35 Burst results for "Influenza"

Dr Fauci On Gain-Of-Function Research

The Dan Bongino Show

01:17 min | Last week

Dr Fauci On Gain-Of-Function Research

"Here's the audio. Here's Fauci and 2012 again. I'll put the link to the whole thing tomorrow if you want to watch it. He appears to be talking about here. Gain of function research with ferrets. Now I just wanna be clear is not talking about Corona viruses here believe he's talking about each one and one or another virus. But still, this is kind of interesting, given that they seem to be denying any role in gain of function research now. Check this out. Okay? And Fouche constructed variants of H five N one avian influenza in order way to identify which genetic mutations might alter the transmissibility of the virus. In their studies, they employed a standard influenza animal model, namely the ferret. This slide shows the basic design of the experiments in which the virus was modified to allow for aerosol transmission from one fair it to another. Guys, ladies. I mean, what is he talking about? He's been adamant up on Capitol Hill and in media appearances. We don't do this gain of function stuff. Well, what is he talking about there? At this virus H five n one. The avian flu was modified by by who? The tooth fairy.

Fauci Fouche FLU Capitol Hill
Flu Trends in Australia

Coronacast

02:09 min | Last month

Flu Trends in Australia

"Is the time of year that we usually telling people to go out any good time to get you influenza shot and it still is but the numbers of influence at this year. Just invitee invitees mole compared to what they usually. I normal year. They are even infinitive smoke. I don't know how to say that. I was called smith's when i actually looked at these numbers so the numbers of notifications this year are an have been low for the last twelve months in two hundred thirty two notifications to the national notifiable disease surveillance system in australia. Ucla this year. And this is the year that testing a lot. More than we probably have in previous years and twenty-five notifications in the fortnight prior and so in in kind of in the last fortnight or so really fortnight prior to the thirtieth of april two thousand and twenty research. Thousand twenty right. Thank you very much You've got your own back on infinitesimal. And they went back and looked to two thousand and nineteen. Now you have to sit. She's thousand nine. Hundred was a bad a bad flu year. But just sit tight in the year to date to the fifth of may so almost exactly to the day in the year to date the fifth of may two thousand and nineteen. I mean applications. Do you think there were a thousand two thousand. You know it's going to be more forty. four thousand. One hundred and sixty notifications of laboratory confirmed influenza to the fifth of may two thousand nineteen from the beginning of two thousand and nineteen and in a fortnight before fortnight before thirty april this year twenty five cases in the fortnight before the fifth of may two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred seven thousand five hundred and in the previous fortnight it was eight thousand three hundred and so seasonal flu tends to start me measure from the beginning of april although you do get Early cases in twenty twenty twenty five quite a lot of cases in january for covid hit two hundred two people admitted with confirmed influenza to the fifth of may and fifty eight in the fortnight the twenty eighth of april two thousand and nine thousand nine

Influenza National Notifiable Disease Su Ucla Smith Australia
Park Howell: The Business of Story

Leadership and Loyalty

02:07 min | Last month

Park Howell: The Business of Story

"I'm looking forward to this because as i said you're nine notebook both no big story not just story but how to construct story and the power of story and you and i talked about in our previous conversation. It's just it's a delicious subject a thing everybody can live from but before i jump into that We stopped by in this world of great influences. Every mondays dogs and influenza who somebody who's influenced you in your leadership who maybe we wouldn't consider all maybe wouldn't automatically think who's somebody who's had not influence on you want an automatically thinking boy. That's a you know. Dr seuss popped into my mind if i ran. The circus was my favorite book growing up. And i don't know why that is a lot of places a lot of people say. Oh the places you'll go. Which is another fabulous. Dr seuss thome. But if i ran the circus i don't know my dad used to sit down and read that to me all the time. He ran his own company which was heavy construction up in the seattle area Dams bridges tunnels. I mean big time stuff and he said yep life is a little bit like this book. So i would look at dr seuss and then Someone that you probably have heard of Sir richard branson. I'm large admire of him. But not a big surprise there. The surprise here though. Is i out of nowhere. Got a very fortunate invite to visit he in his island. A month ago was out necker In march with a company here called digital airstrike spent a week on necker working with Automotive groups in having a chance. To listen to. And be around. Richard branson and i gotta tell you everything he espouses as a leader everything you would think of him being he is and then some and i'll be honest with you. I was prepared to be disappointed. When i got there and yet i was still completely and utterly blown

Dr Seuss Dr Seuss Thome Influenza Sir Richard Branson Seattle
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

The Book Review

02:50 min | 2 months ago

Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

"Carl. Zimmer joins us now. He is a columnist for the new york times and he is the author of many books. He was last on the podcast for his book. She has her mother's laugh. His new book is called. Life's edge the search for what it means to be alive. Carl thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right so right now. You're kinda busy. You've been reporting on corona virus for the times. What is that leg. It's kind of overwhelming You know i am kind of startled that you know the whole world wants to read what we at. The scientists have to write about. You know this virus. But i will remember this experience of the past year for the rest of my life really. It's been exceptional as a as a moment in science journalism as a science journalist. Is this an area that you had been looking at for years and years. Were you especially interested in epidemiology or was this sort of switching gears for you. I've had a obsession with viruses for a long time. I'm actually wrote a book called the planet of viruses a few years ago. So you know. I've reported on ebola and influenza over the years of have done the virus thing. And so you know i i felt like well i can bring my experience to bear on this and and so basically it just started doing the same kind of reporting about this virus but now of course this is a virus that was causing a kind of pandemic that we have not seen for one hundred years. You're not the only journalist covering this pandemic obviously not even the only journalists covering this pandemic on the scientists at the times. How do you all kind of divide it up. Do you have an area in particular that you are looking at specifically yet. None of us can do this alone absolutely and we have to really roll with the punches. You know i was focusing a lot on vaccines for example in the fall overseeing our tracker and then we started to to see these variants were popping up. Then we're of serious concern so i basically had to carve out some time to work on variants but mental really. My colleague has also been writing about various. Like crazy and ben muller and we actually have several people who who just try to keep up with the variants. You know and and there are other people who are handling the store. All the stories of vaccine distribution geopolitics and long cova. There be other people handling that. It's it's such an enormous story. What about it most interest you personally. Well i'm most interested in in The pandemic ending besides that that and not being sick. Yes yeah is unsettling jim how this pandemic has played out exactly. As scientists had warned it would

Zimmer The New York Times Carl Ebola Influenza Ben Muller JIM
FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | 3 months ago

FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

"Panel. But advisers, the Food and Drug Administration unanimously says go for it authorized the Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccine for emergency use. An FDA analysis has found it to be 66%, effective overall in to have a quote, favorable safety profile. Doctor pull off. It has advised the FDA during the vaccine approval process, he's director, the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr Offer. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. The Madonna and and Fizer. Vaccines have a much higher effective, right, Don't they in the mid nineties? So what makes the Johnson and Johnson version a good idea? Just 66%. The return in five for vaccines were tested in the U. S. Only. The Johnson Johnson vaccine was also tested in several countries and South America as well as Mexico and South Africa. So it's not exactly the same population, so it's sort of comparing Apple. Sarge is also the strange that were circulating in South Africa is primarily the South African variant in this strange circulating in Brazil is primarily the Brazilian variant. So there were different strains really that this vaccine was tested against I gather from reports of senior fellow Panelists asked whether Johnson and Johnson's vaccine might be more effective if it were given his two shots, not just one. And that the company is studying this. What's your view on that? So if you look at the studies, they did the pre clinical studies they did in nonhuman primates, as well as the phase one to a studies. They didn't people. What they found was that second dose did increase the tighter or quantity. Virus specific, neutralizing Anna by suggesting that it might be more effective. It's very effective, though it preventing severe disease after a single dose, And it induces the kind of response so called sailor immune response that looks like it's going to have a fairly long that memory, which is all good. But that second off, maybe more effective. I think we'll probably know that by the second half of this year in which case then one could get a booster does. But this certainly provides protection against what you care about, which is hospitalization. I see you admission and death. It's it's virtually 100% effective at doing that. And if authorization follows soon, when one might the vaccine come to pharmacies, another vaccination sites and and how much right so it was follows the pattern of what we saw with the visor and then Madonna vaccines. Usually the FDA advisory committee, in which I said makes the recommendation. The FDA usually follows that recommendation within a day or two, And then it goes to the CDC, which then makes their recommendations about which group or groups might best benefit from this vaccine. That all happens within about a five day period. And then the vaccine can sort of roll off the assembly line into the arms of the American public. Doctor. Often you're a pediatrician. What do you tell parents who are concerned about vaccine for their Children, Andreas tely getting it and also concerned, for example, about what seems to be an increase in multi system, inflammatory syndrome and Children. Were rare but serious disease that's connected to covet. Truthful. I think the Children can suffer from this disease and with that multi system inflammatories is and they can occasionally dime. It's rare, but about as many Children have died of this infection is died of influenza a couple years ago and as typically dive influence every year, so I think we do need of actually, but we can't give that vaccine so we've tested in Children. And I think you're now seeing studies done for in the 12 18 year old. I think when those studies As we lost Dr off it. I think, I think, Doc. I think Dr effect. Well, Dr Paul off it. Remember the FDA vaccine advisory panel? We thank him for being with us if he can still hear us and our regret that apparently, the line

Johnson Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Dr Offer Fizer FDA Johnson Johnson South Africa Sarge Fda Advisory Committee U. South America Brazil Mexico Apple Andreas Tely Anna Inflammatory Syndrome
U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

Pat Walsh

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

"S surpassing 500,000 covert 19 death Just 34 days since it passed 400,000. It took just 96 days for the US to double its death toll from 250,000 to today's 500. U. S death toll now about 3/4 of the number of recorded deaths from the 1918 influenza pandemic at the White House. We fighting this pandemic for so long, we have to resist becoming numb to the sorrow. President Biden, pausing to remember the losses, reminding Americans the stats. Represent real people in families.

President Biden Influenza White House United States
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | 3 months ago

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

Coronacast

03:45 min | 4 months ago

Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

"We finally got the therapeutic goods administration approval of the oxford university astrazeneca vaccine in australia. Which was something that was hinted that was coming soon last week. By paul kelly Yesterday it happened. Norman fine print. Well i'll give you a big print. I look at the big print is this is a really good decision. Untrustworthy decision on the part of the therapeutic goods administration. It creates a political problem for the government. But it's it's it's a sound decision based on the evidence so they've they've maintained an independent position so it's really quite impressive so the first thing is that they have said and i think we've presaged this on corona cast. They've said that the ideal dozy jr is twelve weeks. Apart at standard does of the astro vaccine twelve weeks apart now the evidence is from the clinical trials and presumably they got more since they published trial in december. Is that if you give the vaccine three months apart. Then you get ninety percent. Efficacy in terms of preventing symptoms mild to severe symptoms of covid nineteen and it gives one hundred percent protection against severe disease so in fact the dosage reaching recommended brings it up to the performance of the pfizer vaccine. When you say a standard dice is that the original standardise that was always being used or is that the half dose that was used in one of the parts of the trial that we were talking about las g. no martin standing is to standard doses according to the trial not the accidental. Half does that was given as part of the british trial so it's two standard doses three months apart. And if we're able to do that there's a problem with that. By the way is that you can get variance coming in as a long time to wait in new things can happen with the virus but it does give you that high degree of efficacy which is great news. The detail here is that they had a problem with their trial is that they were late. In recruiting people over sixty five and the trials do not have a large number of people aged over sixty five who actually got infected so they can't actually give you a number for the efficacy of the vaccine in the over sixty five they can give you the average but not offer the over sixty five themselves now. What they say is that in the an. It's true in the laboratory testing over sixty-five very strong antibody response. Which makes you think that you will get efficacy in new over sixty five. But they've got no proof of it in trials yet that will emerge as time goes on and there in lies the problem for the government because in the light of that they probably you know and they're going to go with the evidence people over sixty five shoud get the pfizer vaccine to be absolutely sure. It's highly likely astra one will work in over sixty five. It'll certainly prevent severe disease. You would imagine. But there's no solid evidence of that. At this time you'd be going on the antibodies on the on the flip side of that just so too negative about all this. Is that when you bring on a new vaccine into the market like influenza vaccines or others which is already being tested. Randomized trials you do tend to go on whether or not the having effective antibody response and rely on that so it's not unusual to rely on an antibody response. It's just that the moment we'd like to know that it does prevent disease. So that's the story what we'd be. What's been approved. As a ninety percent effective vaccine and therefore it will prevent severe disease and be really good at malta mortar disease and maybe prevent transmission because one of the few vaccines to be tested for transmission.

Dozy Jr Paul Kelly Oxford University Pfizer Norman Australia Martin Astra Influenza Malta
From wild idea to COVID vaccine  meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

Science Friction

05:20 min | 4 months ago

From wild idea to COVID vaccine meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

"Renew and november. When the first cases started the pop up and wuhan china their description of the virus there description of how easily it was transmitted between families once. We heard that we knew that. This virus had the potential to be a bad actor at that moment in time we said. How are we going to get the sequence for this virus and we started calling our friends and china. We called our friends at the cdc trying to get the sequence of this virus the minute that was published. We started to make our vaccines back on. I think it was january twelfth. We started making the first aren a vaccine that day. It has all happened. Unfathomably fast has an at twelve months later and the pfizer and maduna vaccines have made their way through large clinical trials with good results into syringes and now already into millions of arms. But this quite a back story here. We thought that it would be useful in a pandemic. We thought it would be influenza pandemic but you back in two thousand and five. When we made the initial observation we knew that aren a had a great potential therapeutics. Who with his collaborator catala career. How is a good bit to win a nobel prize for the science driving. Mri vaccines. he's one of my guests on science fiction today. What's been lost in the fast pace race to develop covid nineteen vaccine. This past year is a hidden story of dogged. Pursuit of a nollie scientific idea over decades often in the face of skeptics and nice ideas we went through pharmaceuticals venture capitalists. All other people. it said. Hey we have a great new invention here. And they weren't interested. They said now aren as too hard to work with. We don't think it'll ever work and they just weren't interested now with a pandemic bang with suddenly counting on mri vaccines lock eyes and medina's to help save us. But before this pandemic this brand new technology of marigny vaccines had never been approved for use in humans before. It's incredible isn't it. The heddon even made it to the stage of large scale clinical trials in humans. I don't think anybody could have predicted. Just how effective these vaccines were. And i still get chills. When i remember the moment when that announcement was made a few months ago biologist onto fox is future fellow and associate professor at the university of western australia. It has proved the nice as wrong. I mean given that fifty percent effective is the baa that the world health organization would've liked to say as the minimum to be getting ninety. Five percent is just astounding really hardly any vaccines have that level of efficacy. Cullen pat and professor of pharmaceutical biology at monash pharmaceutical sciences. He's team is working on two different. Mri vaccines for covid. Nineteen in collaboration with the doughy institute in melbourne change from the point of view the future of emo toy syrupy and we haven't had a vaccine working against corona virus. Before i could understand the science. And i could see how theoretically it might work. But i just couldn't see how we could actually make enough to be the billions of doses needed for the world. And that's still looking doc- rod it's entirely contingent on just to pharmaceutical companies meeting. The world's entire supply demands including ours here in australia. Will you receive the pfizer vaccine together just before christmas. We did the vaccine driven by your discovery. Can you describe what that moment was like figuring. My family always yells at me. Because i'm not excited enough. And they're right for man who co owns the intellectual property licenses to medina and i dream osman humble kind of guy. We were incredibly excited. When we saw the results of the phase three trial that are vaccine. Worked and of a safe and had ninety. Five percent efficacy. I'm already moved on to the next thing the next back scene. The next gene therapy you. I'm incredibly excited. That this vaccine is working that it's gonna make a dent in this pandemic many think that there's a nobel prize in chemistry waiting in the wings for you and dr katie. Rico what do you make of that. So people tell the too modest. And i really don't do things for prizes or recognition or anything else.

Catala China Pfizer Aren CDC Cullen Pat Monash Pharmaceutical Sciences Medina Influenza Doughy Institute University Of Western Australi BAA World Health Organization FOX Melbourne Osman Australia Dr Katie
Trevor Bauer signing with Los Angeles Dodgers

Mason & Ireland

01:49 min | 4 months ago

Trevor Bauer signing with Los Angeles Dodgers

"Was a big day in the history of the los angeles dodgers. They went out and signed the biggest free agent on the market. The biggest free agent of the off season that is trevor bauer who will now join a dodgers rotation that includes bueller and kershaw and price and may and some combination of that. Trevor bauer coming off the national league cy young award. He was unbelievable last year. He was unbelievable the year before in cleveland almost won the cy young they're lindsay. You're a big fan of a actually. You broke the news at some point that he was leaving. Cleveland is that what it was now it was. I traded to cleveland. It was huge. There's a three way trade. With cleveland. The arizona diamondbacks and the rights. And so first. Here's powers lineage. He went to heart high in valencia. Then he started in the d-backs organization. They traded him to cleveland then. He went to the reds and won the cy young award. And now he's going to the dodgers. Wow and he almost won it certainly. He was a contender at least once if not twice with the indians and he's got a bunch of he. He has a weird training methods and he's into spin in the ball and he's he he works with that. Spear you know that. I don't know if you've ever seen if you want to learn more about our google. Trevor bauer hbo real sports. They went out and did a whole story on his training methods mostly which he doesn't a garage influenza and it's really interesting he's he's a he's like really eccentric and it's gonna be really fun to have him here. Yeah it's gonna be absolutely loaded absolutely loaded

Trevor Bauer Dodgers Cleveland Kershaw National League Arizona Diamondbacks Lindsay Valencia Reds Indians HBO Google Influenza
Flu cases near historic lows during pandemic, Houston

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:05 min | 4 months ago

Flu cases near historic lows during pandemic, Houston

"The number of people in houston coming down with the flu and going to the emergency room has dropped dramatically. Compared to last year our own matt tells us what the houston health department believes is behind the drop. The department says january and february are typically the most active months for the flu to spread in greater houston and southeast texas last year at this time slightly under four and a half percent of emergency room visits to hospitals in the region were people with severe cases of influenza this year. It's just above one percent and the last three months in particular they say flu. Er visits have been trending downward health. Experts say the primary reason for this is because precautions like mask wearing are being taken to prevent the transmission of covid nineteen therefore it's also stopping the spread of the flu. The department says they got an early indication that the flu season would be mild this year based off the low number of cases being reported from countries in the southern hemisphere. They experienced flu season before we do to date. Houston health says there have been zero. Flu related deaths among children in texas. I'm matt arab in houston

FLU Houston Health Department Houston Matt Texas Matt Arab
You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

Coronacast

05:06 min | 4 months ago

You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

"We're talking about pandemics norman one of the phrases that was bandied about a lot especially at the beginning was the idea of herd immunity that we get to a stage where the virus con spread willy nilly through the community anymore because enough people have had it that it doesn't spread as rapidly anymore and the theoretical threshold for that based on how much a single person with covid sort of tends to spread to was about sixty seventy percent. So what do we know about places in the world where there has been a lot of cover transmission whether we're reaching this community threshold and it's actually making a difference. Well funny you should say that because a couple of days ago in the lancet published a report from brazil which is actually quite disturbing. So the reported from a city in brazil called monas- who are monogamous. Which is in the amazon northwest brazil. I think it is and they had done a study of blood. Donors indicated four seventy. Six percent of the population had been affected with sars cov to by october of last year. And therefore you would assume with fat pie attack rates. You've got herod immunity which is above sixty as you said between sixteen seventy percent except that happened in january in other words just this month between the first of january in january nineteenth compared to december first two thousand nine hundred they had three thousand four hundred thirty one hospital admissions for sars coffee to for covid nineteen compared to five hundred and fifty two in the first twenty days for three weeks of december right. So they've had a big spike last year. It's dropped off. And now the saying a big spike again now. This and hospitalizations had remained low for about seven months. And you've just seen this spike in january and The question is what's going on here. So you could have overestimated the attack rate and the haired immunity ratio so possible that it's a high estimate in terms of when people were immune but even their low estimates based on perhaps errors in their assumptions of Wayne people what antibody response. It's still about fifty two percent as their low estimate there and that should still can fair some degree of immunity. But they do say that when you compare. The blood donors to average population. There was no difference in the university seems to be quite a representative sample of the general community. So they assume but seventy six percent is accurate so then they go onto looking at whether or not. There's been a waning of antibodies. During that time that could be other response but they showed that you and british healthcare workers reinfection was rare up to about six months after the primary infection. It could be due to variance because we've talked a lot on kron cast by the variance in brazil and they've really got to three lineages of variants in brazil which could be both more virulent and indeed war contagious. So the worry here is that we don't really know why they've had a resurgence in a community that should be pretty immune and it's not that these people are getting a model infection the second time around either because the measure that they looking at his hospitalization so presumably people quite sick. Yes and there is growing evidence that some some of these variants are were virulence. Although that's that's not been confirmed in any pure view jr journal. In fact one thing i need to say. But this paper is that it's in the lancet. And therefore it has gone undergone some degree of peer review rather than some of the other pre publication papers. We sometimes court from. So what are we. Take away from this. It seems like a pretty scary fact is is heard immunity. A false goal. Do we know whether vaccination is going to have a long long lasting immunity associated with it like this kind of worrying. It is kind of wearing. The good news is that consistent evidence from immunization at least with the astro vaccine and the fis vaccine even though the astro vaccine may be less efficacious at preventing all disease is that they do seem to generate an immune response. That's bigger and deeper than you get from alive infection which is very unusual. 'cause usually live infections. Give you a better degree of immunity particularly with influenza. But it seems to be contradicted in this. So it's likely that vaccination gives you a better immune response that lasts longer. But you'd have to say that from the study you don't have to watch pretty closely whether or not immunity wayne's faster are your vulnerable to variants more than people have thoughts. I mean it's it's mystery could be wrong but it's a it's a real warning sign.

Brazil Norman Amazon Jr Journal Kron Wayne FIS Influenza
Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

Forum

01:03 min | 5 months ago

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

"Lila wants to know. With even comment on information that there may be new variants of the virus, which the vaccines may not target. Yes, that's a very active area it the bottom line is In some people, it may be the case that certain variants Uh, reduce the efficacy of the vaccine Somewhat, so that's a very iffy If you feel kind of statement, I know, but so far we don't have evidence that they're variance that Uh, completely evade the vaccine and are causing significant problems. But but more generally I think it's likely and most experts feel it's likely that This coronavirus like this may for a number of 10 or 20 years be a period maybe a little bit like influenza viruses where we have to periodically beat get re injected, or, you know, like tetanus shots that you get boosters. Every so often we may need to be re vaccinated eventually, but We don't need to figure that out just yet.

Lila Influenza
How the Pandemic Transformed a Small Diagnostics Company

The Bio Report

06:04 min | 5 months ago

How the Pandemic Transformed a Small Diagnostics Company

"Joining us. Thank you for having me. We're gonna talk about longhorn vaccines and diagnostics. Covert one thousand nine hundred and how the pandemic has transformed your company. My guess is most of our listeners will not be familiar with longhorn which is long been focused on addressing infectious diseases in developing economies. What was longhorn founded to do. And what has its business been through two thousand. Nineteen longhorn was founded to address a coming influenza pandemic We started the company in two thousand and six looking for ways to develop a better diagnostics and vaccine products for preparing for an infectious disease outbreak With the expectation that that coming pandemic would be influenza. We originally had our current diagnostic products available for the two thousand nine. Two thousand ten h one n one o-9 pandemic. We were one of thirteen companies that received an e you way back during that pandemic much compared to the hundreds that have received as during this e way is emergency use authorization. That's correct up until about two nine months ago. I don't think most people knew what that was. I don't think many people in the industry or even at the fda knew what that was. And i think now it's something that has been a critical component to developing tests. And now vaccines for this pandemic. when the covid nineteen pandemic emerged. What were the internal discussions at longhorn. What needs did you see. And what opportunities you think there were for longhorn to address. Well we knew that our product would be on an important product. This pandemic One of the things that we had taken to the us fda in two thousand sixteen was this product that could collect samples and inactivate all of the viruses and bacteria and other pathogens immediately upon collection. So that there was no concern about spreading the virus through The transmission of the tubes and to make it safer for the laboratory people as well so as we saw how infectious virus was and and how much it was putting people in the hospitals and ultimately causing death What we realized was that this was really the moment in time that that this novel product that we created and that the fda had approved two years earlier really this was. It's it's key moment in time and we were surprised that the fda actually reached out to us In january and asked us to begin ramping up production and they wanted to ensure that we also realize that what they saw which was the distribution crucial product in helping expand testing across the country are current diagnostic products available for the two thousand nine two thousand ten h one n one. Oh nine pandemic. We were one of thirteen companies that received e way back during that pandemic much compared to the hundreds that have received e- ways during this. That's correct up until about nine months ago. I don't think most people knew what that was. I don't even think many people in the industry or even at the fda knew what that was. And i think now it's something that has been a critical component to developing tests and now vaccines for This pandemic you've long thought about ways to address issues in emerging economies. You've developed some breakthrough technologies to do just that have these had implications for addressing pandemic in a developed economy as well. Well we knew that our product would be unimportant product for this pandemic One of the things that we had taken to the us fda in two thousand sixteen was this product that could collect samples and inactivate all the viruses and bacteria and other pathogens immediately upon collection. So that there was no concern about spreading the virus through the transmission of the tubes and to make it safer for the laboratory people as well so as we saw how infectious virus was and and how much It was putting people in the hospitals and ultimately causing death What we realized was that this was really the moment in time that that this novel product that we created and that the fda approved two years earlier really this was. It's it's key moment in time. And we were surprised that the fda actually reached out to us in january and asked us to begin ramping up production and they wanted to ensure that we also realize that what they saw which was the distribution crucial product in helping expand

FDA Infectious Disease Outbreak Influenza United States
Why Does the COVID-19 Vaccine Require Two Shots

WBZ Afternoon News

01:02 min | 5 months ago

Why Does the COVID-19 Vaccine Require Two Shots

"Were accustomed to require a single injection with a booster several years or even decades later, Why do the coded vaccines currently in use to require two doses? Andrew Peck Kash, vaccine expert at Johns Hopkins explains with Corona viruses. We have no immunity. So the first time your body sees the Santa Jin. It recognizes it is foreign, but it doesn't really go to the EMP degree in terms of making antibody responses. It makes some And actually this vaccine makes a significant amount. But it's really the second time you see the an Injun that your body now says. All right, this is foreign and I'm seeing it again. Now. This is really a threat. So now I'm going toe increase my amount of antibodies that I'm making and really generate a large, strong amount of antibodies. Hecker says. Most childhood vaccines do require a couple of doses. And the flu vaccine requires a single dose yearly because most of us have had some previous exposure to influenza at Johns Hopkins. I'm Elizabeth Tracy.

Andrew Peck Kash Santa Jin Johns Hopkins Hecker FLU Elizabeth Tracy
Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

The Takeaway

07:20 min | 5 months ago

Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

"The question for today how can the. Us turn things around and quickly get vaccine distribution on track. Here with me. is dr amish adultery. An infectious disease physician and a senior scholar at johns hopkins center for health security. Thanks for coming on the takeaway dr short. Thank you for having me so doctor. Let's start with hospitals. They were rightly given priority for the vaccine. But now they're getting blamed for the slow rollout and for not vaccinating workers fast enough. So you're you work at several hospitals. Can you give us a look into what's happening there. You have to remember that. There's no such thing as a hospital worker. Whose only job is to vaccinate people. So what hospitals are doing are pulling people with other jobs to ronco vaccination clinic and these covert vaccines are not. The same thing is giving employees. Tetanus shots hepatitis b. shots influenza shots. There's a lot involved and the same hospitals that are tasked with responding to an inordinate number of patients are being asked vaccine so there's a lot of precautions that they have to put in place got to set up timings for people to be vaccinated. They've got to find a place to vaccinate people in a place where people can stay fifteen minutes after their shot. In case they have an allergic reaction. They have to be in close proximity to an emergency department. In case severe allergic reaction happens and it it just takes some time to scale this up so hospitals. Don't have the resources to do this in a rapid fire manner and i think they shouldn't be blamed for this. They're being actually tasked to do something. Where the government really has failed because there was not much planning done for that last mile of vaccination and it fell to hospitals to set up their own programs and their own prioritization. And all of that in it's in. It's not surprising to me that there's been lags and delays but it is speeding up and i do think the answer. Here's more resources. What could hospitals do with those more resources. If hospitals had more resources they could have vaccination basically happening twenty four seven instead of at specific times. They can vaccinate more people at a given time. Instead of having certain slots for people to to come to be vaccinated they would have other people to be able to monitor people after their vaccination so if there is an allergic reaction. It's not the same people that are giving the vaccine that have to kind of keep their eye on. Who's who's around in the in the room. That might be having an allergic reaction all of that would make vaccination more seamless and faster but some of the slowness because this vaccine is available on an emergency use authorization and that requires forms consent and checking that consent to make sure it's all accurate. All of that does take time which is very different than when you go to get a flu. Shot at employee health at hospital. Just they basically just jab you as soon as you walk in the door. You yourself have had your first dose. Is that correct yes okay. Have you witnessed any reluctance or skepticism in one of the hospitals. I'm on staff at. There's a lot of misinformation being spread among certain members of the healthcare staff including nurses and doctors where basically every conspiracy theory that you've maybe seen on. Social media is getting repeated in a hospital hallway. So yes that does happen in my experience. It's been really minimum of people and not something. That's generally reflective of what healthcare workers think of this vaccine but clearly the anti vaccine movement and all of those conspiracy theories healthcare workers are not unfortunately immune from it and that has played a role trying to combat that misinformation with facts. And so doctor. How do you balance the need. To prioritize healthcare workers and the elderly with also just getting as many people vaccinated as possible. Who want the vaccine. You have to remember that the overall goal is to get all the eligible populations vaccinated so that this public health emergencies behind us and we cross the herd immunity threshold and hospitals are not inundated. There is a reason for the priority scheme though in order to get the vaccine into people where it will have the biggest impact fast and that's healthcare workers nursing home residents and then kind of moving through other priority games. But you have to remember that we can't be dogmatically wedded to that in if that schedule is an obstacle to people getting vaccinated if it's causing hospitals consternation on how they're going to evacuate and how they're going to deal with excess doses. Maybe they've unfrozen a lot more doses than they needed that day and they've got some that they're gonna either throw out or give to somebody. That's not priority group. One a the answer. There is to give it to somebody. Who's in another priority. Because you have to remember. The overarching goal is to get people vaccinated. And we can't let an overly bureaucratic process steiner that goal and it's not right for governors and other politicians to try and penalize hospitals for doing the best they can and i think that's the most counterproductive is finding hospitals or decreasing their allocation. If they're going outside of the priority group because the goal is always going to be to get the shot into people's arms and who would be the next priority group would it be people with preexisting conditions for instance so overall the cdc says priority group one be would be people that are above the age of seventy five years of age as well as front facing workers so meat packing plants or in grocery stores or transportation workers. That's the overall phase one beat but some states are saying we're going to go to maybe above age sixty five so there is some variation from state to state. But it's generally people that are going to be dealing with the general public but they're not healthcare workers as well as people of advanced age because we know they have a high risk for severe complications. Are there states that have done a particularly good job so far. Well if you look at states in the number of doses that they've allocated north dakota south dakota standout They were places that got hit very hard and most recently and they seem to be rolling out vaccine at a faster pace than many other many other states some states only maybe fifteen percent of their doses have been allocated but again that may be a lot of the idiosyncrasies of each state and you likely will see things homogenize soon as state start ramping up and getting things in order but would say in general. No state is doing the best job Everybody could do better and we have to do better in order to put this epidemic pandemic behind us. So what are you looking for. The biden administration to do what can be what can be done to speed things up the by the ministration can ensure that hell that states have. The funding in there was a funding. Bill passed on christmas eve. But it's also just trying to understand what's going on each state and meeting states where they are. Some states may need different types of help. And i think that's going to be important as having the cdc step into its role of being this coordinating body for the states and allowing the public health response to to really be fine tuned by the cdc adding its expertise to what's going on in each in each state. I think it's also the case that we need more guidance on what to do when you have leftover doses and nobody left in the priority group. Yesterday the cdc did have a press conference or a meeting where they did talk about the fact that the goal is not to have vaccine in the fridge but into into people's arms and we shouldn't be wasting doses or doing anything like that so that type of work that kind of leadership of how this vaccination program should go would would be very useful. I also think the federal government should think about trying to help coordinate mass vaccination sites especially as we get into the community dwelling people people who aren't in hospitals nursing homes who are relatively easy to vaccinate but people who live at home can be done. It's at stadiums. Can they be done at convention. Centers Can we use old school gymnasiums during h one n one i got vaccinated at an old school gym. Can we start doing that to make things move much more seamlessly faster sort of borrowing from what israel is doing. Which is the country. That's leading the world in

Dr Amish Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Ronco Vaccination Clinic Tetanus Shots Hepatitis B Allergic Reaction Influenza CDC Steiner Biden Administration North Dakota South Dakota Bill Federal Government Israel
Dr. Fauci Just Warned New COVID Mutation May Be "More Transmissible"

America's First News

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

Dr. Fauci Just Warned New COVID Mutation May Be "More Transmissible"

"Now, while the new variants of the virus travels faster than prior variance, Dr Anthony Fauci says he thinks the current vaccines work or can be tweaked toe work. This vaccine does not drift to our knowledge, We're gonna follow it carefully, but thus for doesn't drift the way influenza does so. I'm not predicting that we're gonna have to do every year get a new vaccine. I think that would be a bit of a stretch to make that assumption. However way do since we're only one year into this. Need to be very careful. Follow it carefully. And if we do need to make adjustments, I believe we can make those adjustments. I thought you making the comments to

Dr Anthony Fauci Influenza
Should you be worried about allergic reactions to the Pfizer vaccine?

Coronacast

04:08 min | 6 months ago

Should you be worried about allergic reactions to the Pfizer vaccine?

"So now let's talk about vaccines today. And i want to talk to you about a couple of different vaccines. But let's start in the uk where thousands of people in the last couple of days have received the fifa vaccine which is really exciting. But one of the things that we've heard about. Is that a couple of people have had an anaphylactic like reaction. So how worried should we be about that. People have been discussing this risk with the peiser vaccine because it uses a substance code peg polyethylene glycol mackerel goal and what this substance does in vaccine and a couple of vaccines that use it. I think the one of the meningitis vaccines may goco vaccines use. It is kind of out the components in the vaccine and enhances the immune response so essentially what you've got. Is you want the strongest immune response that you can possibly get here and the probably ethylene glycol helps that to happen. So that's what that's about so it does rarely 'cause Reactions interestingly as pfizer says the didn't get an to or allergic responses anymore in the placebo in the anymore in the active group than the placebo group in the trial but these people certainly sound as if they got an nf electric or type reaction within a short time. After the you'd have to say was the pfizer vaccine. That did it. So you're saying that they did have some reports of these sorts of reactions during the trial but they didn't think it was caused by the vaccine. Yes and theoretic and people knew there was a theoretical risk of that because peg is known to cause an actual reactions in some people rarely. It's also used as a laxative. It's seems like a very versatile substance knows how to job well while we're talking about allergic reactions. Can we talk a bit about egg allergies and why we still hear that. If you've got an egg allergy that maybe might not have certain types of vaccine misleading story. That's got into the general public where they believe that if eggs have been used in the manufacture of vaccine. And you're allergic. You're going to get an egg allergy. It's not the egg itself. It's the embryo within the egg that they use embryonic cells within the egg that they use to actually make the vaccine. Influenza vaccine is the one which commonly uses eggs to culture the vaccine and it doesn't contain the york. Can we basically contains little or no egg allergen so it is a bit of a myth. So vaccine allergies are actually extremely rare. I mean some people argue that it's one in one point four million dollars what. Gp's are advised as you got a very egg allergy child them with a vaccine that uses egg. Then you just keep them in the surgery for a little bit longer just to make sure they're okay but a lot of these vaccines are being developed for. Covid have eggs anywhere in the process using all sorts of different new processes. The nova vaccine uses insect cells to produce the vaccine so lots of different selves used quickly. Talk also about china's vaccine which came out really quickly and they were reporting quite promising results. But there's been some news reports in a taiwanese news outlet saying that. Forty-seven people in uganda had the vaccine. Have now tested positive for coronavirus. How much stead should be placed on this news. Report a runabout about zero. We'd be my esteem you know. It's a newspaper. Report might be true. Might not be true. Might be misleading. That could have been part of a trial could have been in the placebo arm of the trial who knows and is complicated by the fact that no doubt taiwanese taiwanese media just love any story which knocks the chinese technological supremacy off the pedestal. So you just take all that with a pinch of salt. It may be true. But i'm really what we've to do. Chinese not done themselves a favor by not doing transparent trials at least yet and so we just don't know what's going on there and that sort of darkness stories like this popout and it. Just don't do the chinese any favors because the chinese are pretty good. Researchers of are some clouds hanging over some of their vaccine manufacturers allegations of fraud in the past. Well

Pfizer Allergic Reactions Meningitis UK Influenza Uganda China
"influenza" Discussed on a16z

a16z

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on a16z

"Inhaler go about your day instead of wearing a mask. And what do we think about safety for these things and safety for delivery and safety for the Crisper Part? The crisper part seems utterly straightforward. Because is going after Arne. It's not editing. Your genome could be the delivery. Part now becomes the real question. Can we come up with delivery where it could be done multiple times in weight of safe so AV is typically the gold standard for gene therapy delivery? These ADN associated viruses are approved therapies. Right now these are what we call one and done treatments because your body will develop immunity against this gaps. If this all works out well this could be a universal krona virus or Flu Vaccine. But if you think about re administration every single year you'd probably want something that is less mutagenic. The other big problem is immunity. Necessity of Christopher nucleus is a lot of the common crisper nucleus that we use do come from pathogenic sources. There are people that are developing new forms of New Claes's Cassocks for instance that might have come from non pathogenic sources that could be used in the less committed. Jennifer Fashion Crisper cast. Nuclear is definitely a a hardware platform? If you think of it in the molecular sense all of the concepts that they showed here in this paper you can apply it not only to cast their team but also differ. Nucleus or even liber- nanoparticles non viral approaches. Different ethic peptides. That also shown to deliver cast. Nine nucleus is really well could be combined here and so we can also think about. How do we engineer better crisper system that utilize the same platform but a lot of the stuff and the foundation? That they've developed can be play. Do you think that the hurdles that we just discussed with safety delivery immuno-genetic city we easier faster or more feasible to clear than the hurdles facing a vaccine for copay nineteen or is it just anyone's guess right? Now there's a couple different scenario. So one scenario is were antibody dependent enhancement. Ad is actually a real serious difficult problem. That can't be cracked if that's the case then this looking pretty good. In comparison there's another scenario where Vaccine becomes much more to like an influenza vaccine and so a more traditional approaches work and then this might be harder unfortunately with Kovin. A lot is still unknown. One I'm thinking about is not just planning for what we can do to help. Covert in two thousand twenty and twenty one. But what would we do about the pandemic that could be in twenty thirty or twenty five if you look at the timing between these pandemics using about SARS and Murs and covert the years between them becoming fewer and fewer? If that's the case having a broad spectrum sort of programmable ish approach that could be brought out very quickly. That's particularly intriguing. Though validating crisper approach my take longer and it might span this current one. You know if we get this moonshot right. We can dramatically save time for all future bendix basically sidestep. There's really linear passive vaccine development. Okay so we've discussed the scientific hurdles that therapy like this would still have to overcome but assuming they were overcome. Are there strong business models and incentives for prophylactic treatments or does it suffer from some of the same headwinds as antibiotics and traditional accedes? Yeah I think if you think about the modern record of producing vaccines. It doesn't really inspire that much confidence because if you think about SARS Cov one Mersey Coppola all really provoked these similar arms race to make vaccine if you will and today only if the bowl effort has been successful and the vaccine was approved basically last year five years after the epidemic really happened. Well learn you talked about. Comparing this to antibiotics thing about. Antibiotics is said we intentionally don't give them out because we want avoid resistance and that's what's economics event novel antibiotic so challenging because If you have a great antibiotic it goes lock box and doesn't get used. This is actually upside down for a couple of reasons. One it inherently is engineered to grafter resistance in that a few mutations. And they're going to make a big deal and then secondly I imagine that it would be the type of thing going lock box. It would be heavily manufacturing distributed such that everyone would have available so that I think there would be a real commercial vantage doing something like this so for those two reasons. I think this becomes almost opposite of what we're seeing antibiotics. I think you know thinking about this. Whole economic context governments and institutions spent billions of dollars every year on nuclear weapons that they hope to never use how about we spent a couple of billion to build these plants and teams who equip ourselves to handle the next upper pandemic. Think that's excellent point. Turn it into a national defense issue and not just a health. Market health demands issue. It's interesting to think about. What can we do either to have a response? Already or to engineer something rapidly in response to something being a threat I think the old style sort of military topgun like war where it's GonNa be our fighter jets against other fighter jets becomes less and less of a reality. Bioterrorism becomes probably a much more insidious threat I mean. These vaccines remained the best. Virtually only weapon against these viruses and bioterrorism. So it's GonNa be a mission critical defense mechanism going forward so one last thing and this may be more SCI FI. It's interesting to ask. Could sort of a crisper approach a true broad spectrum antiviral for like all viruses and especially given the nature viruses and how they spread with a population the ability to tackle these things early means that they don't spread which means that we don't have these crazy pandemics anymore that would be the ultimate fantasy. Thank you both. And thank you for joining the A sixteen Z Journal. Club this week to recap. This research shows that it is possible to program a crisper based system to target both krona viruses and influence to prevent infection. There are a number of challenges still to overcome especially as these results are only in a cell culture model but there is huge potential here to create a broad range kroth electic treatment for viral infection and advances in engineering. Biology will take us. There will continue to discuss related themes other a sixteen Z podcast episodes..

engineer Flu Vaccine Christopher nucleus Arne influenza Kovin Jennifer Fashion Murs Z Journal Coppola
"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"I was just I was just waiting. Almost you know thought I'll I'll slide away had been on. I might have slid away on. You have to bear in mind. I was making that plane tail for a bunch of a three twenty fans of your excuses. I delayed on a bit thick right. They're fantastic podcasts. Yes it is fantastic podcasters on that show all right very good Good stuff okay Shall we continue with the our feedback? You know what it looks like. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA knock at all of it. I think which is going to be like a major wellstone. Maybe we'll see give it a go into this. One tried to get to last time and didn't make it so we've got it this time. Rollo private pilot Rollo here. Once again I'm sending this feedback from the far reach. Oh Eight Less maybe you can put that Overlay up from the far reaches of the Western Pacific. I don't believe I've ever heard anyone sending feedback from this part of the world. So I thought it'd be cool to do it for the sake of our friends over at opposing bases which like secret location code names will call this Pacific island Captain Nick Island in honor of the Air Force Base. That's here with the same surname as the old pilot only with a slightly different spelling. Only know what this is the. Ap as Anderson Air Base on the island of Guam anyways. I'm out here with giving away all his secrets. Yano. Anyways I'm out here with my squadron and the irony of it is what that we're operating out of Captain Nick Island while turning. Wrenches on captain next favorite Boeing the old legacy Hornets or as we like to call them baby Hornets. It's incredible that these old were warbirds are still in service. Many countries are including the US. I've now gotten the opportunity to work on the C nine the navy's version of the mad dog the Super Hornet and currently the baby hornet onto a different topic. The other day I went on a hike down a historic trail on the old Navy airfield. Which is no which is no longer in use. The trail took us through an old taxiway and runway threshold overgrown with a jungle. Now we continue down the rugged trail which led us to a World War Two era F for you Corsair crash site. The aircraft allegedly went down sometime in nineteen forty based on the Little Information. I could find online. The main fuselage half of each wing and parts of the landing gear are still there the engine prop and are no longer there. This was a really cool experience and adventure and we could feel the history that surrounds that crash site and the old airfield like always. I've attached a few pictures of our adventure share with the apogee community and we have one up there right now if you're watching the video. That's Rollo setting 'em where the I guess but the Corsair air have an ejection seat. Probably not they probably just Are just bailed out of those things. Right so anyway you can clearly see the The wing spar on the Corsair which has a very distinctive bend to it. Yeah Yeah Wing crank save quite. It's quite easy to recognize even though he's sitting in a pretty poll state. Yep had an F. Word probably say. I don't know what that is very cool. So if anybody's interested you can see more pictures. I posted on instagram. And he says feel free to add my handle to the show notes and it's at A. R. O. D. L. Eight one again. That'll be in the show notes and Let's see this chaotic chaotic time of Corona virus wishing the crew and community unlimited health until next time private private pilot Rollo and again just check out the show notes and you can see the other photos that he has taken of the crash site and some signs et Cetera. From the this beautiful tropical. All right brilliant. Thank you can I do a quick correction? Yes you're on myself The three twenty five Was actually another name for the three twenty one so they when they stretch the three twenty they colder initially the a three twenty dash five hundred and the three twenty five. Give it both James Bond. Eventually it was called the I three twenty one us what that comes from very interesting. I had a little bit role. Okay what am I feel like? We're YEP YEP backup above fifty percents percent in that vicinity ever take twenty percent f McKay. That's the way we do it here. I'm twelfth gusts though. This is an interesting one. Any anybody WANNA game for taking this one. I'll take it because he's got a question for you and says Hi. Abc crew and community. I hope you're doing good. I A quick question for Steph. I noticed it's been a long time since you went flying. I know any reason in particular. Don't you miss it as a J. pilot I cannot be more than two weeks without it I would start shaking sweating. Don't tell my medical examiner. Your secret is safe with us On through that real quick. Yeah it's been a very long time and part of it had to do with Some family circumstances that were happening that we're keeping me busy on my Otherwise free weekends I did a lot of travel over the past year which I'm grateful for now because I think it's going to be a while with without some of that So I kind of satisfied that It sure bug that I was having for a while to get out and see lots of different places in the world and and visit with friends and do all kinds of stuff so I do. Miss it I laid off have been planning to get back into it updated medical and all kinds of other stuff. I need to do and then in touch with the flight school and I don't know if I'm actually going to be able to do that for the next little while I'm going to Call a flight school tomorrow and see if they're still I'm still getting emails from them. Saying they're running specials on things I think trying to to get a business but I don't know if With some of these stay at home orders. If that's going to be allowed so it might be a little while longer That's okay they'll give me time to Study up some things and brush up on on book. Knowledge side of things and I'll get back into don't worry But yeah it's I do miss it so I'll get back there. Don't worry Changing subjects I stumbled upon this article and wanted to know your thoughts about any alternative source of energy for Airliners. Do you think we are going to see any of this in the near future. And he includes a link to a Yahoo dot com lifestyle article Title SAYS FORGOT FUEL tanks. Better forget fuel tanks batteries Batteries this new electric jet concept uses air friction to generate power. You want me to go ahead and read through that gap if you like myself. Article says.

Rollo Captain Nick Island navy Navy airfield Boeing US Air Force Base Anderson Air Base Yano Guam Ap Pacific island Hornets Yahoo James Bond Steph A. R. O. D.
"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"So. We have corona virus outbreaks. We have We have earthquakes. And what's next Maybe was that no swarms of locusts. You're kidding me. You laugh about this however story. They were driving across town and this is the day after the earthquake and I had just washed my car because we were mentioning before the show that it has become policies here in the southeast of the United States. So my car was covered in this nice. You know layer of yellow pollen so I ran through the car wash that I was driving back across town and I drove through. This huge swarm of bugs like it was like a cloud of bugs and I can only assume that they were locusts. Because what else would they be? What else we should mention. Also that they had the same kind of issues with the krona virus infection or threat of in the New York market Believe JFK and several of the surrounding airports I guess it included Laguardia Westchester and others up in the New York City area that had to shut down because of Corona virus Related fears. So yeah. Well that's right Las Vegas the same thing and Indianapolis by so I hear that Las Vegas and midway are both still operating non towered operations and Our good friend and fellow podcasters dispatcher. Mike said that he received something from Acme that said Reminding the dispatchers to remind aircrews landing at these places that they remember to cancel their clearance. Because this is a problem for looking for you yeah and also I guess. I can't technically allow somebody else to proceed via to the airport right. Yes kind of makes it a big mess. Okay now being from the other side of the world I know. Atc's zero is a well now. Well recognized. I'm not sure how come in a well known. It was In previous decades indication in the states that traffic is shut down on. The new service will be provided. But why use a term like that? Which is not self explanatory when it would be easier to say at traffic control has shut down. Do your thing Writing Cup. The suitable FRY. So why use the code word that his own the FAA used Saggio the only country in the world as far as I know that has ATC's zero. So I'm just a little bit confused. Why have a code word for that? Why not just tell people in plain language? Because that's you know I'm a great believer in when you communicating you make it plain and simple Couch it in a tone that is not necessarily self explanatory. I'm I'm just curious. I'd say that's a great question for the opposing. Basis guys your feedback about our H. He would just coach. Just let it slide up this. This did cause problem with a us-based pilots was a few years ago the first time this term really became. Baltimore was used. Yes yes Nobody understood that was. Yeah we talked about on the show and said never heard that before we had the same we had the same question back then Nick But now at least now when I hear it I I know what that is. Yeah well let's see so I was on the show the gun. Wow that's new one on me. That's a good point now. At least the people at Midway said It's now a class. E airspace so that's kind of the taff and all of that so that should help a little bit but you're right on issues to say. Look you guys are on your own. No air traffic control services where leaving the tower. So there's nobody here to control you. Just use more plain language agree would be a better thing by the way Let's see we have Dave Gooch. Said he thinks that Midway is back open now. He believes as of twenty minutes ago. Perhaps Las Vegas is really well. Okay that was from not Dave someone else in the chat room who has forgotten Anthony. Thank you Anthony Yeah so I don't know that's a good question neck but maybe the boys over at the opposing basis can tackle that one. They probably have the same. The same feelings we do. I'd say it in Eight hundred seventy one fifty five twenty two three dash five seventy one whatever? It is the right. So that's the that's the answer not that I have any problem with that. They have to use phraseology sitting there book. Yeah I just think that book to be might be somebody. Throw them away improve. Find Find Nowadays Book of Eh Traffic Control Craig. Measurement and the Youtube Chat Says K. L. A. S. Tower is up on live. Abc just heard a pilot. Say Glad to have you back Roy. Goodness speaking of good news. We have even more good news. We're always loved these kind of good news. Feeling good kind of story. Feel good kind of story there. We go This one this item D. American Airlines reunites passenger with father. Just before he passes. Well that's not. That's the sad part of that. American Airlines has been in the news recently for all the wrong reasons but Here's a positive story showing that there is still love with an airline Let's see Laurie. Thomas was on a business on business in Virginia when she received a phone call informing her that. Her ailing father's condition had worsened. She immediately booked a flight back home from Dulles to Colorado Springs where the connection in Dallas unfortunately her flight at of Dulles was delayed which meant potentially missing her connection in Dallas on the verge of tears. She wrote a note to the flight crew asking for help. Here's lorries entire story after receiving an emergency. Call while I'm business. Can we just talked about that Not Wanting to burst into tears in front of passengers. I wrote a note explaining my situation and asking if anything could be done to delay the connecting flight. The flight attendant curiously took my note to the Galley and returned with the following notes. Ansi I guess On instagram. They must have posted some pictures of those upon arrival at Dallas Fort. Worth I was whisked to an awaiting American Airlines ramp vehicle on the tarmac and driven to my gate to terminals away. I made it home in time to spend an extra day with my dad who passed away this morning. Thank you to Deanna. And the captain on American Airlines twenty-seven Eighty four and to the captain and crew on American Airlines. Twenty three forty seven. I'm eternally grateful for your compassion and kindness. Indeed despite what you see making headlines kindness compassion and humanity does exist in the airline industry. Thank you to these American Airlines teams. That went the extra mile. Made this happen. Your work doesn't go unnoticed. Keep it up so and this is you know we hear these stories and I'm sure they probably happened a lot more than just like this. Once in a blue moon is just that we don't always hear about these kind of things and We've talked about these kind of stories before on the show. So I guess this probably happened before this whole corona virus outbreak and The incredible Diminishing of service for all the airlines cancelled flights and everything else. I'm assuming I duNno not that it makes any difference. No it doesn't go quite often. These things are just one or two people who go Make that special extra effort itself and not a whole bunch people you find. There are a few individuals suddenly realized this situation. They make a few calls. They do a few things they follow through on a story. Make sure it all happens. I they haul airline may not do that but it ain't take a few individuals to make a really good story that's for sure. Yes that is for sure well. We purposely made our news folder items Small so that we can spend more time answering people's feedback and also kind of talking amongst ourselves and getting to know each other. So here we go are getting to know you segment Get into line queue all right.

American Airlines Las Vegas Atc United States New York Dave Gooch New York City FAA Anthony Laguardia Westchester Nick But Indianapolis Youtube Dulles Dallas Fort Mike taff
"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

The Plant Path

15:22 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

"Hey there everybody say John Popham here founder of the School of Evolutionary herbalism and and the other day I did one of our quarterly live sessions for all of the evolutionary herbalism. Students and someone asked a question about. How do we go about holistically treating influenza? And and you know we're here. It's December of two thousand and nineteen. And as I'm sure you know this tends to be the season where people were coming down and with the flu or people were getting. Colds got compromised immune systems. There's all sorts of bugs floating around in the air and so I thought it would be really fun onto to share some of the content that I taught during that Q.. In a Webinar. So you know one of the reasons why I think this is particularly important is because it's willy conventional for people when they get the flu and get especially especially with the accompanying fever for people to really reach for. You know taking something like aspirin to get that fever down and you one of the things that we see is that when we suppress a fever we actually ended up. Prolonging the sickness. There right we can turn what would normally be. Maybe a three day fever into a week long fever through suppressing it and one of the wonderful things about herbal medicine is that we have plants available to us that really support the body in going going about its natural response in the body reacts to a fever and the way that you know. I think it's important for us as herbalists to remember remember that there is a vital intelligence in the body right in the West we often times refer to that as the vital force and and as holistic herbalists. We want to really make sure that we're always honoring and following that flow of the vital force trusting rusting in the intelligence of the body trusting. In the fact that our bodies know how to self regulate into self heal and that our work with plants is really just supporting that process rather than biochemistry overwriting what our body is is trying to do in order to auto regulate an auto self heal so I thought this was a very fitting discussion discussion to be sharing here. Her in the late autumn transitioning in to winter time. So I just wanted to do a little introduction here and I hope. Have you enjoy some of the teachings that I shared here in our evolutionary herbalism quarterly Webinar. And we're going to be talking a little bit here about some some of my approaches to holistically addressing influenza and fever. What is my protocol for the flu? Well there's a handful of things that I generally consider here in the treatment of the flu and I think before really getting into that. I think it's worth kind of acknowledging the an interesting kind of dynamic in in our terminology where we tend to lump colds Flus right. We always say colds flus. Maybe because they people tend to get them around the fallen wintertime. Maybe that's why But really from I guess from a perspective of pathology. They're actually quite different in the sense that there have similarities and they have the differences. You know they're generally both viral infections affecting the respiratory system but one of the big differences is that the common cold generally affects upper respiratory. Right sinuses you get the stuffy nose. The kind of your head feels like it's floating on a balloon in ten feet above your head kind of tired sluggish sometimes a sore throat that generally is about the extent of it great whereas a fever this is typically yes can be upper respiratory but oftentimes flus tend to get much deeper into into the respiratory system so we oftentimes see a cough oftentimes associated with some bronchitis but the main differentiating factor is fever right and so- influenza infection generally speaking always is accompanied by a fever whereas a common cold is not so. That's a really important distinguishing factor. Here and really kind of changes the approach to you effectively treating the flu. The other thing that I think is worth mentioning is that no one has ever died from the common cold but people die every year ear from influenza. Generally it's usually young children or the elderly people that really don't have very strong immune system strong vitality but nonetheless. People do die from the flu quite often and not dimension every now and then there. Are these really big flu. Pandemics that come out and can be very difficult to treat at Cetera. So just wanted to give a little little background there when it does come to actual herbal treatment for the flu. There's a number of factors that I think are important shortened to consider. I is food actually so an old kind of rule of thumb. Is that you fast a fever and feed a cold so this is why during a cold. It's nice to like have a lot of like hot soups and broth often. You want to keep yourself nourished during the cold but during a fever actually eating food is not good. You know generally speaking when someone has a working fever usually they don't really have that much of an appetite anyway but it's good to keep that person in a fasting state. The reason for that is is that during a fever. All of the blood is being pushed out. Out to the periphery and is being circulated to circulate immunological components to keep things moving to try to push heat out doc and ultimately raise the internal body temperature to cook out that pathogen when you eat a meal all of your blood has to flow back into the digestive digestive system and so that can really inhibit the process of fever in pretty detrimental ways so it always say fast asked a fever feed a cold and the the other important thing before I get into kind of practical aspects of how I go about treating is that it's very important understand is that a fever is a vital response. This is an intelligent response of the vital force of the body in response bounce to a pathogen and so you know alip from an allopathic perspective. We see the fever as the enemy from a vital vital EST perspective. We see that the fever is the friend. And it's actually the intelligence of the body at work fighting off this invading pathogen. And so it's really important that we as Vita list we work with the vital force that we move with that intelligence intelligence of the body and don't suppress it or trying to you know biochemical so to speak shut it off which is essentially what get a lot of are over the counter kind of fever reducing or what we would call a Feb- refuge type drugs do aspirin and I be pro fin things like that. Those non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. They work amazing but they turn off that fever response biochemicals speaking. And you know if you think of that. The fever is the body's innate way of basically raising the internal temperature so we'll Adina nature those whatever the pathogen is and so if you shut that down for however many hours during that downtime. We're the fevers. Not Active. Sure you feel better because you don't have a fever because if he doesn't make you feel good right but during that time. That pathogen is reproducing and so the suppression Russian of the fever is going to significantly extend the period of time. One is sick than a fever. That's just allowed to do. Its job now now from an herbal standpoint as I say we want to support the vital force we want to support the body. We want to encourage courage what the body's already trying to do with our plants and this is why we have this amazing category of remedies referred to as dia forensics and the diaphragm medics are really cool category of herbs because they are used to treat a fever and they do so so very successfully. But they're not suppressing it. They're actually helping the fever to do. Its job and they do this through a couple of different ways. And there's really I think of two subcategories of Dia Foretich so on the one hand. We have our stimulant dia. Forensics these are doc pungent hot warming circulatory stimulating type plants. That are GonNa you know again. Help increase that temperature and so really anything that tastes particularly spicy and makes you sweat. That is a stimulant diabetics. I Fredericks all of our really hot spicy peppers. Erbil Eli Cayenne is a big one here very powerful stimulant diabetic Ginger singer even black pepper. These are all stimulant diaphragm. Really anything that's going to move the blood. Bring the blood up to the surface now. The stimulant diabetics are really used oftentimes during an earlier phase of of a fever so generally when someone feels cold and this is because the Hypothalamus has set your Basil Body Body temperature from its baseline like whatever ninety eight point six or whatever it might be saying okay instead of ninety eight point six as standard one. Oh four as standard standard or one. Oh two or one three or whatever it is but so that's baseline but you're at ninety eight something and so you feel cold right so you get kind of Pale skin low energy. You feel. Chivalry feel cold and this is when you want to give a stimulant diabetic. The other type is the relaxing diaphragm. And these are remedies that are typically used later. You're on a fever when the fevers peaking when you feel hot your skin's red skins dry oftentimes. There's a lot of tension both psychological psychological and also physiological in the sense that your muscles start to get a little achey. Your back hurts. Your head hurts. Everything feels Kinda kinda tight. You're having a hard time sleeping and you feel hot right This is where we use relaxant dia forensics. Then what these are doing is they're actually relaxing constriction in the capillary beds just under the skin as well as the pores of the skin so I always say relaxant diverge close all the all the windows in a room and crank the heat up in that room gets really really hot. Well a stimulant diabetic traffic is like turning the heat up. A relaxant. Diabetic is like opening up the windows. Right and so that's really what those remedies are doing. They're opening up the pores opening up the capillary beds. So all that internal heat can release and ultimately break that fever classic remedies here. It'd be low billy. Korea pleurisy root bone set is a major remedy here. peppermint elder flower Yaro some of those have mixed emulate and relaxing diaphragm. Proper special. Like Yaro I find this kind of working in both ways so these are some really great remedies to consider that are working with in treating the fever side of influenza. Now the last part I wanNA say about diabetics is that it's really important that these are drink as hot teas. That is really what brings out that diabetic property much more as that hot T- taking a tincture it. It'll work but not that well if you are only have a tincture and there's been a lot of situations where I've had to treat fevers and all I have this tincture. What I usually do is boil some water or just get some hot water you you know not just like hot out of the Faucet but you know like tea drinking hot and I'll put the tincture in there and just have someone drink that because think of it hot water? What does it do volatile? Is it steams moves up an out and that's the whole energy of a fever. It's the whole energy of a diuretic addicts were pushing things up and radiating things out. It's like that fire element right. We're pushing up out so yes so dia forensics the other the other element of this is You know I just want to kind of spotlight on bone set a little but here Bone set is very very important. Influenza remedy I think it's the most important influenza remedy it has antiviral viral properties. Which of course is beneficial but it is an incredibly reliable relaxant diabetic specifically for the deep deep aches and pains in the muscles and the bones during a fever bone set has very specific for that and it works very very well so I just want to mention a bone set that's Taurean portfolio Adam. must have remedy for the treatment of influenza. The other aspect of this here is working with antiviral plants..

fevers influenza Colds stimulant aspirin School of Evolutionary herbali Dia Foretich John Popham founder bronchitis Vita Eli Cayenne Korea Adam. billy
"influenza" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The other that I'm focused on or that we are focused on in the foundation is influence, and as you mentioned right now much of the effort for influenza is on seasonal influenza vaccination the goal and the the focus of our influence of clean development efforts is really on on universal influence of acting. So this idea is that a vaccine that is effective against the strains of influence. There are speculating and then as well as the strains of influenza that may emerge, particularly the concern is for pan-demic influenza or influence that is dramatically different than the than what of the circular strains are. So this is a tall order and our efforts at through our partners are in preclinical stages. Primarily at this point. But I think this is the what what we're really aiming for with with influenza. And maybe the last thing I'll talk about is is the work that I'm doing with our partners again on micro peel resistant, most of the efforts and most of the focus globally when people are talking about Anna microbial resistance has really been on Pacific bacterial and past growing bacterial pathogens, but specific to the efforts that I wanna mention today are trying to understand the burden of disease due to resistant, pathogens, and and bacteria in particular. And in our efforts are focused really on neonatal newborn subsidies, and and pathogens are bacteria that are causing subs- mortality in these populations. Then become our potential target..

influenza seasonal influenza
"influenza" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Enhancing, tools of synthetic biology, are very very very widespread today, a very small number of highly trained people could if they wished making credibly deadly pathogens, and it's been done back in two thousand and eleven which is a long time ago in the arc of synthetic biology technology, researchers at the university of Wisconsin and elsewhere made a strain of influenza that was as deadly as the deadliest this. We'd ever seen was called h five and one that particular strain kills sixty percent three out of five people who get infected with swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred people, and we fear swine flu with very very good reason, we should all be scared of swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred this. Monster kills three out of five three hundred out of five hundred. Right. So a lot scarier. Now what happened? They basically took this university of Wisconsin, and experiment. They they didn't use this term. But I'm going to say weaponized that that strain, and they created a strain or a substrate that is vehemently contagious now that was only a tiny group of people the world were capable of doing that in twenty eleven they were people who were not bent on killing people. They were scientists. They probably had the best possible motivations that. We're probably doing it. And sure they in fact, they said publicly, so they could understand what might go wrong in nature. But the point is the things that only a tiny brilliant. Handful of people can do in twenty eleven or twenty eighteen will be doable by ten thousand people in a fairly short number of years. Let's say all bio grad students because the tools are getting better and the technologies and techniques are getting better. So rapidly crisper didn't exist in two thousand and eleven crisper which radically enhanced the ability of. People to edit gene codes now, they can now crisper does exist and a lot of grad students and life sciences, and probably rather soon-, essentially, all of them are going to be masters of crisper and another data point, which is really interesting the human genome project cost three billion dollars and took thirteen years to sequence a single hap- Lloyd genome, which is almost like half Agena, right? That ended in two thousand and three and all that long ago. Right. Two thousand and three that ends today. A single lab tech can do quite a bit more work than that in a day. So we're talking about and probably for about a thousand dollars rather than three billion dollars. So we're talking about three million axe price, compression, and I don't even know how many billion exceleron in the amount of work one person could get done because of the acceleration in the tools. These tools are continuing to accelerate their accelerating faster even. Than Moore's law. So we really need to think about what can five people do today. All of whom are good guys, all who are brilliant. None of whom have single odious is thought that fifty people will be able to do tomorrow that fifty thousand and eventually five hundred thousand people will be able to do. I mean, there will be things that are happening. There will be things happening in highschool bio labs as part of standard experiments thirty years from now, let's pick an arbitrary number certainly thirty years from now that nobody in the world is capable of doing right now. And I think we need to start worrying about this today rather than twenty two point nine years from now, I mean, even if you just look at the history of computing, you will see only governments could create computers, and they were unreliable and buggy in the forecast by the sixties companies could create computers, but very large ones. We're still buggy. Sometimes it took a lot of maintenance an expertise to keep them running by the eighties. Everybody could have a computer. But you still kinda had to be a. Hobbyist, and you still had to wanna make it work and figure out how to make it work and then fast forward to today where most of the world carries a computer in their pocket, which is our full than the most powerful computer on the face of earth during the eighties up. Yeah. So I mean, that's a positive right to grant. Now, imagine apply apply that same trajectory to everything..

influenza university of Wisconsin Moore Lloyd three billion dollars thirty years thousand dollars thirteen years sixty percent nine years
"influenza" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank. You very much Ellison it's really a pleasure to be here with, you this afternoon talk a little bit about. Influenza and it's multifaceted components, of influenza and then we'll have some time for question but as, we mentioned inside you could ask me questions about. Anything besides influenza if you like but let's focus on influenza for the time being I think Alison made a good point in describing why influenza is really different than. Almost any other common viral infection that which we, are confronted with in. Our lifetime it's a virus that is historically an evolutionary early not a human. Virus it's a virus of waterfowl that over centuries and beyond adapted itself to. Human so that, influenza viruses are out in the environment above and beyond the humor Species so the idea that we're ever. Going to get rid of, influenza is a non starter so the question is how do we, prevent infection with influenza again differently from other viruses. There are two major types of influenza when you think about it it's the seasonal flu that you know we talk about influenza viral and infectious disease people like myself. Often say the only thing that you could predict, about influenza is that. It's unpredictable but the fact is the one thing that is predictable about influenza. Is that we're going to have an influenza outbreak every single winter for sure A more unpredictable issue is the issue, of a pin damage so what's the difference between seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza seasonal influenza occurs every winter what happens is that the virus because it's an, RN a virus that tends. To mutate readily it changes generally a little bit we refer to that as a drift. From season to season, which is the reason why we recommend that you get a new? Updated vaccine each season what are the disease do you know of. That we recommend you get a new vaccine every year there isn't any for example. Measles essentially never changes so the measles that I got infected with I'm old enough to have gotten. Infected with measles when I was Gile is exactly the same measles that's in the vaccine that I vaccinated my children with and that's decades later So when it changes it drifts in contrast every once in a while it. Changes so much Weaver to that as a shift and? The reason why that's generally. A major public health problem is? Because there would be no background immunity in the population to prevent a major outbreak whereas with. Seasonal flu even if no one God vaccinated each season I, say that and I get heartburn because I want everybody to get vaccinated but even if. No one got vaccinated? There would be enough residual immunity in the community so that each season it. Would never be. A catastrophic, outbreak because enough people. Would be protected from the previous year so, having said that as a background the burden each year of flu is serious in the United States there are anywhere between a low of twelve thousand deaths, to a high of Fifty six thousand deaths. There are hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations we, tend to get immune to, that in the sense of metaphorically immune because it happens. Every year but as you know there are several tragic deaths each year most of the vulnerable people are the ones that are at highest risk elderly. People with underlying disease, pregnant women infants but also otherwise well people, can be impacted now you heard Alison just mentioned that we had a very. Bad influenza season this season it was, the worst that we had in well over a decade and maybe in, any time of being recorded and I'll get to that in a moment with regard to pandemics. The mother of all pandemics was nine, hundred eighteen when fifty to one hundred million people were killed in. That year globally we've also had a few other pandemics that were a problem But not that serious one. Thousand nine hundred fifty seven thousand nine hundred sixty eight and then two thousand nine the first pandemic. Of this century now, one of the problems that we have. With influenza and this is something we have to just be aware of given the nature of the fact, that, it, changes from season, to, season we don't do..

Influenza seasonal influenza pandemic influenza Alison Ellison United States Weaver Gile
"influenza" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"So if you're not getting the oxygen breathe into your bloodstream and into your cells getting get into your bloodstream but you're cells are not using it efficiently okay and then you mentioned influenza am i correct i expect that to be even more controversial but there is a pattern there that that when when when with ac current was first hardest for power in for lights and power in eighteen eighty nine that's when we had our first big modern influenza epidemic and the second one was the spanish influenza so called spanish influenza of nineteen eighteen which coincided to the months basically of the the intense use the first intense use of radio wave on this planet by the united states is so what that the radio waves use continuing grew but the spanish flu died away yes we had an we had another epidemic in the fifty seven fifty eight when very powerful radar stations were were tried it out all over the fair causing the flu radiation continued with the flu went away if the radiation was causing the flew flew go away but but the the pattern of flu changed in eighteen eighty nine it has never been the same in other words fluids now an annual disease every winter this did not exist came in and it didn't really go out it just got normalized that's correct all right hey we scott and quincy scott thank you for calling us at six one seven two five four ten thirty i invite anyone to call now who may have a question or an observation here six one seven five four ten.

united states influenza quincy scott
"influenza" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Some megan oh oh my god no what i'm reading a headline here a second wave of flu maybe on the way come on the cdc has warned here's what it says the bulk of this year's deadly flu season was dominated by the i didn't know it had this name but it's the h three and two virus i knew it was new it had an agent and then and there i didn't know what had a three and a two that's tough stuff fearsome so is dominated by h three end to virus and influenza a strain that is more severe less receptive to the vaccines we found that out then other types of disease as the season winds down influenza b is now coming up on influenza on setting the scene for a possible second wave of flu after i just got done bragging i you know world tour of bragging about how i made it through this winter without catching the flue and i've been on planes i you guys know i threw away washing the hands several radio appearances daycares preschools that's the only schools i would agree to do and i got through it so i'm not done this thing still could get me you guys can still get a flu shot why i'm not gonna give sean it's almost april this doesn't feel right it's not too late go get your flu shot really quick here there's a guy jinshan is his name he's a magician i think we might have had him on before the sounds of he's gonna be on local tv he was wondering if we if he could come on the radio show i just i'm not sure how magic translates on the radio and i might be wrong in this i felt like we had him come in i tugged on the rope nobody knew it was going on because it's magic don't you have to see the him pulling the coin out of my air.

cdc influenza sean
"influenza" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Which the cdc is now accounting for six and ten flu cases federal health officials say the associated with the beast rain can't be justice appear as influenza a especially for young children and the elderly now data from the cdc shows one hundred and thirtythree children have died from the flu since october so there you go if i think you could still get your flu shot although they found that they didn't have anything that was ultimately very effective against this particular strain at least the last during they didn't maybe they'll do better this time it was not as good as they wanted it to be no water down about the military funding justify it in your head that way.

cdc influenza
"influenza" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on 1A

"Lens but the whole thing about being exposed to the flew in the past from what we've been discussing earlier it sounds like debts bb just lucky on justice part right well first of all let me just point out that when we measure how effective a vaccine is we actually measured you get the vaccine or you don't get the vaccine in and we file you to find out if you get disease or not and clearly the current vaccine's provide some protection even a bad year it may be single digit protection but it surely better than nothing there is also a growing body of data that says in somewhat controversial how much of it does the vaccine reduces the severity of illness particularly in older populations which may be the case one thing i wanted to spell here though there's been discussion on this program about handwashing is god knows handwashing is godly and of itself her mother's taught us that but when you actually look very carefully at influenza transmission very little of it likely occurs from contact with doorknobs or hands and so forth it's really large droplets or or aerosols that occur in his we have more data on that is becoming more apparent so keep washing your hands don't stop there is a lot of other infectious agents for which that is very important but it's likely not a big part of influence of prevention in terms of one of the things that she mentions having had influenza before one of the challenges we now have is that may turn out that in your childhood those very first exposures you had influenza virus may have set the entire course for the rest of your life and how you're going to respond either vaccines or future influenza infections because it turns out that those memory cells are created very early in life in what turns them on returns them offer and a dozen turn them on may actually be only loop affected in a limited way by subsequent vaccines or illnesses so this again is a very complicated area and so if you've got infected by the rights rain at an early age in life you may actually have some amazing protection that goes for a long time for which the vaccine will have only a very limited impact and.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So i think there's a lot of different uses of the word flew on i think of the virus influenza but i know that a lot of people confuse it with you know riskier tori infections as well as cut confections everyone thinks the fluids the flu a cold is cold the really gave the reality is that there's so many different viruses that caused these were spiritual infections so influenza you know there's a few of them and they're just a subset of all the different viruses that's jeff quote epidemiolgist than a researcher at the institute for clinical evaluate sciences and also practices of family physician a trona western hospital in toronto and we are talking about the flu today influenza variety of the flu because a it is flu season and be the flu israeli were talking about influenza definitely causes many deaths every year in the u s it's been estimated so the problem is that there is such a wide range some years agree mild and some years or fear severe um so i think in the average is something in the order of 10 to 20 thousand deaths each year it also causes probably 10 times more hospitalizations causes lots of visits to emergency departments and two physician offices and also causes a lot of people to take time ma from work or school so it's been estimated about somewhere between five and ten percent of the population we'll get infected by influenza each year in terms of when it happens and how it happens can talk about that for a minute why is influenza seasonal flu season flu season and how does that actually work its way through population i think those are very good questions that we don't have all the answers to just yet we do know that you know generally influenza season fall somewhere between november and march generally exactly when it's going to happen is very unpredictable um so some years it starts late january or february a some years starts earlier so as early as types late november or early december and so what the causes it we don't actually no we think that he might be related to whether a.

influenza researcher family physician trona western hospital jeff toronto ten percent
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Yeah but i want to talk about some other types of flu bird flu and swine flu here bet that what's the tail yeah what is the deal with that there are certain types of infections that are called so onomic infections basically meaning that humans can get them from animal spats dr greg moran again there is a cycle of influenza virus and actually it's within the animals that its felt that most of the rearrangement of the genes takes place that helps influenza to change year after year after year so it can keep reinfected people who mentioned the 1918 flew the spanish arthur ain't unable area okay so that was a flu that was particularly bad for many reasons that primarily because that was a swine flu so i talked earlier about how there's this thing called antigen draft rate a human influenza virus undergoes a small mutation and then it infects you again and you don't have immunity to it now something really big and much worse than that can happen called antigene shift so it's a chef like a pivot complete change of directions and this is when a flu virus that infects humans crosses with a fluvirus at infects pigs or birds sergei for the period now too good for the avenue and so now you have this mingling of two different virus species think of it in a way like that and now your immune system this is not like just putting on a little mustache and tricking you this is a completely different very very lent very pathogenic virus so there's a couple ways that this can happen this mixing of the human virus with the pig virus or the bird virus it can either be a direct mixing of those two are in a strains or what can happen is the pig can actually be sort of like the vessel for the mixing of the bird and the human and the reason why that happens is super call it's because pig tr.

bird flu the deal immune system dr greg moran tricking
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Three for to work were to get the flu and then i say i say said at the flu shot now two days later i'm sick smokers the flu shortens because you were already seen before it you know it's interesting is these small little mutations that the viruses go through and they change the surface proteins these are just very small mutations have special name it's called antigen drift so the antigens of the proteins on the outside and drift as if that they're changing a little bit every year so that's what floors a smart i'm gonna change a little bit all the time so these humans in these other things that i might infect won't be able to block me really phosperous their immune system is never seen me before 'cause i have the funny is on mmhmm yeah so i think if they just drifting along little changes at a time but over time just one little changes enough to kind of make it into what your body thinks of as a new virus that it doesn't recognize and what's the reason for your visit posse pie law ties leuchter tourism late and where will you be visiting asked see glad in his brain pretty much snicked underground the grant to okay and what's your country of origin at fries cancer death of the governor the bill could get a guy so what exactly do you die from when you have the flu you're not dying from the flu i don't know maybe you are say people who die from the flu 'cause it actually does kill people it really does but usually people who die from the flu are people who have some sort of illness at baseline so it's elderly it's babies it's people who have lung disease it's people who are immunosuppressed that's usually what happens is very rare that a a young healthy person gets influenza and then dies but there can be other complications of having the flu for example for it you can get what's called a super infection like a bacterial super infection because your body is trying to fight influenza and the bacteria psycho their defense system is down now as much sin they get in there and they cause pneumonia and then on top of having influenza.

immune system lung disease influenza pneumonia two days
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Really bad cold it's like a cold where you think you're gonna die yes that's the flu and it's also a characteristically a very sudden onset where you were just feeling fine going about your normal day and then all of a sudden boom it hits you also i did get a flu shot this year and i also got the flu yes so explain that one great way and that if your hair lean dyerberg did you get like the the bogus shot the one that's really like say when he birdied the jail cbo sharia i did know okc here's how the flu vaccine works every year a group really smart people who study influenza they sit around and they say what are the most likely strains of influenza to get people really sick six months from now because we know that influenza seasonal they could look and see patterns of which viruses are going up and frequency which viruses are going down and frequency that's dr greg moran he's a professor of emergency medicine who's also double boarded in infectious disease at ucla and they use mathematical models than to try to predict what are these statistically most likely strains that are going to be causing the majority of influenza in the coming flu season sydor and a crystal ball oh i can't and this mode and mirrors throw some light predict the future deal acl seasonally pick about enforced strains of influenza and they say these are the ones were putting in the vaccine this year so how come there's no vaccines for colds almost by definition a cold is not gonna hurt you as much as a influenza virus and there are so many cold viruses it's just not worth the time in.

flu vaccine influenza dr greg moran ucla cbo okc six months
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"My name if you want to could you say it's loyola jackson and this hoarseness came along with that too in how old are you ms jackson i'm sixty seven years ago i can totally relate to her because that's basically how i felt a few days ago so if you are somebody who was not at work that week and they're like i was out the flu all all week and it sucks and then they tell you like what what happened what was the flu what will tell me your symptoms it's going to be like the woman said the diarrhea vomiting headaches fevers and chills an aching is sore throat but yeah just thrown up and diarrhea and and just had kind of stuff innis and just feel in the worst you've ever felt yeah so i think that's the the common misconception about what the flu is but why don't we start off by telling you what the flu is not and then we'll tell you what the flu is listed that's a misconception yeah i think feeling click crap well no feeling like kraft true but most people would say like oh nausea vomiting diarrhoea we wouldn't usually associate that with influenza influenza is different that's usually more of a respiratory thing in kids it's more nausea vomiting diarrhoea and sometimes in adults but that's not usually the predominant symptom but the all lloyd said she was throwing up you as ira yeah she was so it can often can help them as of the flu it can happen can happen but a lot of people who just have nausea vomiting and diarrhoea don't have influenza especially adults that's less common lock myself a few weeks ago was in his room vomited and roman endure around victoria and that's not flu.

loyola jackson hoarseness flu diarrhea innis lloyd victoria ira nausea sixty seven years
"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"Are we going to get this thing started we going to do this yep yep we're going to do it now why we're gonna do it because this vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis vis while her and bed look the cough cough i feel terribly i assume are making those kaduna noises to attract my attention brexit flew through flu took can talk about flew why are we talking about the flu gis celtic you might have visit fluids yeah you you had the flu right a couple of days ago well i'm real dedicated to the show thank you and so i signed up to a two get influenza so i can experience it and had to do for everyone when everywhere in licht every doorknob you could find until you got sick i went to work i looked the patients gross sitting i do that there's some rules in on supposed to be doing that but i think there's a lot to talk about with the flu right yeah so many questions that people have what it is what it's not i mean you have me right here right who had influenza few days ago but do you want to hear from a real patient yes okay let's take lesson so tell me about what you've been feeling the last few days i started out billy like i had a sore throat and then as a got on progress in my bones started to eight km me i was like hot and cold hot and cold hot and cold then i had this really bad call i was just call for until i was shelton i was knowledge the actually even think so i was so nauseated a throwing up and then i had to diarrhea too i was just so sick it was different from when i had the coal before how is this different than a typical two goals and uh i took my with it mike medicine episode in at wayo and in time voted it last by the minute you know with nothing like this this was crazy now you've gotten some medications in hey feeling i'm feeling better than i.

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