18 Burst results for "Institute Of Health"

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 5 months ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To be out there to be free well my family's reckon CBS twos Christy for hard Donna was riding home with her mother and brother and their poodle in her lap at a red light there must state got caught between the car to car shooting the intended target even got out of his vehicle and use the reduces Mustang as a shield on her family were heading home from church when the teen was hit by a stray bullet three men and three women have been wounded in an attack at a party in downtown LA one of them reported to be in critical condition as a shooter remains on the loose this happened along east eleventh street between central and Stanford avenues police say the shooter apparently attending the party got into an argument then pulled a gun started firing CBS to Britney hopper says that the shot sent the crowd scattered police are calling it a warehouse party the shooting actually took place right outside very scary moments for a lot of people there's no word yet on the exact ages of the victims California reading in the process of fracking California governor Gavin Newsom says the state will not approve permits for fracking and new wells that use high pressure steam to extract oil until they've reviewed by an independent scientists Kassie Siegel with the center for biological diversity says this is an important step in protecting communities from the dangers of oil drilling science shows that the only way to really protect people from oil and gas wells in the neighborhood is to eliminate those wells that was in fact the recommendation of the state blue read in the scientific panel who looked at the issue and recommended in twenty fifteen that the state institute health and safety buffer zones to protect people the oil industry says it's disappointed by the decision and that this will only lead to more imports from foreign.

Christy Donna LA CBS Britney hopper Gavin Newsom Stanford California Kassie Siegel
"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Process of fracking governor Newsome's as a state will not approve prime permits for tracking for rather fracking a new wells that use high pressure steam to extract oil until they're reviewed by independent scientists Kassie Siegel with the center for biological diversity tells can access is an important step to protect communities from the dangers of oil drilling science shows that the only way to really protect people from oil and gas wells in the neighborhood is to eliminate those wells that was in fact the recommendation of the state blue read in the scientific panel who looked at the issue and recommended in twenty fifteen but the state institute health and safety buffer zones to protect people do you really industry says it is disappointed by that decision and this will only lead to more imports from foreign countries Ben and Jerry's is facing a lawsuit claiming false advertising over their environmentally friendly images and iconic brand but a lawsuit says Ben and Jerry's is violating its customers trust by saying their ice cream comes from happy cows living on sustainable dairy farms that's just not the case according to Katherine Paul associate director of the organic consumers association they're not forcing organic milk these are coming from conventional dairy farms in the conventional dairy farm model the feed for those animals comes from GMO corn in story Ben and Jerry's claims their ice cream is made from milk sourced from Vermont dairy farms that take part in the company's humane caring Gerry program in a statement they said we believe our caring Gerry program is the most progressive in the industry Chrissy greens can extend seventy news radio do you think that flu shot you're about to get is free you need to think again it's part of why we get insurance to cover things like this are consumer may only pays ten dollars when they get the shot or even zero but as we all know that prices paid by the insurance company and that's going to show up in premiums next year and that cost your insurance shouldering and then passing back to you as a lot more than you might think healthcare giant Sutter charge insurers eighty five Bucks for the vaccine in Sacramento about double what another place might charge across the street and as you Essie public policy professor Glen Melnick tells cat acts it's this lack of pricing transparency that's largely to blame for the nation's ballooning healthcare costs thousand things and in its pricing database and most of those are much more expensive than luchar insurers argue this pricing secrecy is needed for competitive business reasons brain pain can extend seventy newsradio he ten fifty on KNX so let's take a look at your money within must do we works failed attempt at going public revealed some major lessons freelancers and entrepreneurs want to get out of the house and share office space but the company's long term revenue plan was precarious their.

governor Newsome milk ten dollars
"institute health" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"institute health" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Right. After I did my MD and PHD. I was a pediatric house officer resident in Boston. And I was admitting child to the hospital every couple of weeks with a horrific disease called him offline influenza type b manage Itis. It has the word influenza because it used during the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. It was aronie sleep thought this was a bacteria caused fluence and not the virus. We note today, but it turns out causes a terrible disease. And I would have to do the spinal tap on those kids, the lumbar punctures, you would see the poss coming out where Cerebrospinal fluid should be. And these children had terrible outcomes. They were either Daf or permanent intellectual injuries and some of the kids didn't make it and this took a tremendous emotional toll on, on the on the pediatric how staff as well. And that was a nineteen eighty seven nineteen eighty eight. By the time I finished, my residency a new vaccine at come online. That was developed in parallel at the national institutes health and in, in Rochester by another group and within three years that disease had vanished from the United States. It was a disease that we divide talked about to the next generation, a house staff purely for historic interest, so like the old timers would talk to me about the theory TATA's. So it just goes to show you the power of vaccines, you know, admitting child every two weeks with meningitis from this disease, thou gone. So that was Dr hotels sharing with us. One of his stories about vaccines, and you are going to hear more from him later in the episode. Hi, I'm Erin Welsh. And I'm aired omen Updike, and this is this podcast will kill you..

flu Erin Welsh officer Updike Boston TATA United States Rochester three years two weeks
"institute health" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Not if you remember. Brad, try the president is paranoid schizophrenic. Paranoiac? What are you gonna do? Oh, Lenny league. Thanks bye. People the way Mucci for six months. Okay. Now as far as what we do for a living. Yes, there's none better than the mooch. It's a whole lot entertainment. Oh, yeah. But if you want the White House to run a specific way, I don't know if mooch is your guy. Hey, if you saw this sort of new agreement that he wanted with the press. It seemed like he really wanted when he was the communications guy for a week and a half. Yeah. He wanted to sort of repair, whatever broken relationship. There was I don't know if you can repair it at this point. Between the press wants this guy. They're gonna do everything they can to try to get Trump out of office. That's their mission right now. And Trump loves to play ball with them. And it's just it's a it's a mutually beneficial hostile working environment between these two folks. And so I I don't know, man. I think it's time to consider bringing back to mooch why not just blow up the entire thing. Let's just have a complete circus. Whatever at this point. There's more to get to on that later on. What about the American couple stuck in Cuba dole? Gosh. Okay. So Kevin and his girlfriend. They went on vacation to Havana. They went on a cruise ship. Norwegian cruise line. There's a four night sale in the Caribbean. It's nice now they were going back to the doc what they thought was more than our ahead of the departure time, they get there though, and the ship is gone. Whoa. Bar said a wrote a complaint to the cruise company saying it was a frightening situation. We exchanged money, and we took a taxi to the airport. American Airlines told us they wouldn't take credit card quoted us four hundred sixty five dollars. We didn't have that much cash. They weren't they wound up being able to book a flight home. And so they're going after Norwegian cruise line now. But it seems like they're out of luck. Because Norwegian cruise line. They say we made multiple notes of the departure time changed because there was schedule. But we let everybody know multiple times in advance of this crusade, by the way update your schedule and the company's terms and conditions also point out that well shipboard time may differ from the port of call. And it's the responsibility to pay all expenses incurred all rejoin the ship in the event, they are left behind magic being left behind in Cuba, though. That's gotta be terrifying. Little dicey. Yeah. Well, they say this is why you want to get a good travel agent. You know, the other thing sometimes you look at a story like this. And you might have the reaction. How can you be that stupid? Yeah. Or maybe the reaction I could see that happening to me. Like what just happened? They did they told us. I didn't even hear it. Oh, wow. Well, this sucks help. No. Because I'm I'd be so paranoid that I'm going to get behind Cuba that I would probably just not even I'd get off the boat for about thirty minutes. Run back on wouldn't do that. Go have a sandwich and I'll go back on the boat. Have you ever been on like that? We got the stops in different places for a while never really wanted to be on a cruise. That's fun. Did at one time. Yeah. I had a good time. I just think it's a floating Petri dish. Okay. Well, I had a great that was the best week of eating in my life. The food was incredible. Isn't it on average you gain ten pounds on a cruise easily gain ten? It was I mean fantastic. And as much as you want it. Yeah. It was really good. Good time. Okay. Gotta get to another story. This is not a big surprise. I don't think we're talking about heavy screen time impacting children's brains. They're spending three hundred million dollars on a study. Now National Institute health, and it is showing that nine and ten year old kids spending more than seven hours a day using devices show signs of premature thinning of the cortex. The brains outermost layer, the processes sensory information. So it's actually had not just a emotional or mental wellbeing. Effect. It's actually damaging physical brain. Yes. Yeah. One of the doctors working on the project said, we don't know if it's being caused by the screen time. We don't yet know if it's a bad thing. The fact that it shows signs of premature thinning of the cortex from every other study we've had is not good. Yeah. That's sorta seems like those those words altogether in a row are not a positive thing. No. I mean, it if you have kids this is one of the things that gives you pause study after study after study. It also showed the kids who spend more than two hours a day on screen score worse on language and reasoning test. There's a whole thing on sixty minutes about this last night, which I usually DVR just haven't watched it yet so much good football. Anyway. Study involves scanning the brains of forty five hundred kids. And it eventually aims to show. Whether screen time is addictive. I would guess it is the researchers said, you know, we need several years to understand the long term outcomes. Yeah. So what do you do that? If you get a kid right now. Try to limit the screen time as possible. Yes. In many ways, the concern that investigators like I have is that we're sort of in the midst of a natural kind of uncontrolled experiment on the next generation of children. It's very true. Yes. Do you ever feel a just from video games just screen time? But from video games when you were the heaviest into it. This would Ben like what ten twelve years ago? Yeah. Maybe a little bit longer than that. Probably fifteen sixteen years ago. Looking back at it. Now, would you said you were addicted? When halo. I came out probably. 'cause I think I'd probably burned to summer playing it on all the difficulty levels. And then when I went outside and saw the sun for the first time in a week. There was like man I needed. Maybe I noticed it when I started having dreams about it. Maybe I needed it cut back on this. I mean, it's like fortnight right now. Which is I do believe bigger much bigger than halo was at its height. Yeah. Probably. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you have professional athletes now getting minor injuries because they keep playing it so much. Yeah. Insane. I still think though man that that's it's even the video game thing is a little bit different than the social media because with social media paid social media, and you love video games. Well, no. But it's yes. Part of in part. But I think a lot of it is because you're interacting with other people more on social media. And now, I mean with video games. It's probably true to you.

Cuba Trump White House Havana Caribbean Brad president American Airlines Kevin Bar National Institute football Ben four hundred sixty five dollar three hundred million dollars fifteen sixteen years ten twelve years thirty minutes sixty minutes
"institute health" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Friend well back to you. Always good to be with you. And it's going to be agreed evening. So let me get your reaction to this. Romain lettuce recall. My gosh, what's happening here. Well, it could be anything. It could be like they say could be animals pooping and peeing in the field. It could be much workers p P and moving in the field would be handlers who harbors and stuff and box it up and ship it who knows it's just contamination. And so this is where young Jimmy comes in. We have a disinfectant to line called. Pure works is a spray for disinfecting the icebox in the bathroom your hands. The nice thing about our pure works. It he will kill e-coli. It'll kill HIV kills viruses bacteria damp, and so forth. Coli? And when it dries it's still as effective for three to five hours alcohol based disinfectants like pure L only work with her wet. And so people are waving their hands around trying to drive them off. Right. So it's only effective for about thirty seconds. And after that doesn't do any good. You gotta Charlottenburg so appear works spray foam for disinfecting icebox. Get those rubber gloves now, they're cheap. They're Nikola piece by box of them. And don't handle that stuff with your hands wash your hands with our pure works shower gel liquid soap, and then spray them again with the works. Either the foam or the spray, and I like to you in my feet, and you only take a shower and everything wash my people. So, but then I use the pure works foam in between other before I put my clean socks on. And just you know, keeps everything clean and nice, doc. I had some friends come over a couple of days ago, and they noticed all my supplements. In the kitchen. I'm in Saint Louis right now for the holidays, and they just went crazy because they're all over the place. And they said you take these every day, and I want everyone every day, and they started looking through all of them going. What's this one four? What's this one four? And I said everyone has a purpose. And I was holding up Tangy tangerine and all the other supplements and my favorite team more him in. I I mean, I got a lot of people just curious about just what these are what they do. And how critical it is in. This is interesting last night. I had a guest on to talk about the economy. Mitch shed lock is his name. He's an investment adviser. And he said on the air, tell me your secret because you shouldn't be looking the way you look tell me your secret. And of course, I didn't tell him everything. But he wanted a whole list of supplements. What do people do in your opinion to get started? In a program if they've never supplemented before. Well, some education they need to listen to George Noory needs to listen to dead doctors don't lie. The CD watch the DVD read the book. And of course, we have fourteen bestselling books. We have an issue. We have one of these some drives now was forty three CDs on it, and Tim DVD's, and we have a new documentary called the density in health, the doctors all Wall Street goes our research fifty years, very proud of that and professionally done by producers of documentaries and that just came out a couple of days ago. Good. And so it's a matter of education has invest a little time going to meetings and educate their families have little family meetings once a week just don't talk about bowling, and and scores it all games and that kind of stuff because you will add twenty five to fifty years. Here's your kids health right now. The government said. In two thousand five aren't children will be the first breach of Americans do not live as long as your parents. Mistake in hostels each year. This is from Johns Hopkins came out in two thousand fifteen medical doctors killed two hundred one thousand Americans each year in hospitals, just from simple mistakes. And how about people over prescribed to? Well that just came out today National Institute health said the number one cause a prescription dose. Of course are opioids seventy seventy two thousand people died last year from overdoses prescription opioids, and so of all the prescriptions, it says the number one killer, and so is much better. People do these things themselves, and so he came up with the book. Let's Dr teaches people how to do their own physicals for four dollars these apps. Armas by the test strips. Your blood your urine, you call them Tacoma's coming to buck fifty freeze test strip a thing on TV. Now, it's a little device size of a cell phone. You can do your own EKG to go in. And we've got one of our clients has the device that talks about that truly remarkable with what they're doing with technology the founder of our program. Art, bell doc died back in April of this year. From what they said was a a prescription drug overdose. And it could have been a combination of the drugs, but there were some opioids involved. Here you go. It's a deadly combination. Isn't it? It's a terrible thing and presented the original research on the opioid nineteen sixties when I was in Africa tranquilizing rhino and elephant because only five milligrams five milligrams. Okay would knock down eight six thousand pound white. Rhino bull and ten milligrams knock down fifteen thousand pounds, excuse me, African elephants, and I learned about all the antidotes and how to wake him back up and all kinds of stuff after we branded them and so forth. Two hundred of them using these opioids chase or overdosing on two milligrams. They should not be prescribed for human beings. Got the Email from Karl who said, George I cannot call in please ask doc wallet. For my uncle. I'm very concerned about him. So I'm going to read you something here, doc in this is a challenge for you. He said he is sixty three years old. He is six one he weighs about get ready. Three hundred eighty pounds, and he's suffering from in vain growth in his abdomen purple discoloration in his legs. Scaly skin sores that develop joint pain problems with psoriasis diabetes. He's got every issue. He said I am aware of the gluten in things that doc has talked about. But what other nutritional things can he recommend? Wow. Yeah. Well, when you have a guy who has eight or ten or twelve diseases Tricia deficiency diseases, including the obesity is inexcusable division disease. You know, you gotta gluten problem. So everybody in the household. The dog the cancer Bertha fish fouls kids mother-in-law show, everybody in the household is gonna be drop dead gluten free. So there's no cross contamination. We borrowed snow exemptions thing. Everything is gluten free oats. Although they'll try and tell them the Luton Osas called gladden still, and then you're to go by body weight and three hundred and eighty pounds of all those diseases. He needs the biggest hammer in our in our toolbox. So he would need four optimally. He would need four one three hundred pounds so three hundred eighty thousand posts foreign pounds. He's four of the healthy, brain and heart PAKs per month. He needs to pull those breakfast lunch dinner bedtime. Four doses a day. And then because he has the he needs the sweeties needs three those three times a day and these bounce a month. He because he's got arthritis need three bowels of the glucose gel capsules if he.

George Noory Romain lettuce Jimmy Luton Osas Johns Hopkins doc deficiency diseases drug overdose Nikola government Tacoma Saint Louis Mitch Tim DVD founder Armas Africa psoriasis National Institute
"institute health" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KOMO

"And shadow. No, Kelly, Dr price. Thank you so much for joining us here on health talk. How are you today? I'm great. How are you doing wonderful? We're going to talk a little bit today about metabolic syndrome, but your natural pathway physician. I and tell us about that practice and tell us about your training, and more importantly, tell us how you got interested in love that question, especially the last one. So I come to naturopathic medicine from research science. I'm a biochemist, and I came to Seattle, and I think the late not the early nineties and notice that a lot of people here were using some kind of a strange medicine called naturopathic medicine. And I thought, you know, does this stuff really workers it wou- and the the question kept ringing in my mind. And I I really wanted to know, but people were using it in consistently using it. So. So I actually after I actually was in the peace corps. And I came back from the peace corps, and I applied to steer university and nine hundred ninety four and I got accepted, and I thought that I would get out and do research, and so I waited for the H to come and they didn't come. So I had to accept they did come in two thousand ten and when I was a became a National Institute of health research fellow. Oh, I see. Okay. I was I was gonna ask what NIH what does that mean? Research health fellow. Yeah. So so the NIH or the National Institute of health has many many grants for research, and one of those grants was I got one of those grants to look at the immunological effects of natural product medicinal mushroom on folks that were healthy had healthy immune systems, and folks that are burdened with cancer or breast cancer. And so that's what I studied from two thousand and five to two thousand and ten with the university of Minnesota and then also best year university. Wow. Interesting. You have quite a background. Don't you? I kinda do. I find it interesting that having a bio chemical background is about chemist and then going into the natural Pathak area. That's interesting because what you're doing a natural path is using natural herbs. And what do you want to call it a supplement? The natural products. Yes. To provide healthcare right affect health. And so my curiosity was again does this work. I am Catholic until I have Catholic guilt about things that don't work. And so I wanted to before I even entered into a field in in administered health or facilitated health. I wanted to make sure that it worked actually did something. And so and that was skeptical. Yes, I was skeptical. And so again, my research background took me into or allowed me to ask. The question does this work, and how does it work? And then when I had the NIH or the National Institute health. The question was does this natural product is medicinal mushroom work. How does it work on immune cells? And so so it incorporated my biochemical research background with this interest in in health. Interesting interesting, did you find out does it work? Absolutely. And so the university of Washington to vaccine center has been also doing research on the same product for a tumor vaccine. So and we weren't the first to study it's been studied for about forty five years. But we were some of the first to study study for breast cancer, where's the mushroom? Come from it. It's everywhere. It's a funny name. I'm going to tell you the the the because I don't want it to sound. Woo. I'm going to tell you the scientific name is true media. I the color, but the combination is Turkey tail and it's found all over the world. And if you're a hiker if you go into the woods, you'll see it as a little mushroom shelf on on logs, and it actually looks like a Turkey tail. It's Brown in in in a beige stripes in this mushroom is pumping up your immune system that mushroom has some chemicals in it that stimulate your existing immune system, but there's four.

NIH National Institute of health peace corps research fellow metabolic syndrome Seattle Kelly university of Washington university of Minnesota Brown National Institute forty five years
"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Are getting ready to enjoy the long Labor Day weekend but more and more Americans are finding it difficult to afford the. Basics of life so we, will go in depth on whether we can truly enjoy the fruits of our labor and the press under attack you know what. I'm talking about the president's claim that the press is the enemy of the. People but as the president continues to rage against various figures in the media a. Possible ramification and Encino man. Charged with making death threats to the Boston Globe over its Trump editorials we'll go in depth on that as well plus are anonymous news sources really fake news later in the show higher education. College and sexual abuse on campus we'll take a look at the. Education secretary is controversial proposed policy that some feel Would lessen the rights of those sexually abused on, college campuses plus affirmative action Justice department says Harvard puts Asian American applicants at a. Disadvantage holding them at a higher standard to get in we'll sharpen our pencils and examined that one and the story of. A man who actually did cut. Off his nose despite his face Labor Day weekend can't wait but. Before we go celebrating research shows four in ten Americans cannot even pay, for basic needs needs like groceries or housing this according to a new study from the urban institute's, are, joining us Steve Zuckerman he is the co. Director and senior fellow of the urban institute health policy center and co author of that study Steve this doesn't. Paint a very optimistic were rosy picture. Of American life in twenty eighteen does it No it really doesn't I mean there are people who are definitely. Having trouble paying for food healthcare housing. Utilities and twenty seventeen and and and there's definitely even though you Konami is strong unemployment is near historic lows. There's definitely people, who are struggling to meet their basic needs, and who are the people is it just people. Who have low incomes or is this recent. Into the middle class well it's it's reaching into the middle class I mean a lot of the people were the. Highest rates of these, problems occur among people who are in poor health or have chronic health conditions but it definitely made. Reaching into the middle class families where there where there's a worker in the family. It the adults are still basically saying about thirty five percent of the time they're having some, problems about thirty five, percent. Of those adults report having some problems meeting their basic me it's worse for families. Without workers Fifty five percent of those adults report having. Problems paying for these basic needs but definitely were reaching into the. Working I into the working families so. Where and how does this end Well, we're in how. Does this end, is a good, question I mean I think that you know it it, probably doesn't end completely there's, always, gonna be some people in an economy struggling but it probably but when the, if the economy if they were more, support for people who are. Struggling then it might be that uh It would help but the idea of it ending. Is probably not something that you can really be thinking about did some of this surprise us some of these numbers are what were you. Expecting when, when you went into it well, I mean I think we. We our expectations were that you know that we're always, going to be. People who were having some of, these problems and I think we we went into this, because we knew there was, a Fairly significant policy debate going on right now about Considering enacting policies that could actually cut back, on, some supports and we. Were thinking to ourselves well the economy is strong I think people are looking at that and thinking that maybe you can cut back on some of the, supports for healthcare for food assistance for housing assistance and, we wanted to see before? Those policies get implemented what what things look like what is the current situation in the current situation is a little bit leaks Steve at the at the very beginning of this show, we raise the question is the American dream dead and it, sounds like maybe it is because in the past each generation had the expectation that it would do better than the generation that came before it is that no longer the case Well I don't know from generation to generation you know, how, whether the study really. Speaks to that but what I think it's really showing is that there's a great deal of inequality that people who are at you know at or near, the bottom and not even that far to the bottom. I mean are are struggling? So it's it's not necessarily the American dream is dead but there's a lot of people that are not yet probably at a point where they feel comfortable with their circumstances on a, day to day basis that's Steve Zuckerman co-director of senior fellow, the urban institute's a health policy center co author of this study KNX in-depth continues front-page news takes cover well explain that one When posting, on most, jobs sites you get candidates I'm the sales the director.

Steve Zuckerman urban institute president long Labor senior fellow Konami Boston Encino secretary Trump Justice department Director Harvard director KNX co-director thirty five percent Fifty five percent
"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To enjoy the long Labor Day weekend but more and more Americans are finding. It difficult to afford the basics of, life and so we will go in depth. On whether we can. Truly enjoy the fruits of our labor and, the press under attack you know what I'm talking about the president's claim that the press is the enemy, of the people but as the president continues to. Rage against various figures in the media a. Possible ramification and Encino. Man charged with making death threats. To, the Boston Globe over its Trump editorials we'll go in-depth on data's well plus are anonymous news sources, really fake news later in the show higher education college and sexual abuse on campuses we'll. Take a, look at the education secretary is controversial proposed policy. That, some Feel. Would lessen the rights of those sexually abused on college campuses plus affirmative, action Justice department says Harvard puts Asian American applicants at a disadvantage holding them at. A higher standard to get in we'll sharpen our pencils and examined that one and the story of a man who actually did. Cut off his nose despite his. Face Labor Day weekend can't wait but before we go celebrating research. Shows four in ten Americans cannot even pay for basic needs needs like, groceries or housing this according to a new study from the urban institute's are joining us is Steve, Zuckerman, he isn't a co director and, senior fellow of the urban institute health policy center and co author of that study Steve this doesn't paint a. Very optimistic were rosy picture of American. Life in two thousand eighteen does it No it really doesn't I mean there are people. Who are definitely having trouble paying for. Food healthcare housing utilities and twenty seventeen and and and there's definitely even though the economy is strong unemployment is near historic lows. There's definitely people, who are struggling to meet their basic needs, and who are the people is it just people. Who have low incomes or is this reaching. Into the middle class well it's it's reaching into the middle class I mean a lot of the people the the. Highest rates of these, problems occur among people who are in poor health or have chronic health conditions but it definitely made. Reaching into the middle class families where there where there's a worker in the family it. The adults are still basically saying about thirty five percent of the time they're having some problems, about thirty five percent, of. Those adults report having some problems meeting their basic needs it's worse for families without workers. That fifty Eighty five percent of those adults. Report having problems paying for these basic needs but definitely were reaching. Into the working in into the working. Families so where and how does this end Well we're, in how does. This end is, a good question, I mean I think that you know it it probably doesn't end completely there's always, going, to be some people in an economy struggling but it probably but when the, if the economy if there were more support for people who are. Struggling than it might be that uh It would help but the idea of it. Ending is probably not something that you can really be thinking about did some of this surprise us some of these numbers are, what, were you expecting when when you went into it well. I mean, I think we we our expectations, were that you know that. We're always going to be people who were having some of, these problems and. I think we we went into, this because we knew there was a fairly significant policy debate going on right now, about Considering enacting policies that could actually cut back on some, of the public supports and we were thinking to ourselves well, the economy is strong I think people are looking at that and thinking that maybe you can cut back on some of the supports for healthcare. For food assistance for housing assistance and we wanted to see before those policies get implemented what what things look like what is. The current situation in the, current situation is a little bit leaks Steve at the? At, the very, beginning of this show, we raise the question is the American dream dead and it sounds like maybe it is because in the past. Each generation had the, expectation that it would do better than the generation that came before it is that no longer the case Well I don't know. From generation to generation, you? Know how whether study really speaks to that but what I think it's really showing is that there's a great deal of inequality. That people who are at you know at, or near the bottom and not even that far to the bottom I mean are are struggling so it's it's, not, necessarily the American dream. Is dead but there's a lot of people that are not yet probably at a point where they feel comfortable with their circumstances on a day-to-day basis that's, Steve Zuckerman co director of senior fellow the urban institute's. A health policy center co?.

Steve Zuckerman urban institute long Labor president senior fellow Boston Encino Trump secretary Justice department Harvard director thirty five percent fifty Eighty five percent
"institute health" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Talk and welcome back to coast to coast i'm with dr charles simone and of course we will get to your calls as well one of his books hot to save yourself from a terrorist attack very important as well of everything that you've done lately charles which would you say for you has been the most satisfying well initially i i showed how cancer can be presented with nutritional factors and i wrote was called cancer nutrition in nineteen eighty that led to the whole area the whole genre of integrative medicine and at that time shortly thereafter i was asked by the national institutes health to set up the first office of alternative medicine and and we did this story with mike wallace on sixty minutes about shark cartilage and many other stories like that but i got involved in cancer nutrition when my patient vice president humphrey was referred to me he was dying not of his cancer but rather of malnutrition in fact forty percent now of all cancer patients die of malnutrition and dehydration if somebody's at stage four and that's almost as bad as it gets before they die i think that with nutrition you could step in and possibly help them we can and we do it we do it all the time we can actually enhance their life make them feel better decrease some of the pain and yes we can we can keep them going for some time give them some extra years i don't know about actually years depends on the tumor type but certainly we can make them feel better and get them help in that way proper nutrition proper nutrients that we developed whole series of things and integrative approach is always the best thing to do in cancer care.

mike wallace humphrey malnutrition dr charles simone vice president cancer forty percent sixty minutes
"institute health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A whole new range of battlefield weapons on the shopping list who the military standoff with north korea an ongoing talking point many see mr trump's get tough approach as a sign that the world is becoming riskier in this regard we'll have more on that in a moment but first is there also a financial agenda at play here on the part of a select few private defense contractors driving the modernisation programme jonathan king thinks so he's professor of microbiology at m it he's also a veteran campaigner against nuclear proliferation this is really a singularly profitable sector of the us economy because one these contracts are monopoly contracts that can't be outsourced to china or mexico or or india secondly by congressional mandate their costs plus so no matter how inefficient corporations are in the manufacturing process well how much they go over the original estimate they guaranteed a hefty profit margin and third that completely screened from conventional auditing and accountability by a national security concerns and it's a very very large sums of money how do we not only five billion american dollars that's equivalent to the entire budget of the all biomedical research in whole united states national institutes health is 30 billion eighty what if they've never been properly audited how do we know what levels of profits are actually making well because they of course are interested in uh you know investors buying stocks and so their annual reports report profit margins it's not broken down by nuclear weapons versus conventional weapons that's a little hard to dig out what parts of the nuclear weapon are being made by these companies in government all done by the private sector in the reason is that the facilities like sandia national laboratories in the mexico or los alamos national laboratory in the go one thinks of these as government agencies but there that those are the pas building the wall had says the labs that actually right who has the blanks right these labs are headed by the corporate ceos and the employees are are corporate so the warhead itself the physical missile the propulsion and the guidance really this for com components all of that corporate dean not trust the government departments to wooded it adequately accurately what that the cost should pay.

north korea professor china united states jonathan king mexico sandia national laboratories los alamos
"institute health" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"All these activists are saying all your your cherry picking the data you're issued this isn't right because no kids kids always stay that way it it no you're you're making all this stuff up turns out there were four studies that said the exact same thing there was a bbc documentary uh based on faulty information at he was trying to counter all this showing all these studies saying uh no it's just a phase these kids are going to go through this and you know what pat him on the head said okay okay johnny you you can feel this way but wait till you are about to you know what you mean i mean it's sixty in seventeen years hold you'll feel differently i you mean to tell me assist a phase like ninety nine percent of the other things that go on in high school exactly riath it going through a very difficult time right glee mentally whatever its every child you know every adult his lived through it and steph we all know how hard it was yes crazy absolutely me to go back no you don't know no you are what you are whatever you're just trying to figure it out you're trying to figure out now instead of two genders in two different sexualities or whatever now we've got one hundred eighty six choices the go ahead and throw into the half and you've got so many people saying oh it's more politically correct to be transgender a gay and heterosexual plus what's on tv what's in the movies what's in uh you know online a you'd think that's by in fact i i remember study of this done a couple of years ago they asked uh juniors in high school what percent of the population do you think is gay and it was anywhere between twenty and forty percent is what they perceive the population the united states was was gay and yet every study that i've ever seen from the national institutes health to the census department keeps it right around three percent and.

united states ninety nine percent seventeen years forty percent three percent
"institute health" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WWL

"Wwl as your home for lsu sports football baseball invest kukal be the first to know the latest about the tigers sign up now for wwl sports alerts just exports now eight seventy eight seventy message and data rates may apply tummy tuck her live from our latter blum studios in the heart of the crescent city on the news talk and sports leader wwl nine twenty four talking to our friend walter dublin an associate professor of economics and finance at uno my alma mater in the school and i'm quoting clancy do bows here that built the middle class of new orleans and i totally agree saddam i get a text here that says oh you mean just like nancy pelosi we have to first pass obama care before we know what's in it i don't i don't know if that's sarcastic i don't know what it is but i think he goes to the partisan nature of this and if he didn't like what the democrats did i don't know why he you would approve of what the public instead in term of process in terms of process if nobody knows what's in it that would mean the person the text that the dozen know as well so they're supporting something strictly because it's a republican plan and their republican and i use that as a background four how important is it that any healthcare plan and be done on a bipartisan basis because if the rare if the republicans lose the white house in the next presidential election whether you're able to against 2020 are we likely to see the democrats before that run on a platform of we're going to re institute health care system or get rid of whatever the republicans wind up call in their plan and if there is a third of the economy.

tigers blum studios clancy new orleans saddam presidential election health care system lsu football tummy tuck walter dublin associate professor of economi nancy pelosi obama
"institute health" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WTMA

"Or commerce by fifteen point seven percent then again the specific spending proposals or a combination of the sensabaugh and head scratching the white house wants to cut five point eight billion from the national instituted health to twenty five point eight don't which is bad policy in puzzling politics rights the wall street journal spending all medical research especially in this era biological breakthroughs is one plays for government needs a need the private sector can't entirely phil there's also by part of since support for and i hate so congress will spend more anyway but the other him the white house is right to wanna saves three billion dollars i d finding the community development block grant program at housing and urban development this is a political slash fun for developers some progressive activist and a spent one hundred and fifty billion dollars since nineteen seventy four with little community development mr trump they right is also picking fights was some of this political opponents by proposing to zero out such long term up touch balls as the public broadcasting in national endowment for the aren't in the amenities department the program's or small relative to the four trillion dollar budget but it's fair stat it's fair to ask if taxpayer should still have to subsidised tb yes in an age with hundreds of cable channels on social media that works and levin tv and see our tv uptight just that up every program should have to defend itself against a grants for also missed research a good little go rule for conservative is if you're going to propose cutting a program you might as well try to eliminate so as you can see this is actually a very very good editorial for the wall street journal which is always backing the establishment and the ryan knows and always backing yeah you know the debt ceiling increases right hander you're going to go broke course we would go broke but so they do not have the political will the circle merits of the wall street journal they do not have the political will when the time comes all right the precipice legislative laid the press the case when it really doesn't matter they're pressing the case.

wall street journal congress social media levin tv ryan fifty billion dollars three billion dollars four trillion dollar seven percent
"institute health" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Vehicle being allowed an right now it's corralling that in the belgian capital and a lot of confused in there before these listening when special actually it happens continues after this a key too good health is eating healthy foods so dashed to the produce i'll for fruits and vegetables dashed to the dairy case for fat free or low fat milk products dash to the foods that are lower in saturated fats transfer cholesterol sodium an added sugars dashed of food that help quite high blood pressure for more information visit www wwe dot dash planned dot org this message brought to you by the national instituted health and the us department of health and human services tragedy in the forty save for people of died expose the poise in this fall seeing guess after someone tried to rinse away a pest the side i mean sprain under the house untouched bother chemical reaction as many as five people also in the house or hospitalized islamic state is claimed responsibility for the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul than kill thirty nine people turkish authorities of so far detained at least eight people but the suspected gunman remains of large president electrode commented to the palm beach florida post newspaper and you know in a game he's running prison run or theories brazil authorities say at least fifty six in mates died during the arrived including several who were beheaded twelve guards were held hostage none of them wounded and um specified number of inmates a scape official save forty been recaptured richard cantu abc news.

blood pressure the house president palm beach official richard cantu us department of health human services istanbul florida post brazil
"institute health" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on KCBS All News

"To say all i can understand that i can understand science i can it's it's good cute in acceptable you know it actually is not every day in a world the science technology engineering in mathematics ten feels a cutting this week's was off to a future by you know that technologies we build what we use them four and unfortunately we're not bringing the full range of talent or perspectives to beer on how we choose problems how we approach from the questions we ask how we tackle coming out was solutions and that's the reason why it's really important for all of us to be involved another thing was science literacy people who make decisions on what you fund they don't have to be that technologies they don't have to be the ones three to work but they make decisions only refund whether there actual people who have the money our whether their government officials to decide how much money is going to the national science foundation on the national instituted health right are to the space program they get to make those decisions understanding earth observations right are the climb in our by bill diverse linear agriculture they get to make those decisions so we need everybody to be science literate what was i was we're talking about the decision makers let your off from moment and look at our current scenario and how many people loaded in the last presidential election with the science issues in mind and the level of science literacy among adults climate tonight years most people do accept climate change is scientifically proven but there are still some who don't and there are now going to be people who don't we're going to be running some of our hefty a scientific organizations the energy department the environmental protection agency presidents elect tom does not in it is not convinced he says he doesn't go are about climate.

space program presidential election climate change tom
"institute health" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Four to six hours of sleep but night i knew about texan andrei beane and distracted driving as an and torrey right in and sell finds an impaired i mean drunk driving but now once was their conversation about young adults in jersey driving a new triple a study find sleep star of drivers are almost twice is likely to be an an accident when they get five to six hours of sleep twelve times more likely with less than four hours seizures older dalton people who have i sleep that are among the the highest restrict jake nelson of the triple a driving with having only earned forty five hours of sleep in a twenty four hour period can be just isn't pairing his driving legally john how away do you think people on this not aware at all and i think that that's really the punchline and for the warren family the grief is still real six years after the crash definitely exceeded in a brilliant player now this what's in the news i'm steve okay finn cbs news key too good health is eating healthy foods so dashed to the produce i'll for fruits and vegetables dashed to the dairy case for fat free or low fat milk products dash to the foods that are lower in saturated fats transfer cholesterol sodium and added sugars dashed of food that help quite high blood pressure for more information asian visit www wwe dot dash planned dot org this message brought to you by the national instituted health and the us department of health and human services traffic and weather on the ten morning keep you informed ended today point in youth radio and forty w h yes.

jake nelson warren family blood pressure andrei beane dalton steve us department of health human services six hours forty five hours twenty four hour four hours six years forty w
"institute health" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"institute health" Discussed on WCPT 820

"He obama administration has wanted more money for basic research for funding of the national eye institute health and lessard spent your arguments for it and say that the part of the problem was a function of the sequestered well i needed the national insisted help was last about twenty percent of its funding over the last several years that both from he quest ration which was a mandatory off the top cut and also just budget cut yeah totally and i age has been really battered by beat budget cubs so you know they wanted more money for ap and i age but they they also had all the tightly as you might remember joe biden in reaction to the tragic death he was made the abyss pinkel but to answer moon shot and that should and that sought to our game you were period types of answered too header information sharing an and of course also on so that was a huge priority the obama administration when this moonshot there are some other things all timers research and if it's think of the precision medical center mission to it would be a priority to be a bomb stretching so what what's figured out was but if you the money what you can do you know it's get something that people obvious particularly performance cynical and medical device industries have wanted for many many years which is big thick in week giving i'll be fb_i approval process and this i know why so so cool road up this legislation this was written largely by swayed upton who is the head of the house and urging commerce committee and on the senate five lamar alexander who's the chair the health education layton pension okay and so they said.

joe biden obama administration upton the house obama national eye institute lessard senate twenty percent