22 Burst results for "Innova"

"innova" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"innova" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

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Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 5 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Hailing the Air Taxi: Secretive Joby Aviation's new electric vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:49 min | 5 months ago

Hailing the Air Taxi: Secretive Joby Aviation's new electric vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft

"Tell us about your trip. Over fires I understand to to get to this. Secret Jobe test. Rain what you saw. Yeah thanks Joe will I've gotta say it was the story in terms of getting the story You briefly mentioned the the fire situation it all happened in the middle of the first big wave really of of wildfires out in California and my initial flights to the San Francisco Bay area, which is really where Jobe is based overall was through a dense clouds of smoke In both directions we had to wear face masks, of course, a part of the covert protocol but we ended up wearing three facemasks. He showed the flight back because otherwise we couldn't have we couldn't breathe in the smoke. So it was the the second flight that I took me onto their sort of undisclosed test area, which was even more interesting because that day. Having. Got To this location and then drove from for many miles into the secure facility came around the corner and they're hiding away. This valley was a small, very unusual looking hell not a helicopter, not not a fixed wing aircraft either this little like a strange hybrid between the two and that's that's the whole point about this new generation. It's something which we're still trying to really figure out as as well as the FAA I think what it is dealing with it, but it was fascinating experience. I showed up it was a really hot afternoon They basically were all poised waiting for me to get there since the dead they had the the vehicle on this little test area in the valley right in front of me a few hundred yards away they and that's the thing. The other thing about electric vehicles is you just turn them on. You know there's no sort of like. Slow. Wind up of a turbine or a piston foreing up it's just flick the switch and the lights come on you flick another switch and it lifts up into the into the air on a was what it was like the the sound which I couldn't wait to hear was so interested to know what it was going to be like eventually when the sun came to me, I was hoping. that it would be different than it was because I had expected something like one of those quad copters where you hear that sort. Of. Sound of the electric motors and ready sort of drums that sort of sound and but it didn't it was much low freak lower frequency sound very lower intensity. San Than expected. Vehicle took off and performed some maneuvers that are sort of relatively low altitude and the whole time I was standing beside. Justin Paints the chief test pilot and we were just chatting in a normal voice. Right it was right aside in beside us, it went off down the valley did some maneuvering. And? Transit didn't fully transitioned to wing bond fly because the valley area isn't that large. But it did become debt fatty fast as it maneuvered across in front of us and and landed and. that it was a remarkably quiet experience when the vehicle was down to the other end of the valley not too far away I mean just a few hundred yards You could hardly hear it above the background noise of of the of the INNOVA around the valley. So I think it would be effectively quite silent in an urban environment. They do say also that in forward in wing borne flight, it will also be effectively silent because The big thing about this design is it is it is a sensor they describe as a powered glider. It's like a like a motor glider really that can take off and land vertically. So it's just a very different way of looking at it. I think. It certainly looks very different. You know you think of a helicopter this has has more the wingspan of small aircraft. Yes exactly. Yeah. Incentive size. It's just a little bit short a wingspan than a embraer phenom one, hundred they they small business jared. An linked it's only just over twenty twenty, one feet body length of fears large with a little bit of overhang with the the the props at the back. But essentially, it's a very small package a footprint that's really designed to essentially go where helicopter like an forty four would fed. So that's the principle is that you're packaging this around six electric power unit. So EPA US, they call them and in a sort of a an oval shape which gives you a nice sort of equal area of left on each side and. Essentially redundancy it case one of those systems fails you've always got five others. One would power down the other forward power up to keep your balanced It's just a the so many layers of redundancy that are built into this design that you know sort of goes to the fact that. Job has really put safety as the absolutely leading design principle for this having actually figured out how to make it a vehicle fly one, hundred, fifty nautical miles. At about one, hundred, seventy five points and do it in such a way that you can recharge between between missions even at that length in a short time. So it's a the so many areas to look at.

Jobe San Francisco Bay California JOE EPA Embraer Twenty Twenty Justin Paints Innova Jared
"innova" Discussed on Immigrantly

Immigrantly

03:51 min | 7 months ago

"innova" Discussed on Immigrantly

"During recessions, INNOVA public way. How does that make you feed and other times when you just want to keep something to yourself? Of course I mean. So the you can really relate to this as a Pakistani person. We're really taught too many ways subconsciously were to not give all of ourselves over. I. You know I I still remember my mom. Telling me not. Always tell the truth about what's happening within the. Family. Members. You know embellishing certain truths and I think that really is part of Pakistan and South Asian coach. Aware. We're not always speaking one hundred percent of the truth always notes. You know if we are putting ourselves in the public eye, it's always the best part of ourselves, and that's why I think Pakistan is do social media so very well, because social media is part is like that. You just put the best things about yourself found rather than you know the depressing things or the not. So Trendy things, shall we say? Of course, there are times when you know you don't want to be in the public eye, you don't want to talk about the hardships or you know, you always don't want to be the resilient one or you don't want to be the one fighting all the time or explaining yourself to different people whether it beats people from within your own. Pakistani. Community within your own queer community within you know the British community, there are points where Saudi I get tired I, get exhausted mentally and I, you know self care is very much part of of. My work and I think coming from such different identities and minorities, it's really important for. US All to take self care really important especially in such climates. But whenever I do put myself in the public eye and talk about my private insurances, I try and be as authentic as I can because coming from, you know the Pakistan e environment, where shall we say I am not to be one hundred percent or authentic actually by doing the I'm breaking that mold? Yeah. and. Breaking down those barriers. and. By being one hundred percent authentic also speaking the truth of. British. Pakistanis of box Tanis of Queer people of thousands and thousands if not millions of people around the world that go through the same experiences that I go through and may see a connection or a side of me within themselves. So Saadia for you, for example, your American Pakistani, I'm a British box. Johnny Trans Person where obviously two very different people. But I know I can see something similar or mirrored in your story, and you see the same in mind where very much. Different chapters of the book and. You know your, for example, you're not. I I'm assuming you're know where I am however, I'm sure in my story, there are elements that UC. Within yourself experiences that land with us, absolute. So. I, guess to answer your question I try and be as authentic as I can and also keeping safety in in in in places where you know I have to think about family I have to think about my own safety as well. So yeah,.

Pakistan INNOVA Johnny Trans Saadia
What is a Blanket?

Robot or Not?

03:43 min | 9 months ago

What is a Blanket?

"Listener James Thomson. Referred to in a previous episode. At ask a question that he says is coming from under a blanket composed under a blanket, John. He says what is a blanket if I take a dubuffet from the bed into the living room, does it become a blanket is a blanket that has sleeves still a blanket. What about a giant blanket? Style Hoodie? Yes, I. Do have all of those things. So? What do you think about blankets I when I read this tweet? Sending it from under a blanket that I'm assuming that is A. A British ISM or a think so. Like. You're managing. These huddled entirely underneath it instead of having his head, stick out in his arms. Are In our country. You say you're under a blanket pictured. Oh, covering the entire body including your head like you're hiding. From right, but I'm assuming. Under completely under a blanket. Just tell who knows happening this out right so just a little a little fun there from across the pond, all right Blanket. This is is is another interesting one where we might have, it might be such a general term that can can encompass many different things, but I'll knock some out away the thing with the sleeves and the hood. Not a blanket. Sorry, I mean there's there's a reason we have selling names that you can call it a slang kit you can call. SNUGGIE! Yeah, not great, and it's more of a brand name. But like if you make clothing out of blanket, material does not make the clothing and blanket. Once you've got sleeves and ahead whole, not a blanket you've just made. A blanket, you can make a skirt out of a blanket. You can make a wedding dress out of a blanket, but if I make a three out of Terry cloth, it is not a towel. Yeah, Maria made made outfits for all the kids that have drapes, yeah! Yeah that one that was as you said that one away plying south off your bed, and bringing it into another room. I mean like I. Know You. People don't want to call it a blanket because that's like you know, it's a comforter quilt. Do all sorts of other words for it, but I'M GONNA. Say that all of those things that you put on top of a bed sheets are. Are Blankets of some kind and the other things are just making it more specific, so bring them into or out of the bedroom doesn't change the fact that they're categorically a kind of blanket now. That'd be to that to say. A quilt is not a blanket. How dare you also just from culture? I consider the thing that's laying on top of my bed. That's INNOVA. Cover a blanket. A comforter, but it's, but it's a blanket. It's a kind of blanket. It does a big flat thing that you put on top of yourself to be warm. That's not a sheet it's it's like it. It's a blanket maybe. If. You want to call that fancy I. Don't know why Americans have debate covers, but also. comforters and that are also blankets I. It's complicated, but I consider that a blanket and if I bring it into the living room. It's still blanket because I'm using it to blanket my body with an object. Therefore I keep warm and it's not a sheet because she'd are thin and blankets are thicker in some way whether they're quilted or have stuffing or just made a fuzzy material, remember the seventies blankets with the velvety ends on them. Remember those yes, that woolley material and they had two long strips of velvety stuff. We have a lot of we have a lot of. The those Fuzzy Fleece Fleece blankets that we have. More modern nineties things please bring stuff. I think the dispenses with all James's stuff. He can come out now. Let's get out from under their. It's getting stuffy in there, James, you need some fresh air. Get Out of the blanket

James Thomson Maria John Innova Terry
"innova" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"innova" Discussed on Epicenter

"And then part of what makes the compatibility theorem little bit easier is that they all use a common VM. Right. It's all, you know, all everything's using solidity and so- representing these interfaces and like translating them, it's only, you know, translate from the spec in the repo to solidity, while in cosmos, we have to translate it. You know, the spec in the ICS repo we have to translate it to an ST k module. We have to translate it to a gory system. We have to translate it to like an Ethernet system. We have to translate it to whatever new VM's come into the ecosystem. And so that process is definitely going to be more complex. And maybe one of the one of the ways that, for example, because in there, there's only that one VM. What happens is people do the interface in the in the Rebozo the twenty standard right? All it defines the names of the functions. And then the real implementation is, basically all always oh, you look at what the standard in the open zeppelin repo, right? And that's like okay, that's, that's what the definition of twenty years now. But we don't really have that. And so now, basically, our specs have to be more. Explicit on what the puncture punctuality of these different ICS are. Anything that? Yeah. I mean, of course, also another thing that's just added complexity is that, you know, let's say if you look at 'cause most, and you want to build applications spans, multiple Blockchain's. Now you have to worry about the different valid or sets and what if one of them fails or like if you have multiple Hobbs and so the security. Just becomes much more complicated and didn't kind of game, theoretic attacks and all of that stuff. So obviously, here is nice in that way you kind of, don't have to worry about any of this. On but yeah, that's just the trade off. And I guess let's see how how it all turns out. Yeah. Like maybe needs helium to point some of the games there were liberties will resurface in different different way. But yeah, I guess I guess, like Moses. Compulsively is going to be high. He's going to be more challenging in costs most because of the reason sunny, mention it. So if you have something like KYC or you have NFC data. Now you ever sending chain that sending some empty receiving chain? And both of these chains, ultimately, they're getting like the stream of bytes to interpret these bites to mean empty, and they have to agree on the interpretation of how these by translate into an NFC, our stream of, by stran- slates into a token, our stream of bytes. Maybe translates into withdrawal message for a validated right? So these agreements will need to happen, and different chains will need like subscribe to these standard ways of translating bites into these higher level for financial objects. I think that's going to be one of the big tasks that emerges out of IBC and other challenge is the synchronicity as well, because, you know, in the theory on the nice thing is that ever since everything is perfectly synchronous, you know, an event that happens in one contract can immediately call something another contract and can force it to do something. The classic example, you know, essentially something, I've been chatting with the people about is like look in the system right now, you can take a CD, maybe and move it to another chain. And if you want to liquidate it probably possible. But what if we get into the in, in maker, what you also need? Is there needs to be mass liquidation events as well? Because if the price of the collateral goes down, it needs to send out a message to all of the CD's that are everywhere, and say, oh, you need to liquidate right now. Or or, or at least you got a re up the CD or it's going to be liquidated. And so it is a much more complex design pattern. When you have to start to do these kind of things across these many chains across these eastern criticize environments. But I think one really interesting powered that I find really interesting about because Moses decay is. That applicastions in the Cozma sticky autonomous Innova that it helium smart contracts are not. So. Tedium smart contract, like a smart contract has some state..

Hobbs NFC IBC Tedium Blockchain Cozma helium Innova twenty years
"innova" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"Because it again goes back to that grit. We're we're going to constantly tweak. We're gonna constantly change in repurpose as much as we possibly can in order for us to get it. Right. And in addition to that we have such an amazing team that works there. But. Off just like we do and believes in the same things that we do in again works extremely hard together. We kinda just move the company forward as a as a team one step at a time. So what was the gopher you'll business when you sit? I set it open. What was your mission after you actually drifted from that mission a total is it just a case of tweaking and evolving as you go. Well, I think it's actually a really something that I think about quite often which is like what is the purpose? And I think in the very beginning in this is a lot of problems that most startups have is that you don't understand your story. Like, you wanna create something just to create it? But there's no real meaning and purpose behind it. And I think it took us I'd say close to even still to this day on one hundred percent. But I think that Innova beginning we kind of just like said something just to say it, and we spent a lot of time figuring it like figuring out what to say. But then that wasn't necessarily. The thing that that we all believed in we kind of said it just to say it, and so we kinda came together. And we looked at our values. Like what what did you find important? What do I find important? How about you? And we asked the collective team. We realize that the the summation of all that was helping people who help others, and that's kind of like our mission to this day is that that idea behind we wanna help people who help others whether that's in a business whether that is a B two B business, whether it's a business selling to be to see, but it's a nonprofit or university or whatever it may be that wasn't necessarily the exact line. But it was still theme within the business. It took us a while to get there. But it's something that I'm really proud of of just like it's a lot of self reflection..

Innova one hundred percent
"innova" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on WLAC

"Hi, Michael, I've been sitting here listening to everything that you're saying and some of it really makes me angry and another part of it makes me think that young women who decide on having the Boertien really don't know what they're doing. You know, I'm sixty seven I'm the mother of four, and I never saw a video of an abortion before until they had the physicians talking about it on TV. And I really believe any woman. That is shown a video of what happens when they aboard a child because I don't think these people think about it. I don't think these young women think about it. I mean, I had known exactly what happened until I saw these Innova made me cry. You know, I just think that if a woman is carrying a baby even if she's carrying a baby that six months long. Okay. Not the full nine months. I believe that if she sees a video of what they actually do to this child, and what does child actually looks like in their home. They would never have an abortion never. We we played. Maybe four five months ago. My very close friend and financial advisor racing Kowit found a video of I believe it was a doctor speaking before congress. And he explained what happened. In an abortion. And. We have a tendency when things are unpleasant to put them out of our minds. It's easier than than grappling with them. You know, when you lose a loved one in a tragedy. You don't have time to to begin the process of coping a car wreck something very very quick. Was first couple of days were a blur. And the funeral preparations are actually very useful..

Michael Innova advisor congress Kowit four five months nine months six months
"innova" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"Certain people were standing out, we humans communicate incredible percentage of our emotions in what's going on in our heads, non verbally, and is a real estate agent that can be a real mind opener for you. So people may say something they may verbalize certain desires or wishes, but does not necessarily the truth. We all tend to wear a mask when we're in society. We try and present our best side to people but beneath the mask, we're giving off all kinds of signs of what's really going on. And I'm trying to to ground you in this other language, humans toss speak, which is not verbally its non verbal. And I want you to sort of the reason I'm emphasizing this. This is this is a way to kind of ground you in my book. I want you to be much more observant of people than you are normally you go through life, and you're not observing anything you constantly listening to yourself. You're not paying attention to the tension in people's faces to the fake smiles. They're giving you the moments when there is really lied up, and the smile is genuine in an extend describes real emotion. It's going on into the kind of body language that reveals that this person actually doesn't really like you feel kind of negative energy. I want you to kind of master is non verbal language and sort of teach yourself how to become a superior observer of people I by kind of paying deep deep attention to their non verbal behavior. And then after that, we can go deeper into other things that you can look at such as the patterns of behavior the people reveal in their actions in what that shows, but I wanted you to understand that in every detail of people's lives there. Nonverbal stuff the kind of people. They choose for a spouse, how they treat other employees around them how they treat those who work for them their staff how they treat their children all of this are indications of who they really are. So don't get lost in people's appearances in what they present to you as the client. But try and be tuned. What's going on behind the behind surface? Yeah. That is so good. Because again. Yeah. Like, you said everyone wants to put on a mask. Everyone myself included, David you. I'm sure we all put on mass. That's like this is how we want the world see us. But if you can get underneath that defined the true motivations. I mean, the the world becomes entirely different a good exit. Like, maybe maybe not a good example. I think it's a good example that something I read once in a book in I think it every day. Now, this comes on my head and make everyone else think this too now when you're talking with someone in you're standing up, whether it's at a bar at church on the street doesn't matter. Look what way their shoes are pointing this like fascinates me every time if somebody's fee. Are pointed directly towards you. They're engaged in the conversation. They want to be there Innova, not if they're focused on where else means they don't really wanna be in that conversation. And so what I look for is find ways to get them from not pointing at me to pointed at me and the conversation. And if I get that. Right. Isn't that cool like that's? Yeah. And I found that myself included like when I'm talking to somebody. And I realized I don't want to be in this conversation. I look at my feet and my feet are not in the direction of that person. It's the weirdest little subtle thing. That's definitely true. Another thing is I'm really big believer. I read about micro expressions enough people understand that that concept. But basically scientists discovered some time in the sixties people give out an expression that only lasts for like a quarter of a second. A look of disgust a look of excitement in quickly hide it because they don't want people to realize what's going on. And I want you to become aware of that. So sometimes when you come approach somebody that you a stranger or someone who haven't seen for a while. And you come at them from an angle so that you sort of surprise them you can catch in that instant a look that microbes pression of excitement they're genuine excited to see you or kind of like oh get away. I don't really wanna see in the quickly covered up with one of their fake smiles. Is there other kinds of things like your shoes point,.

Innova David
Does China Have What It Takes To Be a Superpower?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Does China Have What It Takes To Be a Superpower?

"Join us state run media reports that the country's military is in the process off a major strategic shift. The navy and air force are both being given a boost. But it's a land-based armies being downsized in an attempt to transform the People's Liberation Army. Let's get more on this with the editor of China dialogue Isabel Hilton Isabel, welcome to the program. So first of all, what is the backdrop do this shift? Well, the People's Liberation Army which actually belongs to the party rather than the country and Google out of guerrilla warfare people's wall. So under under Mao and right through to Deng Xiao, Ping. You know, it was very large pretty ineffective. I mean after after the winning the civil war in nineteen forty-nine. It didn't even win a war of to that lost Vietnam, for example in a border skirmish. The most recent wards fought so it was a large expensive, correct? Optic running hotels brothels, all kinds of things the modernization was long overdue, but the modernization also reflects the fact that China went from being a very kind of enclosed country to being a global trading nation and increasing the with our missions to be a global superpower. Now, every global trading nation has long supply lines to defend it, it has fears of interest to build, and that's what China's been doing. So China has identified some years back, you know, the areas in which it would invest in the included cyber warfare included space, and the included crucially a navy and that so we see them acquiring. I an second hand aircraft carrier. Our second one is coming up and quite a large submarine fleet about which we hear rather less. So what what is the goal what what is the Chinese invasion in the end? Well, you know, as I say there are there are supply lines to defend so if you see what's happening in the South China Sea, you know, huge amount of global trade goes through the South China. To see and China has built military installations on on essentially on coral reefs on on what they call islands, but they weren't recognized as Ireland's because they're covered at high tide. So China's been putting military bases. Not only in its near abroad said the South China Sea blows across the Pacific. And if you look at the belt and road project the road part is a maritime project, and that is included heavy investment in all kinds of you know, in Pacific islands, for example, and in port facilities humble tutor in in Sri Lanka allows them to take a very close interest in in the Indian Ocean. You've got one in a Gwadar in Pakistan. You know, you if you see where they're placed you can see that China is is strategically placed now on on several major global supply routes so in the event of a conflict, China's Innova strong position the Pacific islands. You know, if you're going to run, for example in nuclear submarine fleet constantly it see as as the US does and China has said it is Myers to you. You'd need to fair number of friendly port facilities, and these islands are pretty much there for the taking. So if you look at the islands in the western Pacific, which include Guam for many years and US military base and still use military base. The Chinese of very active there, they run a, you know, they have big investments they run a casino. They take students to China for education. You know, you can see that that the US is losing this battle insurance out of neglect largely in China is very much establishing a potential for future

China Pacific Islands South China Sea People's Liberation Army South China Navy Isabel Hilton Isabel Deng Xiao United States Vietnam Guam Editor Google Pakistan Sri Lanka Pacific Indian Ocean
"innova" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"You I shove Lee Innova a bit of water Nash can help in terms of working the lease with the reds. That's different story, and the dodo valet everyone is afraid of lease everyone is afraid of nation of microorganism development. So they want to take the wind out of the lease as fast as possible. They normally put the wine in barrel already after melodic. The winds preserve better the fruit. So if you do melodic barrel, you lose on the fruit. But all the wine is much more integrator for that you take risks of having the lease in the white. And I prefer to that mullenix in the valley. They go creaky. So by December normally everything is done if not before SMU's rarely as you can have it in March, and those are the best years when you have Mallow, but in the village favorite. So why nominally tend to put the wines in barrel, and I used to at Newport to put the wines in barrel to melodic and barrel, and they would stay. We'd Elise eventually at Neport. Our would be wrecking the big majority after the melodic meeting March around that area in my case. Now, they're eventually some wise that don't even wreck depends. I think the more delicate food you have the less extracted wines. You have the more you want to preserve that you don't have tendons that aggressive that they need oxygen. So you should preserve that. So you shouldn't touch and eventually those can stay with Elise lead long time. It's also not a rule. I think you have to face to decide I think the majority of people have big problems with with action. I tend to like with winds push old people used to say, it's better to have a reactive wind oxidise one. So that preserve the wine in certain way. And that happened with me in many cases wines at the beginning. Very active to the point people going to the winery and saying well, these findings off so much reduction and with experience Allen that you have to leave them if it's not the really bad reduction, you'll need to take them out of the barrels leave them there that reduction will pass away we time. Slowly, if you don't fled the one with sulfur, of course. And I work with also so. In that case, you just need patients you'd like this to survive for awhile in the bottle. You're going to tire out if he rack it off in the reductive face, and you don't wanna do that. And the upshot of that is that you'd like some bottle evolution in a positive way. All my wines that I do today. I do them for them to survive in the bottle. I don't know how many is going to survive. I have an idea I can prove it because the first one from two thousand thirteen but my idea make winds you can age in the bottle. So one of the things about those Neport wines. They seem topped up to me. They didn't seem like there was a room for sedition around the edge of the wine. It seemed like there was frequent topping-up is that true or no for doping in the barrels. Yeah. I do. It's still today. I still do that the top each two weeks. It's interesting because. Stopping the wines can be also away for you to add oxygen into the wines. Actually, the action of topping the winds add more oxygen than you just rotate the barrel. Keep it closed in the anymore. You oxidise more topping topping? Many more the housing other producers, you know, they simply don't they rotate the barrel and that barrel always have a little bit of empty space. But they don't touch point in the end you had less add oxygen to the wine that is not necessarily better worse just different result. But for sure you have less Ed oxygen to the wine. Then if you topping every two weeks, that's interesting that you say that because that's exactly what they're doing a patrols. That's one way to do it. So at Newport was the approached the blending because there were several different reds. What that the blending Deba? Look like when I worked for someone else. I really want the wines to be of that person. So I was working for Newport. They will put wines, I may have might touch on the winds, but the owner of the company they they should like the wind. It should be together. With the wine understand the whining. Agree. We the win. What would be fun in the being house with so many different wines?.

Newport Allen Elise SMU Lee Innova Neport two weeks
"innova" Discussed on Spit

Spit

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on Spit

"You the Vela tolerance or even your innova-? Ability to quit. So there are multiple elements. Do not take elements that may be influencing. But what we know is that the proportion of home much content. Explain is not one hundred percents biology is not deterministic. So there is a high component of the environment's. So we may be born with a predisposition, but the environment plays a big role. Right. And that's the theme that we keep finding in these discussions that as you so eloquently put it biology is not destiny in in some ways. But it does contribute to to where we end up. I understand that. You've partnered with twenty me taking advantage of people's opt in ability to to join in research, and you've discovered some things both about addictive behavior in general and dependence in particular, can you walk me through what your study was an some of what it has shown sure. So as Sandra said what? What are the things that we've emphasized in our research is to try to decompose something complicated, like addiction into smaller factors, where we could study the genetics of those factors and where we know or expect that understanding the genetics of those factors would improve our understanding of the genetics of drug abuse as a as a disorder. So I wanna start with the marshmallow test. Yes, I love marshmallows many of your listeners love marshmallows. Many of your listeners marshmallow doesn't want to start with marshmallows. I can't fire in my mind right now. Yes. Right. And and it was just Holloway in that. We're we're in the middle of the candy holidays right now. So you could offer a child marshmallow, and you could tell them that if they wait five minutes they could have two marshmallows instead of the one marshmallow. And if we can put ourselves back into our childhood or imagine around kids, it's easy to envision that. That would be a real struggle that the kid would understand that it'd be better to have to than one. But they'd love to have that one marshmallow now and. Fact, if you look at the kids offered this test, some of them will take the marshmallow some of them will wait for the marshmallow, and that ability to delay gratification or that tendency to make impulsive decisions that have negative long-term consequences..

innova Sandra Holloway five minutes
 Nick Percat and Todd Hazelwood

Inside Supercars

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Nick Percat and Todd Hazelwood

Ford Championship Nick Perk Jack Subic Etel Maria Anderson Ford Bunn DOT Hyun Scalia Facebook Simachev Jackie Innova Ten Years
"innova" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"That's because they're homeless their lights are as you. Can imagine moving retiring And Devastating impact on a child's. Education that's where Catherine Nick comes. In she's the executive director and the longest standing tutor at school on. Wheels it's a nonprofit started twenty five years ago that sends tutors into the community to work with homeless kids go to whatever the kids, are and we provide volunteer tutors to us The gap in their homeland move along and every time they move the we estimate about four months of learning and the, average homeless family moves to right there Hokey Catherine was the first volunteer tutor. On l. a.'s skid row back, in nineteen Ninety-three and tells me it's very personal for her I grew up very poor I know very close that education was the way it might be overcame the goal of school on wheels is to break the. Cycle of homelessness through education Totally chaotic and I think what we bring is a stability and the consistency Innova goal model who's there Charles so they become much more done Really are mentoring and helping them with life schools and really. Changed a lot of the kids And a lot of the kids have changed our volunteered. Lights as well we are proud to name Catherine meek as the KNX hero of. The.

executive director Catherine meek Innova l. a. Charles twenty five years four months
"innova" Discussed on You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

"But I think that he needs to sit down and go, do you have a plan from Innova saying, no, and they may say, no. Okay. I'll call you back, but I'm now going to come up with one and whether we. He sits down with his team, whether he call some really creative smart guy that he he's known from his past, or whether he goes out and hire somebody on his own, writes the check himself. He needs to come up with an idea in a strategy and a plan. I think competitively speaking, they would also be wise fair to take out of the water. Daniel Cormie has gone as far as to say, if brought cannot fight me, I will rematch debate. Daniel in the last month is thrown out the idea that he will fight a number of people. He accepted a fight with Anthony Smith. He called for a fight with show gun. He accepted a fight with Corey Anderson, and now he said the steeping thing. So so Daniel seems to be pretty willing and a pretty good place right now. It's just a matter of Winnie's throwing that many yeses out to that many guys. It's it's not quite the same because remember when Daniel gave a Volkan the kiss, right? So Volkan Volkov I don't mean to be rude about that. But remember when he Daniel came out and said, you're next before the, I don't even think you have see was planning to do it. And Daniel comes out might have even done it on UFC tonight might have actually done it on. Cameras at that guys. Next, that's why fight. Well, then that's always fighting what he'd if you're the, you have c. run that back row, take it, take it all back and find somebody now they were kinda stuck evoke on. Got the kiss. He got the kiss from the champion champions don't call people out. They get called out. So in the rare times that it happens, usually that fight happens with Daniel right now. It's a little bit more spread out. The path in the plan for him is very clearly Brock Lester. But he's also said yes to a few other fights. Hey, let's dish on this for a minute. Why can a car park itself these days? But we still have to drive across town to take a test drive and why getting approved for a mortgage can.

Daniel Cormie Anthony Smith Innova Corey Anderson UFC Volkan Brock Lester Winnie
"innova" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Is you may think steph curry and tristan thompsons are nice guys there's an ego underneath there that makes them the players they are not saying that in a bad way but lebron's gotta be a tougher guy coach when it comes to schematics over a season and a half ago and carrying it to where it is today jazz locker room i'm jordan he's jordan you can blame a coach but you know what you can also blame a referee and tristan thompson he's blaming a stripes the referee are they don't give effort you don't play hard you never itself a chance to win at innova control you can control itself is gonna play gonna play mr make you think you got fouled you think is a travel gotta get back on defense communicate and that's what they want they want you to hang back complaint to the wraps and complain because come down and knock three your face so we can't be worried about that mr mcgregor back on the defensive some straight talk about the stripes nationwide coverage on america's largest and most dependable.

steph curry tristan thompsons lebron mr mcgregor america tristan thompson innova
"innova" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"innova" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"I buy my one minute podcast everyday into a video and i don't even remember i've got a an i five processor on this shorted take seconds to render i suppose that they were long vio trust me if you're doing you know i got the go profusion three sixty camera takes eight hours to to to renoir video on ten corps i mac pro yes there are things you do and people do a lot of people do pros do that do need that power than just the stump stump focusing on the engine and start thinking about the books and the suspension the new generation of intel's will support fossa ssd buses hopefully we'll see some envy me maybe does make a difference of danai think will is a big difference in our i think apple if you think about this idea of three d nand replacing memory and ssd's acting as a cash in the octavia should drive power consumption y down in my opinion and so instead of that's another spec that's very important power it's not the cpu's although the extra performance would be good there's also help bunch of modernisation around how the cpu innova says to the rest of the equipment so st's obtained memory new dims new democracies that are more paraffin using small processes so that can she as power and it's all of that stuff which is actually what when we don't we don't need the cebu but if you can get data in and out of the cpu faster will get deepa ill three buffers whatever the current generation of ages are in ice lake then that's actually going to drive your experience everything feels snappy even though you still running at the same klux bait and that's what we want we.

intel apple innova cebu deepa ice lake eight hours one minute
"innova" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"innova" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Assured besson this cover of vogue arabia i'm not sure what their lead times are but is it actually is tone deaf as it looks or is it just unfortunate timing and hartley the very time in not innova gravies fall in sons but some there's also the ashida on the cover of his martinez unbirthday house of sound whereas the people here that she'd been fighting with this kind of change in championing women's rights not just the right to drive at the end of the guardianship system or that kind of thing on not really given as much prominence there is an interview infighter pages i understand where manner alsharif who is very prominent activist but she's not in the country anymore she quite a while on the other people featured i think off the top of physicians fashion industry figure which for gravier next lotta sense but some when you wade into kind of very hot button middle eastern politics in this way i think it definitely raise eyebrows i can really fly what do we know for sure at the moment about the status of the women who have been arrested recently no no which is a problem amnesty international and hit rights watch both have than in front of vocal in the last two weeks since these women on three men were said it's understood as is who is in the seventies and she's one of the very longtime advocates for women's rights rights drive i think she has been released but as with everything in saudi arabia these house and public information on a very full coming one of the most prominence within she's twenty eight year old fusion half lou she she led a lot of the reasons driving protests fears she's not been on our contact with her lawyer family friends no one even knows where she's being held so it is really quite alarming the you know less than a month before this.

besson saudi arabia martinez twenty eight year two weeks
"innova" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"innova" Discussed on WCHS

"In the morning just after the school day started nikki was in art class when she said someone ran in with a gun and shot a girl in the leg everywhere and then everyone started running out of the building turner ran two where's the girl that we saw coming this way towards a car wash and she chat abandons runner kneecap she apparently got shot in the cabinet would not be the worst of it so many people saying that like there was gunshots and not like people were dead or did most of them students ten others were wounded including a school district police officer who confronted the gunman tonight officer john barnes is undergoing surgery parents are nursing fears we gotta do something this is getting ridiculously happy afraid to school students like page curry seemed resigned that this is how we live now it's been happening everywhere i felt i've always kind of felt like eventually it was going to happen here to tonight the suspect seventeen year old dimitrius gorgeous a junior at santa fe high has been charged with capital murder texas governor greg abbott said he told police he wanted to commit the shooting and then commit suicide but turned himself in because he couldn't go through with killing himself abbott said pa gorgeous took his father's legally owned guns to school and opened fire it appears he also planted explosives in the school and in the surrounding area one was co two device another was a molotov cocktail and there are various other types of explosive devices that have been identified both in a home as well as innova hickel two persons of interest are being interviewed after the.

turner officer john barnes curry greg abbott pa nikki santa fe murder texas innova seventeen year
"innova" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"innova" Discussed on KOIL

"Edward would beef would fall under the category of decency and whether or not it's in the public interest in the public trust to use the n word in order to uh explain or at least describe people of color and that's the thing is that the fcc considered a number of factors in whether to act on a complaint including contacts how the word was used and we know that you're reading hot finn on the radio and you just happen to come across the n word then certainly there are going to look at contact to say well that was in hot finn and so that that helps also if you're watching a football or a baseball game or a basketball game here's someone fumbled or faouzi here the f word come out of somebody's mouth that too is considered that's an emotional things an emotional alpers if someone is on the tv and they just happened to catch fire the hallway there is that they they start yelling all kinds of swear words on broadcasters are confident that they would be exempt for using anything like that in news context you know that they they have something called a journalist impunity and if the president allegedly said this they can say and i quote and they can put it in quotes and say that now that does not violate this decency laws what that does is it basically calls attention to a word was used by or allegedly used by a president so even news organization decidedly use the word then they can they have a right to and if you want to complain you have a right to complain to of the fcc also has a right to investigate innova feel as though that nothing is offensive there's no offensive use that was used at news context than nobody is going to be fine for using the word asshole okay so there there you have it's all arbitrary it's all vague i mean uh people think that.

Edward fcc finn football president baseball basketball innova
"innova" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"innova" Discussed on Risky Business

"David definitely some a possibility be talking about a huge group of users should be lights population at large the will definitely be a small subset which might get moving in the process and and innova given the disruption this issue has all the issues have caused i would say that this is also encouraging some off uh you know set some of the uh customers to also test the pact is before the kind of wisdom out because i just saw recently that there was some issues going on vyed certain process sorts for example this morning like it's few imd uses of being getting the bulgarian yeah yeah so so this is the kind of a kind of a very interesting patch to swallow very interesting problem something which has not dislodged your standard microsoft batch right so in a way this is also pushing people to dislodge diack lead to when automatic update and and look low i would imagine that lot of large enterprises you know who have demand have the cement divided surrender but they may have different machines different cpu would steadily now they have for do doing in wintry and silky how many of these r e m d how many of these are internal and so on so it's it's kind of where to be a pretty big idle icty cycle on this and i mean that's that's your euphemism for a giant mess what about you guys did you guys have to sit that registry flag i well i mean every one has to set the registry value but some were you blew screening uses so that are based on this path.

David innova microsoft
"innova" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"innova" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"To be itself would they be a portfolio with fakes which would create the comes to stomach instability the regulators maybe worried about bitcoin is characteristic that make very unique and this is why i'm cautious to discounted as a pure speculative bubble that will go away i don't think that the interest can bitcoin will disappear overnight and these are my three reasons first it's an extreme investment volatility assets in the low volatility world and his tells us that bitcoin's elti the ultimate if you like financial translation of the anti establishment vote it's a testament of how a versed markets have become too that conventional acid valuations of today the market correlation is the institutional safeguards of the fiat counts the systems which has the combined central bank he we of the past decade say markets want out that wants to diversify bitcoin seems to be providing that beat innova inadequate way another unique feature is that it runs on block choon block chain technology which is a network diversify so the first point is about acid and correlation diversification this one is about basically going beyond the political risk and the market fragmentation that stand in the way of capital mobility and possibly in the real world the today it's a way around the capital controls for countries in asia such as china in latin america thirdly it's a very young low transparency market which has made the point of interest for alternative investors but also for institutions fact the goldman sachs who looking to add alpha but also to create in intermediary structures such as for example the bitcoin futures an ad expand through trading and information infrastructure say the next step here is who regular trade for regulators to intervene and eight oda to rein in the crypt tomania to normalize the blac chyna technology and those are to shift them traditional institutional incentives a companies like goldman sachs towards developing new international.

bitcoin central bank asia china goldman sachs innova latin america