes when we go shooting debates, but. But what it raises the question of this transformation, the Republican party, Doug Bailey's Republican party doesn't exist anymore. And there probably are Doug Bailey Republicans out there among voters, but there yet because of the nature of our politics today, you cannot be what Chuck Percy was, what. A whole series of Republicans Milkin Milliken and Michigan and for people understand Bailey. What's great about Doug is this was who he was his whole life. Do you know as a college graduate student toughs he helped run the writing campaign in the sixty four New Hampshire. Primary that got was either six or sixty four the New Hampshire primary where the ambassador to the Vietnam? Yes, Henry. Wins and Bailey. Doug as basically a graduate student at tufts. Ran that campaign I got to win after he passed away his, his son invited me over to go through some political stuff to see. And I had no idea and he had all these clips up to clips. And it was just the point was he realized that the time the party was going off either too far to the progressive in or two part two of the modern and too far the conservative. But he was always about sort of disruption through voters, disruption through small deed democracy and what I, that's who sort of I learned a love politics from in some ways, sort of an extension of my father, but also the fact that he never changed who he was. He was pushing for sort of this consensus based politics his whole his whole life. Now, I'm curious question back at you because it's a question and I'm gonna ask both. You and we're going to be doing that with Karl rove is. Because I saw Mark mar presented this to me, my deputy, my sort of partner and fellow at the institute politics versus Chicago. And he had been doing basically, he's been NBC longer than I have..

Doug Bailey Chuck Percy Roger Ailes Mitch McConnell Republican party Rodger ales Percy Senate graduate student Karl rove Huddleston Doug New Hampshire Illinois Sammy Milkin Milliken Mark mar Paul Simon Chicago tufts Henry
"institute politics" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Today's show is brought to you by ibm by the end of this podcast nearly ten thousand new mao wear variants will have launched now ai can help protect your data from threats wherever it lives with ibm security let's put smart to work learn more at ibm dot com slash smart i'm carissa sure executive editor of recode you may know me as the general in charge of the militia etheridge in my spare time i talked tech and you're listening to rico decode podcast about tech media's key players beguiled and how they're changing the world we live in today in the red chair is chris cure cough a former partner at the pentagon silicon valley office d i u x which stands for defense innovation unit experimental what an aim it funds private companies in exchange for commercial products that can solve national defense problems he's also visiting technologist and harvard university's institute politics chris welcome to rico decode thank you so when i met you you were working for ash carter that correct was explained that this dui x because i think it's really interesting there's the cia has an innovation unit here all kinds of government agencies do but ashes a real taika file you have to give him credit his vision so beca events secretary under president obama you've been in two thousand one he was merely professor carter kennedy school government he wrote an article that said the rated which commercial are india's growing is quickly going to surpass what the federal government that defense foreign spence are in d and so you know less than generation from now the defense department is going to have a real problem it's going to be out of touch unless it pivots to private are in d and so he he wrote that article in two thousand one of course fast four in twenty fifteen he becomes secretary of defense one of his first initiatives is essentially making that pivot habit right so that's where myself and three other founding partners get launched out here to silicon valley so you got it because we had ashland a show when he was defense secretary was a great show and he had some really interesting stances on a lot of things encryption he weighs with president obama on that issue i'll kinds of shoes but wh how did you get to do that and.

executive editor etheridge partner ash carter cia secretary president obama india ibm harvard university rico silicon valley
"institute politics" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"To debts good you welcome not be back from a little school probably vacation probably paul don't put people they sit on death row mad they're they're in prison anyway so they wanna do um uh life without parole which is the same thing they have assist it just it's just was some people that are going to do it it's just a little bit of a second thing to think about before you go shoot a police officer if that's what you intend to do hey but paul all you could tell them worked up this morning i like that you've got a lot of energy well they look at the front page of us some of these stories a st paul's mean really uh the the teacher had history violations of faculty student boundaries what are they gonna learn that loses academic garbling gouka just say faculty members and not supposed to mess around with students had simply it's illegal i don't disagree with you on that and listen to send between saint paul's in exeter we've had a lot of headlines over the last couple of years and it is very troubling but let me try to quickly steer this this conversation one other way quickly we always talk about the race for the white house in the cancer is the place to come if you're thinking about running we talked mostly about democrat now because we have a republican president donald trump but dot jeff flake be retiring senator from arizona is coming our way in about two weeks i'll be speaking at the new hampshire instituted politics at cnn's lemon uh he's somebody who i you know we're talking with john case it was coming up here in april jeff flake is another person no love lost between him and donald trump he's another person who you know is considering a primary challenge which right now would be a very tall order but he's considering it and a whole picks resigning at the white house in president clashing again with jeff sessions it's like a wwe ya and uh some big you know and the president's uh and it was carried live on all the cable news network this conversation with senators and members of the house about uh guncontrol ah and changing the gun laws also new story yet they want a huge dave news down in washington d c c one day back stein he's back from the slopes in all the.

officer saint paul exeter donald trump senator arizona new hampshire cnn jeff flake white house president john wwe dave two weeks one day
"institute politics" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Wall street diamond bloomberg's paul gordon has details from frankfurt pc these latest governing council meetings a relatively quantum fan but that mass some important divisions and it'll be interesting to see how they come through in the account policymakers are increasingly pushing for a discussion on how to tweak their language to signal that the end of the bomb buying program is closer president draghi has so far being unwilling to have that talk language on how long interest rates will stay low is also a hot topic for sauna saying they'll stay where they are until well past at the end of acid purchases is simply too vague in frankfurt paul golden bloomberg daybreak and a uk the economy expanded less than previously estimated enough fourth quarter gross domestic product rose fourtenths of a percent compared with an initial estimate of five tenths of upper said consumers and businesses absorbed faster price increases in the period here in the us ray delios sees a seventy percent chance of a recession in the next two and a half years the founder of bridgewater associates the world's largest hedge fund made the comments at the harvard county schools institute politics in cambridge i think we're at a pre bubble stage that could go into a bubble stage that then could be followed by a bus face and so that in that west phase of the cycle would be my guest and i would say that the probability of a recession prior to the next presidential election would be out relatively high what would i say i dunno seventy percent or something like that and when it comes to your of ray delio is betting big on a downturn so far this year is firms a mastodon twenty two billion dollars in short bets against some of europe's biggest companies turning to earnings now shares of barclays our up more than five percent in london after the bank posted trading income that fell less than estimates ceo jess daily tells bloomberg things are looking up for barklays in 2018 especially with increased market volatility but for a fourth of january and february volatility came back with some of us had thought of my life and that is good for the markets business way too early to really give any indication but rarely star was quite positive ceo stanley says barclays will also increase its dividend and consider buying back shares for the first time in more than twenty years.

ray delio ceo harvard county schools institu ray delios frankfurt president barclays stanley bloomberg jess london europe cambridge bridgewater associates founder us uk
"institute politics" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Good morning it's thursday october twelve welcome to morning gel with us we have veteran columnist an msnbc contributor mike monico senior political analysts friend vc news and msnbc marcal alfran washington anchor for bbc world news america katty kay good to have you on board this morning cutback really late last night from boston where we were at the institute politics harvard and had a great town hall event there with the instituted politics it was incredible from the students it really was incredible and it was i mean we get great input from great insight there are obviously very concerned that still very of anxiety in the eu but also very hopeful in optimistic and they want to get involved in that will get involved in a significant way and that's just great and and very very openminded about the things that are plugging washington dc right now on some of the things to year plaguing college campuses certainly didn't feel they're they were very openminded you you know it was so impressive really you know what i told them and they were hold them i said you know i'm proud i took special pride in that i've always consider harboured the university of alabama alabama there would be a harvard and yale jokes and stuff like jokes all the time but my my favorite one of my favorite moments in 1960s tv history you ever seen it seen from gilgen divert digressing i'm a little cactus is important i think i showed you this much sleep so so love embarrassed and a hell of a third get separated from the grew right right and this this savage comes through the bushes and he's eating like spitting in and and thirst and goes so much about their served to tell those jokes about the yankees let's ever i met with the game ever.

mike monico bbc boston eu yankees msnbc washington university of alabama alabama harvard yale
"institute politics" Discussed on The Big Listen

The Big Listen

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on The Big Listen

"Serb on their faces and who are willing to put themselves out there and what i find is that uh you know there as passionate about this country is i am and so i approach it in that way i'm not you know i i'm deeply deeply concerned about some of the directions we're taking right now but i can't live in a state of permanent outrage i don't think it's constructive i think it's more constructive to try and find a path forward and yet but i get complaints from that i was on my buddy the john favelas podcast pod save an american somebody people send messages in questions to ask and one of them was why are you so damn reasonable sir you worked 'em you worked as the senior adviser to president obama for but what three years two years two years here's to miss working in the white house oh no i i was i always say the same thing and i mean this very sincerely it was the greatest professional experience of my life it was incredible for someone like me who grew up with all of this and and deeply deeply new with deep belief in it it was incredible experience i learned so much every day every minute of every day was stimulating every minute of every day was consequential but it also was exhausting and draining imagine so yeah i loved it i loved every minute of it but i would do it again david axelrod is a host had be acts files from the university of chicago institute politics and cnn to find out more about his xiao check out big listen dot org.

senior adviser president cnn obama david axelrod university of chicago institut xiao two years three years
"institute politics" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Seven as we take a look back at this past week on new hampshire today in on wednesday morning check out chance toxin politics with neil hlavac hey speaking of politics plenty of that going on down in washington a joining us now and it's been a too long to he's been on because he's been busy guy always is a he runs the institute a politics over at st anton college neil avec joins us in the affair was finalized good morning mr neil how are you good morning commute great good you have at any boating mishaps yet have you this season no you can't really get out to mark the weather in pretty bad but hoping to get out and a little bit i wanna do a separate shows we get into the summer with neil he's a friend of mine and he's a he's a big avid tuna fishermen him and his brother and there's no of the show that on national geographic they have they have nothing on these guys expect separate neil loses his anchor hey neil let's get back to um politics i wanted to get your for a few moments on the show today and you know the president's on his first international trip only get your take on how you think it's going we will we've updated folks on what's happening in great britain the highest security level three more arrests made this morning in the cell but then get back to washington and the ongoing talk and shatter uh about the russian stuff in and around the election continued leaks will what i really want to get at meal vaccine handsome college institute politics do you think this administration and more importantly this president populist type president different style not very political at times a stepping on a lotta toast but he still doing some things that people quietly a lot of people who voted.

new hampshire neil hlavac mr neil president britain washington st anton college
"institute politics" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Go puss america's also brought to you by post made stands if you haven't use press mates yet your imlach because if you down the the press mates up and type in the could kirk did you get fifty dollars worth of free deliberate charges which is excellent puss mates delivers there's like a san francisco fan to get started a delivers food but also other stuff to yes i like to consider it the way in which i survive and avoid starting to death we did say that after love really good friday night we puss made it five or six pizzas to our home to celebrate the big set up another nice yeah i i one supported post mates from a restaurant that was literally one block for my house and and i was in shame after that but it was and i thought he was on the ran new heights of waving this or done of the puts me that today good for some free delivered on the play today we have former senior advisor barack obama the director of the university of chicago's instituted politics and the host of the acts files david acts run other go man it's gone great for me but this to go gruesome you haven't everything's good good to finally having often yeah well we spell good time together the same thing the best time ever have the white house was with you guys with you and love it and all those guys around of the stuff that matter overnight now you it so i miss are i miss arm especially against yeah there's no good oldest now now state senator eric lesser who is your system at the times would be mailed all the speed chargers and say it's time for the mustache.

america barack obama director senator kirk san francisco senior advisor university of chicago david eric lesser fifty dollars
"institute politics" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The white house is running so so i was and believe me with the in the heralded one big u mass president trump it as raul a southern i've pushing back on report says white house says and does a right and a strong offer our sunday grow strategist carle raul neto a life eighty of georgetown university is instituted politics and public service charles line of the washington post and kimberly straw sold from the wall street journal so carle which better describes donald trump's first month in office chaos or a fine tune machine i would lean more to force a former the latter but let's give him credit on substance off to a strong start of cam it's it's true that to me impressive moving ahead with some regulatory changes to obama care republicans on the hill beginning to wrangle over one legislation repeal attacks reform again wrangling move in it for him walk a off well because the process we saw that in the immigration executive order did they don't have a process in place that is collaborative that going all that puts cabinet serve curious would disagreements over white house policy in front of the president to make their argument they were rushed they they did it by using was congressional staffers who didn't tell their bosses in as results are going to have to have a really do but you know that's that we got to give credit he's he's he's move look for a lot of ways spectacle boy off the charts.

white house carle raul neto georgetown university washington post wall street journal president kimberly straw donald trump obama executive
"institute politics" Discussed on KFIR 720 AM

KFIR 720 AM

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on KFIR 720 AM

"Group called the instituted politics at the university of chicago and you see him also once and and i was a senior clinical commentator and he joins us now and i'm going out of podcast next week hey david right so i think i can go i'm gon any time into so you're on demand you're the do the phone the ball well david let's let's talk about this to get into is a smaller is you know the sal been given the not i think and represent something larger which is everything is so paul rise now entertainment is all political now apparently catalog shopping has become political what would you are a command to you know these groups to start boycotting american company is based on a political view of one of their board members and it was and to provide gonna question he hung up only lost a that's very ot but schedule in alabama online one show on the city if we can is going had my friend oh my god it makes it so much so much lower you know i'm i'm one of the million up the big or open out here weber card and my wife right hurt but you know i'm used to watch the indian but there having this week i've been pick a year ago and that it led the league who up the make al you and all that turned all donald trump and the the line year in where third check half wow yeah i.

alabama donald trump university of chicago david paul
"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"He may have the second most difficult job on the planet giants beiser the newly appointed press secretary in communications director for donald trump in coming president has a rich history in politics in communications but now he's taking on the biggest job there it is a speaking for president united states who speaks from self often and a hundred and forty characters sean came body instituted politics the other night to speak to our students and sat down with me for discussion about donald trump and we're country is going from you as giants beiser welcome thank you for coming to me into politics in thanks for being here and then you got a busy schedule i want to ask you before we didn't to sort of more contemporary things has a guy from rhode island end up as a republican that's not i have okay you know it's a great question i think it would island we actually elected a lotta republican history of a packer up but very moderate rivera much ap we had clouding schneider yeah and and run make lee was gone up the first district we had a lot of republican governors over time you know the interesting thing is i i didn't grow but a political household my parents both voted but i think we didn't talk politics at the dinner table much we talked issues and i think as i got in high school there was this week i really kind of grew interested and excited about government in politics i think that that's one of those his is use him academic that academic a brown university in.

press secretary director donald trump president rhode island lee sean rivera schneider
"institute politics" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"institute politics" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"Beloved color would become slotting him because we're to get rid of the terrible incumbent and and it the whole process would open up in changes in pads what we saw at the end of the day with but it didn't get couldn't seem to make that kind of a different arm at least when it came to electing went on and i'm really happy to hear the kind of active recruitment process on the that age happening on the least look inside i know what the project that's going on the california called a closed the gap california which is taking advantage of determined because wanted can be an opportunity you know what's coming and you can get are good recruitment and got a project more on the democratic side the progress that side you targets those hoping district and find and identify and get went into ryan for those eight but you know what you're runway is when you can really do feel targeting put the qualifying in his from real opportunities could turn those numbers around you taking advantage of those opportunities of karmanos closed the gap to one example it sounds like work is being on the republican side as well but it's not going to be hard to get recruits and i think it's going to make it a change and it's different and in that percentage of going and surveying and the california legislature and then he losses director of the center for american women in politics set the dalton instituted politics or rutgers university in let me just say this to all of our guests if you coming into the conversation announced causing up for people by phone here in the fourth vs amy allison senior vice president for power pack plus they're on organize focusing on organized group focusing on engaging most ire racial voters her new book which is coming on january's called she the people it's about the new politics.

california ryan director dalton senior vice president amy allison