27 Burst results for "Ingrid"

Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

Native America Calling

02:22 min | 3 months ago

Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

"This is national native news. Antonio gonzalez three tribes in alaska are participating in a pilot program to collect data and provide solutions on a community level to missing and murdered indigenous. People katyal brian van wa- spoke with officials about how the new project will change their approach on active and cold cases at the beginning of the year. The us attorney's office for alaska announced that the department of justice would embark on a pilot project to address the missing and murdered indigenous persons epidemic in the state which again tribal council in dealing ham is one of three alaska tribes that volunteered to be part of the project. Each tribe will develop a tribal community response plan tailored to its needs resources and culture. According to a study by the urban indian health institute out of twenty nine states alaska ranks fourth in the number of missing and murdered indigenous women. Tribal administrator courtney cardi says the importance of statistics on a local level often. Native communities are researched by outsiders in the situation. It's very important that especially with such a sensitive topic but our council is able to work with families directly to quantify the issue and demonstrate that ourselves versus having outside organization. Be that for the drive meets with the us attorney's office as part of a forum to increase communication between communities and public officials. Ingrid cumberland's is the emma p. coordinator for the us attorney's office in alaska. She says that a key to reduce mvp cases to establish connections between tribes agencies and to implement solid tribal community response plans. We we really just need to build those relationships and and make sure that everybody is as soon as possible so that we can get working on any incident at the quickest possible moment. Brian schroeder the us attorney for alaska stressed that it is important to establish communication and transparency before crises occur. A large part of what this is is getting all the parties involved all the stakeholders involved to start talking to each other. Now you wanna be able to talk ahead of time and know each other and open those lines of communication to young's plan will serve as a model for hub communities like bethel nome more information about the pilot project can be found by contacting the us attorney's office in alaska and billingham. I'm brian vanua

Alaska Antonio Gonzalez Brian Van Wa Urban Indian Health Institute Courtney Cardi Us Attorney's Office Ingrid Cumberland Department Of Justice United States Brian Schroeder Bethel Billingham Brian Vanua
LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

Business Wars Daily

04:30 min | 6 months ago

LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

"Lincoln has built. Its following of more than seven hundred million people by promising to help you find a job now at wants to help you find a new and totally different career. With millions of americans and employed right now an entire laid flat by the pandemic. It's undeniably difficult for many people find new jobs without changing roles and industries. The first challenges identifying your transferable skills. That advice is as old as the hills. The much tougher challenges to figure out how to apply transferable skills in jobs in industries. You may never have considered. That's where linked ends new career explorer to comes in if flip typical job searching on its head rather than searching for a particular job say operations manager you enter one of your most recent titles by mining linked ends. Massive data set the to identify multiple skills. You probably already have then. It suggests other roles where those skills overlap according to a company blog. Post tool references. Thirty six thousand career skills and six thousand job. Titles results are matched up by the percentage of skills that can transfer for instance enter the job of co founder. And you'll see that eighty percent of your skills are also used by board members. The example linked in uses is more common an out of work food server. It turns out a waiter or waitress. Typically has more than seventy percent of the skills needed to succeed in customer service role. The good news linked and also identifies high demand jobs as it happens. Customer service specialists or at the top of that list. Career explore then identifies open jobs in that new career in a third column. The tool suggest skills. You may need to build to help make the leap not. Surprisingly it directs you. To linked learning courses offering such clear direction toward a new career makes a lot of sense more than forty five percent of people never explore career change. Because they don't know where to start. According to a survey of two thousand unemployed professionals commissioned by linked in paul heads up economic policy research at linked and he told the new york times many members didn't necessarily know what job transitions were available to them. Moreover about a third of the survey respondents said they felt unqualified for other industries had no connections. There were didn't know how their skills translated the times reported linked in made the new tool available late last month. In beta to try it out navigate to opportunity dot linked in dot com. It's free not part of lincoln's premium subscription which ranges from thirty dollars to one hundred twenty dollars a month with more and more people using linked in as the pandemic continues to take a toll on the economy the platforms revenues are way up sixteen percent over the same quarter last year. But most of that growth is coming from lincoln's advertising business. not it's talent solutions which includes recruitment and job search. According to tech crunch reporter ingrid london by showing job seekers a path toward a new career and guiding them to link to ends classes the platform can build its recruitment business and it's training and education division simultaneously. London suggests although note that many of those classes are also free such a seemingly. Comprehensive system means the online job. Search business has evolved dramatically. It's far more complex and sophisticated than it was not that long ago when online platforms mainly mimicked classified ads. Like linked in smaller rivals ziprecruiter also promotes training to job seekers. Late last month ziprecruiter announced a new platform offering two hundred fifty different classes. The classes come from training companies collaborating with the company including core. Sarah skill share x. You'd acidy among others and this month ziprecruiter announced another kind of partnership altogether with financial services app acorns which helps users save and invest money. From within the acorns app users will be able to search for jobs. The job portal is made possible by ziprecruiter acorn. Ceo kerner tolsey net. The company wants to help its users. Earn more money since income shortfalls or the biggest obstacle to investing with. Us unemployment still at close to eight percent and record high. Pandemic case counts no. Recruitment executive says job. Hunting is easy but they do still see quite a bit of hiring forty million people search for jobs on lincoln weekly and three people get hired every minute company officials claim so for the unemployed all is far from lost but a better more comprehensive job search plan complete with training and a good dose of imagination about alternative careers should make a very big difference

Lincoln Ingrid London The New York Times Sarah Skill The Times Paul Ceo Kerner Tolsey London Acorn Lincoln Weekly Pandemic United States
Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:26 sec | 8 months ago

Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

"Rhonda Fleming Ah Hollywood star of the forties and fifties fame for her fiery red hair has passed away at the age of 97 from her first color film, Fleming became popular with producers because of her hair and green eyes are best known films included a Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, starring Bing Crosby. And Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbound, starring Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman. She also made four films with future President Ronald Reagan

Rhonda Fleming Ingrid Bergman Bing Crosby Alfred Hitchcock Gregory Peck Ronald Reagan King Arthur Hollywood Connecticut President Trump
Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

Coronacast

07:25 min | 8 months ago

Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

"So one of the things that Australia has really relied on throughout the hall coronavirus pandemic sci-fi is lockdown as a way of getting a handle on what's happening and keeping cases to a minimum. We've seen that really happening in Victoria and a few days ago a special envoy from the World Health Organization was talking about how lockdowns shouldn't be the only sort of tool. That countries used to Cape a handle on the coronavirus and I think that some people in Victoria have sort of used those comments from the WHO as a reason to sort of say, we should be lifting Victoria's lockdown now but it's a bit more nuanced than that. Isn't it? This nuanced? We went into lockdown in March largely to stop the growing pandemic but also to allow the infrastructure for contracting testing to get into place, which is what the WHO, who say. There was an outbreak in Victoria now that I break in Victoria would have killed many many more people had they not to lockdown but in part the outbreak was due to a failure in contracting and testing at that time. So in many ways, they fulfilled whol criteria for lockdown, which is time to get your contact tracing and testing into shape, and in fact, through the second wave in. Victoria that's indeed what they've done some situation where Victoria New South. Wales are pretty XY Pixie in terms of unknown cases number of cases a day. Sorry Pixie. What the hell does that mean some kind of Scottish thing I grew up with meeting. You know roughly equal fair fair enough trying to get a new phrase into the Australian dictionary from Scotland. Anyway. Back to the point the point being. That, you said whereas in Victoria roughly equal and the argument is probably quite well made that there's not a lot of reason why you shouldn't have the restrictions roughly the same in both states the problem of Victoria is you don't WanNa let the break off suddenly because people will just start turning up on masters include a beach which means crowding into trams, etc, etc. so you've got up. Do fairly slowly and carefully, but the endpoint quite soon could be a similar situation to New South. Wales. But we've got to get used to and it's not a trivial phrase a new covid normal. We promised a few days ago that we were going to stop comparing new, south Wales and Victoria, but let's just do it one more time new south. Wales does seem to have like you say. Exceed Pixie level of similar levels virus to what we're seeing in Victoria or at least the confirmed cases that are coming through, and they don't have as many restrictions on them, and we do know as well that it's probably at least a year before we're going to have any kind of vaccine available to that sort of like what we're thinking of as being a trigger for going back to what we used to have as a normal life is what's happening in New South. Wales. Perhaps, a model for what Ustralia could look like over the next year. Well, I think West Australians queenslanders south. Australians would bridal a that because they've got almost nothing happening and they're saying, well, why should we have? Wills has belichick focused on new, south Wales and Victoria for the moment. But I think it is something that queenslanders and others need to be cognizant off is this something we should get used to what we're talking about here for people who don't live in New South Wales is an outbreak from GP clinic now, getting used to is different from getting complacent. So yes I think you gotta get used to the fact that there will be small outbreaks but what we should not do tolerate them and so they're. They're not to be tolerated and our behavior needs to change in the short to medium term which is. Continuing careful social distancing. I believe in new. South. Wales. It should be mandatory mask in public transport just as an extra layer of security. You don't seem to be going that way and really getting on top of outbreaks and people being prepared to get tested if symptoms are in areas where there are outbreaks and if we can do that, then we can cope with these outbreaks but we can't just say. Another outbreak. Let's move on. It's another outbreak. Oh, this could be the moment where this could be the hotel quarantine equivalent moment that we hadn't. In Victoria, whereas if we ignore it is going to get out of control. So get used to not really be able to deal with yes. But just quickly on that, we're talking about being able to be responsive to outbreaks but we see in Shepperton in regional Victoria, they had a the little outbreak happening there people have told to go on to get tested they've gone to go and get tested. They've done what's been asked but they haven't been. Able to access testing this huge queues, how are we going to be out of style up to these? Well, that's for health departments to sort out, but they've got to be ready for particularly in rural and regional areas because this is something that you just need one truck driver to have arrived in a place in spread it and we've already seen somebody hiding away in trying to get into Queensland you just need one person and to move into our networks and off. So everywhere it's got to be ready and you to be ready for scale up and a plan for scale up so. Somebody throws a switch and people start with doing and they set up to prop up clinics, and within a few hours you've got it all going and that's what people have got to plan for and the best thing that can happen is you never have to institute your emergency response, but your emergency response has got to be really Schmidt and if he wants to know. More about how we've tooled up for contact tracing, how good it is, they listen to yesterday's Khurana cast with Ryan McIntyre where we covered a lot of these issues and that chat with Rhino was so interesting and there was stuff in there that we couldn't fit into yesterday's show. So we thought we'd bring it back again in prerecorded form to answer a question from Ingrid. Where Ingrid's ask if a person who has the virus uses a toilet does the next person inhale the virus spray in the toilet is flushed with the lead up and is the virus in urine faeces? Yum. This is just the sort of question that croquettes listeners love energy with toilets. Let's have a listen to yesterday's comments by Rhino McIntyre, which weren't in the krona cast. So this is a bonus we're talking about. And toilets on aeroplanes. We do know that there is a risk with closed transport vehicles with its planes buses. There's been a number of outbreaks already described on airplanes on buses and other vehicles including A. A navy ship whether it was a very, very high tech right? the Theodore Roosevelt in the US. The risk isn't just from Aerosol, droplets spread I mean we know that the highest risk isn't people sitting closest to the infected person and that's been born out in previous studies with diseases like to book your license and Maizels. But the toilet is also respected. There was one study where they were known infected people on board everybody was wearing a mosque and one of the people who became infected took the mosque off in the toilet. So we know that flushing the toilet can create aerosolize -ation. Probably. Less. So on an airplane toilet because of the nature of those toilets that don't have water swilling around, but they still would be rissole generation from the flushing action. So, the hall toilet is probably highly contaminated. So even if you wash your hands afterwards, you could breathe in contaminated aerosols than when you come out even just touching the door handle would be a risk. So that's that's probably one of the real hot spots on an airplane. That was Professor Rhino McIntyre who is professor of global biosecurity at Curbing University of New South Wales

Victoria Wales South Wales Victoria New South Professor Rhino Mcintyre New South New South Wales Curbing University Of New Sout World Health Organization Cape A Pixie Australia Ingrid Shepperton Scotland Theodore Roosevelt Ustralia Rhino
A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

Plant Strong

04:00 min | 10 months ago

A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

"I. WanNa start off by asking you. So your brand is main street Vegan. Why mainstream? Vegan? Well it's a story actually rip I went to a pita fundraiser late in two thousand ten and they showed videos and I've been seeing videos like this for forty years. It took me quite a while to get from. Vegetarian Vegan back in the day. So I've been around this movement for ever. And I've seen those videos about things that humans do to animals but that night, my heart was extra. And all I wanted to do was write a check for one hundred, thousand dollars in hand it to the pita founder Ingrid newkirk and say here, go fix something but the check would have bounced. So I got on the train thinking okay. What's the plan B. and I literally had inspiration I don't know how to explain this. You know you could say God you could say angels on what all I know is that it came to me very clearly okay you don't have one hundred, thousand K. spare but what you can do is make your. Next Book Main Street Vegan, we want it to be geared to the young woman that you were in Wheaton Illinois in nineteen eighty three when you finally stopped messing around and became a one hundred percent fulltime Vegan it needs to have forty short chapters with a recipe at the end of each one and I'm just kind of taking notes in my head of I could do this, I can do this. So my wonderful literary agent sold the proposal to torture Penguin and the editor called to say so happy to have you happy to have the book. But. We hate main street. You need to change the title and they'd bought it. So I had to do something and I'm coming up with these other titles and they were so boring. But I kept trying to write and then I had a begin miracle and I really do believe that this is the age of those believed that this is the time when all these other ridiculous diets are going to go. The way of the dinosaur plant based is going to be the only thing that sensible people are interested in and the idea that we are killing our fellow beings and destroying the planet is going to start to look like are you serious people really did that? So my Vegan Miracle That day. Was Walking up Broadway. We saw somebody so famous, you can recognize him from the back and that was Michael Moore Now, he had liked another book that I had written a weight loss book fit from within, and so I just handed my card to the woman who was with him and a few seconds. Later I hear Victoria there is Michael Moore, following me up Broadway and we started talking and then we started talking on the phone and on one of these phone conversations I said the book that I'm supposed to write should be called mainstreet Vegan publisher hates main street he said they're wrong. Let me talk to him talk to them so. In a three way call with an Academy Award winner my editor in me he convinced her she convinced the higher ups and when she called to say Main Street Vegan is your title everything else started to pop and I've been given my mission for the rest of my life. So why main street because this thing that we do whether we're coming from the health or the environment or the animals or whatever this is for everybody this is not some elitist thing. We don't have to be rich. We don't have to be leftover hippies or punk rockers. We can just be who we are eat reasonably and love more and to me that's Main Street That is mainstream nuts. you landed on something that just resonated and you knew of his right thing. And I grew up two blocks off main street in Kansas City Missouri. So that may have had something to do with it and mainstream Vegan was at your eighth or Ninth Book Because you've written. Now Than Books Right I've written thirteen. So Main Street Vegan would've been eleven. And

Michael Moore Mainstreet Vegan Editor Ingrid Newkirk Kansas City Victoria Wheaton Illinois Academy Award Founder Missouri Publisher
6 Life Areas Youre Avoiding: And 4 Ways to Face Them Head On by Ingrid Y Helander

Optimal Living Daily

05:48 min | 10 months ago

6 Life Areas Youre Avoiding: And 4 Ways to Face Them Head On by Ingrid Y Helander

"Six life areas you're avoiding, and for ways to face them head on by Ingrid Y Hollander of Ingrid why Hallander Ellum T. dot com? You might call avoidance being lazy unmotivated, depressed freaked out or disliking conflict. But if you are human, you probably know the warning signs when you start avoiding avoiding can become a way of life. If you're not careful robbing you of time relationship money fun and other pleasures here are few target areas and examples of voidance that I see in my office every day. Work Life. You're successful career requires consistent task completion, and suddenly you are online shopping. Crazy. Physical Health. There are two wasteful hours before you get ready for work and rather than going to the gym you roll over and go back to sleep. Relationship. Small disagreement happens and use sullenly walk away from your partner. Social. A friend's invitation weights in your inbox and you tell yourself you'll think about whether to attend or not later. Spiritual Your Yoga, Mat and journal sit in the corner and you daily pass them by. And? Financial. Six bills said in your mail pile. He said Masai knowing that a simple check could pay them tomorrow. Sound familiar. What's happening when you avoid and what can you do about it? Avoiding is seldom a fully conscious choice. Elizabeth Scott s explains this frustrating tendency. This way quote avoidance coping also known as Avoidance Coping Avoidance Behaviors and escape coping is a maladaptive form of coping that involves changing our behavior to try to avoid thinking or feeling things that are uncomfortable and quote. Basically avoidance is bitch will coping skill aimed at reducing pain that is reinforced each time you do it. Sadly. The more you avoid the parts of your life that feel uncomfortable. The more shame you're likely to feel about those parts of your life to shame intern causes more discomfort and hence more avoidance. If you tend to worry in are easily overwhelmed, it can be significantly difficult to simply face tasks and situations and do the thing before you is not your fault and is not a joking matter. Just do it is a great model for selling shoes, but it's not so easy for anxious people to implement. So. What can you do today to head on face those things in life you tend to avoid and do so without crumbling in a corner later Here four ways to face her avoidance had on. Now and very gently. Number one acknowledge avoidance without beating yourself up. So. Yes. Maybe you don't WanNa talk to your loved one about a particular topic. Perhaps you have not exercised or prayed or meditated in many moons maybe the bills are on the back burner your friends wonder if you don't like them anymore, this happens to the very best of people simply acknowledging own that part of you is avoiding with as much compassion for your human self as possible if you get very upset with yourself or anyone else in this process, stop breathe and offer yourself at least one moment of compassion. Number. To write down everything you imagine you'd like to do if you weren't avoiding. Off of the suggestion for a few reasons, some people feel like they are lazy or. When in reality, they're getting nearly everything done in fine fashion for people who are highly driven or perfectionist, but don't own this about themselves. One way of keeping on task is constantly telling yourself that you are avoiding things for others. There's so much shame beneath the surface. This exercise can help you get a glimpse of hidden pain and allow this part of you to be seen by you. Then you can access more help with a therapist to get feeling better. And finally you may just be so accustomed to avoiding that imagining moving forward in a more confident manner is a wild new concept if soul be much easier to move toward the picture that you create in your mind's eye using all of your senses so play using your imagination. For example, in my fantasy world i. Any bill, write a check and send it off. Take my wife's hand and talk it through when I feel stressed wake after eight hours of sleep hop in my Wesson and head to the gym. Just play with it. The purpose is not to make you feel guilty. This is an exercise to increase your creativity and curiosity. Let your body and mind enjoy the play and possibility of doing everything in a way you would like to do it. You may feel inspired ready to embody what you imagine or maybe the thoughts feel to threatening and cause increased. Shame. Conversely, you discover that you are in reality facing a large portion of life, but you habitually use the mantra that you are avoiding. Just notice and write down. Will you discover? Number three start with a small change in the easiest of the six targets. See found some area of avoidance and you can see how you'd like the situation to feel different. Great. Begin by choosing from your list of avoidance is just one little action. You can take thou fuel really terrific or at least good when it's done, make it one with just enough challenge to pursue but not so much challenge that it is emotionally overwhelming for you. You really want to succeed on the smaller items here. So feel free to break any task down into a smaller portion. Maybe, spend one minute meditating this week rather than entire yoga or meditation session. Perhaps, he do fifty push-ups before work. Instead of going to the gym, you could write your partner, a letter of appreciation or reply to a couple of work emails.

Partner Ingrid Y Hollander Elizabeth Scott S Intern Wesson
"ingrid" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

07:03 min | 11 months ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Switch4Good

"The NIH is the Nimh a throwing away on old fashioned experiments that causal this grief and putting it into state of the things where you can actually get results that apply to human beings. How do we? If somebody says maybe as listening to this and didn't really realize the extent of what's going on behind closed doors in laboratories and yet they know how to take an action every day to stop the suffering for land farm animals by changing their diet. What can we do to stand up against? What's going on in the laboratories as a single human being on a daily basis or whatever? It might be a weekly basis like like how do we fight that in the in the same way that were or in a similar way or in a different way, but how do we fight it the way that we are? Fighting not eating animals because that's like an action people can you know can grasp easily? Yes three times a day. You can make the decision. You're right. Most people are never going to go into a laboratory than ever going to see inside. One of the things that I think is go We've always got campaigns where like skittles when knocking down one ghostly experiment of to the other. So if you go to Pizza Dot Org and I'm not this isn't just a promotion. It's go there. See what is currently going on. For example, at the moment, there is a test where going to knock out. We already have Pfizer is not out universities of knotted out there other drug companies still using it. To test depression drugs, and this is going to sound crackers because it is for years and years and years, they've taken small animals, Guinea pigs, mice, rats dropped them into a solid side digit beaker of water and allowed them to swim for their lives. They think they're going to drown so that frantically swimming and you see them bill dive to the bottom of the beaker, trying to find a way out. There isn't one they'll try to scratch at the sides. There isn't a way out and they just record at what point they give up. And this is supposed to tell us something about depression. So we've said, knock it out. Stop It. Everyone can get involved in getting to those companies and saying no Lily is one of the lillies is one of the companies that still uses it. Tell them get on their website, bombard them, do our action alerts and one by one will knock them out, but also a color, your representatives even though we all know legislation is. Is. The hardest thing on earth to ever get buzzed, make sure your representatives. No, they're all bills before Congress now, and the can be bills especially in progressive states like California to ban certain tests on animals, experiments on animals that are shown to be completely cruel and wasteful and get behind them. Go visit your representatives. Don't just write them on email them a little time and go and sit with them and say I vote. And I want you to do this, and the more that we come out against the forces of the cage manufacturers. The feed produces for laboratory Chow, all the other forces that make money from keeping animals in labs we need to show power, but there's always something you can do a never. By a household product or cosmetic apostol product that doesn't have that leaping logo that means we did not test on animals, no animal ingredients, you can download the APP. That from it's called bunny free. Isn't it and it's got a little bunny and you can just when you go in the store you if you're wondering, you want to buy something, you just put the name of the product in the. In the APP search bar and they'll tell you whether right there. Peter will tell you whether you. It's tested on animals or not. Yeah. Goes registering read. Don't buy it. And also, so important tell the good companies, the buying from them tell the bad companies why you're not an Iowa say take a picture of the label of what you did by and send it to the company and say, I, would aboard from you. But I didn't because you still test on animals or you still have collagen or hydrolysed animal protein something in your product. That's I'm glad you brought Collagen up because I've had many people asked me what's wrong with it? Well, I, know it's from an animal and just knowing how they take from animals I can only fathom what might go on behind closed doors to get. Collagen. But you probably know. Well, all of these things I mean, if you look at the label, you'll see all sorts, mysterious things that don't sound bad collagen. His one of them hydrolysed animal protein, those two very big ones. But anything if you ask yourself, this simple question is, do you think the animal was a volunteer? Do you think animal voluntarily gave this up whether its land land from the fleas Ever? It is beeswax. You name it placenta. You see in face creams, total oil I. mean these animals needle that stuff. It's part of their physical self, and so it's the same as for leather or anything else. They didn't give it to you. It is not yours leave it alone. It doesn't belong. You do not steal, and so I would say whatever it is. If it's somebody wants to appear on your shoulder or hug your picture taken with a tiger cub or Put your feet in a fish pedicure tank. All, the animals volunteers. No. So don't do it. Don't go the say. No to it all. I WANNA. Know about the animal testing because a lot of people feel like that. We need to test on animals and they might not know that even though we fight human diseases. I. Answer. Life Yeah from an end to know whether a drug is effective an or chemical safe or drug is safe but it's actually holding back innovation because, yes, Ingrid talked about all the the new technologies that don't use animals. But currently the FDA mandates that when you test when you bring a drug to market, you have to test it on animals at least and do a whole bunch of battery of tests, and these animal tests are actually holding back progress because companies that could make even more of these amazing alternatives aren't incentivized because legally animals still need.

Pfizer NIH depression Congress Ingrid Chow FDA Peter Iowa California
"ingrid" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Lamonica. Today. We're talking about one of the most iconic women in Hollywood. Her five decade career won her three Oscars two emmys a golden. Globe and a Tony Award. A high profile affair saw her public image go as she herself once said from Saint to whore and back to saint again. Let's talk about Ingrid Bergman. Ingrid Bergman was born in Stockholm Sweden on August Twenty Ninth Nineteen Fifteen. Her early life was marked by tragedy. Her mother Frito Adler. Bergman died when Ingrid was just three years old. And grits Father Justice Samuel. Birdman raised Ingrid alone until he to passed away when she was twelve. After her father's death angered was left in the care of her unmarried aunt who died within months. Eventually Ingrid settled down for the remainder of her teenage years with an uncle and his family. As. A teenager Ingrid began working as a film extra before attending the royal dramatic. Feeder school and Stockholm, and they said well you got in and where you moved on. The stage realized that you had it. We didn't want to waste any more time. You're in because I thought I was out. there. She made her professional stage debut. In nineteen, thirty, five at the age of twenty, ingrid landed her first speaking role in Swedish film, and just a year later in nineteen thirty six. Ingrid landed the role that would change her life. She was cast as a piano teacher who begins an affair with the students father in the film Intermezzo. Let me be with you likely. Only! Performance your attention from Hollywood Ingrid was cast in the American remake of the film Intermezzo, a love story, which received great acclaim. With its Success Ingrid, Bergman initially arrived in Hollywood. Ingrid starred in films throughout the nineteen forties. Including Adam had four sons rage in Heaven and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. She made overtures Broadway making her debut and Liliam, one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, and starring in a production of Eugene Neal's and Christie nineteen one. Ingrid's most celebrated role came in nineteen, forty, two when she starred opposite Humphrey. Bogart, the Wartime Romance Concept Blanca. I've got a job to do to where I'm going. You can follow. The film was a box office success at an enduring classic, which is reserved a place for injured in the hearts of fans for generations. While Ingrid was not nominated for an academy award for her in Casablanca. She was nominated that same year for her performance Ernest Hemingway's for whom the bell tolls. She finally won an Oscar for best actress for her portrayal of Victorian housewife driven to insanity by her husband in the nineteen forty four Kasich gaslight. Oh! That was being. Making you? Kind of men in the world. I'm sorry I'm sorry I'M Career continued to pick up steam with another academy nomination for the bells of Saint, Mary's and with critical acclaim for her collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock and spellbound and notorious. Ingrid returned to Broadway in nineteen, forty, six to portray John in Joan of Arc, winning her first Tony Award for the performance and securing another academy nomination for the film adaptation. During her rise in the Hollywood, Spotlight Ingrid was portrayed as wholesome virtuous. This was likely due to a variety of factors. Unlike many young stars, Ingrid arrived in Hollywood already married her first husband Peter. Lindstrom was Swedish dentist and later neurosurgeon with whom she had a daughter Frito Pia Lindstrom. Ingrid also had a natural angelic look, which she declined to over embellish with the heavy makeup that was popular amongst movie stars of the time. The perceptions of her beauty and family life led to typecasting and more innocent at the onset of her career, but public perception would change in nineteen, forty nine, when Ingrid began a relationship with the Italian film director Roberto, Rossellini. In nineteen, forty nine, Ingrid wrote a letter to Rossellini expressing her desire to be in his films. In response Mussalini wrote a role for her and his nineteen forty nine film Stromboli. During production for the film Ingrid. Russell began an affair. Ingrid was still married to Lindstrom at the time. Though the marriage had not been happy for many years, Rossellini was also technically married to another woman although the couple had separated. Ingrid became pregnant and both she and Rossellini sought divorces. The two married in nineteen fifty shortly after the birth of their son Roberto. News of the affair and pregnancy shocked American fans expressed outrage at the downfall of their former idol. United, States senator Edwin C Johnson Colorado even took to condemning ingrained in public, calling her a powerful influence for evil. Rejected by American moralists Ingrid lived in Italy with Rossellini, or they made five movies together between nineteen, fifty and nineteen fifty five. During that time Ingrid also gave birth to twin daughters is so to an Isabella. Isabella, and onto become a famous model and actress herself. Ingrid made her return to Hollywood in Nineteen fifty six with the starring role anesthesia. It wasn't her both a Second Academy Award for Best Actress and the return of much of her former popularity. high-profile marriage with Rossellini ended in nineteen fifty seven soon after she married large Schmidt a theatrical producer from her native Sweden. Ingrid's work continued over the subsequent two decades on stage and screen. She want an emmy for the nineteen fifty-nine television miniseries adaptation of Henry James's the turn of the screw. In Nineteen, seventy four. She won her third academy. Award this time for best actress, supporting role for murder on the Orient, express, the winner is. Ingrid Bergman. In Nineteen, seventy five shortly after divorcing Lars Schmidt. Angered discovered that she had breast cancer despite her declining health, Ingrid continued to work. She completed her last film. Autumn Sonata in Nineteen Seventy Eight. And her final television miniseries, a woman called Golda in nineteen eighty-two. Performance in the series as Israeli prime. Minister, Golden, my year, one or both Emmy and Golden Globe awards. On August twenty, ninth, nineteen, eighty, two on the day of her sixty seventh birthday. Ingrid. London home. Her funeral was held in the Swedish in west London, and her were cremated and widely scattered off the coast of Sweden. A small portion were kept and interred in the prominent northern cemetery in Stockholm. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another leading lady. For more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our encyclopedia. A mannequin newsletter will Monica Weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia Britannica. You can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny Kaplan. Special thanks to Liz. Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator.

Ingrid Bergman Hollywood Rossellini Stockholm Sweden Tony Award Frito Pia Lindstrom Jenny Kaplan Frito Adler Lars Schmidt Roberto Ernest Hemingway Broadway Feeder school Justice Samuel twitter breast cancer Alfred Hitchcock Henry James Wartime Romance Concept Blanca
"ingrid" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Forever35

"Learned that body hair. Was associated with class to so. There was a time where people were removing their body hair in order to prevent things like Lyson pubic lice, but there was also this association with class and body hair, so people who were able to remove their body hair were seen as more godly figures and so I thought that was really interesting, too, because I think, there are still remnants of that you know the association with class, and what it means to be beautiful, and often class is determining what we think is beautiful like the upper class is determining that and so I find that to be really fascinating that there are remnants of that that we are living with today. That's really interesting. Yeah I know. How how has that also translated into? Skin acceptance because I know you've talked a lot about your relationship with your skin and rejecting the ideas of having. Good Skin. or quote bad skin. Could you talk a little bit about what that's been like for you? Oh. My Gosh will let me tell you. Quarantine is putting through a whole day relationship with my and my God, I feel like. I'm a beginner again with my skin like it is just everything I thought before is now being totally tested and reexamined. Because I feel like I am so much harder on myself in quarantine and you know. I already identify as a perfectionist in recovery, and what I think is so insidious about perfectionism. Is that even in this moment of like a global crisis? Perfectionism is still trying to squeeze its way into my life and one of the ways that it can look like. Is this pressure to? have. Skin right now because. I don't know where this came from, but it's like this idea of like well I'm spending even more time at home so. I should be tending to my skin and it should look better after all of this is over and I think what I'm realizing. Is that there so much more at play here than just the products that I'm using because I'm using products that I've loved for a while and some new things, but things aren't working in the same way that they used to. And because you know what I realized is that I'm not fully in control of what my body is doing and therefore. Therefore I'm not fully in control of what my skin is doing, and so I could be using all of these products, but I'm afraid I'm feeling grief. I have so much anxiety I am currently sweating right now in my closet from like the nerves that I was experiencing before this interview. Instead that is having an impact on you know what my body is doing and what my skin is doing the way that it's responding and so I think for me in this moment. It means having. Many moments of grace with myself and looking in the mirror, and being as gentle as I can be with myself, because it is so easy for me to be really cruel and really harsh with myself, when I look in the mirror and I'm just like Oh. My God. Those dark circles Omega, these lines that are showing up. That weren't there before. Oh, my Gosh, these symbols that are coming up that were there yesterday, and the list goes on and on and on and on and I have to catch myself and it's. It's just this constant cise in having grace with myself and telling myself I'm not fully in control here. Keep using the products that you love using that. Give you personal enjoyment and make you feel good, but let go of the need for control, and so that's kind of where I am right now. And I think it's allowed me to enjoy like the masks that I'm using washing my face using the serums that I'm liking though oils that I'm liking. It's making the experience fun again because I'm listening up the control, but. Every day is a new day over here and it is such a process. That has also been a struggle for me so. It's. A I mean I'm glad that you're going through this as well but It's nice to hear. articulated. And it's hard. I mean I look at my skin and I'm like Oh my God. What is happening and I have to remember like a global pandemic happening like we're all under. So much stress and this is so hard for so many of us so thank you for that reminder. Yeah I mean I I wonder like. I just feel like we're all trying to. Reach for control where we feel like it's accessible and for me. The way that I have reached for control often is makeup and my beauty products, and it's this line that I'm always kind of dancing on because there, there's the space of creativity and beauty, and just pure love and joy, and then there's also this space of trying to control something and so. Man? It feels especially heavy right now. And I feel like I am just a beginner again with all of it. It's such a great reminder that it's such. Everything is a practice right like we never. We never perfect. Anything and once we think we have it all down there. Something happens. That kind of throws us back on our ass again. Totally yeah I feel like right now. I have just been tapping into my teen self more because I just had this realization that you know teen. Ingrid was so much freer with her emotions like when I was mad as a teenager. You knew it. If I was sad, you knew it. I had no qualms about slamming the door when I was mad at my parents and things like that and I just realized. This is I think this is something I? I should be tapping into now. Maybe not slamming the door, but tapping into these emotions that I used to wear so easily on my sleeve and how? I had so much more grace for myself. I gave myself permission to do things like to cake on frosty Blue Eyes Shadow not because anybody was telling me that that was what looks good, but because I wanted to match the frosty blue eye shadow to my favorite, frosty blue, t shirt and so. I think like tapping into teen Ingrid has been really helpful for me because she's allowed me to explore these feelings that I have, but also my creativity at the same time and I think in this moment. What I've been doing as wearing make-up once a week and Right, now.

Ingrid Lyson
"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"I that I WANNA ask you I'm sure I'm not gonNA. Get to all of them, but you know we've seen reports of the dangerous working conditions in factory farms and slaughterhouses during the covid nineteen outbreak. What can you tell us about the state of factory farming and the meat industry, and is it true that pita is purchasing stock in these types of companies? Yes to start the also you said, I. We have we have now. bought stock in Tyson's GPS Smithfield's and so on. Most people don't know Smithfield is owned by a Chinese company that a Chinese. Operated outfit, but yes we. We have because what we want to do. Of course we have the minimum amount of stock is we want shareholders to be able to go to the meetings of the the annual meetings pointed questions something. We can do from the inside well. We're protesting on the outside and we all protesting on the outside every single day. Almost we are outside slaughterhouse. What is happening is of course. Factory firms are really breeding grounds for diseases like corona virus. If you look at saw an avian flu, and all these other fluids that that have happened across the world even. Even HIV they come from confining large numbers of animals or interfering with wildlife. Animals in uncertainty, unhealthy conditions mired in their own waste and went animals, a stressed, their immune systems, compromise, bacteria and diseases viruses that they have are able sometimes to what we call jump the species barrier and get into other species in China. There's been much said about the wet buckets and pita has been filming in them all over the world is that they are just disgusting they the blood and And the animal waste mixes with the water when they host the places down, people walk through the track it on their feet, and those viruses are mutating that that changing as they go from one animal to a next in China. They thought it was bats that went to penguins, penguins of these dear wonderful much poached wild animals, just as gentlest can be. They're all housed with kittens with. With monkeys together in the markets that factory farms are problem there breeding grounds for disease. Live markets are to and what we have seen in these slaughterhouses is mostly migrant workers who don't have an option to work anywhere else right a desperate for a living and treated very very badly as disposable objects they have had many slaughterhouses, no protection that the beginning, then when under pressure some protection and in some places still there isn't anything for them, and they are getting six seventy four well. 'cause have died outright. and let's build I. Think was one of the most guilty if I'm not mistaken based on what I read, but you I made this comment a couple of weeks ago on the air. Because it just it was the thought that came to me that after seeing so many films of that I've been exposed to as a vanguard member of through pita that you know you guys working to eliminate these markets, but isn't factory farming the same thing, but Jack behind closed doors. Oh, absolutely and the factory farm industry knows this. This is why they are trying in the US and in Canada to poss- These so-called AG, Gag, Louis which says that, even if you work inside, one of these fills pets, and you see cruelty to animals, and we have seen pigs spray painted in the face for fun. Chickens pulled up by the legs and slammed into the wall for a loss. If you see cruelty. Cruelty if you see filth and disease, if you see cancerous tumors on these animals as they using by on the slaughter lion at huge speeds, then if you take a picture or you register a complaint, you could find yourself in jail, not the facility because they don't want the public to know what's going on and so I just say to someone if you care about animals. That's grand if you care about human health. Just for cancer, does he the rest of it let alone the filth and the problems with covert virus and the others. He won't touch meat particularly chicken. I mean. Chicken comes from the filthiest place as amazing. well you. And what is it the dead zone in the in the Gulf of Mexico? That's the size of the state of new, Jersey from the run from Tyson foods right. Oh. Yes, I mean. It's polluting the waterways. It's polluting the groundwater. You got the Mid West, and if you've got the radio on in your car, you'll hear them say on. It's unsafe to drink water from your tap. TAP Today and why is that? That's pig-farming, and when we have tornadoes or hurricanes or anything else those waste lagoons, all that fecal matter from the pig just washes out into the streams kills. The fish kills the wildlife, and they spritz it across fields and people down of that can't even go outside, and they've actually to bring lawsuits to try to use their backyards because the stench is so strong. It's terrible. It is I. Just recently experienced that in the feeding lots in West Texas when I was driving to Arizona a few months ago. but it was terrible. I thought Oh. My Gosh, you couldn't the stench with so bad, Ingrid. You could barely breathe. I didn't even WANNA. Breathe it in because you know that air is just full of. Of Bacteria and just you know God awful stuff and and hear these animals are animals are out there baking in the sun, you know hundreds hundreds of degrees out there one hundred degrees out there you know just baking in the sun waiting to be slaughtered after their fattened up and it's just it's just it's just not right. It's just not right you. Have to really ask I, mean what are we doing and twenty twenty playing to eating animals? We know who they are. We know that they're wonderful. Emotional, sensitive intelligent beings. We know they have their own ways of doing everything from navigating to communicating raising their families. They don't have GPS. They don't have a supermarket. They don't have a dog, too, but they manage. If they're allowed to just be left to themselves and here we are. We look at them, and we still think I'd like to eat a piece of that. The blood the gristle guts of filth. They have an intestinal track. They have a rectum. All that has to be cut.

China Smithfield GPS Smithfield Tyson Tyson foods Mid West cancer Mexico US Jack Ingrid Arizona West Texas Louis Canada
"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"In their own ego that they think it makes some special to scare an animal, but I have seen bulls whose legs of snaps. You know dangling below the able to put any weight on it. And where do they all end up most of them? Not The big Brahma does they used for breeding. Many, many of those animals end up in the slaughterhouse. So why not torture them before they're killed? I think there's something wrong and our coach I mean I come from England. We've done a lot of horrible things in England. The point, you have to stop and think. Is this a part of my culture? I want to cling to I. Don't think so, you know. Racism has been a part of our culture I don't think we want to that and looking down at women and saying you belong in the kitchen or the bedroom. That's been part of our culture. Women couldn't even own property I. Don't think we want to keep that and I don't think we want to keep things which just throwbacks to win. Cowboys was sitting out in the in the wild, and there was nothing around nothing to do, and they spotted a cow and thought hey, let's torture him. Gosh, it's terrible and you know what I completely agree with you, and there is a connection between all the things that you're speaking of. There's a connection. It's a trickle down from the top. You know it is, and it's A. It's a learned behavior. I believe It's passed down from generation to generation and it and it really needs to stop you know Rinaldo. You brought up earlier in. In the week that the the understanding of of the experience of black Americans if you if we would all just read the history as you said Rinaldo, we would have a much deeper understanding in until I have to ask you, although. Do you think there's a connection between racism? The and the poor treatment of black Americans to the the the treatment of animals as well. Just the just the brutality of all of The, only connection I can just really think of with would have to be money. Yeah! That's a good one. That's a good one and I but I do think it's learned behavior and like I said. It's like I think Oh, well, if that's acceptable, then this is acceptable in a bad behavior is not acceptable ever. It's just not and certainly not cruelty, but you know Ingrid. There's so many things I wanna get to, and that includes talking about the Covid, nineteen outbreak and the dangerous working conditions in factory farms. We're going go to break for a quick station identification and a commercial break, and we'll be right back more coming up with Ingrid newkirk. She is the president of people for the ethical treatment of animals dating everyone will be right back..

Ingrid newkirk Rinaldo England Cowboys
"ingrid" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:57 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Org resources we have lists of cruelty free companies and lists of companies that still test on animals. We have health charities. For example. You can give money because you care about certain. Let's take birth defects Easter Seals. They still using animals in experiments. Get away from it. You can give your money to another charity instead so you can. We have those health charity. Louis we have the cosmetics lists. We have the clothing lists food. Lists you name it there when you began this. The entry point like the on ramp was simply unethical argument about the treatment of animals but now we have people who are coming into this because of their current concerns about health. I mean that was my introduction to this whole thing and and now the environment I think has become a really huge Point of interest for people that's bringing more and more people into this so the spectrum of of you know everything you're doing has now broadened tremendously from from when you began. It's true we still have a long way to go. Of course and I am fond of telling people you can fly from Los Angeles to London and back to Los Angeles and you still haven't made the carbon footprint that you would've if you had two boxes of chicken nuggets and people are amazed they think. Oh it's flying so we still have a lot of education to do a lot of people say it's so expensive to be vegan actually isn't at all. I mean you look at cultures like Mexico and SOW BEANS RISE SALSA PASTA. Yeah Fabulous Food for you. Greens you know. Whatever so the still a lot of education but I think the generations growing up have their eyes open wider. I think they're more open to the compassion aspect of it and they're going to teach the adults they always do don't they do. It is interesting. What you said about purity. The purity argument There is A. There is a strain of puritanism that that kind of you know underscores a large cross section of the Vegan community And I think that's important. Somebody has to like hold that line and let us know where it is but it also works across purposes. I think with bringing people in and I remember like we sitting over here like I met Lisa years ago. She came here with a film crew to do an interview with me and this was pretty early on in my evolution as a Vegan plant based person at at the time. I think we have like a cowhide rug that we just had forever and maybe a leather couch and I was like we gotta get rid of this stuff before it comes over here. 'cause I don't WanNa get shamed and like how does this work and like I didn't know the landscape or the rule book about what's Okay and what's not and I had a fear of that strain of puritanism you know being directed in my direction even though like I kind of jumped the fence and was learning as I was going and I've certainly progressed and evolved since that moment but I think that's something that is common among people and I know a lot. There's listen there's a lot of Vegan people. Listen to this podcast. Because a lot of people that aren't and I think the just the sheer idea of Ingrid newkirk coming on the podcast and sharing their her message. It's like Oh man like I don't I don't WanNa be you know. I don't want to be judged for not being you know on this side of the fence or as far along in my evolution here so I was the ultimate slow learner. I had my first four. Cote at nineteen I fished and it's funny because back then I would go along the pier and say to people who have fishing you need to cut the spine. Because that'll stop them from feeling pain. You need to stop fishing. I don't believe that it's about personal purity. It's like some people will take yogurts just for health this spiritual aspect to it doesn't ethical aspect to why we don't hurt animals. Zamora L- aspect. There's a decency aspect so it's good to point out to people that actually That came from suffering or an alternative to that other thing. Or you can be compassionate. And you're being unwittingly cruel but to do it in a nice way. I'm always trying I to negotiate because I remember. I was defensive when someone says something to me even about spaying. My cat back then. I didn't know why you should spare your cat. I'm so glad someone told me about factory farms told me about for. I had experiences that. Open my eyes so I do think we have the obligation to educate but not be condemned at tree because all learning and then if people really don't budge than I think you should be shop with them and say come on. You can do that here. I'll feed you here. I'll show you this. Let me take you out and show you this. Especially if their family or friends all right. So wh- peed in the future and this movement like if it was up to you. What does this what does this? Utopian world his paint the picture. Land this plane I. I'm not very good at crystal balling things. I Live Day to day. Because we've got so much going on and so many things that we have journal retiring anytime soon. No touch would never have wanted me. I won't be run over by factory farmer but no I mean this is my life and this is what I want to do and I don't want to be on my deathbed thinking I should have said something or should have done something. I could do better. I wish I was smarter but I I want to do as much as I can and I think Peter has that mindset at all our founding members have it all our our people have. It is that we want to get the job done. We know it's going to be a long job so we'll never have world peace will never have the end of child abuse in about people work to get as much of it out of the way as possible. And that's that's us. Yeah we need everybody with us. It really is a very thin line between your life. And your vocation like these are. This is who you are ruined through absolutely can't separate what you do from who you are. Lucky. That is very lucky. Thing right to be able to ply your passion and to live this purposeful life that has meaning and and in so doing really change the world and you have. It's it's remarkable the legacy of your career and I commend you for that thank you. It's only because people have come on board. It's only because we've said your power of the purse counts your activism counts. I tried to do five things every day what I would call outside my job and that is putting vegan starter kits in the back of the airplane inside the magazines and all the seats before anybody comes in if I can secret agent talking to the people at the desk removing the sea world pamphlets from the hotel I'm staying because nobody needs to be enticed to go there until they change their stripes talking to people is just suggesting something speaking to the person at the checkout mentioning Vegan foods or clothing. Complementing something on something and saying. Oh that looks as if that's whatever it just working. Yeah well thank you for the service that you do. Thank you. The animals and for humanity. You are a gift and of your commitment to service. It's really a beautiful thing and the world is a better place for having in it. So thank you. Very kind thanking. Yeah the book is Animal Kind. You can find it everywhere. Support your favorite independent bookseller. And if you can't do that you can find it on Amazon. You worked with GENE STONE ON THIS BOOK. I know well. He's wonderful. Man Great Guy. He did a great job with a book. I really enjoyed it so thank you and I wish you health so you can continue to do the work that you do. I wish that to you too and everyone listening. So IF PEOPLE WANNA learn more about you and the work that Pitas doing dot org and you're easy to find on the Internet. Yes and please let us help you want to transition in any way we have there for you call. Thank you peace thank leads. England is a firecracker right. I told you she's funny right. I can't say I saw that coming either way. I really hope this conversation served. You inspired.

Los Angeles Ingrid newkirk Louis Mexico Lisa Cote Zamora England Amazon Peter London
Mexican women plan historic strike against femicides

Democracy Now! Audio

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Mexican women plan historic strike against femicides

"And in Mexico. Feminists are calling for a national strike. March ninth one day. After International Women's Day to protest skyrocketing gender-based violence in Mexico calls for national striker being led by the Mexican feminist group which is of the C- The strike has been referred to as day without US calling on women not to go to work or to school to stay out of the streets and to avoid participating in the economy in any way for twenty four hours. This is a member of which is of the C. C. Under he is must believe that women in Mexico are tired of the different types of violence that are committed against us in all spaces. It is not only femicide crisis but also the day to day in homes in schools on the street on the job. It seems that there's no place that is safe for us. Plans for the national strike game momentum after the brutal murders in February of Twenty five year old Ingrid Skamania who was killed and mutilated by her partner and seven year old. Fatima who was kidnapped and later found dead wrapped in plastic bag in Mexico. At least ten women are killed every day

Mexico United States Ingrid Skamania Fatima Partner
Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:18 min | 1 year ago

Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

"All right everyone still here in in Vancouver at Noor ups continuing our coverage of this incredible conference and I've got the pleasure of being seated with bless Aguado. yuccas blesses is a distinguished scientist with Google. Ai Bless welcome to the Tomo podcast. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me absolutely so you are doing an invited. Talk here at the conference tomorrow morning on Social Intelligence and we're going to dig into what exactly that means for you but before we do love to get a bit of your background sure sure so It's a little motley. I started off in physics undergraduate at Princeton and I studied physics and applied math. There I I took a year off between my third and fourth years because I was not a very good student and I really started to get into into biophysics this X.. Pretty heavily so you're euro for after during during a or a little bit a little bit before and then during I worked for for a little while while in there he was working on bacterial Metaxas. That actually gonNA figure a little bit into mytalk tomorrow morning. So it's the behaviors years of of the intelligent behaviors of bacteria. And how does that. They that they find food. There obviously a really small simple system but maybe not quite as simple as people think okay and end and then from there My my next adviser Bill Bialik is somebody with a physics background. As well but also computational neuroscientist. He ran this course in woods. Hole at the marine. Biological lab called methods and computational neuroscientists it methods and computational science I don't I don't know if you're familiar or how many of your listeners are with with with them deal with marine biological laboratory but it's this place where a lot of Princeton notes on Cape Cod. Okay and so. It's right on the elbow of Kit. Kat across from Martha's vineyard okay this this little tiny town. It's very cute. And there's this kind of ramshackle lab that's been there since the nineteenth century tree that That a lot of a lot of visiting Sort of neuroscientists and biologists have been going for many many years A lot of really basic basic discoveries in science where made their. Oh so it's kind of this cool place. And and at this. Course at nothing computational neuroscience I I met my now wife Adrian Hill. Oh so she also came up in physics and Studied originally chaos and turbulence and fluid dynamics comics and things like this and was making the switch to puck additional science so we met there and and then she ended up getting a faculty job at University of Washington which is how we ended up moving to Seattle and around that time I started a company And was no longer really sleep. Part of academia at that point and the company got acquired by Microsoft couple of years later and they come into doing computer vision type of work or a it's a somewhat somewhat doing sort of multi resolution representations of of documents of of various kinds. It was okay. It was a combination of wave. Latouche kind of tricks six and and you X.. If I think wave letters like Kryptonite for me that was the hardest thing that I studied in Grad School. For whatever reason it was very difficult to rock it was it was hard. Yeah my my advisor. In Grad School in applied math was ingrid do bitchy who was one of the inventors intercept wavelength. Yeah she was she was absolutely wonderful very very smart very kind and I think I think one of the greatest living mathematicians if I. I don't know maybe unbiased. But Anyway Yeah Microsoft acquired it and I did immediately turn the team toward more four kind of computer vision e things right after that so photosynthesis which started off the photo tourism project by University of Washington professor and Microsoft research scientists together. With with their Grad student snively was in three D. reconstructions environments from the images and that was really my introduction to computer vision Asian. That was pretty classical. Wasn't like deep nuts or anything like this geometric computer vision but I kind of fell in love with that with that field and ended up at Microsoft Echo soft. You know sort of doing a lot of leading teams doing that kind of work so Microsoft's OCR team and they're kind of photographic treat type teams the teams that ended up doing a lot of work for a hollow Lens tracking The head using our facing cameras. All that kind of stuff was okay was part of my team at the time so I was at Microsoft for seven years I also was the CTO of bing maps which also had some kind of computer vision? The are photographic tree kind of stuff going on and being mobile and then I am I went to Google. That was six years ago. I come across so many people that are in this field that have some connection to bang. Yeah I shouldn't I shouldn't Bad I mean it was it was it was creative and scrappy at the time You know whether whether Microsoft was really committed to running these things I guess it. It's anybody's guess right but but yeah. I mean one of the most one of the reasons that I ended up leaving Microsoft was because about six years ago they had just Kind of lost the phone phone war and it became clear that they were going to be moving away from being a consumer focused company. We're GONNA start working on just enterprise stuff and I wasn't that interesting to me and that was around the same time. I'm also that did the whole deep learning revolution was really getting into full. Swing and I was very excited about about some of machine learning and computational neuroscience verging and Google is the obvious place. where the kind of hotbed of of a lot of that so nice? So what do you research. Google well at Google I started a team. UNCALLED CEREBRAL. With is not a name that we've generally used in public but that's not at all heading. Thank you it's the plural of brain. So there was a brain team already that you know Jeff. Jeff Teens started years before and I went to Google to start a team that would take how much more decentralized approach so rather than one brain. It'd be many brains. Everybody would have a little brain and I had a very augmentation focused point of view. You know the rather than having one giant running in a data center these things would have to shrink to democratize. There would have to go into devices. Run locally I had a lot of reasons for wanting to push in that direction including privacy Which I will talk about a bit tomorrow so mobile nets and a lot of these kind of efficient ways of running neural nets locally came from From our team again. I'm running. The you know the the the groups At Google the two things like oh CR and face recognition and a bunch of other sort of image understanding Primitives but we also power a lot of a lot of a or features chores or whatever you WANNA call them in android and also on other kinds of devices include including these little coral boards which are sort of an Iot kit for doing taking local I think those are just well. I guess it's maybe half a year ago at the developer conference drink. I have one. That's that's right that's right so yeah we're very excited about those cool he you mentioned OCR and Of all the things that we've talked about I think of that or it's probably easy easy to think of that as a solved problem the problem. But there's probably a lot of Even saying it. There's probably like this last mile problem. Where in order to get to usable or better levels of Accuracy and performance kind of that those last few percentage points are are really hard to get to. So you say I mean it solves problem and yeah I mean. It's good enough for practical use engines. That are good enough for practical use but a of of course. Extra percentage points are always useful. A little bit more is always better but also a team that I run at Microsoft was still using a lot of these classical techniques that would I you know they'll have a whole pipeline of different stages first segmenting out letters and then you know doing template matching and then using language modeling all kinds of like this and the direction that that that I think in the end that the you know the people in the team believe are really the most fruitful now are much more and much more neural so imagine smoke scanner that scans the entire line maybe by directionally and emits a string of characters. Kind of like a speech engine. Might if you you do it that way then you know. Join join letters and ligature is. Don't matter right cursive doesn't matter handwriting. And you don't print could be the same Arabic and other languages. That don't have good distinctions between letters. I ain't going but rather that don't that don't distinguish clearly between letters in the more cursive sort of approach. All of those things work and that sort of general and also just weird funds. There are a lot of things that are easy for us to read that a classic engine right so thinking about it more like a real vision problem some of the brain behind it as opposed to just a classical kind of letter clustering problem with the language model talked on

Microsoft Google Grad School Jeff Teens Princeton University Of Washington Microsoft Research Cape Cod Adrian Hill Vancouver Bill Bialik Scientist Aguado. Seattle Advisor Bing KAT Ingrid
NikkieTutorials: Beauty YouTuber reveals she is transgender

The World

02:19 min | 1 year ago

NikkieTutorials: Beauty YouTuber reveals she is transgender

"Channel Nikki tutoriales has nearly thirteen million subscribers that's more than the number of Twitter followers Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have combined now the beauty guru is making headlines for a new reason it is time to let go and be truly free when I was younger I was born in the wrong body which means that I am transgender Deoghar came out as a transgender woman in a seventeen minute video yesterday the video is trending at number one on YouTube in the US it's also trending in the UAE and Saudi Arabia where LGBT Q. lives are criminalized over eighteen million people worldwide have watched so far younger says she decided to come out because someone was trying to blackmail her I've always wanted to share this side of my story with you but under my own circumstances and it looks like that chance has been taken away from me so today I am taking back my own power the younger is twenty five years old she told viewers that by age eight she wore only female clothing she started taking hormones at age fourteen and was fully transitioned by age nineteen other YouTubers in the beauty entrance communities are expressing their support Nikita Toros coming out as a transgender what men want yeah what you did today means the world to so many people you're changing lives it's just so so important for people to hear that it's not defining to who you are as a person Dutch politicians are also paying attention Ingrid von uncle so then the Dutch minister of education and culture and science said you are really free if you can be who you are role models are of great importance for emancipation Nikki tutoriales is of such a role model to younger took to Instagram today with words of gratitude the incredible amount of love and support and warmth means so much to me thank you and to those who can relate to her journey to younger says if you'll feel like you're trapped and there's No Way Out no and it gets better it gets better for the world I'm be

Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Deoghar Youtube United States UAE Saudi Arabia Nikita Toros Instagram Nikki Tutoriales Twitter Ingrid
"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"The way you do it you I really believe that you set yourself Apart think is such a fun way because cooking should be fun. It is fun if you will. What I realize is other chefs? Weren't really entertaining. No shade to you other chefs doing what they do. But most chefs aren't actors singers performers. What I realize is I was making food? I was doing the whole event separate separate event catering and then I realized people kept asking me for my recipes and I was like well. Let me start entertaining people with my songs and dances and it Kinda just melted into. Do what it is today. Yeah well it's all very fun and exciting and I'm going to go to break here because I need to get ingrid new. I'm so delighted to have around the show. She he is an amazing woman. She is a world leader. And I'm honored to have around the show with us today. We're GONNA be talking about a lot of controversial stuff so stay tuned. Everyone we're going to go go to break. You're listening to one life radio..

ingrid
"ingrid" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

14:10 min | 1 year ago

"ingrid" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Welcome everybody to the healing place pod odd guest. I am your host terry. Well brock excited to have with me today. Ingrid hollaender so welcome ingrid. I terry thank you. Thank you for having me a happy to be here today. Yeah i was just telling you before we started recording that eye doctor website and i love what i see and i love the the idea of your books so talk to us about what it is you do and oh i didn't do your intro of what did i say therapist teacher. Group leader author and i edit teacher only because yeah. I think what you do is teaching. Oh thanks yeah so yeah. You wanted to talk about. What i do. That was the question didn't before now's checking in <hes> i well when you looked at my website. You probably saw my book and <hes> it's called comu- worries unlike your secret code to lasting stress really and self confident and i wrote it after being in private practice and therapy practice for almost twenty years now and raising my children and coming from a long line of warriors and being one myself <hes> i supervised therapists and they come into my office and they would say just don't give me <hes> clients who have anxiety that makes me crazy. I just don't enjoy working with it but i don't get it and i'd be like oh. Those are my people. What are you talking about. That's my fav- how can you even not wanna work with people who worry <hes> and i think because my concept of people who worry is that they care care. You know these are people who cared deeply and who's neurobiology. Who's nine set has just gotten a little uh taken over by that. You know you know you can't one thing you can't say about people who worry is that they don't give a rat they care so true ooh yeah and and i feel like so often people who worry you know. I don't want to overdramatize it because i know that there are people and and i've worked with these people who are suffering from extreme p._t._s._d. Terrible horrible traumas you know severe biological anxiety disorders and i. I'm not minimizing that at all or saying that this is the same however it it can feel so tougher for a person who chronically worries to not be able to be heard about that. You know when you talk to somebody about. I'm really worried about this. The tendency for friends and loved ones is disabled. He wanted right. You look great. You look great. Let it go. You're so you've made it. You've done chameleon times. You're you're looking at successful. You are look attractive. You are in the company friends. You have an inside. That person feels sounds like you. Don't get it at all right so now. I'm even more worried because i don't make any sense and i put people off with my own. Worry sorry so it's this vicious cycle that gets set up for people and so i really decided i've studied <hes> a many different models of therapy as family therapists because that's what we do and <hes> the two that i've landed on that i love in particular are internal journal family systems therapy by richard schwartz and polly vega theory which is not a form of therapy but has been brought into the therapy room by women named deb dana china and those two together along with just kind of who i am and what i do i've found to be exceptionally helpful for people who have chronic worry worry and so i started writing about it and sort of melting those together and talking to people that are worry and it's been so exciting because i know it's helped me. I know it's helped my clients and it can help other people too yeah. I love it and i totally get it. I have a c._p._t. S._d. diagnosis for my elm trauma history from okay her ethic yeah twenty first twenty two years of light but of my time worrying which made me perfectionist stick yes because you know that control saying if i could try to control everything than it wouldn't be so overwhelming and caused me so much anxiety and worry correctly exactly yeah and in in my language <hes> that that perfectionism that controller part is a part of you right and so when you can have respect for that part of you in recognize. It's just trying to help you out. I i just thinks no one would criticize you right and you'll be in control and nothing will go wrong if you just be perfect exactly zack to adjust right yeah and for those of us who sort of <hes> i don't know if you follow the ground but that's kind of an interesting you know type typology and those of us who are type one which are tend to be perfectionists right sort of fall into that very naturally. I you know i like to do things well i like to be i like to have <music> high expectations for myself and all the sudden. It's eating you up right and without trying. It's not a fault. I think that's my biggest message to people who worry. You're not not not growing in you know. There's no that that perfectionism and that you know people's airline far perfect. That's not what perfectionism it is you know and that constant striving self-criticism vigilance. You know <hes> but it's it's not trying to hurt. You and it isn't a bad thing. If it's sort of within your own relationship inside time you have a good relationship to yeah very good. I'm i'm a to serve the helper. Is that yeah that is that's right to and you might have a one wing then right. I don't know that much about. I don't want to tell me i know i know i love it. I think it's so great yeah. I think it's because it's it's it's unbelievably accurate. When i read the i have the book. Actually i have two of the books and oh my gosh is. I read like deepest what the deepest fear is and i was just like oh my god i well. It has been around thousands of years so that they know what they're talking. I had exactly exactly so you you you explain explain on your website that you have your own history. <hes> <hes> with it and i love the fact i love the idea that those of us who have been through something then take what we've experienced and turn it into a positive to help oh bothers so one studios to you for doing that and helping others long. They're healing journey <hes> just beautiful thanks. I don't think you can really do it unless you have been there and you know i i think that's the gift of struggle that that it just opens us to other people people every struggle i've ever had in life whether it's been worry or you pregnancy issues or marital issues or whatever it is parenting. The struggles are what connect you to other people you know and getting through them and understanding them that that brings people to you and makes you more human and helpful fall you know so i i'm pretty grateful for all of that at least at this stage in my life. I can't say it's always that would be the gift within you know gift within the chaos that you re. We eventually not necessarily in the moment but we eventually find. I am the gift in the lessons learned within yeah for sure and how strong we are. You know really humans are amazing just the the resilience and the ability to grow beyond you know i mean i just think about people stories that have sobered me any so through the years and i you just it's such an honor to witness those and to see the amazing strengths and capabilities that come out of them and when you're when you're with someone that's in the middle of one and they can't see it. You know you just you just have such a heart for wanting them. Yes you recognize ice. Oh but look at you. You know look how amazing you are right i just <hes> and when they do that moment is spectacular like nothing nothing else right for sure or yeah. <hes> involved in you know do utilize aces experience. I know what you're talking about. I don't tend to do a lot of those measures that yeah yeah how's the high stress and the how many right is that what you're talking about that scaling scaling of yeah of how just has such a profound impact on people as far as like the anxiety they expect almost like it becomes like you said a part of them. It is apart and as a part of them yeah and it has you know internal family systems is so so amazing to work with around the anxiety and and trauma and things like that because it literally looks at the inner world as an inner family and so oh you have parts that are protective you know you have parts that come in that want to you know save you from whatever not from the outside world particularly but really from from parts inside right that have been deemed scary or unacceptable or too painful and so it's amazing it is it's i love it so much and it is really i have to say i. I've never felt like oh no. I you know i'm i'm not gonna make it as a therapist but i can see why therapists who don't practice body centered models and especially something like i fast burnout because being able to understand really what's going on inside died to use it for your own parts while you're working with someone else and call and call <hes> you know we feel each other right and not to get caught in that fixit exit trap with kind but to understand they have the capability you can just be curious about it and help them to find their way is so energizing jive thing. It's such a different experience than feeling like the answer personnel to fix it personnel at the time. That really isn't true. You know right. We can't fit you know it's it's not we can't fix other people. Although my personality is to be the fixer so exactly right we're in a lot of us in helping profession. That is exactly league. We are for sure. I got a lot of to about me. You know i i love to take your people and i love to know and i love to tell people and i think that's why i i do love what i'm doing now because i do know a little something about probably bagel here theory. I'm not i'm not the expertise. Importance is the expert deb. Dana is the expert very you know janine fisher the expert but i know enough and i understand the science of it that i can help it. Make sense to people you you know and it's made such sense to me yeah so instead of getting an anxious feeling now and going. Oh no oh i'm in. I'm really in trouble or there's something wrong with me or making some kind of story. The first thing i can do is take a breath and understand exactly where my nervous system this feeling is coming from as much as i can understand it right right and then have a sense of what to do with that on a body form just as if i would feel super super hungry i wouldn't go no then. This has a moral meaning. I'm hungry. Why mine's by just eight then i'd be like i'm kind of a pig. That would be bad right but you would tend to go. I'm hungry. How long has it been since i ate. You know what i mean. Needing okay. I can feel you wouldn't go you wouldn't and make a story about generally and so i think the same thing applies to things like worrying you know. Where do you feel it in your body. What's happening for you now and and first noticing it surely is a body experience blameless. Were supposed to feel respond to have nervous system. You know sensation right that happens all day long or more along. Am i safe my dangerous you know. Did someone make a funny face at me. You know get that that scared me a little does that make me think you know just noticing okay wait. My body picked up a signal. What am i doing with it and then to go from there you can get in deeper and go and what part of me is activated and how can i be with that part of me. Just as i would be with a child or something i love it and two things things popped out at me one. You mentioned your said the words just noticing twice in my therapist. I went through e._m. D._r. they're great therapy for four years and lots and lots ninety eight sessions but man do we work through a lot of trauma <music> but one of the most powerful lesson she taught me was just notice when i would be sitting in a in a session and we will be going back into one family. Traumas a panic attack would be arising and i here's a. b. sobbing and shaking and all of that ensure just calmly remind me one that i it was grounded to just notice in and it was that same sort of thing and then the other thing is i'm so intrigued by this because i'm that person that loves to feel my toolbox with so i'm i'm going to have to dive deep into this because i had matt heard of. Is it internal.

deb dana china Ingrid hollaender terry brock Group leader private practice richard schwartz zack matt janine fisher polly vega twenty two years twenty years four years
"ingrid" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What will you create today? Angry so nice to see you again. I had the really distinct honor of interviewing Ingrid couple of months ago at the Chicago ideas festival, but they only gave us a wee bit of time. And so now, I get to ask all the really tough questions five years ago five years ago on February fourth two thousand fourteen you post a question on your blog the aesthetics of joy, which is phenomenal. And I'd like to ask you the question that you posed you said you asked do we have a universal right to joy what sparked that question? And how would you answer that? Now. Wow. Right in the rain. We did the warm up in Chicago. The question was sparked by a conversation with someone who really made me think about how joy is experienced. By people at all sort of levels of the socioeconomic spectrum because I think we often think of joyous this luxury in life this extremist thing yet framing it as the question about a universal. Right. I mean, I knew that it was a universal feeling right. We all feel joy. But what if my hypothesis at the time, and sort of the thesis of my book that our surroundings are an important factor in what brings us joy. If that's true. Then the inequities that we find in the way that our surroundings are constructed could actually jeopardize some people's ability to feel joy. And so I started wondering for myself. Do we have a universal right to join? I think we do. And I think that if we take the perspective that it's on everyone individually. To create joy for themselves and were personally responsible for it. And we have to just figure out a way to do that. No matter. What circumstances we find ourselves in? I think that is responsible that we've actually sort of let people down and that. When you look at many of the buildings, and the places that people in poverty, are sort of left to inhabit, and that many of these things are constructed with an attitude of you don't get to have the nice parts. Right. We're not going to put nice plants, and we're not going to paint colours. We're just going to put brick and metal and make it really plain and simple because that's all you deserve. Right. Then I think we're making an equation between joy and aesthetics and saying that those things are things that we have to earn that we have to deserve. And that they're not universal. Right. And so by posing that question, I think I was hoping to spark a conversation around how we bring joy and dreadful aesthetics back to some of those places. How do you define joy? I tend to go with a try to go at the scientific definition of joy, which is an intense momentary experience of positive. Emotion. And so it's different from happiness because happiness is something we measure over time, it's broader, and so we evaluate our happiness based on a lot of different factors in our lives. You know, how we feel about our work. Whether we feel like we have a sense of meaning or purpose in our lives. How socially connected, we are all of those things go into like our happiness, but joy is much simpler, it's more mediate. It's more visceral, and we can really measure it through physical expressions, smiling laughter and things like that. So for me, it's about these small moments. Interesting that you you take immediately to joy versus happiness because in that same blog post, you go onto state that you don't believe that people have universal rate to be happy. And while our declaration of independence grants a right to pursue happiness. You state that the pursuit horrid -ly gay. Guarantees achievement. And I think that a lot of people forget that you really have to earn your happiness and a lot of ways..

Chicago Ingrid couple five years
"ingrid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Show today ideas about finding joy, and we're just hearing from designer Ingrid Patel who I stumbled upon the concept of joy in design school Ingrid picks up the story from the Ted stage. Where is joy come from? Than happiness which measures. How good we feel over time. Joy is about feeling good in the moment right now. And this is interesting to me because as a culture we are obsessed with the pursuit of happiness. And yet in the process, we kind of overlook joy, I started asking everyone I knew and even people I just not on the street about the things that brought them joy. I felt like a detective when did you see who were you with what color is anyone else yet? I was the Nancy drew of joy. And after a few months of this. I noticed that there were certain things that started to come up again. And again, and again, they were things like cherry blossoms. And swimming pools and three houses, hot, air, balloons, and googly eyes. And especially the ones that the sprinkles these things seem to cut across lines age and gender and ethnicity. I mean, if you think about it, we all stopped in turn our heads multicolored arc of rainbow streaks. Mukasa and fireworks. Even need to know what they're four and we feel like we're celebrating too. These things are joyful for just a few people there joyful for nearly everyone there universally joy fall. Yeah..

Ingrid Patel
YouTube adds feature films to view for free

Talking Tech

05:06 min | 2 years ago

YouTube adds feature films to view for free

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Get out the popcorn. So in a world where YouTube is now being viewed on TV sets marks tablets. The video network has quietly added the -bility feature films for free YouTube cut a deal with movie studio MGM to offer over one hundred of its films. Most of them, you haven't heard of the ones you have heard, of course, would be the rocky and Pink Panther movies. The original Terminator, legally blonde. And then it all falls downhill from there missing in action or films from other studios like Twentieth Century, Fox, Walt Disney Sony, Warner Brothers and paramount. But it's a start, you know, that YouTube is best known as the home of the short video clip, although some of its creators who make videos for YouTube like Shane Dawson and Logan Paul have recently been experimenting with longer original productions additionally YouTube is embarked upon longer original says part of the YouTube premium offering which. Each offer an ad free way to watch in Kane access to exclusive content. So these YouTube films feature ads unless you subscribe to the nine ninety nine monthly YouTube premium offering they appeared directly under the collection of recently released films and TV shows that YouTube currently offers for rent and sale. I think of YouTube is a place to watch short video clips and highlights from comedy shows not full length films, but I checked out the movie section and they've got all the trend movies, and and more. I saw crazy risks crazy. Rich Asians is there. Disney's the incredible too. And they're even advertising current hits. Like a star is born in bohemian rhapsody in the coming soon section expect to pay around five dollars to rent twenty dollars to own YouTube. Also offers episodes and seasons of popular TV shows like AMC's better. Call Saul NBC's, the good place in the classic. I edition of Star Trek at three bucks per episode where ten dollars to fifteen dollars for the complete season similar pricing to how apple does it on I tunes and Amazon with prime video. Now, you may not have heard, but in recent weeks, there's been an outcry over AT&_T's decision to kill the film struck subscription movie services, which is one of the few places online. We're film fans could get access to watching old classics be a streaming think about it. When's the last time you found a classic movie on Netflix? There are a handful on Amazon prime video, but most of them you have to pay to watch it just check it out the next time one of the Hollywood greats dies like Neil, Simon. And then go try to find one of his his or her films to to watch streaming. It's pretty rough. Now, many film pants have wondered where today's generation we'd get the classics like Charlie Chaplin's city lights, duck soup by the Marx brothers or Casablanca with Humphrey Bogart in Ingrid. Bergman not on Netflix Amazon prime, but they are all available on YouTube Ditto for itunes in food do but they cost to ninety nine to three. Ninety nine to view, and that ten dollars monthly from films truck was clearly a better deal, what YouTube is doing with the film's makes a lot of sense because you may not be aware of this. But nearly twenty percent of YouTube Ewing now done on TV's either on smart sets with the built in YouTube app where via streaming players like Roku, apple TV which bring the YouTube app to TV sets. Are you watching movies on YouTube? Let me hear all about it on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham, you've been listening to talking tech, please subscribe to the show on apple podcasts. Please favored the show on Stitcher. And thanks everyone for listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for officiant? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Youtube Amazon Apple Netflix Disney AMC MGM Charlie Chaplin Twentieth Century AT Kane Humphrey Bogart Shane Dawson Saul Nbc Twitter Warner Brothers Sony Jefferson Graham FOX Bergman
"ingrid" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Uh how the devil i it's those day it's the to shop podcast it's episode a thirtytwo with ingrid all that so you may or may not know that a few weeks back by self producer grefe pop to liverpool to the baltic social for that the special night it was our first ever live to show podcast on it was chocolate cannot i was bitter cold but still people came out to support was at it was a fantastic night we had arcade past who shall podcast open fours which was brilliantly the four or five cracking poems the audience will love now i was loving it was great and then we welcome on stage ingrid oliver and yet we got down to things were things called deemed quite quickly we were we're both quite shocked to wear the conversation when but it's a really brilliant episode on a call thank you agree that off for comment on i was great so she had hands and we go episode thirty two of the to shop podcast with ingrid oliver missing would oliver ladies and gentlemen hello high ingrid and i thank you so much for komen old nights liverpool way my asked any pleasure the things that when you said that when you see in my speech steve polka and i'd heard an unusual i can intimate tests huts hats and now reading it live and because i my background is live comedy mind meaty instinct is to take a stand up take them into a tightend so this is quite wit onto sitting down i want to be entertaining and i go what we can do you will be on started with let's just pretended me and you in the room i k of not being rude by the way in which of forgot about you look for the book but let's just think we'll just talked to talk about you and it's just renew in the room all right with every in six i have but i will i will fly set fear fight this for at least the next hour i will ac hang.

producer ingrid oliver komen steve polka liverpool
"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

"Then void talking about simply talking to each other and forming actual relationships that don't rely on some invention to take place yeah for sure i mean that's what the dan pinto character her guessing as who your referencing but that you know that was the intention behind that character as the here's a guy who he's obsessed with batman and he loves probably one of the least popular batman movies which is batman forever and you know i loved that other as soon as that business god popped up in the bat and rival fonda thought was that that's definitely reference that's an accident it'll definitely not a nice it but i i like the having a character who isn't cool and who likes what he likes and isn't doing it to be popular you know and i think to have a character who is authentic and is very much himself and to have that to contrast with all these characters who are all trying to be somebody that they're not and pretend to be somebody whether or not and so that sort of the the point of that character is that she's meanwhile want ingrid's chasing all this these mirages there's a real person here who really cares about her and sees her for who she is is and like surfer who she is and that she's really not appreciating and to me i sort of see this to talk with the nfc the ending is bittersweet i don't see it as a completely hopeless ending but obviously it's not things aren't completely rosy in the end and it's not the sort of happy ending that maybe people want but again referencing the film to wars that you said before you know that sort of the ending of every film it's like you're ends at the main character either incomplete ruin or on the verge of ruin and i think those movies came out of a very anxious sort of postwar mentality of like the feature was very uncertain for a lot of people and so i think that's i feel like that's where at least for my head space was at what we were making a film is not not knowing what the future holds in that we could potentially be on the precipice of.

batman fonda ingrid dan pinto
"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

"Like that and so i think ingrid kind of became this vessel for us to poor all of our conflicting feelings about social media and instagram into she sort of the we serve astra celtic who is the worst person that instagram could happen to you know it is i think the ingrid's kennedy the answer that question she feels like a very authentic character i think most people will look at her ending i i know someone just like that hopefully not just like that riots she is quite an extreme example yeah but if you take away some of the the real extreme 80s that managed to make the plot of the a push alone there are so many facets to her that that feel like little bits and pieces we notice in everyday life it in everyday experiences that we have a is that part of how she was shaped you did you door upon experiences that you'd actually had coming into contact with other people i think she it's a hodge podge you know i think it's like you poll from parts of yourself good darker part of yourself the you want to explore may be people that i've known in the past and then also i don't wanna discount aubry's sure bution to the character because i think you right one thing on the page and then union an actor to bring it to life and i think aubrey did such a great job of playing all these different sides and really think making her such a wellrounded character that you really feel like you care about her even though she is doing these all these kind of desperate things that you may be don't approve of you to hurt yearly please don't do that you know it's like sort of that horror movie thing of like all don't open that door whatever we wanted the character to be very threedimensional we didn't want her to be a joke or we didn't want her to be sort of the sinister villain of the film you know we wanted her to have all these different facets of her character i mean this is very much a film of the moment of.

ingrid kind social media instagram astra celtic aubry aubrey kennedy
"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

"Some people might be confused by the premise set forth in matt spices debut film ingrid goes west is it a film about mental illness babb's on aids more concerned with the everyday banality of social media and how such tools the connective it he can't be used to fill in for real human connections from its opening scene it's clear that ingrid is an unstable protagonist when she's not spending her time in an institution following a violent outburst she's at home in suburbia in iron that she once shared with her now deceased mother it's a sad existence easy to understand then why the endless scroll of opportunities offered by instagram's sundrenched influences might suggest an alluring quick fix youtube can be your best self they say happiness is just a few hundred follow is away the pitfalls of social media are well documented but matt spices film at cleverly avoids falling into the social commentary monitored by focusing his film not on the ills of instagram but only emotional weaknesses that these apps can often prey upon with their economies of lax and double taps despite the ubiquity of social media it's rare four film to expose the medium with such a fine balance of honesty and comedy i asked mad spicer where suggestion for the story came from so dave michael writer and i were having lunch in los angeles and ease a screenwriter to it was just a friendly lunch and and we just started talking about social media and specifically instagram than how we both have this kind of love hate relationship with it that we both use it alaadin were fans of the app but it tends to dredge up the darker sides of ourselves that maybe we wouldn't want to admit exist you know are served insecurity is and things were were looking at what people posts than thinking on are we not going on enough vacations are we not work cohen of closer know things.

ingrid babb social media instagram youtube spicer writer los angeles cohen matt dave michael
"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

"Boom boom by think ingrid carter became this vessel for us to poor all of our conflicting feelings brought social media an instagram into we serve ask ourselves accused the worst person that instagram could happen to ends i think the ingrid's kennedy answer that question a direct a matt spices film ingrid goes west took away the top screenwriting award at this year's sundance film festival it's being hailed as a doc leave funny sat higher about today's obsession with social media about as we'll hear from spicer himself its list about the media and more about the people who use it hello from a dory house in london this is the cinema show i'm ben rislan also today i went to a party and somebody came ever said who your us at my coaches that i guess i just met in script writer so really abuse so i look around and i think who the hell is posing it's a script writer because i've written the script fresh from the success of the classic crime film get kata starring michael caine nineteen at seventy one director mike hodges began work on the comedy thrill up pulp we'll find out whatever happened to the almost forgotten favorite in a special interview with the filmmaker that's older come on the cinema show on monocle 24 madam plans drink piloting ralph love them complaint to immune hashtag them they're logic the marine maybe there pierce outflow hashtag through them.

ingrid carter social media spicer ben rislan writer michael caine mike hodges kennedy london director
"ingrid" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Hello everyone and welcome to slash on daily for september first two thousand seventeen on today's show will be going into the water core talking about don't breathe ingrid goes west and i tunes reviews and in the news will be talking about early buzz for downsizing in the shape of water alexander pain in gear modell soros newest films will be talking about the kuester were choice from force friday to in what we've learned about the last shed djeddai from them and in all female lord of the red alert of the flies' remake uh is in the works will talk about that as well in in the mail bag will be talking about movies that uh have to do with journalism exciting uh with me on today's podcast are y trend billy all right that everyone and brad omen it asked me uh guys come over to water cooler um hasn't stuff to talk about last night i finally saw the horror film don't breathe thing goes from last year um almost every one of my friends told me to see it and i i missed it in the theater in front of finally i think it's unlike stars or something and i was able to see it guys this movie is awesome like why did i not believe everybody that will miss it it it it it is a great horror film um and i don't know why it wasn't uh as love by critics are at least like a i don't feel like it was as talked about in on film twitter in that whole circle bread used you saw the film rate.

twitter ingrid
"ingrid" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"ingrid" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"As in doing this and poor ingrid is just fixated on you and probably has some sort of borderline oh it's it is pretty scary yeah she has something a little off she's she's not the greatest audience for instagram our social media pinkser had spent event she she comes in and stocks me but i just think she is just like a new front until you're onto the next spent yeah that's the thing about social peter end to end tell us she's just like okay you're out like and now like let's have a party this is so different from your fbi except wanted to spoilers or anything she in her own way this person that you're playing is in in a way as screwed up wave as poor anger it is truly because i i what i what i think happens what's happening in society right now we're not society what's happening with the social media culture is that we all just want to be seen we all just went to be noticed and whether that's like committing something like that's a violent act um or posting you know a photo of you looking great by the beach i think people just want to be seen and noticed in its and we get this new satisfaction from it and i think that highs there is something that's that is really messing with how we interact with the world because of that uh i don't think it's all negative i think there there are positives to it i just recently joined in i'm trying to figure out how a new to this new after this movie i.

ingrid instagram fbi social media