20 Burst results for "Ingmar Bergman"

Interview With Roger Corman

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:34 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Roger Corman

"The word legendary is overused but in the case of roger corman. It's well deserved. Roger trained as an engineer at stanford but after four days on the job. He quit to make movies. He began producing and directing low budget. Independent films are getting the underserved teen market. What is films lacked in production value. They made up for imagination. And as roger famously declared he never lost a dime on a picture and he made a lot of them. From nineteen fifty. Five to nineteen seventy-one. He directed over fifty films. Everything from monster. Movies to biker. Pictures to his famous adaptations. The works of edgar allan poe. He focused on producing and film distribution launching the careers of some of the biggest names in hollywood including francis ford coppola jonathan demme joe dante and bringing films by autour like david cronenberg. Ingmar bergman federico fellini to america. Rogers sat down with history of harsh showrunner. Kurt sanga to talk about his remarkable career. You started off directing and producing low budget films in the nineteen fifties How did you deal with the limitations. Faced the early films. I directed i was beginning to director with short schedule and i did what i could. I absorbed films saying. I use certain camera techniques that i've seen before and invented some myself. Now i'm not certain. I really invented them just that i had never seen them in other films. They may not have been as original as i thought. Nine fifty seven directed something like nine films Including tack of the crab monsters personal favourite Fm didn't have a lot of production values. But it was packed. Full of interesting ideas. A what are your memories of that film. Well i remember specifically said didn't have very much money and i remember exactly. The crab monster cost twelve hundred dollars and it was paper my shea but it was very big and it looked pretty good but we were shooting at on the rocks at cabrillo beach and the waves were hitting up against the monster and i could see the waves. Were destroying the back of the monster. So i had to shoot as fast as i possibly could and from only certain angles not to let the audience see that. The vaster was being destroyed. Well we shotted speaking monsters. Tell me about the monster from it. Conquered the world well. The monster from saturn was based upon my studies at the university where i studied physics and i tried within the fantastic world of science fiction to be as logical as possible and i realized a giant planet like saturn would have heavy gravity so therefore a giraffe could not exist but a turtle could because it was close to the ground and would be able to handle the gravity so i had the monster built all about the height of my hand here and thus say was physically correct for the planet saturn. I was having coffee as they were setting up the first shot and beverly garland very hip. Young actress came up to the monster and she looked and she noticed that i was watching her

Francis Ford Autour Kurt Sanga Roger Corman Joe Dante Jonathan Demme Federico Fellini Edgar Allan Poe Ingmar Bergman David Cronenberg Stanford Roger Cabrillo Beach Rogers Hollywood America Beverly Garland
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

04:43 min | 5 d ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on This American Life

"I've seen him with a dozen times. I've seen kevin kline do it at the public theater. I saw the famous diane vanilla version three nights in a row. I even saw ingmar bergman's production in brooklyn performed entirely in swedish. What else is that. learned from. Watching another hamlet. But the truth is this production was different. Because this is a play about a man pondering violent crime and its consequences performed by violent criminals living out those consequences after hanging out with this group of convicted actors for six months. I did discover something..

ingmar bergman kevin kline brooklyn
Max von Sydow, ‘Exorcist,’ ‘Star Wars’ Actor, Dies at 90

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

Max von Sydow, ‘Exorcist,’ ‘Star Wars’ Actor, Dies at 90

"Max von Sydow now has died the self described shy boy turned actor he played the priest in the horror classic the exorcist's price zero your questions class one C. Donald was ninety years old now and art house audiences through his work with Swedish director Ingmar Bergman but it was his role as father Merrin in The Exorcist that brought him international

Max Von Sydow C. Donald Ingmar Bergman Director
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Filmspotting

"If you did that. So number two on my list, and now will probably have to go into my penalty box for a little bit. Yeah. Maybe so, but a great choice for sure. And my number two, I think is going to follow that one nicely. Actually, in the sense that I think you could very much watch this Ingmar Bergman film with the sound off as well, the color being a big reason why and I think it ties back to the original spuria and that use of the color red. But also the new spirit in the way, it focuses on more psychological terror and characters faces in the way, they look at each other. We certainly get that in Ingmar, Bergman's cries and whispers, the opening credits set it all up. It's the simple Bergman approach just text on a background except this time. It's a red background with white lettering. And it cuts from those credits to nature, and we're on the grounds of a manor house in the country. Sorry. It's idyllic. It's peaceful. You might even call it identified. And it does end the sequence on a tree a very large tree there in this garden of Eden setting, and then that fades to the whole screen being engulfed in red which Bergman than utilizes as a transition device often in the film, we come out of that read to inside the manor house where we get even more red, and it's such a stunning image. Actually, the first person we see is live Ullman. She's one of three sisters living in this house and two of them are taking care of the other sister who is dying of cancer and live almonds that first image her strawberry hair against this white gown that she's wearing and the blanket that's white white curtains in the room, but everything else about it is just a blaze with red. And we get that sense of white and angels and faith that Bergman is so concerned with and then there's a lot of use of black. I think to signify death. But then this. Overwhelming use of red as the color of blood, obviously of mortality of life. And you'll see a lot of writing about this movie that will suggest that Bergman's going for a sense of these characters being in a womb, which you would think of that as being safe and comforting in some ways, but you never get a feeling of safety or comfort inside the space and just as much as it's about life that read and how it makes us think of blood also then makes us think of death to serve as that duality there that duality that I think is constant in Bergman's work. Read also represents something kind of sinister evil as a stand in for what we imagine. Hell a conventional hell to look like, but then read also signifies eroticism and lust, and there's again, a duality there, and that sensuality and pleasure should be one of life's rewards. But for so many of Bergman's characters, including in this film. It's more like a punishment. It's feelings that they're repressing or they're being forced to repress or make. Them think of feelings of regret. There's a quote of Bergman's about this film where he says in the screenplay I say that I've thought of the color red as the interior of the soul when I was a child. I saw the soul as a shadowy dragon blue smoke hovering like an enormous winged creature half bird half fish. But inside the dragon. Everything was read as soon as you say that title. I think of those walls even more so than the fate outs to read are. Yeah. The deep red walls of that the walls the carpet the upholstery on the chairs, it's all right? We're at number one. And that's where I put Ron Akra Chris hours nine thousand nine hundred five epic take on King Lear his variation centers on an aging warlord whose dividing his kingdom among three sons run makes extensive use of the primary colors red blue and yellow each son is identified with one of these Hughes. But when I hear someone say, Ron, I think red absolute right away. There's a. Fan door video essay by Philip brubaker. It's titled Curacao color and one of the scenes that he includes from Ron is of soldiers burying these red banners while they ride horses across a green field of the video taxed says red flows..

Ingmar Bergman Ron Akra Ullman Philip brubaker King Lear Hughes
Chicago, Milwaukee and Canada discussed on WBBM Morning News

WBBM Morning News

01:18 min | 2 years ago

Chicago, Milwaukee and Canada discussed on WBBM Morning News

"Degrees for the high today and it could feel as though it's near one hundred when you factor in the humidity for this independence day tonight for the fireworks displays around the area partly cloudy warm and humid overnight low of seventy six degrees some sons and clouds tomorrow still hot and sticky with a high of ninety degrees shower or thunderstorm or two could move in in the afternoon cool things off for friday only seventy eight degrees and looks like it's going to be a beautiful weekend saturday eighty one sunday eightyfive degrees right now in chicago seventysix at o'hare at seventy seven at midway seventy three at the lakefront seventy two degrees right now in milwaukee the wind south at six miles per hour wbz news time six twenty our top story this hour to the recent heat wave has stretched from chicago up to canada and to the east coast has now turned deadly there are reports of at least eight heat related deaths in canada and the united states since last weekend including six in montreal more than one hundred three million americans are under heat alerts today love much more on the story coming up at six thirty one a new retrospective on the career of renowned swedish director ingmar bergman opens this weekend at the gene siskel film center downtown nearly all of the films will be presented a new digital restorations prepared in a massive project by.

Chicago Milwaukee Canada United States Ingmar Bergman Montreal Director Gene Siskel Seventy Eight Degrees Seventy Six Degrees Seventy Two Degrees Eightyfive Degrees Ninety Degrees
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"They might have my hunch opposite to yours. Is that really the more intelligent philosophical comment would be a taxi driver that doesn't let us the doesn't let us off the hook and not that. I mean, again, it's a little exaggerated that you never really hear. Let us off the hook. It's very dark somber movie. And as a lot of intense things to say, it's just worth discussing that on the other end of the spectrum, I think Ethan Hawke's priest is pretty much done for. Yeah, pretty dark ending. No matter. It's obviously an open ended ending. Even even Paul Schrader said that he doesn't exactly know how ends even though he wrote it in directed. But yeah, I think no matter how you read it. It's bleep. Yeah, that's very of the definitely some. The taxi driver in first reform have in common is that there's not a lot of light at the end of the tunnel for either character. And I actually, again, I don't want. I won't ruin I performed because it's new movie. You should go out and see, but there's actually similarities in my opinion to the ending of both foams. Sure. In terms of like, what's really going on, you know is, is, is a literal thing is objective thing that are fantasy that dream is not there so much open for the person to experience. But to me, I drew, I drew connections between the two films. I can't say anymore, but yeah, there's definitely connections there don't don't shy away too much from spoilers though, because I always think of this show as something that people listen to as an addition like after they watched the film. Okay. Well, that case case. Basically, I think that even hawks fantasizing. Yeah, I think that he drinks drain. Oh, yeah, thing he's dead and I think he fantasized about making out with what's her face. Yeah, and but that even that is more in inverted or that's more internal than taxi driver ending to where it's like he wants to be recognized by the family, and you know, he, he talks the girl at the end, but really it's that letter from the parents. It's like you're a hero and he's in the newspaper, and he's getting all the strength Michaud. So where I think it's much more intimate and personal even hawk just has that passionate personal connection with somebody. It's a fantasy, but it's much more personal that Travis Bickel who wants who wants to be lauded as a hero. Sure, sure. So you know, I think with that good point to move on to further puzzle pieces for for these movies. And like I said, we'll probably start here with I reformed, which I know you said you have quite a few puzzle pieces for. So I'll let you go first with your next puzzle piece for first reformed. Okay. Well, let me puzzle pieces. I have portrayed a thank for because he really with interesting about Paul as that he was a a film critic for he was a filmmaker and he wrote extensively about his influences and he's still one of the few directors, especially arthouse directors that will discuss his work. Yeah, you know, everyone's really kind of like, hey, watch the movie and see what you think. And I agree with that mentality. I don't wanna discuss my projects to go see him and feel what they feel, but I really love that. We get this weird glimpse of what Paul thinks about his own work. So the first puzzle piece, the big thing for me is an Ingmar Bergman film called winter light. And this is something I'm not sure if Paul personally. Said, but a lot of comparisons have been drawn. Winter light is actually about a suicidal priest who is suffering with the science of God in the face of nuclear war as opposed to global warming climate change. I mean, it's it's, it's a crisis facing the planet, and he's like, where's God in this? And if that's where the two films slightly diverge is where the priest Bergman's film is kind of hopeless in that there's a God and that God should take on more responsibility..

Paul Schrader Travis Bickel Ethan Hawke Ingmar Bergman Michaud Paul
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Against a real quick synopsis here for those unfamiliar with video jerome james woods plays a sleazy tv exact who tries to track down a snuffed show and in the process he begins to suffer these severe encroach task host nations i'm just going to share a brief story here and i mentioned this on twitter to the horror of people okay i'm watching video drome okay where there are klusener nations involving technology in one of these is when james woods tv set starts to kind of pulse eight and essentially come to life right the screen freezes with that image on it and there's like a garbellini and a worrying coming out of my dvd player oh now had you now it froze at well i did find out what it was but i froze because i was knocked queen near the thing it was a trap it will be that now youri suet vets creepy i've never had like anything like that in watching a movie it ended up finally got the disc out it took a little while and there was like a a crack on the underside so there was a logical explanation but for a few minutes really disturbing we'll get into yeah maybe why when we get to our review yeah i'm sure we will my number three is ingmar bergman's fanny and alexander movie the takes place in turn of the 20th century sweden it's supposedly bergman's most autobiographical film and some people may think of this as a 1982 film indeed that is how it is listed over at i am de be i think it was released in sweden and norway maybe elsewhere in 82 but it was in '83 film in the us it one oscars in eighty four at the academy awards actually took home four out of its six nominations i've never seen the full television version of fanning alexander that's how it originated it was over five hours long i love it enough i would be more than happy to sit down if i could find the time and take in all five hours as it is that the intrical version the film version is just over three at one hundred eighty eight minutes like brisson there's some crossover here that i'm going to explore a little bit it was meant to be his final film turned out it wasn't.

james woods twitter sweden academy awards ingmar bergman alexander norway five hours one hundred eighty eight minut
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Um and i didn't know he was there mickey showrunner and that wish werner cheney and goodman why aren't and we knew as we were in mississippi traveling around that mickey was they were missing but i didn't know it was mickey until much later uh and they had been found in the levy they've been buried and so in the in the early part of your career whiz are a part of you that you said of the theater is more my calling a night and you didn't really want to go out to hollywood and try to make films into tv shows naughty was more your well your liking first of all it was i was emotionally retarded uh so i wanted to design sports cars and i went to middlebury as part of a threetwo program you went to rpi nyugat boast degrees an engineering in engineering and i wanted to design sportscar that was at my father was making a picture in sweden with ingmar bergman's of my burnell spin neither dole beck and sven nykvist was the cameraman and i went i was now eighteen and i looked around i looked at them we went out to my brits house and people are articulate and attractive and and loquacious sophisticated and sophisticated dr shipman is as i gotta do this i got to do this they're gonna joe your own was beautiful so italy took me about a month to get you know frustrated with the theater department at middlebury now that i was a dinu anything and then went to new york couldn't uh and herbert was herbert was freshly really a central to my i mean for all his shenanigans i really loved him and i adored huda when you meet with herbert.

mickey showrunner werner cheney goodman sweden ingmar bergman dr shipman new york herbert mississippi hollywood dole beck sven nykvist italy
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Design architecture show with the focus on humancentred socially conscious designs everything from are you guys outdoor equipment to the first apple desktop computer so the show should be really fun for local audiences and now a month of film celebrating one of the world's great directors ingmar bergman i also voted two years for the side suddenly i didn't know if i them scenes or if they existed life could be very strange and very crew of the late swedish film director ingmar bergman who serves get a festival at the pacific film archive in his hundredth year and that cut he could be talking about his films psychological thrillers that were compelling and really disturbing when i first saw them well that's the case for me to say i watch just about every one of these films when i was a super serious teen in high school and in college which is to say i was way too young to have a new what bergman was talking about these are really films for grownups we have the pacific film archive and berkeley celebrates ingmar bergman centennial february first through the 24th with live all men bergman's news and favorite actress she'll be at the pfa february first in third now here's the most streamed woman senior in england with a song about female solidarity dramatic free don't be a threat cabanas and going no uh gone down and that england's dual epo singing her hits on new roles with advice for her sister's and i gave you pick leepo through this a preview the unites always a little exciting to see a pop singer on the pacifists with big stardom it's still a little too early to tell with you a leap was.

desktop computer ingmar bergman england apple director two years
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KGO 810

"Time of year and say why isn't christ in christmas h r s t mas the next film that you say is the best movie about jesus of all time the greatest story ever told blow it probably my motivate right they call me because i am the youngest jesus that's a good night thank you judge ito rightly she is guilty of adultery the law calls we'll have to be stolen yes let him among you who is without sin cast the first stone max van sido of course plays jesus in the film and i'm glad you included because christians should remember what the holiday is about santa clauses fun but it is about the birth of jesus talked was about the greatest story ever told he at route john this is probably my my most favorite cinematic rendering of the christ during i think it's because on a larger scale it it it camps to kinda create a kind of a hybrid movie it's a big hollywood production it's also kind of anti hollywood many ways before this will be came out and then keep sixty five hollywood made biblical movies like the way you know tests will be demand made movies end and then they were hollywood they were like the ten commandments quote bodies the rogue king of kings ben hur was an attempt to make something more serious and more dramatic but when george stevens announced he was going to make this movie of the greatest story ever told he said it was going to be different than what audiences we're accustomed to seeing and it is a different kind of movie it it's it's it's it's more a reverend and reflective and meditative and contempt live in i guess room with a woman as if i guess you'd say uh rendition of the story of jesus and that's what i like about it so much uh and the director george stevens as we heard and the clip he cast an american american unknown in the title role max von sydow who was an ingmar bergman regular and bergman's great swedish movies but unknown to american movie goers at the time and he's just he could delivers an amazing performance just a.

ito john ben hur ingmar bergman hollywood george stevens director
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Interest as it well long actually reminded me a little bit i ahead a look this up of the german film requiem did you ever see requiem what about the movie the exorcist emily rose eight deliberately at that okay we'll be there both based on the same story which is fascinating to watch them both is emily roses like this really hard hitting american horror film it's this loaded with the facts in israeli tacky and then requiem place the same story very much like thelma accept much more simplified which i liked better wedge which is about this woman whose experience of the she especially it's not really special powers in that she's feeling possess but it also relates back to that heavily religious background and maybe that those stresses kind of are more explain what she's going through but i think it was deavere early was quoted as as saying that thelma was like ingmar bergman's carry and i was a all i could think of was like i wanna see brian diplomas chrysler whispers instead he now i feel like something with a little bit more muscle to it because i had just the whole thing kind of fell off live from me but i i don't mounted stooped to be people way i think if you're really into the vibe of the film it might get to unite the entry is a pretty clearly talented guy that people should continue to keep up with i certainly understand what you're saying about the left the right one indication of genre but i'd love letter eta is does give me some of the same vibe but i i find that much more of a positive thing that you i wouldn't want this kind of film to replace brolin cellblock 99 notes never going to do i but i want both of those things to exist and i'm i'm perfectly fine with both having the the highbrow take on john or trash and the lowbrow take on genre trash i prefer the variety myself this is a part of me that's like what do you think you too good he think you should rid of johore full.

ingmar bergman brian diplomas john thelma brolin
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Just yesterday i caught a wild bird with my bare hands and then i said it free because that's just drew i am when you love something you said it free but first euus catch and now my friend eric lutz access who is a lot like they're caught bird largescale microphone in the mountains that was that was beautiful man folks it's contact to show we call this the show about everything because we like to talk about a lot of stuff and we've figure everything probably would cover it a lot of times i talk about films that are coming out i talk about books i talk about current events today we're talking about a film a lot of times i receive screeners in the mail or i get a link online to watch something and even if i sort of like it it's rare that i will rave about it because mike taste is a little arcane sometimes you know if somebody asked me with your favorite movie i might say the seventh seal by ingmar bergman or the life aquatic with steve zoo by west sanderson you know i i have i have i tastes so i never know whether i'm going to really like something or not the other day somebody sent me a movie called molly m u l l y i thought what is molly it's it's another one of these christian film starring kevin sorbo all right let's see what it is and i popped in and they got the shock of my life kevin sore bo is not in the movie that's because it's the documentary it is fantastic fantastic and it's being promoted by focus on the family and i thought it would be fun to talk to the head of focus on the family jim daily dim daily are you there eric i'm here fill laughing over that intro you little bird i like the idea that if you love something you have to said free but first you must catch it with your bare hands iin the and then said it for you.

mike taste ingmar bergman kevin sorbo eric lutz molly
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Did you ever hear of dick conn tino oh yes you did yes and yet dig county no herta we had the guy a anthony ferranti the wreckage the shark nato movie's release told us he was a deeper he thinks he's a direct descendant of ferranti of fraught the entire culture uh isn't that cool well joe thing dean levin guinean and nigerian line out on their you know my name being and so you you did the show from two from episode tooth two hundred and one to episode six hundred and yeah i think i did above a little over a hundred episodes and and one of the creatures on it is as serb gum ball machine as nurse the tom service one of the robot's is is is a gumbo machine and crowe t robot is kind of a lacrosse um thing turned into a robot kind of and what god for go note that day the earth froze right that's another one that is actually one of the better movies that we did his his wits this like some uh swedish film it looks like a look leg ingmar bergman did a sifi movie or something you know and it and it actually has kind of a good budget and some clever things in it um i think it kind of pushes the ceiling of of was it quite bad enough i think it was bad enough but it it it kind of toe that line a little bit younger i wrote we are you were picking the films the entire time you were there will i will want them i would pick them and recommend them to the to the rest of the crew and then then then we decide on it.

ingmar bergman dick conn anthony ferranti
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"Into all of israel's whereas matthew mcconnahey as much more subdued physically and would project his intensity verbally and and a little bit in silence but mostly through sort of imposing and his gestures would be more would serve with his hands in his face as opposed to like bending one me like there's a move this is seen as we were tom cruise like digs a whole for a a duffel bag folic cash list and that scene with tom cruise and as he was vacuum economy are fundamentally different with regard to the shirtless nece the shoveling how it's all conduct it just went felt like something out of an ingmar bergman movie it just like frenetic and just like thrashing so it lacks the subtlety of what i would describe as are rated tom cruise but has instead of the kinetic energy of pt thirteen ready causes that's how i would've so so this is a movie about a pilot aeroplanes dole fly themselves in the '70s and '80s and he he starts flying covert missions to take pictures for the cia because he had a little side hustle those illegal importing he gets like importing or like a flying contraband from cuba into canada and he gets caught doing this by the cia they strongarm him into doing this he ends up a running drugs for the medellin cartel ends up arming the contras in central america and you know and on and on and on all the while he romances his wife played by the actress sarah right who is a woman who was not born when tom cruise released risky business in nineteen heathrow she was holiday wear underwear in this movie and he's like i've never done that whatever when she she risky business was two months old when tom cruise's wife in this movie was was.

israel matthew mcconnahey tom cruise cia cuba canada america ingmar bergman medellin sarah two months
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The world to commemorate he sent tinari the celebrations will include screenings of his films new films and television program about him exhibitions new productions of his plays and additions of his writings including much previously unpublished material the norwegian actress liv ullmann start in ten of bergman's films including cries and whispers autumn sonata on this terrible our inability to reach one up it is written man failure a frana grandma property sara wctc men and allman had a relationship between nudging sixty five and seventy and a daughter now the novelist live but also remain close friends on continued to work together until bergman's death in two thousand and seven she went on to direct her own movies where my colleague james menendez caught up with her while she was in town for the launch of this and tinari celebrations if she was asked to explain to a young person today why they should take the time to discover ingmar bergman's movies what would she say i wouldn't say to young people who have never seen is movies to watch all this move movies because some nice team put them out of date but there are some movies that i even reflecting on the times we are living in now i think they will find that cinema is more than star wars cinemas something you walk out of their cinema and you think i was recognize things that i'm thinking about what's there under the screen in other words trying to make some sense of the the human and condition absolutely and i think many people don't know that abutting my but the more you start to watch and listen to what he says may be even more than the performances which she see on the screen you will here this is a deeply humanistic care man and i think in the years to come he will be more famous for his writing than for his films it's bad for us act because they will forget us but his writings i think will survive even the best of his movies.

ingmar bergman liv ullmann allman james menendez
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"City obsessed with movies obsessed with movies and if you grow up the they're in your blood there's no way of not being a movie addict and then you know when i was in a college in england it was this extraordinary golden age of the sound cinema it very hard to explain to young people know what it was like when when what we now think of as the great classics with this week's new movie the you will do to the movies and this it would be fellini's age and a half a next week it would be ingmar bergman's the seventh seal how many people were members a surfeit or here in san francisco i mean that's where we saw what is the exact without there was this little theater in cambridge we'll i was a college call the arts cinema a tiny much much smaller than this room that we room i felt that i got my education in that room as much as i did in any library i would go and see movies tour three times consecutively to try to understand them especially vergara philippi and bone well well it was the trio last year it modern bud almost impossible film to understand so so i would defeat in three consecutive performances in order to try work it up i was just i love movies have done ever since and can we include bollywood in that yeah so it well you know up to a point spain everybody everybody though matter how serious of reader you are sometimes you want to read trash it so no matter how serious a filmgoer you are sometimes trash is good news.

england fellini ingmar bergman san francisco cambridge bollywood spain
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Think Again

"Welcome to think again saw thank you view i think i'm going to start with the idea of film um film plays a very big role in this book and it's important that the narrator is a filmmaker who is making a film i mean i think i guess we can come back to a brief kind of overview of what what the book is a ballot but let's start let's start with film like films play a big role here yeah i've been i've always said the films have played a very big role in my understanding of the world you know like when i was uh when i was a college cambridge in england um there was this little like art house theaters a cold cold the odds cinema brain which like everything else now it's a coffeehouse no no more cinema noel nomo it does coffee but it was i feel that in that relatively small room ago as much of my education as i go anywhere else in the university because this was of this is the mid 60s i'm saying and this this is a really rich periods of world cinema in a goat tired comes up a lot in the yes so from i think from like the late '50s to the early seventies there's a period they're of old which i think is that like the golden age of the sound cinema and yeah i i was being blown away by what for then the new films of it is very hard to describe the feeling of going to the movies and this week's new movie is la dolce vita it right right right or whatever it might be it so i was watching the you know the go to the fringe new wave the italian new wave all these great world cinema people like ingmar bergman and such a budget drained.

ingmar bergman
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Slate's Represent

Slate's Represent

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Slate's Represent

"Favorites stories to tell and then also what kind of like what are your favorite shots early in one or the the the this sort of scenes at you like to craft within your filmmaking okay so i love film nouri conversation a my favorite i would say my favorite filmmaker is ingmar bergman like onloan bergman films i love the intimacy of the stories betty tells um so for me i think that's something that super important to me to um she's a fan of spike lee's worked to woody allen's early films i'm a huge fan of as well julie dashes daughters of the dust like rearrange my entire life and everything that i thought of film could be so she's certainly someone who's always high up on my list but losing ground was really really remarkable um to me to an ordeal jews the conformist is up there on my list to a really like i experience that film like over and over again i remember the first time i saw him film school analysis lake blown away and to this day still love it yeah so for me i'm really really really really attracted to telling like those really intimate story that was when i was going to say it's like very um yes intimate a close closeups end and mary revealing phnom conversations it's funny that you mentioned losing ground because like when i was watching or found that's that's actually kind of what i thought of as like the same sort of conversations that they have in losing ground in in which you know the lead character like it's it's a movie for those who am i mad at a lotta people haven't seen because it's really hard line but it's it's about you know black intellectuals and of sheet the league character a is a professor um and you know her in her husband are like they go through a rough patch but then they also have these like wildly leave philosophical conversations art and life amazingly he adds me here um and let it reminded me a bit of of your fell as well because they're they're having these same very deep conversations about like.

nouri ingmar bergman spike lee onloan bergman betty woody allen professor
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"And then also a great movie that with me and my personality i might not have washington have you seen the ingmar bergman felt persona what that's a now on are you take that might be the greatest movie i've never seen is a great movie yeah applaud have you seen it that's pretty good i'm breast by the number actually 'cause you know ignore bergman man that's that's not a lot of millennials are seeking that but okay so how would i see that you think on dvd blu rain on film struck something like that it's very easy to get all lindsey my blu ray i don't like that i love that 'cause all need to get a blu ray machines but it's about time i have one of those that they they're not going to go you know blueberries are gonna be around for a while right we'll see just hanging around in new york into this on the film for i think in lays every fifteen minutes like that plan rob to music ones who well i don't think you know what about have you seen wild style sao has debbie harry in it oh heavy harry smoking a joint listening to early five five freddie freestyle early it's a brilliant brilliant film it's a it's a lowbudget film should check that out and what is that what's that like from the eighty eighty three eighty two i would guess brooklyn i have not seen it but i know what it is brilliant film it's after that came beat street which was more mainstream film which is a great movie the ending of beat street with nelly male wrapping but wild style is a indy movie with debbie harry's in it all during like the cb gb days and she looks so hot and she smoking a joint checking out like early hip hop in it's brilliant just for that scene alone check that out the describing a third time.

ingmar bergman new york debbie harry brooklyn washington fifteen minutes
"ingmar bergman" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

The Vulture TV Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"ingmar bergman" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

"Anybody else on the show i think everybody gets their own version of the of the other world if that is in other world but i think and this and i almost hesitate to say this because it sound so such a prosaic or even medical explanation but there have been studies suggesting that when people die when they have a neardeath experience and they come back they report sing a tunnel of white light and they feel a great piece settling over them and there's a theory that this is not heaven nor you know an alternate universe or would ever happening it's what's happening is your brain is dying and there's an evolutionary defence mechanisms and that is injecting chemicals in your brain to basically make you feel fine about the fact your bet to cease to exist right and i think something like that might be happening when people go under in some way like kevin goes on people go under as into the underworld and kevin goes under literally you know he is fixated himself and sometimes he literally drowns himself under the water who she goes under the water and that's how she has her experience and what kind of experience to she have her experiences she describes like kevin is in basically a michael bayfield right or a james bond movie and what is she in it's like a frigate and tarkovsky fell you know it's a world of like she's not like you know measuring her vagina to get access to the pentagon she's wandering around this desolate you know it's like a becket play or something larry jane campion if is very happy and it's very jane campion it's like ingmar bergman's persona or something like that big monologue reminded me of the famous mont of the famous seen persona.

kevin michael bayfield pentagon larry jane campion ingmar bergman tarkovsky