24 Burst results for "Ingo"

"ingo" Discussed on Los' Lounge

Los' Lounge

05:54 min | Last month

"ingo" Discussed on Los' Lounge

"It was what oh pretty big pretty pink. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. Yeah that was her. Best friend leah. Okay so Why chewy doug older. I can't okay bad about was easter. Do this really cute thing on stitching chain. There's probably ingo trench verschoor. Tmi for listening audience. But i just thought it was cute. Cheery chain chain so the to good monchy all right so we are going to play the fifth hour addition. Here we go. You know what you are a guest co host today. So i am going to hand it over to you. I'll let you go first so so you didn't do the you didn't do the homework. I said right down three questions. Because i was purchased by. Now you can hit. You can hit me with it. Okay okay so this is like all those who are bars right like pretty good. Do out of all of your access. Who was the best bet. Shit won't.

ingo trench verschoor leah
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

04:44 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Nuclear sites sites which is to my mind in controversy incontrovertible those things appear with regularity and have done for decades over nuclear installations of multiple descriptions that bits clear the implications of that to me on those which is why. I'm not polarizing. It as did that good or bad. I just don't think the data's clear enough yet for me. Certainly to draw that distinction. But it's interesting. It's super interesting and i think it is all bound up with consciousness by the way i would agree with you on the goody t- batty because the other thing i see is the you know raping you without your consent in kind of quasi-public in the extended brow don't fit in any near death experience account that i've ever heard so what's up what's up there so i i agree. It's much more subtle much more complex and even the lumping of et as singular you know as opposed to multiple multiple multiple species multiple different timeframes multiple agendas within species. I mean all that stuff has to be on the table in a way that we can't begin to understand so i'm with you on that i agree true and that and that is a very good point. Which is that. I mean understandably those who are coming to this phenomenon Relatively recently You know characterizing e. t. as just a thing you know a one sort of entity but i think any one certainly who has come at this from a sort of consciousness suspected that asks the question all the layers to the reality that we see and in those layers may is it possible for intelligences of various descriptions that we fundament fundamentally wouldn't recognize as being remotely human or kintu humanity. Might they reside in those layers and to characterize that multiplicity potentially of intelligences is quote as e. t. is just fundamentally wrong but that is a result of people coming relatively late to the narrative and also coming at it from a nuts and bolts perspective. Which is not unnatural. Actually if you view your world as nuts and bolts threats hinterland then you're going to see the world it takes a lot to. I mean i've been looking at the consciousness thing probably for decades maybe longer if you sort of On the on the sidelines take into account the remote viewing story in ingo. And but even. When i knew ingo i couldn't get my head around the whole consciousness thing. We'll begin to then so to expect in the military to is is is a big ask. Yeah fair enough. But getting back to the book resurrecting the mysterious and go swans great lost work and also you know i do want you. If you can to at some point talk about. I want to pick up this book. I will pick it up. I just didn't have the time but this looks like a really good. Read the grid. And i hear you. You have a secret sequel coming out of that in then Here's some of the other books but let me pause for a second. What's the grid all about. Well the the grades was sort of my project in my sort of inbetween years as i call them because After i left jane's wacko kind of download moment that what the What airspace in defense industries should really be doing is saving the planet. And that is so counter intuitive. When i got the idea. I was doing everything i could to sort push it away. This actually doesn't make any sense. But then when i looked today's and it came out. Of course that what download moments do come out. Which is you know. I think malcolm gladwin would probably attest to this. Tens of hours of research into a particular thing and of course. I'm grounded in the aerospace and defense industry and what i see is a whole lot of unused technology in Our understanding of the planet From subsea through see through the atmosphere and into space..

ingo malcolm gladwin jane
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

02:46 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"As sort of you rightly along with those others is is is referred to as the father will goldfarb Viewing and let's add a little detail to that. Just so people have a sense because sometimes we say protocols and we skip over it what are some of the things that ingo in jock. Vallejo put off russell. Targ what are some of the things that they implement. Suggest is part of this training program that they will then teach to other remote viewers and now has been taught to thousands and thousands of both government employed remote viewers and private remote viewers. Yeah and that she funny enough. You've reminded me of something else today. I was reading about english witches. Ingo was of logo. I'm also and He he absolutely nails are sort of primary characteristics. I think which is that what you know. What quite clinic eighty. And i think that's all left brain side but all right brain side wet quite sort of we like to think we're quite autistic as well. Ingo was certainly that there was data crunching side to him which enabled him to come up with the protocols remote viewing talking about those his contribution Tweaks by suggestion from jacques. Ballet was that if If we if we of a given coordinates An end to begin with they would just not coldness then somebody thought what. Actually that could be that could be faked because someone could some enterprising individual with a really good memory could memorize every single not coordinates on the surface of the planet and then slew that so-called mind too telling people what was that Ridiculous nation of course. But that's what's skeptics. Were were were angling leveling us at the end and just to be clear because a super important point these super important point in my mind. These folks aren't like doing theoretical experiments. They're doing operational implementation so they're mindful of the potential fakery because they might get that from some smart ask guy from naval intelligence agency. Who says you know. Hey so they're looking at it from that perspective they're not like oh my gosh you know. James randi might come in poo poo on herself because they're in the business of actually getting reports and then wow ing their sponsors with. Yeah i just went and promote view this russian sub base..

Targ Ingo ingo Vallejo russell jacques naval intelligence agency James randi ing
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"That it is the move from the emerald kingdom to this quantum is just reality that then locks it into time space space time right because so many of the things that we hear about these extended realms that we're going to talk about your wife's shared near death experience They oughta buddies all these things. Eighteen counters where people automatically say has bam. I was outside of space time. I was outside of time space. Everyone around me said it was two minutes to me. It was a year outside of space time right away. If we think about that we get that that is a larger reality right. That are reality here inside the space time in this kind of consecutive. That was before this is after the icons on the screen is kind of dumbed down for us to kind of process in a certain way maybe for a certain reason maybe this is a lot of people have said. This is our school and this is the way this school works. And it's chunked down to do it so with all that said any comments you have on. That would be welcome the other thing. That just intrigues me about ingo swann. Is he get so much shit wrong. I mean he gets this stuff right. That is like no way anyone should be able to get this stuff right. You shouldn't be able to remote view the moon and get back data. That's real you. Shouldn't be able to remote view jupiter and back the exact data that the probe sees when it gets it. You should be able to do all that stuff and he can do it so he's right in this way that we can't reconcile but he's wrong. The first the first words of the first chapter of the book. He's got the near death experience than completely wrong. And you know that. Because you i've had shared near near death experience. I know that. Because i've talked to virtually every near death experience researcher and to the extent that we can use that data and i we have to..

ingo swann
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Works and a lot of his presentations on youtube. Hoffman's analogy that we view reality on a sort of screen that is defined for us by what he calls. I think conscious agency in other words that that we only get to see the reality that we need strictly speaking for survival and also viable boils down to some pretty functional things hold on he throws out survival bullshit in there because he has to to kind of have any kind of credibility within his community and then he has to throw in evolution to. But when you really push him and we had a good conversation you really push them towards the spiritual kind of all that falls away and he goes. Yeah that's that's bullshit. It's closer i think what he's saying to what ingo was saying. In what you think really. Beautifully brought into focus is this. I am not sure tuning is the right word. But it's close but what you guys are saying you in. Ingo are saying is that. Maybe there's some relationship some biophysical relationship between the quantum mechanic biology and this larger consciousness that allows us to kind of sink. It up you know in a way that makes it inexperienced that we're having in the way that you're talking about with donald hoffman. Yeah well so just to sort of finish. The don often thing where it helped me was his description that on that screen that we have created for ourselves the reality screen all user interface. Much like the user interface hero. My i have on my laptop. There are icons and it's those icons that we interact with. We don't need to understand the guts of the machine the software and hardware that make it work. I just have a i. Click on an icon that i need and i think without wishing to paraphrase Donna hoffman too much. That you know that sort of the. That's what i took. Certainly as sort of the main Thesis all the main facet of his exposition..

Hoffman ingo donald hoffman youtube Ingo Donna hoffman
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

03:52 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"You know the the thing that a consciousness supporters would say is the substrate of all that is and reality so that is the second half of the volume and together they make up this This one sort of take home. What i like to cool really is. It's still inga's take. I think home consciousness. Here's the summary from the amazon page offers. a grand unified theory of the human experience and in part of consciousness itself. Asserts that paranormal a. T. is part of an expanded reality set rooted in the relationship between quantum theory us the observer in something infinitely more profound well. I think that i didn't write that by the way. But i think he captures. That's exactly two things really jumped out at me about england's world. One is that for all his extraordinary abilities. And i think those are well proven. I mean we can talk about some of them that you mentioned some you know in your introduction but for all is proven abilities. Ingo always maintained that these were latent abilities in a soul. We all have them to some degree. It's just we've got to find them or they have to reveal themselves to us point one secondly is that there is no there is no in english is mind or in inga's mind. There was no division between paranormal and normal. This was an artificial construct that had been placed there by science historians philosophers. You cool them. What you will and as such we have d- through them come to think of these two wells. A weld of normal underworld apparently in go said there are not wells it is just one world that has not revealed itself to us in all of its glory. Yes and that is part of His an are and everyone's expiration that journey and some of us explorer deeply and others. Don't but it's all consciousness. You know so i think those this sort of two big takeaways from from inga's world. There's a real paradox here that we have to resolve in terms of our need to know our need to pursue our need to explore which is so much what ingo is about. And so much what this book is about and then this other sensibility of the emerald kingdom kind of sensibility. That hey no matter what we do. We are severely disadvantaged viewpoint. We are looking through the wrong end of the telescope. And we're talking about things we can't possibly understand so just check yourself a little bit kind of thing. Well absolutely as you said. Ingo described this if he had many names for it but at the emerald kingdom was one of them. I it's this idea of a greater reality. A substrate to existence that we don't customarily see because when not tuned to see it in fact as a very small digression. I'll come back to go. I'm as a writer. I'm always looking for sort of analogies that that allow me to picture. These very complex idea is simply You may well. Have you think alex you might have interviewed. Donna hoffman of you intimate donald. Yes well. I spoke to him..

Ingo amazon england ingo Donna hoffman alex donald
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

02:24 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Had an experience where he was sitting on the stoop with ingo before being admitted into the sanctum. And ingo had said if that pitching which is next to you I think it was hops onto your foot urine if it doesn't you not coming anywhere. The pigeon did hop onto robot spurt. And he was in so it was these sort of quirky little kind of Entry points into inga's world that made him just a fascinating character. Then when i got down when it walked down the stairs as he just told me that he had cleared by sharman over Some kind of weird entity that rushed out of the basement in a howling sort of gush of wind. So all of this sort of prepped. Me for so two quite an alarm. In sort of an initial intro into inga's wealth but that was in two thousand and two he then actually almost robot nights comeback and Film him film bits bits of his life and we did that in. I think it was about two thousand nine. So i then had a second sort of go getting to know ingo In two thousand nine and then of course. He died in two thousand thirteen and his family. Very kindly asked me whether i initially whether i would write a sort of definitive biography of his life. Will we looked at all of his papers and stuff that already been written by him including quite a by ingo himself he liked to write about his life and It was decided in the end that we'd go for this other projects which was to To to to to do this Great lost work of his this resurrecting mysterious volume of his to sort of quite seminal pieces of work. Describe both the inner psychic mechanisms that plug ass into the hologram of the consciousness. You know whatever you wanna call it. That's sort of part one in a very boil down way and part to really is what ingo cool the matrix or the multi-diverse which is depth consciousness..

ingo inga sharman
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

04:35 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Ingo wrote quite prolifically. In fact we found a few sodas lost manuscripts in his archive his family. And i when we were going through it so maybe even that backstory is kind of interesting. You know so what. I didn't add to your bio which is interesting. So you're a very good writer you right successful books and then people approach you and say. Hey why don't you go. S- write a book for me which you do. And then you'd be in those become bestsellers kinda known as a guy who has voice can produce so the back story of how you came to quote unquote edit and right. Because i think your contributions to this book are key. I even wrote to you in the email a lot of ways. I've found what you wrote. I don't wanna say more interesting than ingo but certainly on par interesting so that that back story is of interest. Well thank you festival in a. I really enjoyed working on that bokan. And and writing the introduction to it and the the epilogue as well. So i how i got to know actually goes back to the hump zero point two. I mean a lot of zero point was like a fantastic cooling card. May i tried. When i finished it to sort of move on. You know. i wanted to move back into jane's by some miracle. I still you know Employed by them after the book came out And i wanted to get grounded again in the sort of business of aerospace but kept on getting pulled back by the hunt and it's been a fabulous calling card for me really ever since two people who rang meal approach me Off the book came out shortly after it came out one was Oregon and the other walls. Ingo and ingots said the next time you passing through new city. Would you drop by. And so. Because i did quite a lot for work. I did the next time and it was. I think In two thousand and end of two thousand two so we met then and talks and he was interesting and his his house at three..

Ingo bokan ingo jane ingots new city Oregon
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"And you're on board with all that so we're going to walk a very interesting road here with you. Let's talk for a minute. Go back twenty years and talk about the hunt for zero point. Because as i mentioned it's very important book and in a way it kind of bridges this world that we're going to talk about these two worlds in a way it points in that direction. Tell us the origins so that the impact. It had how it changed things for you. What happened after that. Well i was. I was reluctant to to do it. In many ways. I was I was dragged into by by circumstance. Identify what in the end sort of really pulled into it. But i just realized in this raw that sort of Cynical way in a sense that i had this fantastic access through jane's i could The through the good name of the company and the magazine. I could open doors That access extended pretty much to the soda. Upper echelons of government so whilst i was going around In my day job my every day fighting stories for the magazine. I thought i wanna use this. But something more. And that's when this request kurds which was with a. What's the biggest thing that i could investigate and figured that the biggest thing would be a new energy and propulsion source that perhaps hasn't been revealed. I mean that's struck me as sort of technologist as the the biggest thing that the pentagon could hide or any agency could hide just to put a point in time it. Two thousand one..

jane pentagon
"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"The call to serve. It has no sewn yet. I have heard it has no form yet. I have clearly seen it. America's navy a global force for good. You gotta admit they do great ads and also really interesting. You don't those american navy. Ads used to be a force for good and they changed it to a global force for good what he thinks of with that. So i have an interview coming up with a guy. Excellent guys so fortunate to get this guy to come on his name. Is nick cook. And he's written a terrific new book about ingo swann. You.

american navy America nick cook ingo swann
"ingo" Discussed on The Value Driven Brand

The Value Driven Brand

08:04 min | 6 months ago

"ingo" Discussed on The Value Driven Brand

"The amazing keys to creating value different brand if I've heard them before. Or if I have not heard them before, actually, that's a veg. I've heard them. So I think that is just fantastic. And it would be remiss of me not to tell you about one of my favorite steelworking stories. Which I'm sure you've heard before. But it comes from a gentleman called Dale Carnegie, who wrote a book back in the day about a steel magnate called Charles Schwab and Charles Schwab had a team of steel manufacturers who were not producing the level of steel that they needed to produce. And he was actually on the precipice of bankruptcy. And he came into the mill one day and he said to the team, the day shift team, how many steel rods have you made? And they said, 6. So he got a piece of chalk and he wrote on the ground a massive figure 6. And then the night shift team came in and they said, what's this about? And they realized that that was the amount of rods that the team on the day shift had created. So they went um we got this and essentially what Charles Schwab did was he improved their motivation. He improved their drive to deliver their promise of steel by helping the teams compete against each other. And then the next morning, the day shift team came in and there was a 7 on the ground. And then basically, that kept going and it's so interesting that you say, you know, the team pushed back because the story goes that the team pushed back, they couldn't produce anymore without recruiting more people. So obviously, there were no longer on the precipice of bankruptcy and shutting down that actually gone completely the other way and became one of the largest steel manufacturers in the USA. So there is a lot to be said for improving that employee experience. And everything that anger has talked about today. Yeah, a good example. And if you don't measure things like quality, that can get out of hand as well where people take shortcuts to meet certain KPIs. So if you don't have other metrics in place that can catch you that as well, which is why it's important to have that balance of metrics. Yeah. Absolutely. Jason going. People again have pride. They get excited about what they do. They're not just coming in to work 8 hours and clock off again. Yeah. That's the key. Yeah, absolutely. Give the team something to feel proud about some purpose behind what they do every day. And I'm most certain that you will start to see you are in supply chain and organization a full organization become quite the optimized optimized way of doing business. Ingo, before I let you go, because I just absolutely delightful insights and for those of you who watch me on my life broadcasts a couple of times a week. Let it be known that I'm taking some of this information and running with it. So I think you so much. It's just being sort of wonderful. But for those of you who have listened in before, you know they're still one more piece. And for those of you who don't, every guest who joins me on the value trip and brand podcast gets given a guest profile, which they're very kindly fill out for me. And give me some insight into themselves and one of the questions that I ask each guest is what is the one song that gets them pumped up for anything inger? Do you remember the song that you chose? Yeah, it's one of my favorite Queen songs, and it's always on the top of my most playlist on the art. It's a queen queen song called don't stop me now. I love it. I love it. I'm having such a good time. I'm having a ball. It's all back to what we talked about the employee experience. So you can sing that in the workplace and get your employees to sing and believe in it. I think your value driven brand is a guarantee. I reckon. Yeah. In goes back to slide into DJ DJ inggo. Into an organization near you with a pumping soundtrack I can imagine. No, it's true. And when you got the right music cone in the background, you can get the team to work even even more productive. But yes, it's now for those of you who don't know, we have a special playlist here at the valley driven brand. It's called the aileen day official guest playlist and you can now also grab this new entry to the playlist when you visit value driven brand dot com forward slash podcast series. And that is where you're going to find this podcast recording as well as all of the resources in available to get in touch with ingo. And if you are an organization who thinks that you might need some of ingo's love and caressing in consulting and coaching around the way that you do business, then you can also visit value from brand podcast forward slash podcast series. I'm going to start that again value driven brand dot com forward slash podcast series. Goodness me. When my man Brendon does this transcript, he's going to think what was she doing? That is where you're going to find all the information. Ingo, it has been such an absolute pleasure to get to chat with you about supply chain optimization about doing business better and creating a value driven brand. Thank you so much for joining me. Thanks for the opportunity, and it's been fun talking to you. And we didn't swear as much as other people and surprised. No, we did it. We're keeping it PG today. M is for after 8 p.m. on Mondays. I love it. All right, that is it from us today, but thank you to ingo and we will be back with episode very soon. But for now, get a house, go and create value for somebody else in your life, because we all know what goes around comes around. I'm a linked day, have a great week. Thanks for listening to the value driven brand podcast with your host ailing day. Is your business struggling to become known as the sought after leader in your industry? Access our value driven brand quiz and special three part podcast series. To identify the gaps and what you need to focus on first. Go to WWW dot value driven brand dot com forward slash podcast series. That's value driven brand dot com forward slash podcast series. Tune in next time, where we discuss more ideas on how you can deliver your own values driven brand..

Charles Schwab Dale Carnegie Ingo inger Jason USA ingo Brendon
Ted Danson Is the Mayor of Los Angeles in New TV Show

TV's Top 5

02:38 min | 11 months ago

Ted Danson Is the Mayor of Los Angeles in New TV Show

"Mr mayor is new. Show from rubber karla faye and features a lot of fantastic people and the featuring of a lot of fantastic people is reason to watch it. It's ted danson as the new mayor of los angeles and this is just another one where we're timing is so bad really You know if you are in los angeles you are well aware of what having a somewhat. Bumbling somewhat ineffectual mayor or even having let's just say a mayor whose track record is mixed. Let's just say that. Let's say. Garcetti did some things that the beginning of the pandemic that seemed to be good and then not so much lately. That's an it is it. I'm trying to be tempered. We've definitely had a lot of evidence of what happens in a major city if the mayor is not perfect and so i found myself really kind of unable to laugh at a show where it's like. Ha ha ha. The mayor of los angeles is job is to go to mall. Openings and celery appearances your results on that one may vary as los angelino or at least a los angelino transplant. I also kind of got the feeling that tina fey and rubber karloff. Not so much with the knowing. Anything about los angeles and twenty twenty. The jokes are all really really lazy. Really really facile jokes about california. That in some cases are are two decades old our colleague. Ingo king reviewed it for us and she notes that one of the funniest jokes involves the other candidates who run for mayor against ten danson's character and you stop and realize that the joke that's being made about the other candidates including gary coleman's ghost and a libertarian. Porn star all relate to a recall election. That was fifteen years ago. I mean that is just not finger on the pulse and so all of these things if the show were funnier. It'd be funnier but let's not forget that. Mr mayor was originally conceived as thirty rock spin off that was going to be set in new york featuring alec baldwin reprising his role and baldwin was negotiating for the better part of a year per sources and when he backed out producers went out to ted danson. Ted danson lives in los angeles and did not want to relocate to new york so they moved the show to los an- to being set in los angeles and removed any traces of of its ties to thirty rock. So there's that in the back of your mind

Mr Mayor Los Angelino Los Angeles Karla Faye Garcetti Ted Danson Ingo King Karloff Tina Fey Danson Gary Coleman California Alec Baldwin Baldwin New York LOS
Is LinkedIn ready for Black LinkedIn?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Is LinkedIn ready for Black LinkedIn?

"Lipton has a reputation for being all businesses, but that has been changing recently especially in the last four months workers who are at home and trying to navigate racial upheaval in America are turning to Lincoln to talk about race and activism especially as it relates to work. Black. Workers say it's great that these conversations are happening on the Microsoft owned platform because so many executives and company decision makers are on Lincoln. Ashanti Martin wrote about this for the new. York Times. She said workers are being as she put it black any black black on Lincoln and lots of folks just aren't sure how to react. My first example in the article was that I e should Joseph made a post about companies who bring out there quote House Negro to deal with the difficult black employees visit tricky conversation because I could see how the word Ingo could be labeled as inflammatory. But the fact of the matter is that among black people understand these are these are conversations we have about the House Negro versus the Field Negro why does it matter for authentic black voices to appear on? Lincoln specifically as compared to say twitter. A lot of the discussion that you're seeing on link in is that how black people present themselves is often decided from a white perspective and I think the authenticity factor is a pushback is people demanding to be recognized for their full selves, but it is a very hard dynamic to overcome because you just see so much resistance to it and I think linked in exposes a lot of fat resistance. How Has Lincoln responded as well? I know one of the big problems that black users were having was that their content was. Hidden but they weren't being notified and it just lead to a lot of questions that linked hasn't really satisfactorily answered at this point. One of the things that give people cause for concern are the fact that linked in is an absolutely not diverse company. Three and a half percent of their employees are black. One percent of their leadership is black and only one point two percent of their tech workforces black who has programming these algorithms, and what are these algorithms and what is the machine learning to flag as well as the actual content moderators. The important conversations I think that people are really learning from our conversations about racism in the workplace and these people have a lot of followers. So what I think black professionals do not want to happen is to miss the opportunity to actually gain allies and to make a significant change in the workplace. I mean obviously, it coincides with what is happening in the in the country and do it also reflects conversations that are happening in the workplace to? I think it's hard to say because much of the professional workforce is remote right now in a way lengthened is one of the only ways to have conversations with colleagues. You don't have the chance opportunities to talk with your colleagues after meetings or during lunch breaks. So this is really the voice of professional life for a lot of people especially when it comes to talking about these topics, one thing I think is important to know is. That I think that these conversations are not ones that are easily had in the workplace just because of the dynamic of working with teams working face to face and maintaining a professional environment but I feel a sense of almost relief for a lot of black employees people of color other people have marginalized groups to be able to talk about these things and have their colleagues see these conversations that probably wouldn't take place in the physical office. I mean that's what I think is interesting is you're not writing about conversations in in some ways it's about. People Lincoln talking about workplaces and how they should be more. But what you say is that people are being, what did you say quote blackened black black. Lincoln Yeah that that what you're really seeing is is people being their true selves bringing their true selves to Lincoln in a way that didn't exist before and is. Making some white people uncomfortable, right Yeah. I have one of the questions that guided me as I was thinking about the article and doing interviews in writing it was. Thinking about black twitter and the impact that black twitter has had on our culture just in terms of simply the language the memes will also the Hash Tags Black Lives Matter Oscarssowhite, amend the conversations that come of those Hashtags, Meredith, Clark who I spoke to from my article. She's probably the leading scholar. On black twitter, she's writing a book about it She's a professor at the University of Virginia and she also talks about how black twitter really demands accountability. So in thinking about that impact, the black twitter has had on our culture American culture specifically I started to think about what if that same model was applied to black link thin and how it might affect just the presence of black people in offices across

Lincoln Twitter Lipton Professor Ashanti Martin Microsoft America York Times Joseph University Of Virginia Clark
"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"One day This will seek. I must, buddy that got shot. Meaning? Yes, I knew Eva exit. Does nothing. I say spoon does Ingo All the way. I told you Come on over. Does knowing they say spawned a single pay Fonzie Don't give me that fucking gusset my leg, you know? Yes. Okay? I don't really, really want Just let it be. Don't Don't. Okay? I don't really, really want bacon. I don't know. Then do it far exceed those? Nothing I say is to think. Oh, so you're looking for the exit doors? No. Entice a single Mementos movie, faceless, poor cows, Khurana.

Fonzie
Greenland ice sheet lost a record amount of ice in 2019, study says

AP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Greenland ice sheet lost a record amount of ice in 2019, study says

"A new study finds hundreds of billions of tons of Greenland's ice shelf melted last summer. Imagine enough water to flood the entire state of California. 4 FT. Deep That's how much water 140 trillion gallons melted last summer from the ice shelf that covers the world's largest island studies lead author Geoscientists Ingo Sebastian. Overall, It's the largest loss on record so that the previous record was set in 2012 in the research session, and his colleagues used NASA satellite imaging of Greenland to assess the ice loss, leading to slowly rising sea levels, Coastal flooding and

Greenland Ingo Sebastian Nasa California.
"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"One day this will seek. I must buddy that shot meaning it does not say spoon does Ingo No. Sort Brenda sell very man Scandal Sub will see a guy if you could probably get more. They gotta get me some Something. Maybe even a woman sees me. Let's see the swami The Davis submarine in there, Okay? Jules, Let me get that. Evil moment. Get out. I believe it will be that Master, you must be that they call.

Ingo No Jules swami The Davis Brenda
"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"ingo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Does nothing stays calm. Eunice Moore boy, almost anybody that ever exceed those living saints pulled a single It was a nickel, so make good money, you know, But there's a photo. And then you take in a bit. That was my but that day I'm in the back court. He wanna slack off course you gotta cavil G. We let them rest because they let in them. But I don't see lip on a man. Get it. I don't see a man does Thank you. Must be that scooters that exit they say spoon does Ingo Good. Oh, man. More than More than Not exceed those knowing they say, Listen, call Hey, Fonzie. Okay, look good with a simple thing with gusset my love for you. Yes. Yes..

Ingo Good Eunice Moore
Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

Pivot

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

"Dig. Tech firms are schmoozing regulators into to not doing their jobs. Thirty four anti-trust officials were wined and nine last year by the global anti-trust into the suit, a part of the Antonin Scalia Law School at George. Mason University in Fairfax Virginia basically don't regulate us. Please enjoy this delicious meal. Global Antitrust Institute is funded mostly entirely by big companies affiliated foundations including Amazon Google qualcomm George Mason I covered it when I was at the Washington, Post they were always doing this kind of thing like putting up, you know. Being very friendly to corporate corporate citizens as I recall during this time when they were just getting started. Trying to attract a bigger level of professor there and so talk about this Mr Academics in terms of these things that get funded at universities, you institute Scott. Galloway Institute of Jabal Thank for example. That's right. like it's it's were. Universities are not immune from the lure of capitalism and a big component of. Your ability to get tenure is to get research funded, and it's difficult if you WANNA know. If. You WanNa. Know the outcome and a conclusion of research. Just find who's paid for it. Yeah, and in the case of most academic research. It's a lot of times it's funded. By nonpartisan sources are the university itself, and so if there is a a lease bad version of peer reviewed research, you're GONNA. Find it typically universities, but these think tanks if they're funded by. Certain And we have him on the left care we fund. We found groups to do research to basically support our know our narrative so i. don't think this is anything unusual. The question is abound power in that is. In addition to this think tank Sarah now more fulltime Amazon. Lobbyists making I would bet somewhere between four hundred eight hundred thousand dollars a year. Then there are sitting US senators now one hundred full time lobbyist from Amazon living in DC, taking all of these nice women and men to to golf into dinner and saying hey, we just a big fan of your leadership. We fight to get involved in your campaign by the way when this whole antitrust off comes up. We assume that you're you're for capitalism. Your four consumer lower consumer prices. And this is the danger, but I don't think these think tanks. We have on both sides nervous now whenever I time talking to one today and I was like Oh, where did you get your money? Like I never thought this like in terms of. The university and I was like I'm going to have to check in case, I'm. Saying something that sounded reasonable, but it was sort of like who's paying your bills and you know there was some controversy around some of this Kobe testing of where these these researchers have, it just feels like a lot of steph feels. Bogus like. It feels bogus when they're doing this and they're trying to influence, but I think many some universities are doing real research. Others are much more pay for play and I think that's that's really when I was a does. You've inspired her synapse farmer talking about this when I was? Five years into my Nyu Kerr invited me to a meeting where they were talking about doing some research about around financial markets and the impact on IPO's and They admitted meeting. And there was someone from the Nasdaq, and they were willing to fund it Funds Research and fund even fund center, and as one of the guys in the meeting Professor Bruce Buchanan who I think's one of the clear blue flame thinking economists in the world you know at the end of the meeting, said a not comfortable with the Nasdaq taking money. Money from the Nasdaq for research around the financial markets, because ultimately we're. GonNa end up saying that that the Nasdaq has the right you know. He just wasn't comfortable with private enterprise being injected into academic research, and then the meeting ended and I was like what the hell are you thinking? We have an opportunity to go great research here. Don't so pedantic. And as I've thought about it I'm wrong and he was right. Yeah, you can't help it. You can't help, but if they're paying for like all the smoking ones so much damage in terms of like smoking wants. We're like cigarettes aren't bad. That went on for a long time and Whatever the whatever the research is, it just seems like if it's cooked, it's cooked then. How do you pay for like the university should presumably just pay. Pay For right and live and die on the quality of the research, but that's sort of naive. I suspect you in the majority of about any sort of fifteen year overdue apology to a Professor Buchanan Vice. Chancellor Ingo Walter felt the same way that this was just. This creates too much opportunity for bias research so anyways. Net Net in it's a sample size of one, but Nyu takes that got role being a neutral arbiter very seriously. and. You have these funding you know. I'm thinking of all the different organizations are they seem like the like their criminal justice stuff Very Friedman! It feels like it's really good research right now, and that's the thing it's like who you have. They should at least be very clear about who's paying for it, so you know and and what they might turf. What what the what reports they might put in the drawer like the government is doing right now,

Amazon Global Antitrust Institute Galloway Institute Of Jabal Antonin Scalia Law School George Mason Mason University NYU Washington Fairfax Virginia United States Funds Research Chancellor Ingo Walter Professor Buchanan Vice Professor Professor Bruce Buchanan Friedman Sarah Kobe
"ingo" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"ingo" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Event that's sort of a longer story because I might my mentor was in gross one well you got the best I did get the best and I miss him terribly but yeah I mean and he he was one of the people I ever knew because he was incredibly he was gifted a whole lot of it was something they did you know my aunt who knew him well shivika curricula she wrote the book called breakthrough to creativity you know what that rings a bell to me I I don't think that I knew her but but perfect that's writing about she was very close with angle and I'm just wondering if your paths your your your cross you know paths crossed well most of my time that I spent with lego I just spent with ingo I think he because he compartmentalized a lot so as you begin to learn all of this there was some conclusion I think you made personally with yourself just to say this stops the real deal that wasn't it it it took me decades that long really yeah because I'm not you know we may I'm very very skeptical I I doubt myself more than I doubt anybody else and in the course of doing all my different types of training you know psychic and paranormal and.

ingo
Local Masks

She Podcasts

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Local Masks

"Hello Hello Welcome to sheep. I guess I am just a cup for many of you are watching or listening for the first time. That's me this. Is She podcast? Episode to sixty four with my co-host. Lc as Khobar and our producer. John Jim Ingo. How are you guys doing today? Not to ridicule any news whatsoever about anything at all. I mean podcasting but like other like personal stuff. Well Easter was exciting. I did a drive by dinner. How while because I went to my ex this house and then because I'm not going in because they go to work and everything they brought dinner out so the kind of we set like six feet apart and they talked and I had dinner and it was weird. It was really weird. Bonnie says it's a facebook privacy thing about stream yard. They can't see your name unless you grant them permission right and I guess people just don't do it right so no or do they want in that point. A lot of them don't wanted grant permission right so but see. This is a facebook private group so we can see them in here anyhow. This isn't GonNa go. This video is not going anywhere I get it. It's not a big deal. Oh so elsie. So yes Jessica and I figured out something today that I can't believe I didn't think of this. Oh God Jessica has the adobe suite so she has adobe audition okay so one of the things. We've always had problems with his she uses quicktime and some so. She has adobe audition she can record right into addition and we've never used it in two hundred sixty four episodes. Why is that that is so card yet? Dum Dum Dum Dorky. It's Kinda Dorky. Right Kinda dark. You must have known that I've had it though right. No I wouldn't have put to do together because the thing is though just you wanted to break up with adobe suite so many separate times true and not one of the Times that. We've had a discussion about your break-up the possible break-up with adobe suite has audition ever come into the conversation that's never part of your everyday. It's just you know photoshop. Right so we use that to record her instead of quicktime and it would be so much easier and so much better and we would always know that the Mike correctly picked all the good stuff. I am so happy. Yes and we can also add to the track. We can also add compression because just could really her voice can really use compression so that you can do all of that. Pre like Yes prefixed prefixed. For her right so right now on excited like like a kid right before. Christmas. Because I'm excited because when we get off here we're going to make an appointment. We're going to go through this thing. I'm sure there'll be a lot of yelling and hollering there. Yes probably I noticed that I do have an issue when I'm trying to describe and do things when I can't see. It frustrates me when I can't see the other person's what they're doing. It frustrates me and I've been doing a lot of that lately for different clients and stuff as they set up to record in their home. Oh okay yes I need. I need to calm down. I need to be able to breathe through that. I need some kind of yoga breathing. Technique to center my Chee. Said what are you Senator Senator? Something we can just give you just can send Isaac. I can send may May and you can get through them. Then you'll find yours end. You know it's like a living. We'll be like here deal with her for a bit and then leave work through. That had four under the age of four. I know but you haven't. When was the last time? Oh well that's true. This is what I'm saying. It's like there's a practice I know when I'm in I'm in my sixties or seventies and somebody tells me how to deal with a four year five eight year old. I'm not I'm not going to be adapted. I've been like you know. Been out of it for awhile. I'm over. Yeah it's like it's forgotten like I don't even want to think about when they were infants. I don't I know Yeah No. I don't really like the idea of taking my clients and comparing them to eight year old child. I just. That's not the way it is that feeling. Oh the tenseness in the chest and the tightening in the chest he so we have some like communications. Lets say why. Don't we just acknowledge the folks and just to let everybody know that we are as of now for the past few episodes? We as in the sheep. Podcast team has been recording directly into the sea. Podcast super squad. Which is our Patriot community. So you guys can kind of watch. Us Record live in there. We're going to do the show as always Joe. Johns GonNa do post production and everything but we do have a live chat so we have some people there. We have Bonnie and we have Masai Lena. We have tiffany Humboldt who. She just actually posted that. She's. She wore her flower crown from she. Podcasts live during during the Hardcore Mermaid. Show on Friday. That's amazing that's so cool. And then she. She's asking him. What version of Stream Yard? We are using John. This question is for you. Well stream yards a web application. So you don't have to update it so I don't know what version I know what? She's talking about tiffany. You can only record stream yard if you're a pro client pay for that So in order for you to to be able to record and download your files you have to be if you are not a pro then all you can do is stream. So you have the capability to stream. I don't know how many hours for you know. I don't think anybody needs more hours to stream. But that those are all pro functionalities one of the things that Justin I also wanted to do was to do a double streaming stream to hear and to the podcast main group or to the podcast page. And we can't also can't do that unless you're pro so if you're a pro you can. I think you can Cross post to two places at once. We have done that and if we ask. Yeah have the option of two. Yeah Yeah if you're did you upgrade it Ogden profile? I've been down. No I know I know John Is. Yeah but you know I didn't know. Yeah Yeah you can only do the same time. Yeah no no basic no base. It used to be. I think way back right. John like right windstream yard. I started loud. Yeah they allow for yet when it was in. Beta. That's right. They did allow for for recording and downloading but once they opened it up. Then that's what you pay for. May GotTA STAY IN BUSINESS. Somehow and you want him to be able to stay in business. I mean it is an amazing platform. Yeah we're streaming. You know I'm telling you right now. Once they decide if they can record audio as separate separate tracks right they will be a force in podcasting. I don't know if they ever get there yet but still

Adobe John Jim Ingo Bonnie Facebook Johns Jessica Producer Senator Isaac The Times Windstream Tiffany Humboldt Chee Patriot Community Mike JOE Justin
"ingo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:37 min | 1 year ago

"ingo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Oh boy it's so good to hear so good to hear his voice now ingo we're working on the film for yeah right now and go I know you're probably hanging out here listening to us because he used to all the time and it's going to be pretty good it's going to take a couple more years I imagine welcome back to twenty first century radio on doctor Bob Parana's our guest is Nick Redfern is truly amazing Nick how many books have you written okay I think it's it's all the fifty four fifty five I think you just do for fifty five and there every one of them is excellent that's our Frank for me not trying very you know it's a little bit of time everything from many black big for like months does time travel conspiracies and now I try and with each book give the rate is something new I'm sorry new concepts and ideas to think about and you know long as I can keep doing that okay do it but what I just love the way you document things you know you're very up front about the whole thing and that's really good all talk about some strange things out there what about those flatwoods monster number that we what what what monster stories an interesting one because it's almost sort of unique in the sense that we've seen this creature or click at the crater reported once and that was it I'm so what it was you know we don't know but the the stories fascinated he goes back to September nineteen fifty two in flatwoods West Virginia and interestingly enough flatwoods right West Virginia is actually only bad and I I was drive from point Pleasant West Virginia where the Mothman sightings began in the made to light nineteen sixties has some papers sort of suggested maybe that could bear as kind of a connection that but as for the flight was months the story began one evening September nineteen fifty two when I strange lights with same flying over soaring go but the old small town of flatwoods and a number of papal sold a certain rice dives into the woods and up the hills and so these things sort of go over the horizon the crash land what they did say however was based whole huge humanoid figure which is described as bait having sort of a a height of about twelve fate and the face and that sort of back of its head the card to resembled the the face on the ISIS bites card do you think of it like the ISIS bites on a deck of cards that's what the head looks like and I've got these glowing ETS and it was giving off the sort of Spock's in lights and illuminations and I'm quite naturally they a group of people who sold ace sort of flag for their lives is a soul rates and and so the judge down the hill again and the creature was not say the guy and the what's potentially intriguing is that the British scared me the U. S. **** low paid to the story that actually send personnel out there to investigate the sights and speak to the local people so very taken very seriously as to what this creature was but as I said because of it's sort of a unique appearance with the face of the head and its height you know it was nothing like you know sort of your average daily and I have been fairies put forward that big creek the creature itself my actually obey much smaller but it could have been sort of concealed within sight sort of like the equivalent of you know I die the going into the ocean you know we've sort of a oxygen tank and you know a mask and so on so that's that's an interesting theory the idea that we might actually never of say the rail creature in my actually being so damn bad deed in some sort of craft that would allow you to sort of existed atmosphere with that sort of having to you know rely on what could have Basil rack toxic oxygen and so on so you know it could have been kind of like a doll version of something like a drone today you know with and the and the creature would be sort of with the in the in the drones out of space I'm trying to remember right now that it did its spew out anything or was there that it was that did it our I recall I do believe I recall that it actually on on it wasn't fire or something but it's something came out of it well yeah there was sort of lights and the lights and flashes and babes of lights and and of course of the play place all these you know they weren't sure if this was going to play in it or a piece was some sort of you know dangerous weapon I mean luckily nobody was hurt but I guess you know if your deep in the woods late at night you see these twelve foot creature and the baby was of light coming out a lot of people may not think twice and you know that first thought might be a you know that's a weapon is something to kill us and so badly we did not stand around they just sort of fled the area and under the saddle valve the **** located two eight Cindy bash the guy did it and put false together it's one of the fascinating cases because as I said at the start of these debates you know it was so unique and so unlike most of the other kind of entities that have been reported a main you know over the years but new reports of the greys and the rest Talia and so on but with this one you know the the flatwoods monster was kind of like a you know you say one second if he's gone the next second and and he never comes back a gain so he was sort of a definitive adding matic ice railing so we never found out who must of taking the time to make it I thought I wonder what the whole reason was that was that just the scare people or well I mean one of the interesting aspects to the seas that supposedly during that time period the clandestine oldest where I put together by the U. S. apple's warning that if you say one of these things here to die on so that's one of the interesting thing is that the idea that they craft the creature was in could actually being disabled or at least damaged and it sort of slammed into the ground but the creature's survival possibly even it you know was able to carefully land you know even if it was even if it was for the broker and or not working properly so you know the very fact that the airforce was a hands on trying to you know bring down these blind sources in the fifties it does might be one that you know a it was sort of an emergency landing that's you know wait sort of let loose with that rockcase and bullets and and that brought it down and you know the the mail trip and try to figure out what was going on so I think that's an interesting scenario when you look at the time frame that you know the military was looking to capture one of these things sort of dead or alive well boy there the next thing we're going to talk about his the goblins of Kelly Hopkins and bill was just an extraordinary situation tell us about this what bird of this take place again Hopkins in Hopkinsville yes it's it's become known as the Kelly Hopkinsville thanksgiving helicopter Hopkinsville okay talking particular case eight eight eight tracks the because in the same way a colleague of mirrors the the whole issue of flatwoods and by that I don't necessarily mean you know that the creatures with similar because they actually would not settle you know that that that is an important thing to note but thing to note is that you know basically again was a unique case but it involves to families who were sexually hold I'll put in that a one particular farm well the strange goblin like creature with terrorizing them sort of floating in the sky and hiding in the trees back in August nineteen ninety five when it revolved around the sun and family and they got visitors from Pennsylvania and so that's a quite a few people in the house at the time and that's the important thing to note he wasn't like just one person and you know sort of having mistaken identity it was and he was named one family it was two families and the and the sultans of the title as well having so just a regular you know evening hanging out together catching up on you have missing time is that true and speaking to each of the roast say nature there for awhile and then suddenly soul these strange activities and I would describe as cirques shining a glowing and I was sort of the size of a like a slug among K. something along those lines and through the trays and flipping around and the families tried to shoot to these creatures and they said that when they when they should shop at bullets at the creatures like kind of almost sort of this call also levitated if you like and sort of spun around to the ground extremely slowly you know which would be impossible for anybody else in a normal person to do but also the the ball it apparently had no effect whatsoever on these creatures and as the night got later in the creature's couldn't be saying save the family shut off to the local police report you what happened came back to gain the police couldn't say anything but after the police left collaborative these creatures will back again and it really was kind of like you know extraterrestrial versus human gun fight that's the best way I can really describe dates and they were kind of imagine something the size of a chimpanzee but with no hat and I am because I I'm kind of large heads that's they would describe in so you know again we daily with something that was uniquely unity your name though what they were you know we don't know but the the Kelly Hopkinsville case because of the sort of shoot have and the strange creatures of the family you know sort of stuck in the house certain terrified to leave it you know sort of posted that were made at close to seventy is light and seven decades lied to pave the still talking about it yeah I've finally enough based Tuesday night basically channel show project blue book is actually on that case these chairs the night okay yes all the one with the her hope they have a lot of good visuals on that because these were these little creatures they look more I think I might be mistaken as but with a almost frog like yes yeah that's an important things to note you know when I mentioned I was sort of like three foot tall their bags it's important that they weren't like the classic grazed the face he did sort of look like over sort of I'm Fabian frog like you know sort of light white marriages like you have a typical frog has and that sort of kind of reptilian way kind of listening scan to them and so you know there there is this kind of again sort of like a wreck Talia around Fabian type aspect to these creatures which again kind of made them sort of again unique creatures rarely the we need to take a break is this true all we gotta take a break on twenty first century radio with our guests Nick Redfern weaver talking here about the goblins of Kelly Hopkinson bill in Kentucky and does not a matter of.

ingo
How to Use Network Effects for Prospecting

Daily Sales Tips

03:33 min | 2 years ago

How to Use Network Effects for Prospecting

"Today's tip comes from Ryan O'Hara Ryan is the VP of growth and marketing lead IQ and the host of the prospecting podcast. He also does a ton of really cool stuff with video that makes him an especially great follow on Lincoln. Now. Those are my words he didn't tell me to save at here. He is with today's tip pyro on this is right O'Hara Tonette only give a daily sales tip about network effects, and how you can use network effects to help you with prospector to those people that are down with the cool Ingo network effects. Basically take advantage of people knowing each other. So that you can create more pipeline and be seen everywhere. The cool part about network affects is if I know Scott and Scott knows me. And then, you know, Scott, but you don't know me. And Scott does something with me, you're more likely to now want to know me that's kind of the effect of what I want to try and do with that work facts here to help you with prospector as a sales rep if your audience is online, you're going to want to be posted on social. East once a week, especially on Lincoln, you can give into video post photo post tax post, but one of my favorite things to do is actually go interview prospects, grab ZUM call or Skype. Call you can go do a quick interview with them and ask them one quick question record them trim it, and then post it really quickly on Lincoln when he puts on linked in you can tag the person when you've tagged the person who's going to see it. It's going to be you your connections that have recently engaged with you their connections there connections, recently, engaged them and new connections that you both have and the best part mutual connections. That's one of the really cool parts about this whole thing. So what you're going to do is you're gonna actually go prospect all the people that liked and engaged on that post. If you're connected to the person, you just featured on linked in, and you have Lincoln sales navigator, you can actually see the connections that you guys have and you can go after their connections to use that you're prospecting your way more likely to actually get a response, if you're showing your piece of content that says, I know that person that's really weird. The people that you prospect in work with after you, do these post could also potentially be future guest on your content that you do and the reason that you want to do to take advantage network affects again, if I keep seeing your name come up with the same people over and over again, I'm more likely to recognize you in a more likely to respond to you. Whether you're at a cold Email to me if you do a cold call what's better for me to say? Hey, this Ryan, we'd like you. Do you have a couple of minutes talk on to see how you're actually managing getting contact information near different systems that use or what if I said he prospect name this Ryan point IQ. I just recently did a video with Boba. I saw that you know them. How's it going the lateral always win? And it's important. If you're a leader to actually take advantage of having marketing support sales in this effort, it's better to be known in a small circle. The not be known at all if you're into the whole science and goggle lab coat thing and want to know the science behind this. There's actually a thing called media friend theory where if you're exposed to someone over and over again in content you'll. Feel like you're friends with them. And that's what you wanna kinda create here and the best way to kinda get more exposure. And get people see you is to take advantage of network affects if you're feeling like this, stuff's pretty cool. And you want to check out some of the other stuff that we did you should get lead. I q dot com right now. And you can check out our blog, we write a lot about this cool stuff, that's kind of next level prospecting. If you wanna check out some of the videos and crazy stuff that I'm doing online on linked in abbey. Ellington rate. My pitch dot com in redirect right to my linked in profile. You can add me. They're just please personalize. The message everyone out there. Please, please. When you're doing sales do what you can to make the prospector person you're selling to feel really

Ryan O'hara Ryan Scott Lincoln Lincoln Sales VP Tonette Ellington
Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

The Big Story

19:23 min | 2 years ago

Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

"Hey, it's Jordan, and I've podcast for you. Commons is Canada's most popular podcast about politics last season. They tried to answer the question how corrupt is Canada this time around. They're investigating our national addiction oil the currency's featuring host Arshi man is called crude. And it's about Canada's relationship with the oil industry. The good the bad the ugly and the weird you'll find Commons wherever you get your podcasts. So go check it out. I'm going to try to tell you today's story the way all probably tell it to grandkids someday. There was this guy a golfer named tiger. He was the best golfer in the world probably ever, you could argue if you wanted to, but nobody who'd watched him play would listen to you. And if that was our story, it would be a boring one, but it's not anyway, tiger was the greatest he had it all the fame money commercials endorsements beautiful wife and adorable children. But he was also a jerk. There were a lot of stories about this. He was rude to fans who wouldn't give kids high fives or sign autographs. He had his caddy yell at people who was a notoriously bad Tipper. He was a sullen guide to play with. He was robotic with the media, and none of those things mattered because he was the greatest until he wasn't just after two on Friday morning. Thirty three year old Tiger Woods. Drove out of his house alone. His car I hit a fire hydrant then a tree police after that crash. His wife left him. It turned out he'd been cheating on her with dozens of women across the country. His sponsors dropped him. Almost as fast as she. Did Ben details of his affairs came out, and they were humiliating. I want to say to each of you simply and directly. I am deeply sorry for my irresponsible and selfish behavior. I engaged in his knee gave out and then his back and even when he felt good enough to play golf. He was bad at it. And then despite surgeries his backup worse and worse until he could barely sit down without pain. He needed a spinal fusion surgery he had it just so he would be able to play with his children in his old age. He said but afterwards he felt better. So about two years ago, he picked up a club and tried to play again, and he could and he started getting better at it on the rest. Well, we'll tell you the rest, but you probably know how this ends. Then he doubted we'd ever see it. But here it is. Turn to glory. So it's Tiger Woods. Now. Redeemed? What is it about him that compels so many of us to root for him despite his flaws? What does the way we cheer for tiger tell us, but the kind of stories that were drawn to and about the kind of heroes. We prefer. I'm jordan. He's rawlings. And this is the big story. Stephen Brent from sports net is one of our favorite guests to talk to you. Whenever sports gets bigger than the games on the field. Why did everybody I know even with people on my production team who don't care about sports watch golf on Sunday? Well, let's see because the greatest golfer of all time came back under what seemed like impossible circumstances in rows right to the top of the sport in a after being written off for really good reasons over the last several years, especially over the last five or six years because he because Tiger Woods is a ground-breaking figure culturally. The people who don't know the wouldn't know Jordan Spieth of walked up their driveway know, who he is the he's he's an icon and a groundbreaker. So we has significance beyond the game. He plays. And because we all love a good redemption story, whether it's true or not we all want to believe that if you turn your life around if you do the right things instead of the wrong things if you follow the rules. You will be rewarded somehow in the cosmic sense. And for a lot of people. I think that's what it felt like I I'm not sure if the greatest I'm trying to think is this. Latest comeback story in sports history. That's a big one. Right. And I have a personal bias on that. Because I saw George Foreman. When the heavyweight championship at age forty six having been away for eleven years, and then come back as a big fat guy had people laugh Ataman lose nine rounds of a fight Nakagawa the tenth. So that was pretty good. But this that probably just me, but otherwise yet may potentially the greatest comeback story in the history of sport, a nostalgia moment for some people. I yeah, I get creeped out thinking of nineties style. Just somebody my age at doesn't nineties is like yesterday. But there's it's an established a moment, you know, this kind of the big three right there. Right. So within the sport historical greatest of all time, and the redemption narrative, and the and the style jet for a certain generation who remember remember when way way back in those nineteen nineties tell me about that. Because that was something that everybody was talking about right after he won is that moment twenty something years ago. Now when the world saw Tiger Woods for the first time. Do you? Remember the first time you saw Tiger Woods. That's good. I know not specifically. I certainly remember the first master's I remember talking about him in the US amateur. I remember him being out. You know, what I know? I take that back. You know, when I saw him the first time, I was at home as a teenager, a young teenager. Maybe not even a teenager yet. And after school. My parents watched the Mike Douglas show, which was a talk show that was on every day like five o'clock in the afternoon, and that's the famous show where they were L. Whereas whereas all man brought him out as a six year old and he had calls. I saw that show. Do you remember when Tiger Woods became I guess the Tiger Woods that we talk about? When we talk about the beginning of this story. When is lapping the field at the masters. I'm one of those moments when he just did something that when he seemed on another planet when he seemed different from all of the rest when he separated himself and that puts him on a very short list with Jordan and alley and what was it like watching him in the late nineties and early two thousands. Well, the guy so I'm not a golf guy. I have to. So is this I read like, I quit playing golf is fourteen. I walked off the course on the second hole. I hated hated the people here that the clothing, I did everything. So I just laughed. I literally just walked off in the middle of the game. And that's why we're talking you. Because this story is golf, so I hate golf and everything about it. But no, he was he was like a he was a superman, right? He was this. And and again, the nontraditional nature in terms of golf the whitest of sports. Yeah. Those days more so than now. But the idea that you could be, you know, someone other than a rich white kid, and and take on the sports or the way they're with Williams sisters and tennis the same that you could you could kind of just going to throw this back through all of that back in people's faces planned courses that were segregated up. You know within my lifetime. Yeah. There were courses that I remember remember the commercial? I think that Nike did about that. He was the first black person to ever play on some of these courses that he'd been playing. Yeah. I do remember that. And that was you know, again, that's a very so you felt like this was righteous to that that he was kicking down those doors and breaking those barriers and thumbing. Knows that the racist and the racist traditions and golf news, you know, total package now that that said the other side of them was completely unknowable. You know, we saw him. He was again public use a public figure, and he's a six year old to a degree. And he was kind of a brand Ike on it was like, Jordan. He was universal. Right. You could you could show that picture in any continent on earth and people say, oh, that's him. But he was impenetrable. He still is I have no idea who that guy is I really don't you know, has left people try to figure it out. And a lot of very fine writers have taken a crack at it. But I have no idea who what's inside them. Do you think we know him better now than we did ten twelve years ago? I think we would like to think we do again, I think under pretending that we know these people is important to us because it gives meaning to something that's otherwise meaningless which guy just put myself out of out of a job here. But you know, it doesn't really matter this stuff. Right. It doesn't. It's funny. You're like putting a little white ball and a hauler Gorna touchdown or scoring a winning goal and overtime and hockey game. Then add up a whole lot. You know, it doesn't even add up to what your doesn't add up art adds up to you know, with art. You can say the the art is the is what's important. So we will forgive people when number one you don't need to know the personality of the person producing yard you. Appreciate the art as a separate thing from them. And number two, you forgive them their sins. Right. Doesn't matter miles Davis horrible person. Right. Like one of the worst people ever, but produced sublime transcendent, revolutionary, art. And that's enough. You don't have to care about him. But but fleet was that's the thing. It's different. Because this no one's I. Yeah. I know it's you can argue make the argument that it's art, but you know, games come and goes Gore's, come and go somebody wins somebody loses. Like I've been doing. I've been writing about this stuff for a long time. It it. It doesn't add up to a la- beans, but if we can give it meaning, you know, if you can kind of imbue it with meeting and say, there's a human lesson here. And there's a human involved in this. Then I think it kinda justifies it. So I think that's part of we want to turn this into a parable. We wanna turn sports into a parable. That's how we understand the world is, you know, through parable as someone who. Who tries to do that and turn sports into those lessons for us. What did you think when I guess when Tigers false started when the news broke of the car crash and the details of that came out any stepped away? I you know, I felt like Klay like the rest of us. You know, it was it was interesting because it was kind of a flash of humanity in there he'd been so packaged and so protected in so manufactured, and, you know, both as a player, you know, by his father, and then certainly by Nike and everybody else who were in the image business image management business to to to be around tiger. I was a couple of times golf tournaments. And you know, there's no, you know, sense of what was behind this thing. And so, you know, I think that there is well, it's what the gossip industries built on right that they're kind of the Makarius thrill of oh, they're like us, aren't they? They're just like us. As a real under the Nike. Yeah. But especially on a flawed Cuban, right? So yeah, he may be rich, and he may be handsome, and he may be may have this beautiful wife. And but really he's like, you know, the the bad guy down the block, you not like you because you would never know that he was like the bad guy down the block. He has flaws. He's he's he's human in a so, but I I think there's a little bit of glee that goes without sometimes kinda, you know, the the whole shot and Freud thing, right? That you're you're you. I think a lot of people kind of were excited about it. You know, in some ways and said there, you go, you know, you may have thought you were something else. But here's what you really are. But I think it would it mostly revealed was a guy who I again, I'm not going to I wouldn't try and put a framework aunt and say, he was you know, all about golf and then never developed the other dimensions of his humanity. I have no idea. Like, I I don't know who the guy is. I don't pretend. But I think the impulse there is to say, yeah, he's he's a he's he's a flawed human being like the rest of us. And again weirdly to take some satisfaction from it. Well, there is that narrative that we probably like to put on. Sports stars because they're bigger and faster and better and richer than us that they are missing out on an essential part of humanity because they had to focus on this game since they were three years old. And they missed the whole rich tapestry of life that we got. Yes. No. And that's a great point. Right. That is a great point that, you know, the those character lessons you learned by being a really crappy little league player, right? For instance, or how to sit on a bench or being dumped by various girlfriends or ignored by others or just understanding failure that these guys were believed they were impervious to it. But in fact, you know, everybody gets their come up at some point. But again, that's that's kind of a religious theme. Isn't it? It really is. Yeah. Well, it's the it's the new idea of the human experience. Right. And that we all kind of go through the worst valleys in our lives. And it's what comes after that makes it worthwhile. Theoretically, you're radically. Yeah. Theoretically, or you know, it could be just all pointless, which would be another another more bleak way to look at it. We'll how unlikely was the next peak after that Val. Because it wasn't just the personal life scandal. It was like I mean you cover lots of athletes who try to come back from Steph. If I asked you five years ago, Steven what's the chance that I see? Tiger Woods win another green jacket snow slim two years ago. Right. Look, it's not about and it's not about the personal life stuff in this sense. Because look he was quite capable of winning golf tournaments while his personal life was apparently you're Radyr chaotic he managed to keep those things separate as when it was the physical stuff. It's one is back when you know, this guy who could barely bender bent over to pick something up off the floor two years ago the back. You can't swing a golf club with with that. You know, I think physically that idea that no matter how hard he worked his body at broken. And that's you know, way that it was not it did not appear to be able. So he could try as hard as he wanted to and he can live as clean life as you want to do and all of those things, but it didn't matter because this machine was broken. So I I don't think anybody hearing those stories from twenty sixteen twenty seventeen about his back kind of whispers because. It wasn't very public thought. You know this. No, there's no chance right? He can't go out there and compete. We can week out. And then he kind of comes back, I guess about a little over a year ago now and starts playing golf and laying. All right. And even then I don't know about you. But it was like watching an older athlete play out his years with some semblance of what he used to be. But not the same person, certainly the British the British Open right in the open championship. Right. Where you come thought. You know, he's he's not that far off and it's not like, but it's a different year. Right. It's a different vibe was a different vibe in at the masters because you know, the the old vibe is the, you know, I'm going to I'm going to destroy you. I'm going to destroy the golf course, which is what really I'm going to destroy the rest of you in this tournament. And that kind of Uber confidence that he had. I thought the most interesting thing watching that last round was watching him play the eighteenth hole, so carefully so super carefully. Right. Because you know, again, I would have been it would have been just insane you up there and hit a driver at that point, you know, because God knows and and but just. Kind of watching him play a really safe bogey to win that tournament. That's that's not in some ways. That's the anti-tiger. Right. It's just but it was it was smart. It was the right thing to do. And really the way he won that the way you try in that last round was by being kind of dog it and watching and consistent and then watching other people fail around him. It wasn't like he just sees them by the throat they had to fail. So that's a little different. If we're going to do the metaphor thing. Again, he humbled himself in front of the eighteenth hole. And is that can we read into that anything about his new life? I mean, a lot of people talked even before this tournament about how he just wanted to win for his children. Right. And he wanted his kids to see daddy win. And that's not the old tiger. Yeah. And who knows who knows who knows this guy enough to actually say that. I have no idea. I think he probably likes being tiger. Yeah. And I thought the and the chance to be tiger one more time at forty-three. That'd be pretty cool. Right. That'd that'd be an yes, it'd be great to have it. Do it in front of your children? Who'd never really got to experience it in to shut up the nose of everybody who ever said anything about you, there'd be a lot of things that you would take satisfaction from. But again, this is a guy who has programmed to be that that thing that character that kind of golf playing robot from the time he was a toddler, and you know to have that. It's right Thompsons got a new book about kind of greatest the kind of the the nature of some of the greatest of all time athletes him Jordan criminal for the other two are, but is his take on tiger is among his takes on tiger. Now, he's a great writer of golf and a Greg. I was around the sport is you know, that he thinks tiger hated the sport that whole first phase that he he was incredibly good at it and hated every minute of it because it had been forced and imposed upon him. So again, if I'm going to play amateur shrink here, I could talk about them being liberated in this second half and doing it for himself and for his own reasons rather than someone else's reasons and not having the daddy figure hovering over in them and being the daddy himself. And but like now, I'm a sports I'm being a sports writer here. Just extrapol-. I saw that column come into view. I just don't know if it's true, right? I honestly don't I have no idea. I I've no idea we know what lies in his soul. But I don't have any idea. What lies in most people souls? Right. It's we, but we go seeking it. We go seeking that story. Yeah. We're trying to find the meaning we're trying to find the meaning. Yeah. It's and you know, and then tomorrow, we'll try and find the meaning and something else. But this one looked the one thing as a sports writer sports writers people. I was asked to do cheer. We cheer for stories. Yeah. I've been lots of press boxes. Lots of press rooms everybody. Cheers for the story. Everybody got what they were cheering for and you'll end fan through the really that's what fans want you wanna. Yeah. You support your team and you support the uniform. But man, there's nothing like a story is there. Well, here's the question. Then how come I was and probably you were certainly millions and millions of people were cheering so hard for a guy who objectively from the little that we do know about him, isn't that great guy at least hasn't been and cheering form as a huge underdog went objectively. He's one more majors than anybody. But one person and he's one hundreds of millions of dollars because we're flexible. We as a species are very flexible, I wanna feel like we shoot for a real underdog. But we can you know, you can turn it. You know, think about watching the March madness if you have no real rooting interest. And so there's two schools on there. You have no idea who they are. You have no idea who those players are. But you can construct something around that game where when you know, east west North Dakota state beat somebody you go. That's the greatest thing I've ever seen your route informant that basket goes in. And then you go onto the next thing we we do construct stuff like that. And you know, he's like that the idea of the fightback that's really fight back from adversity fight back against the impossible. And the character stuff as I said, it's tricky we could because sport has been a place where we've confused being good at something having great motor skills or winning the genetic lottery, or, you know, working hard or all this up at everybody works hard. Right. We we do confuse I with character. Sometimes those things are blurred might that. You know that he's a character guy. You know? That's that's why that's why he succeeded. Not because you know, he was born this way. A or had some advantages or because there's something else inside. We got we go for that. And a lot of time and the flip side of his we're we're quite willing to ignore the opposite with where somebody could be like Michael Jordan's. Not a nice guy. Right. There's not really any suggestion. That Michael Jordan's a nice go. No there's like with tiger. There's plenty of stories to the contract. And you know, Allie was a terrible husband and a crappy fodder by and large. Now, there's also a political social components rally. So that's you know, it's a little bit different. But as I was saying before about, you know, the separating the art from the artist you can do that with our, you know, Pablo Picasso is bad guy. Right. Really bad guy. But it didn't stop anyone from treating him as Picasso during his work that way. Well, you don't have to cheer for Picasso. You don't and you can see you know, it. It gets tricky with the, you know, the Woody Allens of the world, you know, it gets it gets into some dicey territory there. Maybe I'm not sure anybody's going to listen to a Bill Cosby monologue the same way anymore. But but sport, the two things are connected. The two things are connected, and we'd like to you know, we want to kind of link those two things. Say this guy triumphed or this woman triumphed. Because a yes, they were very compact because they worked harder because they had more of that grit and character in, you know, Royal jelly, we we really we seek that. And I'm not saying, it's not true. But I think it's more that we needed to be true. Or we want it to be true sometime like it's a chicken or the egg did tiger win again because he became a better person or because he's winning again. Do we just think he became a better person Ingo? Yeah. And his backup better. Yeah. That to actually could swing a golf club dad like he may he may be a great guy now and totally, you know, Saint Paul on the road to Damascus had a moment where hang on when everything's clear down. And I'm not going to do all those terrible things anymore or maybe just got healthy. I don't know. We'll never know. But the, but the, but the former is way more compelling than the lab. Thanks, Steven bye. Stephen Brennan from sports net hates golf, but loves narrative that was the big story for more from us. You can find us at the big story, podcast dot CA or at frequency podcast network dot com. We are also up in your social media at frequency pods on Twitter on Facebook and on Instagram, and you can always reach us at v big story. F P PIN on Twitter as well. We're in your favorite podcast app. No matter which one it is. And we'd love a rating or a review. We've us comments. We love comments, apple Google, Stitcher. Spotify you pick where there thanks for listening. I'm Jordan he throwing we'll talk tomorrow.

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"ingo" Discussed on V103

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02:42 min | 3 years ago

"ingo" Discussed on V103

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