39 Burst results for "Influenza"

Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on KNX Programming

KNX Programming

01:02 min | 55 min ago

Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on KNX Programming

"We think we'll be able to help a couple 100 businesses or so within 1/13 district that have anywhere from 3 to 26 employees. This small grant could be just enough to keep from going through this pandemic. It's something we've been working on for the better part of a couple of months. It's not easy to stand up new programs like this, but we need to get those Checks out to help augment operations program is going to pay out a $1,000,000 in total is going to be operated by the city's economic, a Workforce Development department. Almost two months have elapsed since film and TV production was allowed to resume locally and the number of film permits being authorized is sawn the up, but the number of permits being granted, according to film a president pull off. There's only about 34% of normal with most of the work being still photo commercial shoots, advertisements and music videos fear another shutdown has kept major producers from applying for permits. I have concerns about how unions producers will work to develop and impose strict safety protocols are the did venture. A guess, though on when the industry may return to pre pandemic work levels. We'll see a fair quantity of work come back, but I don't think we'll see the full return of any industry really, including film and television until the vaccine is available. In the meantime, the safety protocols are going to be very stringent. He was, however optimistic that feature film and episodic TV productions may begin in mid September. Pete Demetriou Okay and extend 70 NewsRadio. Flu shots are now must haves across University of California campuses. They have to be gotten by students, faculty and staff before November 1st, officials released a statement saying it's a proactive measure to help protect members of the UC community and the public at large and to ameliorate this severe burdens on health care system's anticipated during the coming fall in winter from influenza and covert 19 illnesses. They already require students to be screened for tuberculosis and vaccinated for mumps, measles, chickenpox and more. Officials say they're medical plans will cover the cost of the vaccinations. John Stevens can extend 70 NewsRadio 7 21 Look at your money. Here's Andrew Oh, day in a world of closed bars, mostly roped off dining rooms, festivals and wedding receptions canceled and sporting events in empty venues. The liquor business with sales down is waiting is anxiously as you are for things to change, but what we're doing in the meantime, I'm actually is creating the experiences at home. So what if the friends you've seen is cooking from scratch and baking? As Victor Ivan is a CEO of world's largest spirits maker, Dogo tells Bloomberg. The key to the strategy is increased.

Workforce Development Departme Victor Ivan Pete Demetriou Bloomberg Tuberculosis President Trump Influenza University Of California Andrew Oh John Stevens CEO
Why it's more important than ever to get a flu shot this season

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

Why it's more important than ever to get a flu shot this season

"Urging urging Texans Texans to to get get a a flu flu shot shot this this year. year. Dr. Dr. John John Heller Heller steps steps with with the the Texas Texas State State Health Health Services Services says says that that you you declining declining number number of of hospitalizations hospitalizations has has been been good good news news as we go into flu season. The even better news is that in the case of influenza, we have an excellent vaccine that says been proven to be very effective. In the flu season in the Southern hemisphere, and that's the flu vaccine that be using here, Dr Heller Stat says. For for physicians, the symptoms of seasonal flu and Covad, 19 are very similar. There's a Corona

Dr. Dr. John John Heller Helle Flu Vaccine Texas Texas State State Health Dr Heller Stat Influenza Covad Corona
Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

"Kids with your eye on health. I'm Dr Deanna Lights. Children under the age of five with mild to moderate Coben 19 symptoms have much higher levels of genetic material for the virus in their nose, compared to older Children and adults, according to a study in JAMA pediatrics. This means young Children could transmit the virus as much as other age groups. It's not surprising to Dr Joel Fishbein, an infectious disease expert at Beaumont. Grosse Point Anybody who has had Children knows that kid come home with either know or minimal symptoms in adults get pick influenza, etcetera, So I'm not really super surprised that they're finding this with your eye on health from the Delta Dental Health desk. Dr Deanna Lights still a W J. NewsRadio 9 50 Right now Switch your family that T Mobile and get four lines for $25 Align.

Dr Deanna Lights Dr Joel Fishbein Delta Dental Health Influenza Jama T Mobile Beaumont
Why COVID-19 poses a special risk during pregnancy

Science Magazine Podcast

07:04 min | 2 d ago

Why COVID-19 poses a special risk during pregnancy

"As it seems kind of to always the case these days there are a lot of open questions about corona virus and something else. In this case it's pregnant women like are these women at greater risk for more severe infections can the virus infected fetus? How likely is transmission at birth from an infected mother Maribeth? I know you don't have answers to all these questions but let's start with what are some solid trends at this point. For example are pregnant women more at risk if they're infected, it seems to be the case that they are although the data is very incomplete given though what the consequences are from a severe infection, it's really better to err on the side of caution and assume that. Yes, they are at increased risk and that wouldn't be totally surprising because it's known from our understanding of other respiratory viruses that women can get much more severe infections and have worse outcomes. That's particularly well established for influenza and it's thought to be the case for SARS Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. That's caused by a similar virus. That's a close cousin of the new corona virus. There are a couple of biological factors that point to why this might be the case particularly how the immune system changes during pregnancy. How might that contribute to more severe infections? The immune system in pregnancy is like a moving target it's constantly adjusting HASTA. Hit this tricky balance of still repelling foreign invaders but not rejecting the fetus, which after all half of the fetus is not from mom and might look foreign to the immune system and what can happen is that things get outta whack perhaps there are worse infections than might have otherwise been the case. At the same time we know that the new corona virus causes really severe inflammation in particularly serious cases of infection. And if the mother's immune system is also active as it is in pregnancy, it's possible. Some experts think that this. Piles on with additional inflammation and that you get a worse situation than you would have had had mom not been pregnant. So it's not well understood but it's thought that there can be unhealthy interplay pregnancy also puts stress on the long Lewis and the cardiovascular system these are both too targets of Kobe eighteen. How is the body affected by pregnancy in such a way that the lungs cardiovascular system are harmed and how does Cova nineteen effect the lungs cardiovascular system sure. Will you imagine if the woman particularly as she goes into later pregnancy in the fetus larger and larger has decreased breathing room That is GonNa, make any respiratory infection in which you're breathing capacity is being affected by the infection itself. That's going to double down and make it even tougher to adequately oxygen at your blood. You basically have less room to breathe right and that's a serious impediment. If you're already sort of breathing at bat reduced level and then you have a virus causing an infection that is filling some of your breathing space with fluid, you can imagine how you could get into serious trouble quite quickly. What about the cardiovascular issues and how does that interact with the new corona virus? Well there's a couple of things one just the amount of work I mean the body. So amazing women pump by the time they're in late pregnancy, fifty percent more blood than they normally have. So there's a ton of blood circulating and that can lead to lots of fluid exiting into the lungs and making a bad problem worse, and then we know that the virus cannon does have bad effects on the heart and blood vessels which are already under strain because of the pregnancy. So again, the virus is potentially aiding and making worse this part that's kind of punching at the. Top of its weight already, there's a final effect that's not fully understood and not fully pin down, but it's known that the corona virus causes increased clotting in some patients. The blood has more of a tendency to clot will guess what in pregnancy the blood already has more of a tendency to plot. So now you layer an increased tendency to clot on top of an increased tendency to clot, and you can see where women can also get into trouble with clotting, which independently been a problem in serious of covid nineteen. We just talked about how the virus pregnancy my. Interact in a negative way. What is the evidence for the fact that women fare worse when pregnant and infected with a new coronavirus will there was a much notice steady that came out of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late in June that showed that pregnant women with Cova. Did were up to fifty percent more likely to end up in intensive care and seventy percent more likely to end up needing a breathing machine. Then they're infected but non-pregnant peers. Now there, there's some caveats to that study number one they were not more likely to die which is reassuring. Number two even though this was a lot of pregnant women that CDC looked at about ninety, one thousand, it was only twenty eight percent of all the women of reproductive age that have had covert and have had their covert reported to. CDC, through early June. Why is that? Because these reports have a box that say check pregnancy status? Yes pregnant no not pregnant and many many basically seventy, two percent of the reports that CDC received came in without either. Box, checked, and so they couldn't use that data and that makes the study quite incomplete. There's a more comprehensive but much smaller study that was published by the public. Health Agency of Sweden into lie and it found that the women who were pregnant for landing in ICU, at six times the rate of non-pregnant women what's unique about this study is captured. All ICU. Missions in. Sweden and it used Disa- dominator, all non-pregnant and all pregnant women of reproductive. Agents Sweden. This study was very small however in the end only thirteen corona virus, infected pregnant women, and forty non-pregnant infected women were admitted to Swedish I see us in the timeframe of the study.

CDC Late Pregnancy Cova Sweden ICU Maribeth Influenza Respiratory Syndrome Health Agency Of Sweden Covid Lewis Kobe
Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

01:46 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "influenza" discussed on Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

"Next, we're moving at record speed to develop and improve a vaccine for the Corona virus. We're in phase three trials right now, with many vaccine candidates, and a lot of people think that that's the goal line. That's the endpoint. Once we approve a vaccine, everything will be over. Actually, that's where the hard part starts. The hard part, is distributing the vaccine to millions of Americans. The coordination, planning and communication needed to pull this off will be so complex, and it has many worried, considering the poor response to the pandemic so far by the administration. For more on why distributing the cove in 19 vaccine will be so hard. We'll speak to Lena Son Health reporter at The Washington Post. As you mentioned it is going to require a lot of coordination and part of the confusion comes from the lack of information that has come out from the administration. President Trump and officials have repeatedly said that the military is going to be involved in the distribution, but they haven't given the specifics. Of how that's going to work and the existing immunization infrastructure in this country is a network that pushes out millions of doses of routine childhood vaccinations every year, and it was used during the 2009 H one n one swine flu pandemic. CDC runs at network with the state. And they basically scaled it up to push out vaccine influenza vaccine in that pandemic this time around, it's not exactly clear whether they're going to rely solely on the CDC system, whether they're going to create a new system or whether it's going to be some kind of hybrid at a briefing that was given for reporters. Last week. The Health and Human Services Department, which is the lead agency for the pandemic response, told us that it was going to be a hybrid and that D O d was going to do everything related to the logistics, getting the vaccine to the right places at the right times in the right conditions. Remember, we're talking about multiple vaccine candidates. Some of the vaccines may need to be stored at temperatures of minus 80 degrees. You might need special freezers or refrigerators, and the.

CDC President Trump Health And Human Services Depa Reporter The Washington Post
Dr Maria Van Kerkhove talks about WHO's response to Covid-19

America's Morning News

02:25 min | Last week

Dr Maria Van Kerkhove talks about WHO's response to Covid-19

"Thursday, marking six months since the World Health Organization declared the Corona virus a public health emergency of international concern. Thursday, also marking the fourth consecutive day, the U. S reported more than 1000 related deaths, bringing the nationwide death pull closer to 150,000. The World Health Organization's Dr Maria van Kirk off on the agency's response that's been a target of blame. For the Trump administration. Me and we will Where is the doctor? I think we can characterize the response globally as mixed. I think we can weaken very strongly show that countries that have acted Fast have acted aggressively have acted comprehensively and really, it's due to many countries who have had direct experience with something similar or a similar threat. Countries that had experience with Stars Movie won the first stars in 2003 countries that had direct experience with avian influenza. Those that have had experience with MERS those countries across Africa that I've had experience with other infectious diseases that they deal with so often really saw the threat really knew the thread of this We as an organization active immediately, we mobilize ourselves on on the day we were alerted to this and mobilize all of our forces Tio acts and to inform Our first guidance materials were out on the 10th 11th and 12th of January, which was the comprehensive package of how to find cases care for cases how to protect healthcare workers from infection, how to collect samples to be able to test Onda checklist to get countries ready. On DH, So there was a lot that was put out early, and we really saw countries that that took an aggressive approach Countries that took all of government comprehensive approach really see some success in the beginning of trying to combat this these tools over and over again. If they're implemented, they work. Taken suppressed transmission and they can save lives on and I think what we need to do going forward as look at how we could be more efficient and our response. How? How can everyone Be more efficient in the tools that we apply so that we don't have to go into large lock down again. Our so called lock down measures.

World Health Organization Dr Maria Van Kirk Stars Movie U. S TIO Onda Africa
Fresh "Influenza" from Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro

01:04 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh "Influenza" from Ben Shapiro

"Hey, Welcome. This is Ben Shapiro Sure got a lot to get to this hour A little bit later on in the hour. We'll get to a comatose Joe Biden getting real weird with a reporter. We begin at this hour with some good news of alcove in that the media refused to tell you about. So what is that good news uncovered? Well, there's a study that is now published in Science magazine. And it suggests that t sell immunity is a thing. So there's been a lot of discussion about how you reach herd immunity with this disease. Does this disease had herd immunity at 50% of the population 70% of the population? If it takes all the way till 70% of the population, then you're talking about maybe millions dead over the course of time in the United States, But we have seen in places like New York in places like Sweden, and what we're seeing now in Florida and Texas and California is that once the virus kind of Works its way through a community. It doesn't have to hit 70% of the community. It only has to hit more like 20 or 25% of a community. In order for the curve to start bending down and folks been wondering about this. I'm wondering why is that? Well, one of the going theory has been that there's an enormous number of people are just not hit hard by this virus or either asymptomatic or don't get in the first place because they have something called T cell immunity, meaning that their body has these things called T cells in these T cells. I've already learned how to deal with Corona viruses and viruses would include, like the common cold. So if you have a common cold in the last two or three years, and your body has already learned how to fight off we possibly Cove in 19 is sort of the going theory. Well, now there's an abstract from a study that is in science magazine, August 4th, 2020 And they say many unknowns exists about human immune responses to the covered 19 virus covered, 19 reactive CD. 40 cells have been reported unexposed individuals. Suggesting preexisting cross reactivity cell memory in 20 to 50% of people, meaning that maybe half the population already has some sort of pre existing ability on immune leveled pushback against Cove. In 19 the source of the T cells have been speculative using human blood samples arrived before the covered 19 virus was discovered in 2019 142 t cell. A pitiful epitaphs across the Stars uncovered two genome cover to cover 19 to facilitate precise interrogation ofthe repertoire. We demonstrate a range of preexisting C D four T cells that across reactive with comparable affinity to covert 19 and common called Corona viruses, thus variegated T cell memory to Corona viruses that cause the common cold unreliably some of the extensive heterogeneity observed in covered 19 disease. So this answers why some people are getting crushed by it, and some people are just having like a mild cold and then basically Being done. That's actual good news. Okay. That means that a huge swath of the population already has some pre existing level of immunity to the virus, which is excellent, excellent news, and we have more excellent news. And now it turns out that the numbers in terms of profit, 19 cases have been declining market Lee like seriously market like in Florida, in Texas, in Arizona, the Sunbelt surges over search is over. There's talk about maybe a second search in the winter. But that always presupposed that this thing was sort of die out in the summer because of the heat, and then when everybody was it was it was in the cold. Then people would be sort of in their in their offices, and then the heating systems would move this thing around, It turned out. That's precisely the reverse happened in order for the virus to be killed off by the heat. You have to be out in the heat, so it is it is certainly possible, and there's good data to suggest that in areas that don't have air conditioning that heat is killing the virus. Precisely. The reverse has been happening in the Sunbelt. Why? Well when it's hot, outside first world country like the United States, everybody's got Central air. Everybody's in the office the air circulating when you actually ended up with a surge during the summer because people were not in the heat. So in 1918 right with the influenza with the influence of pandemic flu pandemic was a different story. There was no air conditioning in 1918 as very is reserved for super rich people. That meant that everybody was basically in the heat all the time. He was killing this thing. Well, now that you live in a modern society with central air conditioning when it's really hot outside what you do Go inside. When you go inside, all the virus gets blown around, And then you get an up to the optic is over in Florida is up to the optic is over in Texas is over in Arizona, and it may, in fact, have Pete's already in California. According to NPR officials in Florida State cases of Corona virus are continuing to decline, an indication that efforts to halt the spread of the disease are working out. This is the part where media I just I don't think that the media are being responsible about this. I don't There's this idea that it was government intervention that is preventing the spread of the disease again and everything was going wildly haywire. And then everybody stepped in and shut down. Societies getting lockdowns crushed the curve again. That is not right. Look at the timeline. Florida really only began to to crack down on particular activity about a week and 1/2 ago, Okay, and the case has started to decline last week. It is not enough of a delay, if you actually want if you actually want to see when the cases began to decline, The answer is once it started burning through the community. Same thing in Arizona. Same thing in Texas, California never really opened.

Texas Florida Arizona California Science Magazine United States Sunbelt Ben Shapiro Joe Biden Cove Reporter Asymptomatic New York Influenza Stars NPR Sweden
Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:48 min | Last week

Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

"Kicking off today with some potentially positive covid nineteen news from our canine friends. Dogs being trained, to sniff out. Drugs, weapons, and diseases like malaria, and even cancer is nothing new, but a new study shows that when trained dogs are able to sniff out code in Nineteen infections, quoting CNBC a new study, which was piloted by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover the handover medical school in the German armed. Forces found that if properly trained dogs were able to discriminate between human saliva samples infected with SARS COV to and non infected samples with a ninety four percent success rate overall, the hope is this method of detection could be one day used in public. Such, as airports, sporting events and other mass gatherings in addition to laboratory testing to help prevent future covid, nineteen outbreaks, according to researchers and quotes. The study was conducted using eight dogs from Germany's armed forces. They were trained for a week, using thousand samples of both infected and uninfected saliva, also neither of the researchers, nor the dog handlers new, which was which. Marin because black widow, who conducted the study says the dogs can probably detect folic change which occurs when a person is infected the one issue, the dogs apparently can't differentiate Kovic nineteen from other diseases like influenza yet, but the research team says that is the next step and the Hannover Medical School in Germany aren't the only ones conducting trials on trained dogs. Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and tropical medicine are also training and studying dogs to see if they could detect covid nineteen from person's body odor, which they say is altered by respiratory disease, and as for the canines welfare quoting CNN. Dogs are known to be. Be Able to contract cove nineteen, but there is no evidence that the virus can spread from dogs to humans, the team, medical detection, dogs or sure CNN that the dogs are well looked after and will be kept safe from infection, our dogs we trained on a dead virus, and then have no contact with the individuals. They're screening, but will sniff the air around. The person says representative Jimmy Butler and the dogs will only be permitted to be touched by the handler, which therefore means there will be very low risk of spread of the virus from the dog to their handler or to the people they live with and quotes. While this might not replace the uncomfortable diagnostic tests it could, certainly as the article said be a boon for public spaces where you need to test large numbers of people instantaneously and where fever scanners would only catch symptomatic. Assuming that is that the dogs could sniff out positive infections in a symptomatic. So, we'll have to see how accurately the dogs can be trained, but sounds like a promising solution so

CNN Germany Hannover Medical School University Of Veterinary Medic London School Of Hygiene Malaria Jimmy Butler Cnbc Fever Representative Marin Kovic Cancer
Should schools reopen? Balancing COVID-19 and learning loss for young children

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Should schools reopen? Balancing COVID-19 and learning loss for young children

"To school, a growing number of them are being told. Stay home. There will be no in person school this fall School District's from California to Georgia to Maryland are now gearing up for online on Ly instruction are citing the spike in Corona virus cases, but just how dangerous is it to send Children? His teachers and staff back into classrooms amid a pandemic. And why is there so much debate over that question? We have called Jennifer Nuzzo to take on those questions. She is a senior scholar with the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Welcome. Thank you. We're going to have you with us. I do want to start by asking. It seems there is just madmen, maddeningly little real information about the risks to kids and how likely kids are to spread the virus. Why do we know so little of this point? Yeah, it's true. I agree. There's not as much information as we like. We do have some studies that have generally given us the belief that kids are probably less likely to be harmed by this virus than adults. Also some information to suggest that they may be less likely to transmit the virus like they do you know is compared to other viruses like influenza, but it's hard to really study because you know, we've done these great measures where we've shut down and we've decided to stay home. And we don't fully know if we've kept kids home more and not as exposed as they would otherwise be. So it's fairly artificial circumstances. Yeah, I suppose kids haven't been in school since March, for the most part, so it's hard to study what transmission would would look like if they were I have noticed that a lot of the studies that have been published today have come from other countries. There was a big study that made some news out of South Korea that found kids. Older kids like they just had to 19 actually can spread the virus as well as adults that younger kids under 10 spread it much less. How much stock do you put in studies like that? Yeah, That's that, finding that there may be an age related effect with the older kids, possibly being a more worrisome case with the younger kids. That is something that we've seen elsewhere. That's at this study. I think experts feel may not be completely generalize along the sense that it was sick kids at home and not necessarily kids who don't have symptoms at school, but it's still important to learn from The CDC

Jennifer Nuzzo Fall School District Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Influenza LY South Korea California Maryland CDC Georgia
13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

TIME's Top Stories

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

"Thirteen religious sisters at a Michigan Convent have died from the Corona virus with twelve sisters passing in the span of a month, the women aged sixty nine to ninety nine were all members of a Felicien, sisters. Convent in Livonia Michigan on Good Friday. The virus took the life of sister. Mary Louisa was ninety nine by the end of the month eleven. Other sisters had passed seventeen more. More were infected, but recovered according to sister, Noel Murray Gabriel. The director of clinical health services for our lady of Hope Province, a thirteenth sister, despite an initial recovery passed away in June the sisters in presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mother Convent in Livonia as well as all of us in the province are still very much dealing with the loss of so many sisters says Suzanne Wilcox. Wilcox English Executive Director of mission advancement for the Felicien Sisters of North America the sisters. All of whom were longtime members of the convent, lived prayed and worked together prior to their retirements. The women had worked as school teachers college professors and principles. Librarians nurses and organised sister. Mary Louisa was Indiana had served as the sunshine person for the local minister, sending Peace Day and birthday cards. Cards to the sisters in the infirmary and obituary reads sister Victoria Marine dykes sixty nine lead nursing students regular trips to the Felicien sisters mission in Haiti sister Rosemary Wallach Eighty six spent eight years working as a secretary in the Vatican Secretary of State Sister Thomas Murray Would Hausky seventy three once led a second grade class to win a national prize and a Campbell's soup commercial competition. The death of the thirteen nuns could be the most serious loss of life experienced by a group of religious women in the United States since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic, according to Global Sisters report a nonprofit Catholic News outlet globally at least sixty one felicien sisters have died, but other religious orders have also been struck by the virus with six sisters, dying of covid nineteen at the Our Lady of Convent in Wisconsin in April. The convent closed its doors to visitors in. In March and placed strict restrictions on group activities, but the virus still reached the convent and spread quickly for many sisters who normally pray alongside those who are dying, having to socially distance during a time of grief was difficult. Normally we will share stories about the sister. We have lost during the vigil the night before the funeral says English, but we have been unable to do so. Their collective impact on the community has been and continues to be very deep, says English.

Blessed Virgin Mother Convent Global Sisters Our Lady Of Convent Mary Louisa Suzanne Wilcox Noel Murray Gabriel Michigan Executive Director Of Mission Hope Province English North America Livonia Director Rosemary Wallach Indiana Felicien Haiti Thomas Murray Secretary
Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response

"Jonathan, Kaye part, and this is Cape Up. My guest has been her states. Secretary of Health sees represented her State in Congress today. She is said to be on Joe. Biden's vice presidential shortlist in chose it. She would be the first lat next American on a presidential ticket. She is New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Hear what she has to say about that and her states response to Corona virus in this special case up live episode right now. Governor Welcome! You know I'm delighted to be on your show. Nice to meet you spend a little time with you Jonathan. Likewise. Thank you very much for being here now. I mentioned that you were the health secretary. You are a member of Congress because they gave you incredible insight, I think and how to deal with the corona virus early on you declared a statewide health emergency on March eleventh when there were only four cases in your state. What did you see that pushed? The pushed you to move so quickly. Well two things that you know that this virus is moving, and so it comes with travelers we've got commuters were movie Hijab I was still dealing with folks who were trapped on a cruise and California and I've dealt with the pandemic before and the. You Start and the more aggressively you start, the better control and management efforts you have in. This is the problem because you can't see the pandemic everyone I think falsely assumes it won't come here. The it'll be easy, and we'll wait until we see what's happening because I think for too many leaders. It's easier to explain you have to move immediately. Otherwise it rages out of control and we're seeing that all across the country now. What we follow up, you said you've been through a pandemic before. which are you talking Ebola or something else? Blue so we had two issues. We had a flu epidemic I said pandemic epidemic in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand eight, and then in two, thousand and five. We had a flu vaccine shortage so when you are in a state where you've got higher. Per Capita. Issues related to chronic issues for children and adults, and that you have a higher death rate then from influenza we'd have a third of the capacity of healthcare providers and hospitalizations I literally had to join with illiinois to. Import flu vaccine from Canada Rich. You really couldn't do then and we found A. Soft, can I say loophole and brought it in and I protected Mexica residents then we took. Out of flu vaccine, so I took all the mercury out of it to further protect new Mexicans. I wouldn't buy anything that had. Mirasol in it, and then when the epidemic was coming in the same thing, he didn't have sufficient investments in public health, so getting to people getting them vaccinated partnering with limited. A. Private Provider Group was really challenging so probably answering this too long Jonathan but in December I knew this was coming. I asked my teams to start planning in early January, so we began to have round tables and start looking about where we was secure. And testing supplies. That's really interesting. You started focusing this on in December. And then moving with your staff in January, so you anticipated what could happen, but didn't you anticipate the inaction from the federal government in terms of having a national strategy? No in my wildest dreams I would not be spending my known specific time finding supplies testing supplies, and the right manufacturers, trying to figure out which instruments right the FDA was going to authorize in an emergency use environment, then test for the for the virus, so not every instrument was available. Not every then re agent is available every testing because they're not all. They weren't at the time universal, getting swabs and then chasing. And, then, in my wildest dreams I wouldn't be dealing with the federal government who would literally then take the things that you secured and redistributes them for the country while you want it to be a country focus. Because it wasn't it meant that you were fighting? Frankly with other governors and FEMA to get the adequate supplies into your state, and now we're seeing it occur again because there was without any federal strategies, still now that you have these outbreaks, governors are in the same situation chasing down supplies and P P and trying to adequately cover their first responders is the most outrageous environment I've ever worked on worked in in my entire career.

Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Flu Vaccine Jonathan Secretary Congress Influenza Cape Up JOE California FDA Kaye Canada Fema New Mexico A. Soft A. Private Provider Group P P
Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

Your Brain on Facts

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

"Medicine men even published their own version of the farmer's ALMANAC with handy information about whether in crops and animals, and of course lots and lots of their ads. And the things they would write those ads. Swims. Panacea purportedly cured all belette diseases, including scruffy La chronic rheumatism ulcers, old sores boils and car bungles, diseases of the spines and wasting smedley Chili paste cured SCIATICA, rheumatism, sore throat Lumbago gouty pains and bronchitis among other things. Halls coca wine was invaluable for cases of influenza, sleeplessness, anemia and mental fatigue. And Lydia Penguins Vegetable compound seems to be able to cure women of anything, not just female troubles. Apparently, it was a curable, but only for half of the population. I've got to read you. One of their ads Lydia e Pinkham Vegetable compound is positive cure for all those painful complaints and weaknesses so common to our best female population, it will cure entirely the worst form of female complaints, all very troubles, inflammation and ulceration, fallings and displacements, and the consequent spinal weakness, and is particularly adapted to the change of life it will dissolve and expelled tumors from the uterus in an early stage of development, the tendency to cancerous humors. There is checked very speedily by its use. It removes maintenace flatulence. He destroys all creating stimulants and relieves weakness the stomach it cures, bloating headaches, nervous, prostration, general debility, sleeplessness, depression, and indigestion that feeling of bearing down causing pain, wait and backache is always permanently cured by its use it will at all times, and under all circumstances act in harmony with the laws that governed the female system. For the cure of kidney complaints of either sex. This compound is unsurpassed. It goes onto also plug. No Family should be without Lydia Pink Liver Pills, they cure constipation, billion and torpedo of the liver. Good stuff! So, what was in these bottles of snake oil? Very rarely oil of snake, which is hard to source. Ingredients ranged from benign but unhelpful like tincture of mallow route to. A dangerous. Many patent medicines contained significant levels of alcohol opium, morphine, cocaine, basically anything that would make the end user good, so they think it was working the fact that many of these medicines were made with highly addictive drugs was probably good for repeat business as well. While patent medicines were hot sellers. They weren't without their detractors. In nineteen o five and nineteen, six Collier's magazine ran a series of. Articles by Samuel Hopkins Adams entitled the Great American fraud which exposed many of the deceitful and unsafe methods practiced by patent medicine manufacturers. Exposes like these and other grassroots efforts helped bring about the first federal, food and Drug Act in Nineteen, oh six. Now drug labeling had to include a list of ingredients not. Of them just certain concerning things like heroin, chloroform, cannabis and of course alcohol. And Manufacturers were prohibited from making unproven and unprovable claims. Cocaine wouldn't be banned from freely available patent medicines until nineteen o nine. The Classic Sodas. We know and love. Today got their start as patent medicines. Before? We addressed the to soda elephants in the room. The brands so big that apparently they had a war in the nineteen eighties, which I was less aware of than our impending war with Russia which never came to pass, but did give us a glut of heavily accented movie villains,

Cocaine Lydia Pink Sciatica Bronchitis Influenza Samuel Hopkins Adams LA Collier Indigestion Bloating Lumbago Russia Fraud Opium Heroin Cannabis Morphine
Leaving the World Health Organization

Second Opinion

03:41 min | Last month

Leaving the World Health Organization

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with. The pinion over the past few years. Our President has made some incredibly ill informed policy decisions even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, these decisions have negatively impacted people's lives through policies around covid climate change, immigration health care women's rights, lgbt rights education, and of course, our relationship with foreign countries, but the president's recent decision to leave the sixty year. Old World Health Organization is among the very most irresponsible decision will. Will hurt the US every bit as much as it will hurt the rest of the world the W. H.. O. Is not a perfect organization. It is plagued by politics and infighting and a low budget, but it's still serves a super important function. The whol plays a key role in many decisions that directly or indirectly affect our lives more than ever before our global interconnected world create great risks particularly with regard to the spreading. Spreading of diseases, it is the WHO that is. Our First Line of defense the WHO. I alerted the world to the infection that came to be called covid in early January, and it advised healthcare workers how to protect themselves from the spread. Perhaps it could have been more aggressive with its policies, but if there is a problem, conduct an audit help improve the organization. Don't be a baby and take your toys and walk away. Away and it's not just covid were who plays a vital role. It coordinates the global response to diseases like polio Ebola Malaria HIV TB and yellow fever. The near nation of diseases like polio has saved the US tens of billions of dollars in treatment costs, and the WHO isn't the only Health Organization the US refuses to work with as the US decided to focus inwardly. We have already stopped funding the pan. American Health Organization. Pan. America is the area that is currently home to half of the top ten countries with co Vid. Now aside from helping ourselves, we also have a social responsibility to help resource poor countries by helping to provide education laboratory training tools like p. p. e. and clinical trials drugs to treat emerging and reemerging diseases. When we step back from these responsibilities, China steps in, and they're now in our backyard, working with countries that will old them a big favor. The WHO also directly benefits the US for example each year influenza virus mutates resulting in new variants around the world. It is the W. H. O. that leads the. The flu vaccine development process each year which includes several American researchers and organizations like our FDA and CDC. The US depends on data from the WHO to predict which strain of the flu will spread to the US so that we can make ineffective vaccination in the end the total US funding for the WHO is equivalent to the overhead of about one ass hospital about three hundred seventy million dollars. It would be very hard to get better value for that

United States World Health Organization WHO Covid Dr Michael Wilks President Trump American Health Organization Flu Vaccine Polio Health Organization Malaria FDA W. H. O. America CDC China TB
WHO official says universal vaccine is the 'holy grail of our long-term hopes'

Tom Sullivan

00:40 sec | Last month

WHO official says universal vaccine is the 'holy grail of our long-term hopes'

"For a vaccine to Battle Cove in 19 the World Health Organization's Dr Mike Ryan says the every elusive universal vaccine is quote the holy Grail of our long term hopes and quote We've spent many decades thinking and hoping for a universal vaccine against influenza, and that has not been achieved. The flu vaccine is not the same every year because the flu virus ah Rhinovirus changes to find a universal vaccine. Scientists need to find the consistent sequences. Proteins common in all viruses find enough of them to develop a vaccine to target those in an effort toward universal protection. If a vaccine for Corona virus could be developed, and we expect it will maybe common elements between it and a rhinovirus can be found that could lead to a universal vaccine. I'm

Flu Vaccine Dr Mike Ryan Battle Cove World Health Organization Influenza
Study warns new flu virus in pigs could morph to cause a pandemic

Steve Cochran

00:33 sec | Last month

Study warns new flu virus in pigs could morph to cause a pandemic

"A new flu virus found in Chinese pigs has become or infections to humans and needs to be watched more closely. While there's no imminent threat, experts in a new study say there is a potential for a pandemic virus. Team of Chinese researchers looked at influenza viruses found in pigs from 2011 to 2018 and found the H one n one strain that's caused concern Chinese pig farm workers. Showed elevated levels of the virus in their blood, and the researchers have called for close monitoring of the swine industry and human

The Red Summer

Black History in Two Minutes

04:43 min | Last month

The Red Summer

"Reeling from the unprecedented devastation of global pandemic. Nurturing wounds from a brutal military victory abroad. Struggling to accommodate demobilized soldiers into a slumping economy fraught with heated competition for jobs. Jim Crow separate, but equal policies endorsed by the president of the United States himself. Now firmly in place as the law of the land. White supremacists targeted terrorist attacks. On an all-too-familiar scapegoat. In another epidemic GLAC citizens found themselves on the lethal end of an outbreak of racial violence in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine, so horrific that the civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson called it the red summer. The events unfolding across the United States today. In the wake of the brutal murder of George Floyd. are in eerie repetition of events that marred the history of race relations in this country. Almost exactly a century ago. African. American soldiers returned from Noble Service in Europe during World War One fully expecting that their sacrifices to their country would at long last entitled them to their full rights as equal citizens. Instead The uniforms they wore, literally became targets on their backs. wbz Do boys famously said that we return from fighting we returned fighting. We've saved democracy overseas and we're going to save it in the United States. That didn't happen. Between. November of nineteen, nineteen with a country devastated by an influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Racial unrest rolled through the south and north in the Mid West where the great migration was just unfolding in its earliest years. The immigration of course had transformed large parts of the north and the West. In, Nineteen fifteen, there were hardly a few black people in Chicago Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety one point. Two million people have spread themselves across the map. This demographic transformation of the color of the urban, north. Coupled with the stresses of a postwar economic downturn, combined to create the volatile conditions under which African American workers. Conveniently became magnets for white resentment in fear. The pushback was fierce. Chicago was wracked by fights along a dividing artery between one population and the other hundreds of people are dead. Cities are smoldering. It was one of the most vicious virulent violent race riots in our nation's streets. Small towns were also shaken by race fueled violence in Elaine Arkansas, for example, white vigilantes joined plantation owners. Sheriff's Deputies and even state officials to battle with faecal. And Uprising. Hundreds of black sharecroppers were murdered. Merely for trying to form a union. Yet in the aftermath, a grand jury callously indicted more than one hundred black women and men for their so called crimes. Of course, racial violence was anything but new in the America that time. Still. Amid the fallout from the Great War the rising generation, calling themselves new negroes. Was Not about to fold their tents. Instead read summer saw black. Americans, not only picking up arms to defend themselves. But also utilizing political organizations like the end of way C. P.. To challenge the violence in Congress in the courts in the media. And on the streets. In if we must die. The poet Claude McKay. Captured the tenor of the Times. In, his immortal call for defiance in the face of tyranny and terror. What the before us lies the open grave. Like men will face the murderous cowardly pack. Pressed to the wall dying. But fighting back.

United States Chicago America Jim Crow Mid West Claude Mckay James Weldon Johnson President Trump Murder Glac Europe Elaine Arkansas Noble Service George Floyd. Congress
Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

The Bio Report

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

"For pilly therapeutics to begin a face to study of an approved antiviral therapy as a potential preventative treatment against covid nineteen outbreaks, the study will enroll seven hundred sixty participants who are in long term care facilities in Ontario. The others are looking at the drug as a possible treatment for covid nineteen. This is the first study to consider its potential to prevent outbreaks. We spoke to Armand. Balboni see Ova pilly about the drug how it works and its potential to prevent outbreaks of covid nineteen in high risk populations. Armin thanks for joining us. Great to great lengths. We're going to talk about a guy. Its efforts to repurpose an approved antiviral as a prophylactic treatment against the covid nineteen virus in patients, long term care facilities in Canada for people, not familiar with the company. What does APU I do? Pillai Therapeutics was started. Twenty fifteen as an as a company in the anti infective space to address unmet needs. In. Fairly creative way we, we really are in global fighting instant action broadly, and what that means is, we are agnostic to a particular technology. We don't suffer from wasn't invented here, so we don't like it. We really look for the toughest problems in infectious disease, and then go and try and find solutions that could be an antibacterial, antiviral, anti, fungal, or accedes, which we actually have all of those so that that really is a little bit of different approach many. and. You're sponsoring the first clinical trial evaluating VIP Aveer for the prevention of covid nineteen. What is? there. So. The drug is a broad spectrum antiviral, and what that means is it has activity active against a wide range of viruses in this case there any viruses, so things like influenza. Ebola or I I had a chance to look at this in a couple of other agents. LHASA FEVER A Disease that endemic in. An Africa and of course songs cokie to. OR OF A. Ninety, and so it is a broad spectrum antiviral. Proof for influenza Japan and we noted that because of that activity. It is probably a great drug with a lot of safety data to to try against Cova Antena and that's binding. You actually had experience with the drug back when you were a staff officer at the US. Army Research Institute of Infectious Disease. What was your experience with the drug then? I was I. was at you Sam read actually. I was on I'm an officer been an officer? The US Army as both MD end of. Upper over seventeen years, and so what that means I've worked on a number of anti effective programs. The US. Department of Defense sent me to to the food and Drug Administration at two thousand fourteen for the outbreak, and it was during that whole. Albert but I had the opportunity to work as part of the review team reviewer in. In the FDA and looked at both from severe trump. It's now being used by Gilead and Santa Peer Review I'm so both drugs are broad spectrum. Antivirals and had had an opportunity to look at how they were against a some Arnie viruses legal.

Officer United States Army Research Institute Of Inf Us Army Pillai Therapeutics FDA Department Of Defense Cova Antena Armand Ontario SAM Lhasa Santa Peer Review Armin Vip Aveer Africa Japan Ebola Fever Albert
How Tear Gas Affects The Body  And Why It's Dangerous During This Pandemic

Short Wave

07:42 min | 2 months ago

How Tear Gas Affects The Body And Why It's Dangerous During This Pandemic

"Tear gas. I started seeing all the reports of law enforcement using tear-gas all over the country all. Julius protest after protest. I saw the photos of the the white smoke coming up. Videos of protesters, desperately washing out there is. People are choking gasping for air. Volga. tear-gas clearly makes it hard to breathe. Very Soul what bench march from whatever was an I just thought. What exactly's tear-gas. It doesn't seem like a good idea to us in the middle of a respiratory pandemic. Back streets as protesters picking up some of those canisters. Throw them back at police. Unprecedented Street. We actually have any science about whether it's safe or not. So Lisa set out to answer those questions. That's when I started talking to researchers and scientists and really getting a sense that. The combination of the way that tear gas is being used in these protests, the huge quantities the frequency with which it's used the way police are using Ed is really a cause for concern. Today on the show why using tear-gas could be especially dangerous right now during a respiratory pandemic, and how some law enforcement tactics could be making its impact, even worse I'm reporter Emily Quang, and this is short wave, the daily science podcast from NPR. So as far as I understand, tear gas is a term that's broadly applied to describe a set of chemicals right, and these are liquid chemicals in. It's not actually a gas right, so the term tear gas is confusing because different people use them in different ways, scientifically speaking tear-gas refers to several different chemicals that make your skin burn that make it hard to breathe. It's really painful stinging. The way that the CDC refers to tear gas and the way that law enforcement refers to tear gas sometimes they're referring to a broader set of chemicals, but in general, yes, tear gas is actually a tiny liquid droplets, and my story focused on the most common type of tear gas used by law enforcement in the US, and that is a chemical called. See US and see us. How is it designed? How does it work so it's designed to cause pain and. The description I got from a scientist. WAS THAT CIS? Gas triggers a particular pain receptor in your body. It's the same receptor that's triggered when you eat with Sabi, but it's much more powerful. If you take that stinging sensation from eating with Sabi and multiply it by up to a hundred thousand fold that is how much more powerful CS is. It sounds incredibly disorienting. How of those you've interviewed described hit by tear gas. What that experience was like? Yeah? I I mean I. Personally am very lucky and have never been exposed to tear gas, but the various protesters I interviewed. They describe this incredible feeling of fear and helplessness. Your eyes are burning. Your nose is running. Your mouth hurts, and you have trouble breathing, so you can't see you're in pain, and you're having trouble catching a breath and you feel like you're choking. This one protester I interviewed was part of this protest in Philadelphia that got a lot of media coverage, and at one point she was in a part of this highway that ran partially underground, so what was the stark semi-enclosed space and with tear-gas got in there? Everyone panicked. You know they couldn't see everything hurt and they were trying to run away, but there was really nowhere to run, and she said that she actually feared for her life. She feared that in the panic she would get trampled and she did actually get bruised all over because people were stopping her as they were running away. So as you look to tear gas from a medical standpoint, what it does to the body and one of the things that you discovered is that tear? Gas has a big impact on the lungs. Can you tell me about that? Right so one of the things scientists told me is that when you inhaled tear gas? You're going to start wheezing and coughing and that means that your lungs are working hard to try and get rid of this. Tear gas, so it doesn't have the same amount of strength or the same reserve to fight off any additional infections you might get and that could make people who've inhaled tear gas more susceptible to getting the corona virus. Particularly, if they already have asthma or some other respiratory condition, because they are already at higher risk to catching infections, like influenza or the common cold, and so the fear is that tear? Gas could trigger an asthma attack, or further weakened the body's ability to fight off Covid, nineteen rights and the tear gas. It also weakens the demonstrators protections against the krona virus, because it changes the way people are moving around in a crowd, it creates chaos. Yes, and this is one of the things that public health professionals are worried about is a lot of protesters are doing the responsible thing by wearing masks during the protest, but as As soon as you hit with tear gas, you're trying to breathe as much as possible because you're gasping for air and at that point instinctively you're gonNA. Take off the mask to try and get some fresh air and when you do that, you're going to be coughing because you're trying to get rid of the tear gas in your lungs, and we all know that coughing is one of the things that spreads cove it, so there's a lot of fear that people who have the corona virus spider as dramatic as they're coughing while trying to deal with tear-gas that they're spreading the disease among other protesters in the crowd From your reporting looking at protests around the country I'm wondering to what patterns you've seen with. How tear gas is being used by law enforcement. We've seen it used in different ways, but a pattern that we've seen is that. The police are often using a lot of tear gas. They are using it in quick succession, and it's that combination of the sheer volume of tear gas, and sometimes it's being used in situations when the protesters are trapped in an area and can't get away like we've seen in Philadelphia and that really compounds the dangers and risks of tear gas right, so it's not just that it's being used. It's how it's being used, and how often right so? Tear gas comes in a variety of forms, and there are different tactics and tools that police can use. They can spray it from cans. They can shoot canisters filled with tear gas, and there are some manufacturers for example that will sell grenades that not only does it expel tear-gas there's also bright lights, loud noise to further cause confusion and make the protesters tried to disperse. There's also a type of product called a triple

Scientist Pain Volga. Tear-Gas Coughing United States Julius Philadelphia Stinging Sensation NPR Asthma Lisa CDC Emily Quang ED Reporter
Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

Cyber Talk Radio

03:16 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

"Story the corona virus pandemic is still with us and we'll cover it nineteen was initially thought to be a respiratory disease many of the symptoms have another thing in common poor blood circulation and blood vessel damage forty percent of deaths from corona virus related to cardiovascular complications for more on how this disease is starting to look like a vascular infection instead of a purely respiratory one we'll speak to Dana Smith senior writer at elemental I mean it's a really bizarre infection and I want to be clear you know it's definitely still in fact in the long people do still have pneumonia like we initially thought they did but like you said there's a lot of really bizarre other symptoms that have emerged things like strokes and blood clots a lot of cardiovascular complications that you don't typically see with a normal respiratory disease fell if I merge and I laugh mother Jill that it could be that the virus is not only affecting fell in the longer the respiratory tract but also infecting blood vessel cells and that's really unique not many buyers to do that and we don't think there's any other respiratory viruses apparently know that did it all felt felt the original hardwired influenza viruses don't infected blood vessel cells so it's really unique for Kobe to the novel coronavirus in particular and it could explain a lot of these really strange and really deadly complications that we're seeing so let's talk a little bit about how it progresses through the body sars Kobe to go through the body and connects to these AC E. two receptors that are usually in the nose and throat and from there what happens it can start destroying some lung tissue and it can break open some blood vessels and then it started catching to all these other cells that have to do with the blood vessels are called endothelial cells and and then it creates this immune response and then everything starts going haywire but it seems that all these other side effects seem to be kind of coming from the blood vessel problems we know that it could be to get them out of Iraq have to latch on to these these two receptors and there a few weeks after the all through your nose in your respiratory tract in your long thank you all for your body there the company and have been there some even in the brain and they're also on the bloodbath well we think that just like we've always thought about the virus gets into the body through the nose and throat which is why you still need to wash your hands don't touch your face the boy being around people who are coughing all the standard recommendations are critical it's still the same with this new development but we still get infected through the respiratory tract and then the virus travels down into the long wait is still causing damage and and ammonia but then the unique part is the final step where it does actually get into the blood vessel felt still activating on the H. two receptors on the bloodbath without editor there it can travel everywhere in the body and for that but you start being these really bizarre things that would like to call the toes that people are talking about that could be a problem with circulation all the way to you're good at your fingers and toes it's why you start being of the blood clot it's why risk being potentially damaging the intestines and the liver and the kidneys really furious diseases because a lot of information and can cause organ has shut down to the part of the body's overactive immune response which is what we thought was happening with Kobe nineteen to begin with and that still could be the case but the evidence is mounting that there's this kind of other route that the virus is using two is fast and caused damages other organs that

The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

Coronacast

03:42 min | 2 months ago

The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

"Monday the first of June the first of winter. And give it is beginning of winter. Maybe we could talk about whether we can expect things to get worse as we come into the called a months. Do We know Norman? What effect it has? On covid nineteen transmission, the short answer to that question is that the experts think it probably will make a difference, but it depends in which environment you're in so in countries where you've got a rising epidemic, pandemic or very large numbers of cases, you probably won't notice the difference of winter, but you could in places like Australia in New Zealand where we've got very little virus around in a small increase could give you a significant blip. And essentially what we're talking about here is that we're indoors more more likely to transmit the virus to other people indoors. We've spoken about before is the high risk area it could be that the environment in winter favors the virus as well because it does other corona viruses, so you would expect it to get a little bit worse winter, but you might not notice it in amongst the noise in countries like the United States in the United Kingdom. You might notice it in Australia one of the things that we were sort of worried about. About, a few months ago is coming into winter. At the same time of these new pandemic was that perhaps it was going to coincide with the flu season, but everyone's staying harm. So is it a we? Is that still something that we're worried about? Or maybe? Is it going to be a good season for US hard to know? We are now coming back out of isolation, and maybe I'll be that seasonal flu remarriages, but there's also been quite a high uptake of influenza immunization, so it remains to be seen what we see about. Flu But you would expect seasonal flu to make a bit of a resurgence as we get out and about a bit more over the next few weeks. Another thing that we were hearing a bit more over the weekend about was this name that just won't go away. The Ruby Princess so passengers on board. The Ruby Princess cruise have have led to one of the biggest current of ours clusters, but there's been another health warning issued around that boat. A cream has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. Yes, you another reason not to call on crucial think, but you know just when you thought it was safe to go out here's somebody with Berko losses. The probably health artists are saying that the risk is low to other people on the ship, which it certainly lower than corona virus. Temecula losses can actually be quite infectious. Just remind you what this is this is. An inch a very very ancient disease. It's been around longer. Probably than humans have been around and was scourged, particularly in the nineteenth century, causes a lung disease, but can affects your kidneys can almost any part of your body, so it's pretty nasty and high high degree of fatality particularly if you're immune, compromised such as HIV AIDS. You can get clusters of tuberculosis. I covered the story a story a few years ago and outbreak of tuberculosis in Adelaide and when the traced back the outbreak, it was sprayed. It was a man on boss. He caught the bus each morning from the Adelaide hills down into the city, and he spread it to other people on the bus. So Tobacco can be infectious, but it's not as infectious as corona virus. Do We know given byes? Lung Diseases is they a people with take a at higher risk of complications from Iris very good question. Don't know the answer to it intuitively. You'd say yes, you've got. Got Pommery TB you would be you. You'd think that you're more susceptible. although TV does funny things to your immune system, and that may affect responses well to the corona virus, because sometimes the things going on in your lungs and the immune response, they are helped to dampen the immune response to covid nineteen, so it's complicated story, but I don't think anybody's published on that yet.

FLU United States Lung Diseases Australia Norman Adelaide Adelaide Hills United Kingdom Iris HIV New Zealand Aids
Elderberry: Friend or Foe Against Viral Infections?

Diet Science

04:45 min | 2 months ago

Elderberry: Friend or Foe Against Viral Infections?

"So D-. What's the topic for this week this week? We're talking about a particular little fruit called elderberry elderberry. Yeah, they're little little fruit almost grow on a vine, grapes, and they have actually it's kind of known as black elderberry, because it has almost like the blackberry color. Okay, and but it almost looks like a blueberry so. So and many people may have heard of like elderberry. Wine was just about to say. Berry Jam Right. Yeah, so elderberry has been around for a very long time, and in fact it's been used medicinally by the native Americans, and by people in Europe, as a preventative treatment for infections and even for wound, healing, so but it it has garnered some more recent attention in you know as it because it was found to be very effective against the H, one N, one flu virus Oh In fact, there were studies showing that It, it worked in a couple of different ways against that one was as a preventive meaning that if you had it in your system, and then we're exposed to the virus that it prevented, you know basically like stopped the the virus from getting into host cells within the body, so prevented the infection altogether, and then other studies showed that another way that it was beneficial in in the flu virus. Was that it? if it, if you already were infected that it could actually like. Stop the infection from getting worse. Oh, so it had a so it works in two different ways in in relation to particular flu virus. So it got a lot of attention. in fact it, you know I mean it's been around because of that with the flu. And so people have been getting either extracts or or syrups of it, and sometimes they can come in capsules as a dried extract. And taking it as a preventive against the flu, so obviously during this cova time. They're probably taking it for that or any any evidence that it can help with that. Well that's where it starts to get a bit. controversial and it also gets to be a little bit like scary, because you have to really know whether or not, it's the right thing to be taking at the right time so and some of the where this kind of comes from. Was that people started you know when when covid became you know a pandemic. People started buying up elderberry supplements off. You know the Internet Mac I remember you. In early March every place that I looked including my own sources for physician grade elderberry. It was all out. And, then like you know back order. Yeah, I mean. People were just buying it up like crazy, and so you know obviously people were thinking I've got to get this stuff. 'cause he's list. We know that it can protect against certain flu, viruses and but the thing is, is that we? We obviously have no research. Right on whether it can be effective against Kovic nineteen virus however, I wanted to give our listeners just a little bit of background on. Why why it was considered to be a potential. you know supplement that could help people with their immunity. Okay so there was a research research study that was that was published in two thousand nine, and it demonstrated that elderberry have particular fighter nutrients in them called flavonoids that they bind to that influenza as one n one of. The virus in you know in the in the host cell, so they protect it from infecting the host cell, and that was the the study that a lot of this was based off. The also found that it's very high in vitamin C.. which is another you know nutrient that's essential with antiviral properties. So you know so there's so that so that was out there that the thing about elderberry that's concerning though is if so as a preventative. The the experts are saying it's great for that as a preventative, because if you don't have the virus And you want to protect yourself from it. It's very probable that it will you know it can be helpful in preventing you from getting

FLU Europe
“The Great Influenza” author John M. Barry

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

05:25 min | 2 months ago

“The Great Influenza” author John M. Barry

"Back John M. Barry is our guest he is the author of many phenomenal books of the one we're most focused on in this episode the great influenza John talk to me about what public health learned and did to respond to that influenza and how it compares four days informing what we're doing now well I think that there are two lessons that come out of nineteen eighteen the first is to tell the truth if you're going to get the public to comply with public health advice they have to trust you and you have to trust the public and you have to tell them the truth I think that's a very clear lesson incidently that's a lesson that is written into the pandemic preparedness plan for not only the federal government for every one of the fifty states you know when the bush administration launched a very significant initiatives for preparedness including creating national stockpile vaccines technology in an acting capacity things like that included a planning process they asked me to participate in that was the last thing that I can't beating on people but nobody ever argued with me and it's very high priority tell the truth to the public the second lesson is social distancing and other public health guidelines like that the cities that you know the reason I was asked to participate in those groups was because I knew what happened nineteen eighteen and the cities that that closed down earlier stayed closed longer I tended to do better in terms of the disease and oddly enough there's some recent studies by two different federal reserve branch banks they both concluded that the economies of the cities that were closed down longer actually did much better when they came out of lockdown density you said were closer short what should what should that tell us about our pace of re opening now well I would need that we need to note phase it in hand and be very careful monitor the disease in nineteen eighteen many cities possibly most I did but I didn't do it precise numerical assessment of many cities reopened to some they were open for several weeks and had closed down again as the disease surged back there are a few cities maybe more than a tiny handful that had to do that three times our and you know S. that's a lesson that I don't know that we've learned I think politically right now it would be extremely difficult even if there is a significant resurgence for some of these states to shut back of course hopefully there won't be this search right considering your advocacy for truth telling how would you evaluate truth telling for public officials in this pandemic well you have a distinct you have to draw a distinction between fourteen people in the administration but not directly associated with the White House twenty five genes CDC and so forth I thank you know they made every effort to be auctioned and then you have the White House operation and you know clearly they have not told the truth unfortunately and the result is that you have a lot of people who are not complying with the guy with the advice date you know somehow the white house's managed to politicize attempts to save people's lives and protect them hi you know how they managed to do that I mean I know how they did it you know how they did it but a mask is become a political statement is just crazy the mask was not a political statement in nineteen eighteen I gather it was not it was not there were a number of cities particularly on the west coast which passed laws mandating mask usage in the first round there was a large got a considerable compliance without any trouble as in some cities like San Francisco where Hey you know we open this Saturday are you not to wear masks the city back down again and and and mass the mass school are required was reimposed and there was a lot of pushback and again given that Sanchez goes to one of the hardest hit cities in the country and a lot of people are dying so you know that's a sign of how strong that sentiment was mostly I think because people felt okay again after re opening and and no they thought it was over and to disappoint them again it's just this resentment that builds up why did why did you let us tell us that we were okay initially when I just keep it and anyway but that's speculation on my

John M. Barry
"influenza" Discussed on a16z

a16z

06:26 min | 3 months ago

"influenza" Discussed on a16z

"Inhaler go about your day instead of wearing a mask. And what do we think about safety for these things and safety for delivery and safety for the Crisper Part? The crisper part seems utterly straightforward. Because is going after Arne. It's not editing. Your genome could be the delivery. Part now becomes the real question. Can we come up with delivery where it could be done multiple times in weight of safe so AV is typically the gold standard for gene therapy delivery? These ADN associated viruses are approved therapies. Right now these are what we call one and done treatments because your body will develop immunity against this gaps. If this all works out well this could be a universal krona virus or Flu Vaccine. But if you think about re administration every single year you'd probably want something that is less mutagenic. The other big problem is immunity. Necessity of Christopher nucleus is a lot of the common crisper nucleus that we use do come from pathogenic sources. There are people that are developing new forms of New Claes's Cassocks for instance that might have come from non pathogenic sources that could be used in the less committed. Jennifer Fashion Crisper cast. Nuclear is definitely a a hardware platform? If you think of it in the molecular sense all of the concepts that they showed here in this paper you can apply it not only to cast their team but also differ. Nucleus or even liber- nanoparticles non viral approaches. Different ethic peptides. That also shown to deliver cast. Nine nucleus is really well could be combined here and so we can also think about. How do we engineer better crisper system that utilize the same platform but a lot of the stuff and the foundation? That they've developed can be play. Do you think that the hurdles that we just discussed with safety delivery immuno-genetic city we easier faster or more feasible to clear than the hurdles facing a vaccine for copay nineteen or is it just anyone's guess right? Now there's a couple different scenario. So one scenario is were antibody dependent enhancement. Ad is actually a real serious difficult problem. That can't be cracked if that's the case then this looking pretty good. In comparison there's another scenario where Vaccine becomes much more to like an influenza vaccine and so a more traditional approaches work and then this might be harder unfortunately with Kovin. A lot is still unknown. One I'm thinking about is not just planning for what we can do to help. Covert in two thousand twenty and twenty one. But what would we do about the pandemic that could be in twenty thirty or twenty five if you look at the timing between these pandemics using about SARS and Murs and covert the years between them becoming fewer and fewer? If that's the case having a broad spectrum sort of programmable ish approach that could be brought out very quickly. That's particularly intriguing. Though validating crisper approach my take longer and it might span this current one. You know if we get this moonshot right. We can dramatically save time for all future bendix basically sidestep. There's really linear passive vaccine development. Okay so we've discussed the scientific hurdles that therapy like this would still have to overcome but assuming they were overcome. Are there strong business models and incentives for prophylactic treatments or does it suffer from some of the same headwinds as antibiotics and traditional accedes? Yeah I think if you think about the modern record of producing vaccines. It doesn't really inspire that much confidence because if you think about SARS Cov one Mersey Coppola all really provoked these similar arms race to make vaccine if you will and today only if the bowl effort has been successful and the vaccine was approved basically last year five years after the epidemic really happened. Well learn you talked about. Comparing this to antibiotics thing about. Antibiotics is said we intentionally don't give them out because we want avoid resistance and that's what's economics event novel antibiotic so challenging because If you have a great antibiotic it goes lock box and doesn't get used. This is actually upside down for a couple of reasons. One it inherently is engineered to grafter resistance in that a few mutations. And they're going to make a big deal and then secondly I imagine that it would be the type of thing going lock box. It would be heavily manufacturing distributed such that everyone would have available so that I think there would be a real commercial vantage doing something like this so for those two reasons. I think this becomes almost opposite of what we're seeing antibiotics. I think you know thinking about this. Whole economic context governments and institutions spent billions of dollars every year on nuclear weapons that they hope to never use how about we spent a couple of billion to build these plants and teams who equip ourselves to handle the next upper pandemic. Think that's excellent point. Turn it into a national defense issue and not just a health. Market health demands issue. It's interesting to think about. What can we do either to have a response? Already or to engineer something rapidly in response to something being a threat I think the old style sort of military topgun like war where it's GonNa be our fighter jets against other fighter jets becomes less and less of a reality. Bioterrorism becomes probably a much more insidious threat I mean. These vaccines remained the best. Virtually only weapon against these viruses and bioterrorism. So it's GonNa be a mission critical defense mechanism going forward so one last thing and this may be more SCI FI. It's interesting to ask. Could sort of a crisper approach a true broad spectrum antiviral for like all viruses and especially given the nature viruses and how they spread with a population the ability to tackle these things early means that they don't spread which means that we don't have these crazy pandemics anymore that would be the ultimate fantasy. Thank you both. And thank you for joining the A sixteen Z Journal. Club this week to recap. This research shows that it is possible to program a crisper based system to target both krona viruses and influence to prevent infection. There are a number of challenges still to overcome especially as these results are only in a cell culture model but there is huge potential here to create a broad range kroth electic treatment for viral infection and advances in engineering. Biology will take us. There will continue to discuss related themes other a sixteen Z podcast episodes..

engineer Flu Vaccine Christopher nucleus Arne influenza Kovin Jennifer Fashion Murs Z Journal Coppola
"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

07:26 min | 4 months ago

"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"I was just I was just waiting. Almost you know thought I'll I'll slide away had been on. I might have slid away on. You have to bear in mind. I was making that plane tail for a bunch of a three twenty fans of your excuses. I delayed on a bit thick right. They're fantastic podcasts. Yes it is fantastic podcasters on that show all right very good Good stuff okay Shall we continue with the our feedback? You know what it looks like. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA knock at all of it. I think which is going to be like a major wellstone. Maybe we'll see give it a go into this. One tried to get to last time and didn't make it so we've got it this time. Rollo private pilot Rollo here. Once again I'm sending this feedback from the far reach. Oh Eight Less maybe you can put that Overlay up from the far reaches of the Western Pacific. I don't believe I've ever heard anyone sending feedback from this part of the world. So I thought it'd be cool to do it for the sake of our friends over at opposing bases which like secret location code names will call this Pacific island Captain Nick Island in honor of the Air Force Base. That's here with the same surname as the old pilot only with a slightly different spelling. Only know what this is the. Ap as Anderson Air Base on the island of Guam anyways. I'm out here with giving away all his secrets. Yano. Anyways I'm out here with my squadron and the irony of it is what that we're operating out of Captain Nick Island while turning. Wrenches on captain next favorite Boeing the old legacy Hornets or as we like to call them baby Hornets. It's incredible that these old were warbirds are still in service. Many countries are including the US. I've now gotten the opportunity to work on the C nine the navy's version of the mad dog the Super Hornet and currently the baby hornet onto a different topic. The other day I went on a hike down a historic trail on the old Navy airfield. Which is no which is no longer in use. The trail took us through an old taxiway and runway threshold overgrown with a jungle. Now we continue down the rugged trail which led us to a World War Two era F for you Corsair crash site. The aircraft allegedly went down sometime in nineteen forty based on the Little Information. I could find online. The main fuselage half of each wing and parts of the landing gear are still there the engine prop and are no longer there. This was a really cool experience and adventure and we could feel the history that surrounds that crash site and the old airfield like always. I've attached a few pictures of our adventure share with the apogee community and we have one up there right now if you're watching the video. That's Rollo setting 'em where the I guess but the Corsair air have an ejection seat. Probably not they probably just Are just bailed out of those things. Right so anyway you can clearly see the The wing spar on the Corsair which has a very distinctive bend to it. Yeah Yeah Wing crank save quite. It's quite easy to recognize even though he's sitting in a pretty poll state. Yep had an F. Word probably say. I don't know what that is very cool. So if anybody's interested you can see more pictures. I posted on instagram. And he says feel free to add my handle to the show notes and it's at A. R. O. D. L. Eight one again. That'll be in the show notes and Let's see this chaotic chaotic time of Corona virus wishing the crew and community unlimited health until next time private private pilot Rollo and again just check out the show notes and you can see the other photos that he has taken of the crash site and some signs et Cetera. From the this beautiful tropical. All right brilliant. Thank you can I do a quick correction? Yes you're on myself The three twenty five Was actually another name for the three twenty one so they when they stretch the three twenty they colder initially the a three twenty dash five hundred and the three twenty five. Give it both James Bond. Eventually it was called the I three twenty one us what that comes from very interesting. I had a little bit role. Okay what am I feel like? We're YEP YEP backup above fifty percents percent in that vicinity ever take twenty percent f McKay. That's the way we do it here. I'm twelfth gusts though. This is an interesting one. Any anybody WANNA game for taking this one. I'll take it because he's got a question for you and says Hi. Abc crew and community. I hope you're doing good. I A quick question for Steph. I noticed it's been a long time since you went flying. I know any reason in particular. Don't you miss it as a J. pilot I cannot be more than two weeks without it I would start shaking sweating. Don't tell my medical examiner. Your secret is safe with us On through that real quick. Yeah it's been a very long time and part of it had to do with Some family circumstances that were happening that we're keeping me busy on my Otherwise free weekends I did a lot of travel over the past year which I'm grateful for now because I think it's going to be a while with without some of that So I kind of satisfied that It sure bug that I was having for a while to get out and see lots of different places in the world and and visit with friends and do all kinds of stuff so I do. Miss it I laid off have been planning to get back into it updated medical and all kinds of other stuff. I need to do and then in touch with the flight school and I don't know if I'm actually going to be able to do that for the next little while I'm going to Call a flight school tomorrow and see if they're still I'm still getting emails from them. Saying they're running specials on things I think trying to to get a business but I don't know if With some of these stay at home orders. If that's going to be allowed so it might be a little while longer That's okay they'll give me time to Study up some things and brush up on on book. Knowledge side of things and I'll get back into don't worry But yeah it's I do miss it so I'll get back there. Don't worry Changing subjects I stumbled upon this article and wanted to know your thoughts about any alternative source of energy for Airliners. Do you think we are going to see any of this in the near future. And he includes a link to a Yahoo dot com lifestyle article Title SAYS FORGOT FUEL tanks. Better forget fuel tanks batteries Batteries this new electric jet concept uses air friction to generate power. You want me to go ahead and read through that gap if you like myself. Article says.

Rollo Captain Nick Island navy Navy airfield Boeing US Air Force Base Anderson Air Base Yano Guam Ap Pacific island Hornets Yahoo James Bond Steph A. R. O. D.
"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

08:52 min | 4 months ago

"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"So. We have corona virus outbreaks. We have We have earthquakes. And what's next Maybe was that no swarms of locusts. You're kidding me. You laugh about this however story. They were driving across town and this is the day after the earthquake and I had just washed my car because we were mentioning before the show that it has become policies here in the southeast of the United States. So my car was covered in this nice. You know layer of yellow pollen so I ran through the car wash that I was driving back across town and I drove through. This huge swarm of bugs like it was like a cloud of bugs and I can only assume that they were locusts. Because what else would they be? What else we should mention. Also that they had the same kind of issues with the krona virus infection or threat of in the New York market Believe JFK and several of the surrounding airports I guess it included Laguardia Westchester and others up in the New York City area that had to shut down because of Corona virus Related fears. So yeah. Well that's right Las Vegas the same thing and Indianapolis by so I hear that Las Vegas and midway are both still operating non towered operations and Our good friend and fellow podcasters dispatcher. Mike said that he received something from Acme that said Reminding the dispatchers to remind aircrews landing at these places that they remember to cancel their clearance. Because this is a problem for looking for you yeah and also I guess. I can't technically allow somebody else to proceed via to the airport right. Yes kind of makes it a big mess. Okay now being from the other side of the world I know. Atc's zero is a well now. Well recognized. I'm not sure how come in a well known. It was In previous decades indication in the states that traffic is shut down on. The new service will be provided. But why use a term like that? Which is not self explanatory when it would be easier to say at traffic control has shut down. Do your thing Writing Cup. The suitable FRY. So why use the code word that his own the FAA used Saggio the only country in the world as far as I know that has ATC's zero. So I'm just a little bit confused. Why have a code word for that? Why not just tell people in plain language? Because that's you know I'm a great believer in when you communicating you make it plain and simple Couch it in a tone that is not necessarily self explanatory. I'm I'm just curious. I'd say that's a great question for the opposing. Basis guys your feedback about our H. He would just coach. Just let it slide up this. This did cause problem with a us-based pilots was a few years ago the first time this term really became. Baltimore was used. Yes yes Nobody understood that was. Yeah we talked about on the show and said never heard that before we had the same we had the same question back then Nick But now at least now when I hear it I I know what that is. Yeah well let's see so I was on the show the gun. Wow that's new one on me. That's a good point now. At least the people at Midway said It's now a class. E airspace so that's kind of the taff and all of that so that should help a little bit but you're right on issues to say. Look you guys are on your own. No air traffic control services where leaving the tower. So there's nobody here to control you. Just use more plain language agree would be a better thing by the way Let's see we have Dave Gooch. Said he thinks that Midway is back open now. He believes as of twenty minutes ago. Perhaps Las Vegas is really well. Okay that was from not Dave someone else in the chat room who has forgotten Anthony. Thank you Anthony Yeah so I don't know that's a good question neck but maybe the boys over at the opposing basis can tackle that one. They probably have the same. The same feelings we do. I'd say it in Eight hundred seventy one fifty five twenty two three dash five seventy one whatever? It is the right. So that's the that's the answer not that I have any problem with that. They have to use phraseology sitting there book. Yeah I just think that book to be might be somebody. Throw them away improve. Find Find Nowadays Book of Eh Traffic Control Craig. Measurement and the Youtube Chat Says K. L. A. S. Tower is up on live. Abc just heard a pilot. Say Glad to have you back Roy. Goodness speaking of good news. We have even more good news. We're always loved these kind of good news. Feeling good kind of story. Feel good kind of story there. We go This one this item D. American Airlines reunites passenger with father. Just before he passes. Well that's not. That's the sad part of that. American Airlines has been in the news recently for all the wrong reasons but Here's a positive story showing that there is still love with an airline Let's see Laurie. Thomas was on a business on business in Virginia when she received a phone call informing her that. Her ailing father's condition had worsened. She immediately booked a flight back home from Dulles to Colorado Springs where the connection in Dallas unfortunately her flight at of Dulles was delayed which meant potentially missing her connection in Dallas on the verge of tears. She wrote a note to the flight crew asking for help. Here's lorries entire story after receiving an emergency. Call while I'm business. Can we just talked about that Not Wanting to burst into tears in front of passengers. I wrote a note explaining my situation and asking if anything could be done to delay the connecting flight. The flight attendant curiously took my note to the Galley and returned with the following notes. Ansi I guess On instagram. They must have posted some pictures of those upon arrival at Dallas Fort. Worth I was whisked to an awaiting American Airlines ramp vehicle on the tarmac and driven to my gate to terminals away. I made it home in time to spend an extra day with my dad who passed away this morning. Thank you to Deanna. And the captain on American Airlines twenty-seven Eighty four and to the captain and crew on American Airlines. Twenty three forty seven. I'm eternally grateful for your compassion and kindness. Indeed despite what you see making headlines kindness compassion and humanity does exist in the airline industry. Thank you to these American Airlines teams. That went the extra mile. Made this happen. Your work doesn't go unnoticed. Keep it up so and this is you know we hear these stories and I'm sure they probably happened a lot more than just like this. Once in a blue moon is just that we don't always hear about these kind of things and We've talked about these kind of stories before on the show. So I guess this probably happened before this whole corona virus outbreak and The incredible Diminishing of service for all the airlines cancelled flights and everything else. I'm assuming I duNno not that it makes any difference. No it doesn't go quite often. These things are just one or two people who go Make that special extra effort itself and not a whole bunch people you find. There are a few individuals suddenly realized this situation. They make a few calls. They do a few things they follow through on a story. Make sure it all happens. I they haul airline may not do that but it ain't take a few individuals to make a really good story that's for sure. Yes that is for sure well. We purposely made our news folder items Small so that we can spend more time answering people's feedback and also kind of talking amongst ourselves and getting to know each other. So here we go are getting to know you segment Get into line queue all right.

American Airlines Las Vegas Atc United States New York Dave Gooch New York City FAA Anthony Laguardia Westchester Nick But Indianapolis Youtube Dulles Dallas Fort Mike taff
"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

The Plant Path

15:22 min | 8 months ago

"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

"Hey there everybody say John Popham here founder of the School of Evolutionary herbalism and and the other day I did one of our quarterly live sessions for all of the evolutionary herbalism. Students and someone asked a question about. How do we go about holistically treating influenza? And and you know we're here. It's December of two thousand and nineteen. And as I'm sure you know this tends to be the season where people were coming down and with the flu or people were getting. Colds got compromised immune systems. There's all sorts of bugs floating around in the air and so I thought it would be really fun onto to share some of the content that I taught during that Q.. In a Webinar. So you know one of the reasons why I think this is particularly important is because it's willy conventional for people when they get the flu and get especially especially with the accompanying fever for people to really reach for. You know taking something like aspirin to get that fever down and you one of the things that we see is that when we suppress a fever we actually ended up. Prolonging the sickness. There right we can turn what would normally be. Maybe a three day fever into a week long fever through suppressing it and one of the wonderful things about herbal medicine is that we have plants available to us that really support the body in going going about its natural response in the body reacts to a fever and the way that you know. I think it's important for us as herbalists to remember remember that there is a vital intelligence in the body right in the West we often times refer to that as the vital force and and as holistic herbalists. We want to really make sure that we're always honoring and following that flow of the vital force trusting rusting in the intelligence of the body trusting. In the fact that our bodies know how to self regulate into self heal and that our work with plants is really just supporting that process rather than biochemistry overwriting what our body is is trying to do in order to auto regulate an auto self heal so I thought this was a very fitting discussion discussion to be sharing here. Her in the late autumn transitioning in to winter time. So I just wanted to do a little introduction here and I hope. Have you enjoy some of the teachings that I shared here in our evolutionary herbalism quarterly Webinar. And we're going to be talking a little bit here about some some of my approaches to holistically addressing influenza and fever. What is my protocol for the flu? Well there's a handful of things that I generally consider here in the treatment of the flu and I think before really getting into that. I think it's worth kind of acknowledging the an interesting kind of dynamic in in our terminology where we tend to lump colds Flus right. We always say colds flus. Maybe because they people tend to get them around the fallen wintertime. Maybe that's why But really from I guess from a perspective of pathology. They're actually quite different in the sense that there have similarities and they have the differences. You know they're generally both viral infections affecting the respiratory system but one of the big differences is that the common cold generally affects upper respiratory. Right sinuses you get the stuffy nose. The kind of your head feels like it's floating on a balloon in ten feet above your head kind of tired sluggish sometimes a sore throat that generally is about the extent of it great whereas a fever this is typically yes can be upper respiratory but oftentimes flus tend to get much deeper into into the respiratory system so we oftentimes see a cough oftentimes associated with some bronchitis but the main differentiating factor is fever right and so- influenza infection generally speaking always is accompanied by a fever whereas a common cold is not so. That's a really important distinguishing factor. Here and really kind of changes the approach to you effectively treating the flu. The other thing that I think is worth mentioning is that no one has ever died from the common cold but people die every year ear from influenza. Generally it's usually young children or the elderly people that really don't have very strong immune system strong vitality but nonetheless. People do die from the flu quite often and not dimension every now and then there. Are these really big flu. Pandemics that come out and can be very difficult to treat at Cetera. So just wanted to give a little little background there when it does come to actual herbal treatment for the flu. There's a number of factors that I think are important shortened to consider. I is food actually so an old kind of rule of thumb. Is that you fast a fever and feed a cold so this is why during a cold. It's nice to like have a lot of like hot soups and broth often. You want to keep yourself nourished during the cold but during a fever actually eating food is not good. You know generally speaking when someone has a working fever usually they don't really have that much of an appetite anyway but it's good to keep that person in a fasting state. The reason for that is is that during a fever. All of the blood is being pushed out. Out to the periphery and is being circulated to circulate immunological components to keep things moving to try to push heat out doc and ultimately raise the internal body temperature to cook out that pathogen when you eat a meal all of your blood has to flow back into the digestive digestive system and so that can really inhibit the process of fever in pretty detrimental ways so it always say fast asked a fever feed a cold and the the other important thing before I get into kind of practical aspects of how I go about treating is that it's very important understand is that a fever is a vital response. This is an intelligent response of the vital force of the body in response bounce to a pathogen and so you know alip from an allopathic perspective. We see the fever as the enemy from a vital vital EST perspective. We see that the fever is the friend. And it's actually the intelligence of the body at work fighting off this invading pathogen. And so it's really important that we as Vita list we work with the vital force that we move with that intelligence intelligence of the body and don't suppress it or trying to you know biochemical so to speak shut it off which is essentially what get a lot of are over the counter kind of fever reducing or what we would call a Feb- refuge type drugs do aspirin and I be pro fin things like that. Those non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. They work amazing but they turn off that fever response biochemicals speaking. And you know if you think of that. The fever is the body's innate way of basically raising the internal temperature so we'll Adina nature those whatever the pathogen is and so if you shut that down for however many hours during that downtime. We're the fevers. Not Active. Sure you feel better because you don't have a fever because if he doesn't make you feel good right but during that time. That pathogen is reproducing and so the suppression Russian of the fever is going to significantly extend the period of time. One is sick than a fever. That's just allowed to do. Its job now now from an herbal standpoint as I say we want to support the vital force we want to support the body. We want to encourage courage what the body's already trying to do with our plants and this is why we have this amazing category of remedies referred to as dia forensics and the diaphragm medics are really cool category of herbs because they are used to treat a fever and they do so so very successfully. But they're not suppressing it. They're actually helping the fever to do. Its job and they do this through a couple of different ways. And there's really I think of two subcategories of Dia Foretich so on the one hand. We have our stimulant dia. Forensics these are doc pungent hot warming circulatory stimulating type plants. That are GonNa you know again. Help increase that temperature and so really anything that tastes particularly spicy and makes you sweat. That is a stimulant diabetics. I Fredericks all of our really hot spicy peppers. Erbil Eli Cayenne is a big one here very powerful stimulant diabetic Ginger singer even black pepper. These are all stimulant diaphragm. Really anything that's going to move the blood. Bring the blood up to the surface now. The stimulant diabetics are really used oftentimes during an earlier phase of of a fever so generally when someone feels cold and this is because the Hypothalamus has set your Basil Body Body temperature from its baseline like whatever ninety eight point six or whatever it might be saying okay instead of ninety eight point six as standard one. Oh four as standard standard or one. Oh two or one three or whatever it is but so that's baseline but you're at ninety eight something and so you feel cold right so you get kind of Pale skin low energy. You feel. Chivalry feel cold and this is when you want to give a stimulant diabetic. The other type is the relaxing diaphragm. And these are remedies that are typically used later. You're on a fever when the fevers peaking when you feel hot your skin's red skins dry oftentimes. There's a lot of tension both psychological psychological and also physiological in the sense that your muscles start to get a little achey. Your back hurts. Your head hurts. Everything feels Kinda kinda tight. You're having a hard time sleeping and you feel hot right This is where we use relaxant dia forensics. Then what these are doing is they're actually relaxing constriction in the capillary beds just under the skin as well as the pores of the skin so I always say relaxant diverge close all the all the windows in a room and crank the heat up in that room gets really really hot. Well a stimulant diabetic traffic is like turning the heat up. A relaxant. Diabetic is like opening up the windows. Right and so that's really what those remedies are doing. They're opening up the pores opening up the capillary beds. So all that internal heat can release and ultimately break that fever classic remedies here. It'd be low billy. Korea pleurisy root bone set is a major remedy here. peppermint elder flower Yaro some of those have mixed emulate and relaxing diaphragm. Proper special. Like Yaro I find this kind of working in both ways so these are some really great remedies to consider that are working with in treating the fever side of influenza. Now the last part I wanNA say about diabetics is that it's really important that these are drink as hot teas. That is really what brings out that diabetic property much more as that hot T- taking a tincture it. It'll work but not that well if you are only have a tincture and there's been a lot of situations where I've had to treat fevers and all I have this tincture. What I usually do is boil some water or just get some hot water you you know not just like hot out of the Faucet but you know like tea drinking hot and I'll put the tincture in there and just have someone drink that because think of it hot water? What does it do volatile? Is it steams moves up an out and that's the whole energy of a fever. It's the whole energy of a diuretic addicts were pushing things up and radiating things out. It's like that fire element right. We're pushing up out so yes so dia forensics the other the other element of this is You know I just want to kind of spotlight on bone set a little but here Bone set is very very important. Influenza remedy I think it's the most important influenza remedy it has antiviral viral properties. Which of course is beneficial but it is an incredibly reliable relaxant diabetic specifically for the deep deep aches and pains in the muscles and the bones during a fever bone set has very specific for that and it works very very well so I just want to mention a bone set that's Taurean portfolio Adam. must have remedy for the treatment of influenza. The other aspect of this here is working with antiviral plants..

fevers influenza Colds stimulant aspirin School of Evolutionary herbali Dia Foretich John Popham founder bronchitis Vita Eli Cayenne Korea Adam. billy
"influenza" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The other that I'm focused on or that we are focused on in the foundation is influence, and as you mentioned right now much of the effort for influenza is on seasonal influenza vaccination the goal and the the focus of our influence of clean development efforts is really on on universal influence of acting. So this idea is that a vaccine that is effective against the strains of influence. There are speculating and then as well as the strains of influenza that may emerge, particularly the concern is for pan-demic influenza or influence that is dramatically different than the than what of the circular strains are. So this is a tall order and our efforts at through our partners are in preclinical stages. Primarily at this point. But I think this is the what what we're really aiming for with with influenza. And maybe the last thing I'll talk about is is the work that I'm doing with our partners again on micro peel resistant, most of the efforts and most of the focus globally when people are talking about Anna microbial resistance has really been on Pacific bacterial and past growing bacterial pathogens, but specific to the efforts that I wanna mention today are trying to understand the burden of disease due to resistant, pathogens, and and bacteria in particular. And in our efforts are focused really on neonatal newborn subsidies, and and pathogens are bacteria that are causing subs- mortality in these populations. Then become our potential target..

influenza seasonal influenza
"influenza" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Enhancing, tools of synthetic biology, are very very very widespread today, a very small number of highly trained people could if they wished making credibly deadly pathogens, and it's been done back in two thousand and eleven which is a long time ago in the arc of synthetic biology technology, researchers at the university of Wisconsin and elsewhere made a strain of influenza that was as deadly as the deadliest this. We'd ever seen was called h five and one that particular strain kills sixty percent three out of five people who get infected with swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred people, and we fear swine flu with very very good reason, we should all be scared of swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred this. Monster kills three out of five three hundred out of five hundred. Right. So a lot scarier. Now what happened? They basically took this university of Wisconsin, and experiment. They they didn't use this term. But I'm going to say weaponized that that strain, and they created a strain or a substrate that is vehemently contagious now that was only a tiny group of people the world were capable of doing that in twenty eleven they were people who were not bent on killing people. They were scientists. They probably had the best possible motivations that. We're probably doing it. And sure they in fact, they said publicly, so they could understand what might go wrong in nature. But the point is the things that only a tiny brilliant. Handful of people can do in twenty eleven or twenty eighteen will be doable by ten thousand people in a fairly short number of years. Let's say all bio grad students because the tools are getting better and the technologies and techniques are getting better. So rapidly crisper didn't exist in two thousand and eleven crisper which radically enhanced the ability of. People to edit gene codes now, they can now crisper does exist and a lot of grad students and life sciences, and probably rather soon-, essentially, all of them are going to be masters of crisper and another data point, which is really interesting the human genome project cost three billion dollars and took thirteen years to sequence a single hap- Lloyd genome, which is almost like half Agena, right? That ended in two thousand and three and all that long ago. Right. Two thousand and three that ends today. A single lab tech can do quite a bit more work than that in a day. So we're talking about and probably for about a thousand dollars rather than three billion dollars. So we're talking about three million axe price, compression, and I don't even know how many billion exceleron in the amount of work one person could get done because of the acceleration in the tools. These tools are continuing to accelerate their accelerating faster even. Than Moore's law. So we really need to think about what can five people do today. All of whom are good guys, all who are brilliant. None of whom have single odious is thought that fifty people will be able to do tomorrow that fifty thousand and eventually five hundred thousand people will be able to do. I mean, there will be things that are happening. There will be things happening in highschool bio labs as part of standard experiments thirty years from now, let's pick an arbitrary number certainly thirty years from now that nobody in the world is capable of doing right now. And I think we need to start worrying about this today rather than twenty two point nine years from now, I mean, even if you just look at the history of computing, you will see only governments could create computers, and they were unreliable and buggy in the forecast by the sixties companies could create computers, but very large ones. We're still buggy. Sometimes it took a lot of maintenance an expertise to keep them running by the eighties. Everybody could have a computer. But you still kinda had to be a. Hobbyist, and you still had to wanna make it work and figure out how to make it work and then fast forward to today where most of the world carries a computer in their pocket, which is our full than the most powerful computer on the face of earth during the eighties up. Yeah. So I mean, that's a positive right to grant. Now, imagine apply apply that same trajectory to everything..

influenza university of Wisconsin Moore Lloyd three billion dollars thirty years thousand dollars thirteen years sixty percent nine years
"influenza" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank. You very much Ellison it's really a pleasure to be here with, you this afternoon talk a little bit about. Influenza and it's multifaceted components, of influenza and then we'll have some time for question but as, we mentioned inside you could ask me questions about. Anything besides influenza if you like but let's focus on influenza for the time being I think Alison made a good point in describing why influenza is really different than. Almost any other common viral infection that which we, are confronted with in. Our lifetime it's a virus that is historically an evolutionary early not a human. Virus it's a virus of waterfowl that over centuries and beyond adapted itself to. Human so that, influenza viruses are out in the environment above and beyond the humor Species so the idea that we're ever. Going to get rid of, influenza is a non starter so the question is how do we, prevent infection with influenza again differently from other viruses. There are two major types of influenza when you think about it it's the seasonal flu that you know we talk about influenza viral and infectious disease people like myself. Often say the only thing that you could predict, about influenza is that. It's unpredictable but the fact is the one thing that is predictable about influenza. Is that we're going to have an influenza outbreak every single winter for sure A more unpredictable issue is the issue, of a pin damage so what's the difference between seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza seasonal influenza occurs every winter what happens is that the virus because it's an, RN a virus that tends. To mutate readily it changes generally a little bit we refer to that as a drift. From season to season, which is the reason why we recommend that you get a new? Updated vaccine each season what are the disease do you know of. That we recommend you get a new vaccine every year there isn't any for example. Measles essentially never changes so the measles that I got infected with I'm old enough to have gotten. Infected with measles when I was Gile is exactly the same measles that's in the vaccine that I vaccinated my children with and that's decades later So when it changes it drifts in contrast every once in a while it. Changes so much Weaver to that as a shift and? The reason why that's generally. A major public health problem is? Because there would be no background immunity in the population to prevent a major outbreak whereas with. Seasonal flu even if no one God vaccinated each season I, say that and I get heartburn because I want everybody to get vaccinated but even if. No one got vaccinated? There would be enough residual immunity in the community so that each season it. Would never be. A catastrophic, outbreak because enough people. Would be protected from the previous year so, having said that as a background the burden each year of flu is serious in the United States there are anywhere between a low of twelve thousand deaths, to a high of Fifty six thousand deaths. There are hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations we, tend to get immune to, that in the sense of metaphorically immune because it happens. Every year but as you know there are several tragic deaths each year most of the vulnerable people are the ones that are at highest risk elderly. People with underlying disease, pregnant women infants but also otherwise well people, can be impacted now you heard Alison just mentioned that we had a very. Bad influenza season this season it was, the worst that we had in well over a decade and maybe in, any time of being recorded and I'll get to that in a moment with regard to pandemics. The mother of all pandemics was nine, hundred eighteen when fifty to one hundred million people were killed in. That year globally we've also had a few other pandemics that were a problem But not that serious one. Thousand nine hundred fifty seven thousand nine hundred sixty eight and then two thousand nine the first pandemic. Of this century now, one of the problems that we have. With influenza and this is something we have to just be aware of given the nature of the fact, that, it, changes from season, to, season we don't do..

Influenza seasonal influenza pandemic influenza Alison Ellison United States Weaver Gile
"influenza" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"So if you're not getting the oxygen breathe into your bloodstream and into your cells getting get into your bloodstream but you're cells are not using it efficiently okay and then you mentioned influenza am i correct i expect that to be even more controversial but there is a pattern there that that when when when with ac current was first hardest for power in for lights and power in eighteen eighty nine that's when we had our first big modern influenza epidemic and the second one was the spanish influenza so called spanish influenza of nineteen eighteen which coincided to the months basically of the the intense use the first intense use of radio wave on this planet by the united states is so what that the radio waves use continuing grew but the spanish flu died away yes we had an we had another epidemic in the fifty seven fifty eight when very powerful radar stations were were tried it out all over the fair causing the flu radiation continued with the flu went away if the radiation was causing the flew flew go away but but the the pattern of flu changed in eighteen eighty nine it has never been the same in other words fluids now an annual disease every winter this did not exist came in and it didn't really go out it just got normalized that's correct all right hey we scott and quincy scott thank you for calling us at six one seven two five four ten thirty i invite anyone to call now who may have a question or an observation here six one seven five four ten.

united states influenza quincy scott
"influenza" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Some megan oh oh my god no what i'm reading a headline here a second wave of flu maybe on the way come on the cdc has warned here's what it says the bulk of this year's deadly flu season was dominated by the i didn't know it had this name but it's the h three and two virus i knew it was new it had an agent and then and there i didn't know what had a three and a two that's tough stuff fearsome so is dominated by h three end to virus and influenza a strain that is more severe less receptive to the vaccines we found that out then other types of disease as the season winds down influenza b is now coming up on influenza on setting the scene for a possible second wave of flu after i just got done bragging i you know world tour of bragging about how i made it through this winter without catching the flue and i've been on planes i you guys know i threw away washing the hands several radio appearances daycares preschools that's the only schools i would agree to do and i got through it so i'm not done this thing still could get me you guys can still get a flu shot why i'm not gonna give sean it's almost april this doesn't feel right it's not too late go get your flu shot really quick here there's a guy jinshan is his name he's a magician i think we might have had him on before the sounds of he's gonna be on local tv he was wondering if we if he could come on the radio show i just i'm not sure how magic translates on the radio and i might be wrong in this i felt like we had him come in i tugged on the rope nobody knew it was going on because it's magic don't you have to see the him pulling the coin out of my air.

cdc influenza sean
"influenza" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Which the cdc is now accounting for six and ten flu cases federal health officials say the associated with the beast rain can't be justice appear as influenza a especially for young children and the elderly now data from the cdc shows one hundred and thirtythree children have died from the flu since october so there you go if i think you could still get your flu shot although they found that they didn't have anything that was ultimately very effective against this particular strain at least the last during they didn't maybe they'll do better this time it was not as good as they wanted it to be no water down about the military funding justify it in your head that way.

cdc influenza
"influenza" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on 1A

"Lens but the whole thing about being exposed to the flew in the past from what we've been discussing earlier it sounds like debts bb just lucky on justice part right well first of all let me just point out that when we measure how effective a vaccine is we actually measured you get the vaccine or you don't get the vaccine in and we file you to find out if you get disease or not and clearly the current vaccine's provide some protection even a bad year it may be single digit protection but it surely better than nothing there is also a growing body of data that says in somewhat controversial how much of it does the vaccine reduces the severity of illness particularly in older populations which may be the case one thing i wanted to spell here though there's been discussion on this program about handwashing is god knows handwashing is godly and of itself her mother's taught us that but when you actually look very carefully at influenza transmission very little of it likely occurs from contact with doorknobs or hands and so forth it's really large droplets or or aerosols that occur in his we have more data on that is becoming more apparent so keep washing your hands don't stop there is a lot of other infectious agents for which that is very important but it's likely not a big part of influence of prevention in terms of one of the things that she mentions having had influenza before one of the challenges we now have is that may turn out that in your childhood those very first exposures you had influenza virus may have set the entire course for the rest of your life and how you're going to respond either vaccines or future influenza infections because it turns out that those memory cells are created very early in life in what turns them on returns them offer and a dozen turn them on may actually be only loop affected in a limited way by subsequent vaccines or illnesses so this again is a very complicated area and so if you've got infected by the rights rain at an early age in life you may actually have some amazing protection that goes for a long time for which the vaccine will have only a very limited impact and.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So i think there's a lot of different uses of the word flew on i think of the virus influenza but i know that a lot of people confuse it with you know riskier tori infections as well as cut confections everyone thinks the fluids the flu a cold is cold the really gave the reality is that there's so many different viruses that caused these were spiritual infections so influenza you know there's a few of them and they're just a subset of all the different viruses that's jeff quote epidemiolgist than a researcher at the institute for clinical evaluate sciences and also practices of family physician a trona western hospital in toronto and we are talking about the flu today influenza variety of the flu because a it is flu season and be the flu israeli were talking about influenza definitely causes many deaths every year in the u s it's been estimated so the problem is that there is such a wide range some years agree mild and some years or fear severe um so i think in the average is something in the order of 10 to 20 thousand deaths each year it also causes probably 10 times more hospitalizations causes lots of visits to emergency departments and two physician offices and also causes a lot of people to take time ma from work or school so it's been estimated about somewhere between five and ten percent of the population we'll get infected by influenza each year in terms of when it happens and how it happens can talk about that for a minute why is influenza seasonal flu season flu season and how does that actually work its way through population i think those are very good questions that we don't have all the answers to just yet we do know that you know generally influenza season fall somewhere between november and march generally exactly when it's going to happen is very unpredictable um so some years it starts late january or february a some years starts earlier so as early as types late november or early december and so what the causes it we don't actually no we think that he might be related to whether a.

influenza researcher family physician trona western hospital jeff toronto ten percent
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Yeah but i want to talk about some other types of flu bird flu and swine flu here bet that what's the tail yeah what is the deal with that there are certain types of infections that are called so onomic infections basically meaning that humans can get them from animal spats dr greg moran again there is a cycle of influenza virus and actually it's within the animals that its felt that most of the rearrangement of the genes takes place that helps influenza to change year after year after year so it can keep reinfected people who mentioned the 1918 flew the spanish arthur ain't unable area okay so that was a flu that was particularly bad for many reasons that primarily because that was a swine flu so i talked earlier about how there's this thing called antigen draft rate a human influenza virus undergoes a small mutation and then it infects you again and you don't have immunity to it now something really big and much worse than that can happen called antigene shift so it's a chef like a pivot complete change of directions and this is when a flu virus that infects humans crosses with a fluvirus at infects pigs or birds sergei for the period now too good for the avenue and so now you have this mingling of two different virus species think of it in a way like that and now your immune system this is not like just putting on a little mustache and tricking you this is a completely different very very lent very pathogenic virus so there's a couple ways that this can happen this mixing of the human virus with the pig virus or the bird virus it can either be a direct mixing of those two are in a strains or what can happen is the pig can actually be sort of like the vessel for the mixing of the bird and the human and the reason why that happens is super call it's because pig tr.

bird flu the deal immune system dr greg moran tricking
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Three for to work were to get the flu and then i say i say said at the flu shot now two days later i'm sick smokers the flu shortens because you were already seen before it you know it's interesting is these small little mutations that the viruses go through and they change the surface proteins these are just very small mutations have special name it's called antigen drift so the antigens of the proteins on the outside and drift as if that they're changing a little bit every year so that's what floors a smart i'm gonna change a little bit all the time so these humans in these other things that i might infect won't be able to block me really phosperous their immune system is never seen me before 'cause i have the funny is on mmhmm yeah so i think if they just drifting along little changes at a time but over time just one little changes enough to kind of make it into what your body thinks of as a new virus that it doesn't recognize and what's the reason for your visit posse pie law ties leuchter tourism late and where will you be visiting asked see glad in his brain pretty much snicked underground the grant to okay and what's your country of origin at fries cancer death of the governor the bill could get a guy so what exactly do you die from when you have the flu you're not dying from the flu i don't know maybe you are say people who die from the flu 'cause it actually does kill people it really does but usually people who die from the flu are people who have some sort of illness at baseline so it's elderly it's babies it's people who have lung disease it's people who are immunosuppressed that's usually what happens is very rare that a a young healthy person gets influenza and then dies but there can be other complications of having the flu for example for it you can get what's called a super infection like a bacterial super infection because your body is trying to fight influenza and the bacteria psycho their defense system is down now as much sin they get in there and they cause pneumonia and then on top of having influenza.

immune system lung disease influenza pneumonia two days
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Really bad cold it's like a cold where you think you're gonna die yes that's the flu and it's also a characteristically a very sudden onset where you were just feeling fine going about your normal day and then all of a sudden boom it hits you also i did get a flu shot this year and i also got the flu yes so explain that one great way and that if your hair lean dyerberg did you get like the the bogus shot the one that's really like say when he birdied the jail cbo sharia i did know okc here's how the flu vaccine works every year a group really smart people who study influenza they sit around and they say what are the most likely strains of influenza to get people really sick six months from now because we know that influenza seasonal they could look and see patterns of which viruses are going up and frequency which viruses are going down and frequency that's dr greg moran he's a professor of emergency medicine who's also double boarded in infectious disease at ucla and they use mathematical models than to try to predict what are these statistically most likely strains that are going to be causing the majority of influenza in the coming flu season sydor and a crystal ball oh i can't and this mode and mirrors throw some light predict the future deal acl seasonally pick about enforced strains of influenza and they say these are the ones were putting in the vaccine this year so how come there's no vaccines for colds almost by definition a cold is not gonna hurt you as much as a influenza virus and there are so many cold viruses it's just not worth the time in.

flu vaccine influenza dr greg moran ucla cbo okc six months
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"My name if you want to could you say it's loyola jackson and this hoarseness came along with that too in how old are you ms jackson i'm sixty seven years ago i can totally relate to her because that's basically how i felt a few days ago so if you are somebody who was not at work that week and they're like i was out the flu all all week and it sucks and then they tell you like what what happened what was the flu what will tell me your symptoms it's going to be like the woman said the diarrhea vomiting headaches fevers and chills an aching is sore throat but yeah just thrown up and diarrhea and and just had kind of stuff innis and just feel in the worst you've ever felt yeah so i think that's the the common misconception about what the flu is but why don't we start off by telling you what the flu is not and then we'll tell you what the flu is listed that's a misconception yeah i think feeling click crap well no feeling like kraft true but most people would say like oh nausea vomiting diarrhoea we wouldn't usually associate that with influenza influenza is different that's usually more of a respiratory thing in kids it's more nausea vomiting diarrhoea and sometimes in adults but that's not usually the predominant symptom but the all lloyd said she was throwing up you as ira yeah she was so it can often can help them as of the flu it can happen can happen but a lot of people who just have nausea vomiting and diarrhoea don't have influenza especially adults that's less common lock myself a few weeks ago was in his room vomited and roman endure around victoria and that's not flu.

loyola jackson hoarseness flu diarrhea innis lloyd victoria ira nausea sixty seven years
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Are we going to get this thing started we going to do this yep yep we're going to do it now why we're gonna do it because this vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis while her and bed look the cough cough i feel terribly i assume are making those kaduna noises to attract my attention brexit flew through flu took can talk about flew why are we talking about the flu gis celtic you might have visit fluids yeah you you had the flu right a couple of days ago well i'm real dedicated to the show thank you and so i signed up to a two get influenza so i can experience it and had to do for everyone when everywhere in licht every doorknob you could find until you got sick i went to work i looked the patients gross sitting i do that there's some rules in on supposed to be doing that but i think there's a lot to talk about with the flu right yeah so many questions that people have what it is what it's not i mean you have me right here right who had influenza few days ago but do you want to hear from a real patient yes okay let's take lesson so tell me about what you've been feeling the last few days i started out billy like i had a sore throat and then as a got on progress in my bones started to eight km me i was like hot and cold hot and cold hot and cold then i had this really bad call i was just call for until i was shelton i was knowledge the actually even think so i was so nauseated a throwing up and then i had to diarrhea too i was just so sick it was different from when i had the coal before how is this different than a typical two goals and uh i took my with it mike medicine episode in at wayo and in time voted it last by the minute you know with nothing like this this was crazy now you've gotten some medications in hey feeling i'm feeling better than i.

influenza cough kaduna billy diarrhea eight km