36 Burst results for "Inflammation"

Fresh update on "inflammation" discussed on Curtis Sliwa

Curtis Sliwa

01:13 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "inflammation" discussed on Curtis Sliwa

"Talk on one of 71 and 77. W A B C U, walking along and all of a sudden the aches and pains they kick in. And your muscles begin to just like, you know, it's stretching. You're stretching me. So what can I do? I got this long holiday season to get through whether you decide to shelter in or meet and greet family and friends. You don't have Ah, chance to do any kind of third piece out there will do what I learned to do. In the last month, I took a three week quick start program from relief factor. You can learn more about it by going online to relief factor dot com. And it's a syriza of supplements. They're all drug free that is spent helping tens of thousands of people with their back neck, shoulder, hip or knee pain. And that general muscle pain. Sometimes it's like your muscle memory that show to remind you. Oh, my God has stepped into this, David. I stepped into this hole. And now all of a sudden you got pains and strange And look, I'm sort of like the human Pignon and when it comes to pains I'm telling you this works, and I had a conversation with Pete and Seth Talbot, who? The father and son owners of relief actor, and they ask doctors originally to research information, and they would so hopelessly right. And those doctors then selected for the best ingredients that eat help of Bonnie deal with inflammation, which definitely triggers off the pains and strange that you generally save yourself. I.

Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

05:05 min | 1 d ago

Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

"I got convinced to join a stereo which is the company. I'm working for right now I've been with history for five. Monster is a brand brand new organization. It it's a different type of organization and from my experience. I concluded that this is executive type of organization. We needed to have so the very moment. I learned about historian about what it was all about. I was really adamant to join in and so so it is so. I'm not a managing director for europe middle east africa And a little. Bit for usc at a starring. But can you give us some insight. So what is your day today like. What would take up your time these days. Well my day to day. I'll have to divide my time in between Three things is to manage my wonderful team as any manager. we'd have to do another one. Is we have a community of members. Mum some would call that client who prefer to call members. These are very big organizations all over the world with which we have decided to have a very close trusted relationship and so a certain amount of my time is to engage with this community. Tried to understand what's going on. Try to understand the emerging problem trying to understand what's happening over the arisen as well as the most immediate problem so that's one big spirit of of my time. Another aspect of my time is history is also investing into cybersecurity and overall digital risks organizations. So i spent quite some time to king With emerging organizations indo digital risks cybersecurity field talking with venture capital talking with the leaders talking with regulators trying to understand what is happening what is relevant trying to create an ecosystem if you will of organizations in which we can invest and also trying to understand the need for today tomorrow and the next six months On on the typical customer side. You know strikes me that With your experience you have You have something that i think. A lot of people don't which is A real view of the global situation when it comes to cybersecurity. Your your experience has taken you around the world literally am. I'm curious what insights you can share about. That experience i mean are having been to different parts of the world. Seen the way that different cultures approach cybersecurity. Are there lessons that you've learned there. Are there important take homes you can share all. That's an extremely good point. You make what. I let me just share a little bit i. I'm very hopeful to sit on the board of advisor of elvis. You know the If unique and space defense organization have been sitting on this star community as they call it for for many years and the reason why invited me is because they said i understand cyber for an american company amid a european person i'm belgian guy from heritage and i leave thirty years while nearly thirty years in asia. I've got a very good understanding of what's happening on a worldwide basis when it comes to digital re cybersecurity so you quite spot on what. What i found out is the risk same. I mean i have worked with the If you will the equivalent of the sizzle of the chinese government. When i was working at microsoft and i found out that this gentleman is exactly the same problem as any other seasonal anywhere in the world in any other country or any other enterprises fish with exactly the same problem so the problem we faced with are the same the difference if you will resides in the sophistication. Some organization sub countries are way more sophisticated than others for some. We could speak about bits and bytes issues for others. We're talking about just to learn to walk and not certainly not to learn to run and the thing that is critical to me is the difference of culture also the organization level. I found out. And i have wounds all over my body to prove it because i thought it out the hard way i found out that you cannot take something that works in one culture and plug it into another culture and who backed it will work the same way. It's not true. Cyber inflammation security his as much psychology as it is technology as i usually say behind every cybersecurity incident. You have a human being either because you have an attacker attacking us for whatever reason either because we made a mistake a human mistake into way we tried to To to configure to deploy was security at the organization. And so it's very important to integrate the cultural aspect to make sure that a message is done is propagated the right way. Make sure that that people synchronize in endure is some crystallization iran. Some problems and delete works in. Us's not the way it works in career. That's not the way it works in germany and so on and so on so. My experience told me the problems i usually the same but away. You address them varies. And you've got to be very cognizant on on this cultural aspect to be able to the right wing.

USC Chinese Government Africa Europe Elvis Asia Microsoft Iran Germany United States
Dolly Parton's donation helped fund the Moderna coronavirus Vaccine

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

01:54 min | 6 d ago

Dolly Parton's donation helped fund the Moderna coronavirus Vaccine

"Dolly Parton. Was Was in in an an automobile automobile accident. accident. Mm Mm hmm. hmm. She She was was treated treated at at Vanderbilt Vanderbilt in in Nashville, Nashville, Vanderbilt Vanderbilt University, University, and and she she befriended befriended Doctor Doctor there. there. Who Who happens happens to be now the head of iron the Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology and inflammation, Okay? And she said, Hey, you know, they just became fast friends. Well, recently they had seen each other again and he told her Hey, we're starting to make some real advancements. In the fight against Cove it here in Vanderbilt. So Dolly Parton heard that. And cut a check for a million dollars to the Vanderbilt Institute for infection, immunology and information. And Now we're learning that that $1 million donation. Supported the development of the modern of vaccine. When you look at the credits, when when you see the stance that are coming out on the Madonna vaccine, right? There's about four groups to get credit for the funding of this project, National Institutes of Health, the things of that nature things you expect and then one of those that's getting credit. Is the Dolly Parton Covert 19 Research Fund. Good for Dolly. She cut a check for a million dollars. And it's going to lead toward this modern a vaccine Well, and that's uh, that's truly amazing. I love that. I mean, she's a very philanthropic person. She's giving away over 110 million books by the way through her imagination library. Things like that. She's just always, she said, because I believe that God didn't mean for me to have kids, so everybody else's kids could be mine. That line. Well, there you go. Um and so still at it, though, Dolly Parton gave him money Speaking of money and

Dolly Parton Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Universi Vanderbilt Institute For Infec Nashville Vanderbilt Institute For Infec Inflammation Vanderbilt Cove Madonna National Institutes Of Health Dolly
Derm-Approved Ways to Treat Dark Circles, Undereye Bags & More with #TikTokDoc Dr. Mamina Turegano

Breaking Beauty Podcast

06:05 min | 6 d ago

Derm-Approved Ways to Treat Dark Circles, Undereye Bags & More with #TikTokDoc Dr. Mamina Turegano

"We really want to start with some of the basics and one of the questions we had was. Can you explain what is different between the skin around. Her is verse. Says the rest of our face if anything because i think that could get a bit confusing for people so the skin around the eyes is definitely thinner and hence more delicate and so we because it's thinner we can see signs of aging faster on the skin around the eyes and also because it's thinner we can see vascular were easily so if the solar worn gorged or if you're swollen that's just very much more pronounced through the i. The eyelid skin and eyelids. There's upper eyelids. And there's lower eyelids to so any kind of small. Insult to the body can manifest more readily around the eyes. And so would you say because this is a bit of a hot debate i feel. Do you really need eye creams or misuse moisturizer. All the way up. Because i've definitely talked some germs who've said no i'm curious your take yes i can definitely see both sides of it. I think that not everyone needs an eye cream if you do not suffer from dark circles if you're just looking just to use a cream for anti aging purposes and just keeping overall skin health intact you don't have to use an ice cream. The only issue is that because the skin is more delicate i. I don't think that you should just use the same exact thing that you use on your face around your eyes. If you're gonna use any kind of actives whether it's an antioxidant or i do recommend diluting it with a moisturizer or disappointed rising serum so that the irritation risk less for sure. I definitely see more. I see more issues with irritation around the is honestly. I think the majority of our questions was about dark circle. So maybe you could tell us you know. Is it really about not getting enough sleep or is that just an urban myth like what are the main causal factors whether genetics or ethnicity. Or what the yes. There's a lot of factors that are at play when it comes to dark circles and dark circles. Are there for a couple of reasons one. There could literally just being darkening the actual skin which can be due to multiple things. It could be due to having allergies and irradiation around in rubbing your i. It could be due to having skin issues like eggs. Emma and then that could lead to post inflammatory hyper pigmentation you get darkening from any inflammation. That was there of course. Lack of sleep like asleep affects the circulation around the eyes and the circulation the vascular becomes more pronounced. And that's where you get the dark circles and also if you're if you're not sleeping while isn't adequate as well incorporated into the skin and so you could see more of a hollowing around the eyes and that shadow effect can also be too dark circles. I think that certain food sensitivities. That's a little bit harder to tease out. Because everyone reacts differently the different foods but food sensitivities can lead to lead to inflammation which can lead to kind of it can affect the blood flow around the eyes and that can lead to dark circles and then of course as genetic predisposition darker skin tone. You're just more likely to get hyper pigmentation. And then and then genetically to some people just have less volume around. There is some people will just get more of a hollow around there is and then get at were essentially to shadow effect. Now just tell you that as you're telling us like giving us this concrete information your expertise which i love hearing about. I'm like picturing you doing the running man right now from your tiktok video. Yeah i ran l. At gosh i love it. It does that mean like. Can you give us before we get into ice creams and stuff like that. Like what would be some lifestyle tips that you can do without spending a dime sleeping easier said than done but getting adequate amount of sleep and i think that's different for different people. I mean people say eight hours. I do with six hours but anyways everyone's different so so doing that. And then if you have allergies. I mean just taking. It means daily. You know over the counter over the counter antihistamines. The non-drowsy kind. And then you don't have to change up your skin care routine if you're if you're using a moisturizer in sunscreen make sure that you're using it around your eyes to getting back to life style. Hydration super important water and interestingly things like our vices alcohol caffeine. Those things can be very dehydrating so being mindful of those to pay. So we're going to talk about ice cream that can help with dark circles so often hear about vitamin c. You hear about caffeine. But i really wanna know what are the cold hard facts when it comes to those ingredients that are proven around the eye area. Because it's like you just. There's there's so many choices out there and so we just wanna give me some tools to help them shop like when they are spending and investing in these types of products. What really works around those round. The i for dark circles treating pigmentation. It's the same thing that applies to the rest of the skin. So of course oxidants whether it's vitamin c can certainly be helpful. And then you know if if you're dealing with more severe hyper pigmentation. There's lot of like anti hyper pigmentation ingredients. So i mean milder ones are like nice cinnamon which is also an antioxidant but there are things like kojic acid hydra known these things. Lighten the skin and we know that it works also a retinoid. A retinoid is helpful because well first of all it increase skill turnovers. So you're getting rid of any old skin that could be hyper pigmented. But retinoids also causes skin allow the skin to become thicker and with thicker skin. There is less visibility like there's less translucent plays a huge part in like seeing the dark circles around the eyes and then the other ingredient that can help just kind of help with skin are peptides

Inflammation Emma
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients twice as likely to die than those with flu, UW study finds

News, Traffic and Weather

00:58 sec | Last week

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients twice as likely to die than those with flu, UW study finds

"With severe cases of flu, according to a New University of Washington study. Almost Ryan Harris has more study of patients that you w hospitals not only showed that 40% of those with covert died compared with 19% of flu patients, but that the covert patients spent longer on ventilators and were more likely to develop potentially deadly lung inflammation. Researcher Dr POV in betrothed You acknowledges the study was done very early in the pen. Mimic, and that since then, patient outcomes have greatly improved. But he says they're nervous about how many flu patients they'll get, even though it's early, and they haven't had many case scenario. If we're seeing more cases of influenza and cove in 19 cases arising, this would be something that we really have to plan ahead of time of figure out what re sources are available toe adequately care for these patients and provide space for everyone. Dr. Betrothed you says. It's another reason to protect yourself and your family by getting a flu shot. Ryan Harris come Oh news. Thanksgiving's a huge worry for health

FLU Ryan Harris Dr Pov University Of Washington Inflammation Dr. Betrothed
Healthy Eating vs. Pseudo Healthy Eating with Shawndi Borup

Break The Rules

06:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Healthy Eating vs. Pseudo Healthy Eating with Shawndi Borup

"Well, I'm hello and welcome to another edition of the brake cables are cast going to plug wiring noise and the outfit and Fitness World and today off and super honor and have Sean D Bora in the house of show me all the living. So if you can't guess what she's all about it is all about healthy living and Tony is a healthy living wage. It's certified fermentationist a woman after my own heart there and a real food chef who is all about just being living proof that implementing a simple healthy. Lifestyle and healthy habits really promotes Optimal Health and well-being and just really making that easy and accessible to many folks who make to even just overwhelmed about getting back to the kitchen. And so don't you think so much for coming onto the show today? If you could give us a little bit of background about who you are and what sort you into doing the work they're doing in the world thinks long and it's a pleasure to be here such an honor to be part of your podcast and I I love you know, what you do what what this podcast is all about about breaking the rules and we'll get in touch with that and and how that applies to what what I can help your audience to really Implement especially in this time, but my back story, you know, it starts about three decades ago, and it was in the I was I had three young children and they all had their own little chronic issues, but my oldest daughter was she was the most ill with severe asthma and and so I thought Sitting in the rocking chair giving her another breathing treatment in the middle of the night and it just the thought came to me. There has to be a better way and thought just kept cycling through my mind, even though I was doing everything that I possibly knew how to do what to do. And so I was determined that night to find a better way. And so I ended up going to Rome a holistic practitioner and he gave me one sheet of paper and on that one sheet of paper was a list of you know, a list of foods that really nourish and feed the body and I I took that home and I you know, I'm a really competitive person and I decided okay, I'm going to I'm going to do this for one year and I'm going to prove that that food couldn't possibly make that much of a difference in the life in the health of my family and not as dealing with my own chronic issues at the time. I had chronic tendonitis and it was really hard to put shoes and socks on my children and I couldn't go bowling birth. You know do cartwheels in the yard with them or anything either because I was in so much pain and I kind of ignored it. You know, I was just in my late twenties at the time and I thought oh this just you know was is not really happening and I remember going to the doctor for my wrists and he handed me a prescription and he said, oh, he said you just got tendonitis and I said great. How long do I have to take this, you know as an anti-inflammatory em said for the rest of your life and that of course didn't sit well with me and I just had a I had a couple of those experiences my daughter would seem to get worse with her asthma and allergies when I gave her cow's milk. And so I asked the pediatrician do you think it would help if I took her off of this and she said it won't make any difference at all. And you know, that's again one of my mother raised tuition that gut feeling said into me like, okay, you need to try this anyways, and so that's what I did is I just started, you know, I took the information from this holistic practitioner that really phone On the whole body and under you know, not just symptoms but really building building a strong immune system really was all what this was all about. And I remember sitting on my couch dog doing my weekly menu. I had my dry erase board on my lap and I looked at the one sheet of paper and everything that he suggested eating and then on the other side of the couch. I had all my recipes the things that I knew how to do home and nothing match up and I and he was a proponent of eating a lot of raw food at least half of your plate because it's the enzymes in raw food that help digest your food and you know Concepts that we're totally foreign to me a hundred and eighty degrees away from the standard American diet, which I had grown up on and and new and so I just started getting back in the office and that's where I started and I started, you know, eliminating refined sugar refined flour, which of course as we you know, it's more talked about today drives blood sugar in the body. Which dog Ives Cravings which drives inflammation which drives chronic illness and so I just started, you know doing one thing at a time and one thing I learned about helping people get back in the kitchen is that if you try to do everything at once you're just going to get overwhelmed and that's when we feel stuck and we stop and so I really emphasize with people that you know, we know that we should be eating, you know, more vegetables. We know that we should be eating less sugar. But how do we make that happen? You know, how do we apply that in in our eating today? So that's where I show me healthy living came about because I wanted to help people to really practice how to feel their best. So that's amazing. I think experience is always off teacher and the mother of all Innovation. And so how long have you been at this and how long did it even take you to kind of get into that seat of showing people healthy eating from like learning wage? Healthy eating right? So I've been teaching people for gosh. I would say fifteen years now probably half of long, you know half of the amount of time that I've been doing it, but you know, I I started this journey, like I said about three decades ago and you know, I I told you that I was going to do that experiment for one year and proved it wrong that food couldn't make sure we make that difference but actually after a year my children's, you know, chronic health issues had completely gone away and there it was so amazing to watch

Sean D Bora Asthma Tony Tendonitis Rome Bowling Inflammation
Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

06:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

"Well, hey everybody, welcome back to the dr. Jockers functional nutrition podcast and you guys know that one of my favorite topics to talk about is blood sugar insulin and metabolic health and we had a great interview recently with Dodge van Dyckman. We went in depth on that and this is almost like a follow-up to it because we're going to talk about really the personalized approach to really looking at your blood sugar and how it's responding to the foods that you're consuming and so my guess is dr. Casey means she is the chief medical officer at levels and she is a Stanford trained physician again, chief medical officer and co-founder of the metabolic whole company levels, and she's the associate editor of the international Journal of disease reversal and prevention and he can find more information about her at levels health.com and we're going to talk about what the best food. Are for blood sugar management for metabolic health and how that could be variable depending on how your body is responding to the foods that you consume. We're talking about personalized medicine. So dr. Casey that joining us here. Thank you so much for having me. Dr. Jockers. So happy to be here. Well, yes for sure and I've heard of several of your interviews on other podcasts and you really do a great job of explaining how important blood sugar stability is and you know, this this new technology that we have now continuous blood glucose monitoring. And so what I love to do is start with your story and you know how you went from Stamford and trained in in medicine to now kind of branching out into a functional nutrition Integrative Medicine approach. Yeah. Absolutely. So like you mentioned I trained as a medical doctor conventional medicine. I trained at Stamford did my undergrad and Med medical school there and then I went on to become a head and neck surgeon. So I was deep in the surgical birth. Hold for about five years and in my role as a head and neck surgeon, which is really treating the conditions of the like your nose and throat. So an ENT surgeon something I noticed was sort of hitting me back, you know after about five years, like wow pretty much all of the conditions that I'm treating are inflammatory in nature. They're all related in some way to chronic inflammation. So some of the things you think about are like sinus infection, which is inflammation of the sinuses and chronic ear disease, which is inflammation of the eustachian tube the tube that connects the nose to the ear you get, you know inflammation in that tube and you get past building up in the ear, you've got Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is inflammation of the thyroid you've got things like vocal cord granulomas which are inflammatory masses of the vocal chords and then lots of head and neck cancer, of course, which we know cancer has very much relationship between inflammation. So it was really interesting to me sort of step back and say wow. This is sort of a very common theme between a lot of the conditions that I'm treating and in some way it didn't make total sense wage. That we would be treating those conditions with surgery because chronic inflammation is fundamentally a issue with how our immune system is responding to perceived or real threats in in the environment in our bodies and thoughts were more were learning about how chronic inflammation is in many ways really rooted in our everyday exposures. So what we eat the toxins were exposed to in our food air and water, you know, how much sleep we get the stress in our lives how much or how little exercise were getting our microbiome all of these things have a direct relationship to chronic inflammation. So I'm treating it with this sort of very reactionary invasive more anatomic approach with surgery, you know, there was some sort of missing missing link there and certainly surgeries are really important in beautiful art but phone no other conditions really rooted in chronic inflammation. It kind of got me thinking there might be a better way to approach us. What could we be doing what sort of really personalized dietary and lifestyle interventions really foundational help to really quell bath. Chronic immune response. Well that threat the body is sensing and potentially keep Patients Out of the operating room. You're not going to prevent all surgeries, but I certainly think there's some low-hanging fruit we can do to help minimize the severity of the disease is and hopefully never have to get have them get that really end of the line where they see me in the or going under the knife, which is a really serious serious thing. So that really got me on this journey of trying to understand the root cause of disease and that led me to functional medicine and so I actually stepped away from the operating room got training with Institute for functional medicine and really started thinking of disease a lot differently. I started seeing things much more as symptoms and diseases often being the branches on a very similar true and that tree that we that that sort of route that that connects a lot of seemingly disparate diseases often comes down to things like inflammation and even deeper Inflammation metabolic dysfunction this was talked about so beautifully on your episode recently with dr. Bed big man who is talking about metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, but was so interesting is that you know in our country. It's it's not that about 88% of Americans have met have signs of metabolic dysfunction that was shown in a study a couple of years ago from UNC that 88% of adult Americans have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, which are kind of two sides of the same coin really can directly feed into inflammation. So it's all really created and what's sort of hopeful about this is that those are things that are readily modifiable with smart choices in and how we live and what we expose ourselves to so became really interested in that and and really this system the network biology movement, which is really stepping back and saying, you know, we've we've conventionally looked at diseases in in conventional medicine. As isolated silos, you've got depression. You've got obesity. You've got diabetes. You've got prostate cancer. You've got IBS and these are all things that are different and we treat them separately with totally different with medications a totally different mechanisms. But when you step back and you use sort of more advanced research techniques, like whole genome sequencing and proteomics, how can we actually see? What are the molecular links between diseases and you create a web a network a system and that's really the root of systems and network biology. And when you start doing that you see these connections and I think the future of Iraq and its really treating conditions at that level at the connections between diseases cuz when you do that you can you know, hit a lot more birds with one stone that's sort of a negative metaphor, but you know what, I mean, it's it's it's got instead of playing whack-a-mole. You're really you can have multiple various effects with with some single interventions effect that root cause physiology. So my career really moved

Inflammation Dodge Van Dyckman International Journal Dr. Jockers Stamford Casey Chronic Ear Disease Neck Cancer Stanford Hashimoto Inflammation Metabolic Dysfunc Metabolic Dysfunction Cancer UNC Prostate Cancer Obesity Depression Diabetes
Is Sugar Bad For You?

Living Healthy Podcast

09:47 min | Last month

Is Sugar Bad For You?

"Without further ado, I'm going to bring in our guest today. She is our registered Dietitian joining us on the show again is Debbie James how're you doing debbie I am grand. Thank you very much. All right. Good. Thanks for joining us on the phone here. So I guess right off the bat will jump into it. The big one that people ask is sugar bad for you. Is it bad? Loaded question. I like to give you the loaded one's. GonNa break it down. I'm going to say sugar naturally present in foods is usually fine but the over consumption of added sugar that linked to cardiovascular disease and obesity and cholesterol of not to mention inflammation oxidative stress. So those types of conditions are what added sugar is related to as far as the research goes Particularly, you know pretty vascular disease and it's really oftentimes the higher percentage of calories from added sugar. It's not just that you had them at how much that you had or that the sweet and beverages like seven servings or more per week. That are linked with the mortality from cardiovascular disease. So it matters when we're talking about what kind of sugar and how much right. So you could say excess sugar is bad for you. Can you say that we're yeah, you can say that but natural sugar. So I don't think that there are too many people that have just had an overabundance of raw fruit. that. Were hard pressed because you're getting the antioxidants and you're getting fiber and you're you get all those other things that are beneficial right? Right. The kind of bounce it out and it's probably hard to eat so much food that you would like just way go in excess of your sugar needs. It is so low in calories. Oh my gosh. I went to get like a smoothie. One of the you know maybe places in it a sixteen ounce smoothie had three hundred, sixty calories mike well, definitely not going to be sitting down eating eight apple. You know if I were to just turn to some raw fruit and sit down and chew, it's Never I. It's just not gonna add up that. Much right. Right. So are there are there are there different types of sugars though I there's like the wall stuff you get out of fruits and vegetables but is there you know like what's the additive the different ones? Are there different types early, those are those are like big picture group, their sugars I'm going to narrow it down and get a little. So chemically speaking sugar is either just one like ring of carbohydrate called a Amano ride or sugar also refers to some are two of linked together called a Diet Thac. Hope I hope our listeners at home or taking notes. Okay. We're be a quiz at the end for sure. It only makes little difference because let's say that that glucose blood sugar okay. Brick brick toast is fruit. Sugar. But sucrose table sugar the white crystalline stuff on your table it made of Glucose and fructose. The competent. Okay. That's one of the double sugars right So the reason that makes a difference. Is that the single sugars? They get a short they just they don't need to be broken down or anything. Whereas if you eat a longer sugar, we still call him simple sugar in the Diet but if you need a longer sugar or if you eat a complex carbohydrate like dark from rice or pasta corn potatoes. Your system needs to take time to break that down into its individual tiniest a small little piece to get gored and guess what? That's a sugar interesting. Okay. So because you got because it all right interesting. It's almost like how you just broke down sugar. It took a little longer. But it wasn't as simple to digest as but it was but it did make sense in the end. Okay. That's interesting. So like the if it's the combination, it almost like your body has to pull that apart and then digested. So it's like all right we gotta we gotta take this bar before we can use it. If. It's already we're calling it a sugar whether it's from honey or maple syrup or whatever it like a fraction leg. It is so so so fat birth is you had a bowl of cereal and you're gonNA break down that brand flake that takes a lot longer. Right, okay. It turns it turns to blood sugar even if there's no sugar in it. I don't know if that. Hydrate confused. That's true though you can look at your label of I have some Rice Pilau and it says zero grams of sugar. But I know that it will raise my blood sugar. Two cups of it. You know. Because your body breaks it down digestion. You've got them in time, and then like I said, you clean it down to its very smallest. Piece Particle and Adore Bet and that you're. Going Okay So are there with when it comes to sugars? Are there actually could you deem some sugars healthy for you? Or is it just? are between the different sugars are some more healthy for you than others Okay well, we mentioned natural sugar I think I should Kinda sorta define what what added sugar is. Okay. So if you think of added sugar as something as an ingredient that that's in food in the processing and preparation or added to the food at the table that's really meant as as a sweetener sweetener. Okay. The things that things on the label you might see they could be dextrose could be brown sugar it could be powdered sugar, corn syrup it could be invert sugar lactose, all these names. that. Are within the food those are added but let's say you're looking at fruited yogurt and you feed that there's milk and there's strawberries and boo, there are going to be some grams of sugar. Those are the natural one from the milk and the strawberry, but there may also be some of these other dextrose and. added. In addition to really didn't. Make it a more pleasurable eating experience or drinking experience off to make it. Yeah. To make you crave it. Provides structure and baked good. They, they actually have a a role to play and architecture if you will. I was just thinking been. Yes. I was GONNA use that word. That's funny. Yeah. That's interesting So going. So that's the definition but going back to your question are some like better for you than others are considered healthy. So if you think of natural sugars, they're better for you consumed in their original food source but just bruder milk because of the other nutrition you get with them like I mentioned, fiber calcium, protein, vitamin, C, or D. And you could even say, okay well, what about more purified natural sources like honey or maple syrup are Garvey there's still condiments but. let's say honey it's known to have antimicrobial antioxidant properties and it's a natural cough remedy though if I was going to put them sweetener mit then. I might preference choose honey. Okay. So that's okay that kind of I think touches on like whether. Natural, Rossouw, better for you. But how how much sugar are we talking about that? You should have on a daily basis? What how much should be in your daily Diet? In. General. Okay their recommendation, Perm, lots of different. You know organizations so and and it's because we have found that American adults and children. We consume more than fifty percent of our calories from added sugars and mostly it's from sweetened beverages followed by credited desserts and baked good categories so. I thought. That percents champion many. Oh I it's taking the place of nutrition food right. Did you. Did you say fifteen percent or fifty percent. Keen fifteen. Okay. The first time I heard fifty and I was just like what? Okay fifteen still high feel high. Yeah Okay I'm glad we clarify that. Okay. Continue to help the another would be extraordinary. So the Institute of Medicine, they recommend that added sugar take up less than twenty five percent or a quarter of your total calorie rich like you know it's up there the American Heart Association recommends limiting your added sugar. They offer it a different way. They do it less than a hundred calories per day for women. So that's about sixty spoon or a hundred and fifty calories a day for men, which is about ninety burns. Yet the World Health Organization they recently issued new guidelines stating that only five percent of a person to total daily calories should come from sugar

Debbie James Obesity Registered Dietitian Rice Pilau Institute Of Medicine World Health Organization American Heart Association Cough Garvey
Is Sugar Bad For You?

Living Healthy Podcast

05:22 min | Last month

Is Sugar Bad For You?

"Guys and welcome back to another episode of the Living Healthy podcast presented by la fist. I'm your host Ngoga Bell and I am alone again today because we were recording couple episodes back to back and so Brittany can't join us on the phone at the moment just GonNa be me but we are going to be talking today about sugar. That's right. Sugar is it good for you is bad for You, how much should you have hopefully all the questions you have about sugar when the myths maybe you've heard about sugar are going to be settled here today. So without further ado, I'm going to bring in our guest today. She is our registered Dietitian joining us on the show again is Debbie James how're you doing debbie I am grand. Thank you very much. All right. Good. Thanks for joining us on the phone here. So I guess right off the bat will jump into it. The big one that people ask is sugar bad for you. Is it bad? Loaded question. I like to give you the loaded one's. GonNa break it down. I'm going to say sugar naturally present in foods is usually fine but the over consumption of added sugar that linked to cardiovascular disease and obesity and cholesterol of not to mention inflammation oxidative stress. So those types of conditions are what added sugar is related to as far as the research goes Particularly, you know pretty vascular disease and it's really oftentimes the higher percentage of calories from added sugar. It's not just that you had them at how much that you had or that the sweet and beverages like seven servings or more per week. That are linked with the mortality from cardiovascular disease. So it matters when we're talking about what kind of sugar and how much right. So you could say excess sugar is bad for you. Can you say that we're yeah, you can say that but natural sugar. So I don't think that there are too many people that have just had an overabundance of raw fruit. that. Were hard pressed because you're getting the antioxidants and you're getting fiber and you're you get all those other things that are beneficial right? Right. The kind of bounce it out and it's probably hard to eat so much food that you would like just way go in excess of your sugar needs. It is so low in calories. Oh my gosh. I went to get like a smoothie. One of the you know maybe places in it a sixteen ounce smoothie had three hundred, sixty calories mike well, definitely not going to be sitting down eating eight apple. You know if I were to just turn to some raw fruit and sit down and chew, it's Never I. It's just not gonna add up that. Much right. Right. So are there are there are there different types of sugars though I there's like the wall stuff you get out of fruits and vegetables but is there you know like what's the additive the different ones? Are there different types early, those are those are like big picture group, their sugars I'm going to narrow it down and get a little. So chemically speaking sugar is either just one like ring of carbohydrate called a Amano ride or sugar also refers to some are two of linked together called a Diet Thac. Hope I hope our listeners at home or taking notes. Okay. We're be a quiz at the end for sure. It only makes little difference because let's say that that glucose blood sugar okay. Brick brick toast is fruit. Sugar. But sucrose table sugar the white crystalline stuff on your table it made of Glucose and fructose. The competent. Okay. That's one of the double sugars right So the reason that makes a difference. Is that the single sugars? They get a short they just they don't need to be broken down or anything. Whereas if you eat a longer sugar, we still call him simple sugar in the Diet but if you need a longer sugar or if you eat a complex carbohydrate like dark from rice or pasta corn potatoes. Your system needs to take time to break that down into its individual tiniest a small little piece to get gored and guess what? That's a sugar interesting. Okay. So because you got because it all right interesting. It's almost like how you just broke down sugar. It took a little longer. But it wasn't as simple to digest as but it was but it did make sense in the end. Okay. That's interesting. So like the if it's the combination, it almost like your body has to pull that apart and then digested. So it's like all right we gotta we gotta take this bar before we can use it. If. It's already we're calling it a sugar whether it's from honey or maple syrup or whatever it like a fraction leg. It is so so so fat birth is you had a bowl of cereal and you're gonNA break down that brand flake that takes a lot longer.

Registered Dietitian Debbie James Ngoga Bell Brittany Obesity
AstraZeneca, J&J resuming US tests of COVID-19 vaccines

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:40 sec | Last month

AstraZeneca, J&J resuming US tests of COVID-19 vaccines

"Vaccine trials are resuming by two drugmakers after they had the hall testing of their vaccine candidates. Fox's Jill NATO. Had To stop its trial of a vaccine in early September. After a study volunteer developed a rare health issue and inflammation of the spinal cord Johnson and Johnson halted tests on its potential vaccine. Last week when a volunteer developed a problem, the company didn't specify what the trouble was but they said they found no evidence that the vaccine candidate caused the event both drugmaker said, Friday they got the go-ahead from the Food and Drug Administration to restart testing those vaccine candidates chill NATO Fox.

Jill Nato Johnson Food And Drug Administration Nato FOX
AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson to resume COVID-19 vaccine trials

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last month

AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson to resume COVID-19 vaccine trials

"Tests on the vaccine were stopped worldwide early last month. Study volunteer in Britain became ill. AstraZeneca says studies have resumed in other countries and the Food and Drug Administration is now giving the go ahead. This is one of several Corona virus vaccine candidates and final stage testing. It's common to temporarily stop testing. Researchers want to know whether an illness is a side effect or a coincidence. In this case, the volunteer developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. I made

Food And Drug Administration Astrazeneca Britain
AstraZeneca resuming US testing of COVID-19 vaccine

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

AstraZeneca resuming US testing of COVID-19 vaccine

"AstraZeneca says federal regulators are letting it resumed testing of its coronavirus vaccine candidates tests on the vaccine were stopped worldwide early last month study volunteer in Britain became ill AstraZeneca says studies have resumed in other countries and the food and drug administration is now giving the go ahead this is one of several coronavirus vaccine candidates in final stage testing it's common to temporarily stop testing researchers want to know whether an illness it's a side effect or a coincidence in this case the volunteer develop severe neurological symptoms consistent with the rare inflammation of the spinal cord I'm a Donahue

Astrazeneca Britain Donahue
Guidelines for the Leader and Commander

Jocko Podcast

06:21 min | Last month

Guidelines for the Leader and Commander

"Is Jaakko podcast number two, fifty two. With Dave Burke and me Jaakko willink good evening. Dave. Good Evening Echo Charles is taking care of some other business. On the last podcast. Number two, fifty, one with Leif and we started getting into the book guidelines for the leader and Commander by General Bruce Clark but we only made it thirteen pages in two and a half hours, and it's one hundred, seventeen page book. To, recap a little bit, this is a book that I searched for for over a decade I originally heard about this book in my favorite book, which is called about face by colonel. David Hackworth. Finally, found a copy a month and a half ago. and. So here we are just a little background once again on General Bruce. Kark. World War One. World War Two Korea enlisted in one thousand, nine hundred and up going to west point colonel in World War Two. Then a general commanded the Fourth Armored Division in Patents Third Army. Battle the Bulge Distinguished Service Cross three silver stars forty five years. Of Service? And then spend a bunch of time not only leading troops but also training troops or overseeing training commands so. Awesome Career Hackworth talked about him glowingly in the book about face and That's where that's where the star took me a long time to find this book. Who did somebody texted me about it. And said, it was the white whale. that. It was definitely hard for me find this book, but we have it and that's it. That's what we're GonNa do where do you go back into this book? So here we go back into guidelines for the leader and commander by Bruce General Bruce C Clarke. This section starts off with administration some thoughts for the commander. And he says inflammation, I would like to point out the close. Interrelationship between training programs. And Sound. Overall management. So this is something you know when you're that young gung-ho leader. That just thinks, hey, where you're operate whatever that operation is whether it's shooting machine guns or whether that's out selling things or making things and you think, Hey, I'm I'm on the front lines I'm going to make things happen and you think all the administrative stuff you shouldn't have to worry about. That's not me. And I know many individuals that are like that I know one individual in particular like that whose name is Jaakko. 'cause I was definitely like that. Many commanders. I should say I. was like that when I was younger because I absolutely I realize this and you can hear. We'll talk about the paperwork drills that we had to do and how. Life. Came to me. We shouldn't have to do this stuff and I said Oh we're going to do it and we do a better than anybody else. So I figured this out but it is it is definitely a learning moment that people have and so why not learn it right now many commanders are defeated by poor administration. Imagine that just that statement many commanders are defeated by poor administration not defeated because they were tactically unsound not defeated because they made bad decisions not defeated because they couldn't come up with a good plan they fail because their administrative losers. Without. Sound Administration at Commander CanNot Succeed in his training and maintenance programs. Good. Administration is nothing more than applied common sense. I'm including here a number of items that may well be considered a checklist of indicators of sound. Administration. Number. One. Importance of time. The principal coordinating device in the army is time. Learn the proper time space factors. So you can be on time and make reasonable demands of your subordinates. So. So that's number one by the way, which is probably why you hear a lot of talk about time management. Just think about the idea that the first thing he's GonNa say is time this is someone who clearly understands that have all the resources in the world that we have. That's the one that matters the most because we just can't produce more of. I was GONNA say it's the it's the one that matters the most and it's the absolute one that we have the least control much control. You have time you zero you cannot stop it. You cannot bring it back. You gotta say the power curve. I hate that fewing. I hate that feeling and let me tell you what. I realized this a while back. So when you go to the airport if you show up at the airport late. In now look TSA doesn't care that you're late the baggage handler doesn't care that you're late the uber driver does not care what time your planes leaving they're they're doing what they're doing, and so what that does is it takes you have no control. Over that time once it started to commence, what do you have control over going to the airport a little bit earlier? That's all. That's all not that big of a deal. Go to the airport a little earlier, and you won't have to worry about TSA. You won't have to worry about baggage you won't have to worry about. How long it takes for the Uber driver or the left let's give proper. Credit or lift driver to show up and bring you to the airport. Not so so how'd you get control? You can't control time once it's unfolding you can't bring it back you have to you have to plan for appropriately. And there's a there's a sense of urgency and I have a pretty good sense of urgency and you you may have may or may not I know like at the monster especially the earlier musters when we weren't. When the backside wasn't quite the well oiled machine that it is now certainly as a well oiled machine now the early musters do. Not a Well oiled machine. So on the on the front side, people would know that when Leith and I were walking out on stage at eight o'clock in the morning, we had two hours sleep because we had to do whatever we had to do behind the scenes and that's just the way it was. I can feel I can feel. When the shortage of time in fact, I think I feel the shortage of time every single day single waking minute.

Commander Jaakko David Hackworth Dave Burke Bruce General Bruce C Clarke General Bruce Bruce Clark Charles Leif Fourth Armored Division TSA Leith Korea Patents Third Army Principal
A Banana a Day Keeps the Heart Disease Away

Diet Science

07:03 min | Last month

A Banana a Day Keeps the Heart Disease Away

"What's the topic for this week this week? We are talking about bananas bananas. Yeah, you know, we always have that old adage of an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but we can actually add a banana into that too and banana a day may keep the heart disease away. Oh heart disease. Okay. Well, I'm listening bananas have a lot of cardiovascular health benefits because of the nutrients that are in them and here again kind of like wage. Talked about on a previous podcast of potatoes being banished right as a a food that is too high in whatever bananas have often been relegated to that category as well because they're always considered to be thinking that they're high in sugar and that sugar content is, you know too much for our you know, our blood sugar levels that but actually a bananas are actually in the office low glycemic category. Hm all different stages of ripeness. So for example, a under ripe banana, which we would basically call like a green banana. It's glycemic index level is a 30 which is really low to be low glycemic. You need to be between 1 and 55. So 30 is considered a very low glycemic if you have a slightly under ripe banana, that's yellow with a little bit of green. The GI is 42. Okay, and then in a ripe banana cake Can all yellow his fifty-one so you're kind of getting close to the 55, but it's still in the low range and then an overripe yellow flecked with brown has a GI of Forty-Eight. So all varieties of banana and no matter what type stage they're all low low glycemic. Hm. So I think that that's a you know, it's a myth that's been perpetuated and of course, you know, we have different sized bananas that you can buy. There's like really big ones during those small ones. So I always try to go with the medium sized banana cuz that's what these GI numbers are from. Well I can see why the internet just kind of grabs onto that. It's got a lot of sugar boy if we only didn't have bananas we would be better people. I don't know what the deal is but they really don't like bananas the internet. Yeah, and you know, we see that in low carb diets and those types of things that bananas are off the list but so here's a nutrient quality of bananas. They're high in vitamin K. 6 about 25% of our daily value comes from a banana and they also have vitamin C fiber 11% of our daily need for fiber is from a banana. And of course, they're very rich in potassium. Oh, that's that a medium sized banana has about four hundred milligrams of potassium. So I'm not good for our emotional health isn't that potassium is good for a number of things but really good for the cardiovascular system potassium is also an electrolyte so long we need it to have fluid balance within our body kind of has an electrolyte is something that has like a little electrical charge within the body. So it it actually takes care of our own nervous system all of the nerve impulses that we have. So potassium's important for that. But in terms of cardiovascular health are actually three different ways that bananas help. So the first one off It has to do with the potassium content because potassium is a mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. And so the inclusion of bananas can help prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis, which is basically atherosclerosis is like when you have inflammation in the arteries and they constrict and oftentimes cholesterol buildup can occur because of that so that's really important a second cardiovascular benefit from bananas involves their content of something called sterols. So bananas are there's no fat food, but one type of fat they do have are small amounts of these compounds called sterols, like saitou sterile campus sterile and stigma sterile and they look structurally similar to cholesterol. So when we say sterile people might not think of cholesterol, but cholesterol is a type of sterile as well. They're they're all similar compounds month. Literally, so these plant sterols because they are structurally similar to cholesterol. They can block the absorption of dietary cholesterol. So if you if you have some cholesterol in your meal, but you also have eaten a banana along with it though sterols and the banana May block the absorption of some of that other cholesterol from your meal off then that helps keep your blood cholesterol levels in check. Wow, so that's and that's another you know, really important aspect of having plant Foods in the diet as a lot of plant Foods off kardos have sterols and them as well and that's like avocados are known to be a cholesterol-lowering food because of their sterile content and then a third type of cardiovascular benefit from banana juice is has to do with their fiber content. I probably talked about this before but bananas are really good source of something called soluble fiber which fiber dissolves in a Fluidity Waters that are you know, from foods that are coming through your digestive tract. So it forms kind of like a gel in a way. I always like to use an example of cuz people can use this visual what happens when you put chia seeds with water. They they absorb the water and they jell up they make like a almost like a gel and so that's happening in your intestine when you have soluble fiber in your diet. So bananas have a lot of soluble fiber and what that does is it attracts cholesterol to it and it also attracts even some of the carbohydrates and sugars from the meal. It tracks them into that gel and then they don't get absorbed into your bloodstream. They stay in the stool and then they are eliminated through the bowel movement rather than actually having them into the bloodstream. So that's how soluble fiber manages our blood sugar and manages our cholesterol levels. So that's you know, some bananas man. They're really good. Yep. Really good, they also so something really interesting with athletic performance that I found information on about the banana. So the name of a unique mix of vitamins minerals and the low glycemic carbohydrates making them a favorite fruit among athletes a study of distance cyclists found that eating the equivalent of about one half of a banana every 15 minutes of a 3-hour race was just as good as keeping energy levels steady as drinking an equivalent amount of a carbohydrate and minerals from a processed

Atherosclerosis Apple Fluidity Waters
Pregnant women should not take ibuprofen after 20 weeks, FDA says it could harm the baby's kidneys

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:32 sec | Last month

Pregnant women should not take ibuprofen after 20 weeks, FDA says it could harm the baby's kidneys

"New warning from the government for pregnant women about commonly used medication, CBS. Lisa Matteo, the U. S Food and Drug Administration is requiring labels for non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs to include a warning that if women take them at 20 weeks or later into their pregnancy there, baby can have fetal kidney issues. It covers a number of prescription and over the counter drugs, including ibuprofen and approx in known by the brand names Advil and, uh, leave. The FDA says they can block the production of a certain chemical in the body that causes inflammation, Least. Matteo CBS News, the

Matteo Cbs News Lisa Matteo U. S Food And Drug Administrat CBS Inflammation Ibuprofen Advil FDA
Remdesivir has ‘little or no effect’ in reducing coronavirus deaths, WHO says

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:00 min | Last month

Remdesivir has ‘little or no effect’ in reducing coronavirus deaths, WHO says

"A study involving 11,000 plus patients funds in any viral drug that was part of President Trump's Corona virus treatment had little or no effect on reducing cove in 19 deaths, or the likelihood that the patient would wind up on a ventilator. The drug Grim death severe made by Gilead Sciences based in Foster City doctor Peter Chen, Hong infectious disease specialist at UC San Francisco, says Rob December is no magic bullet by itself, but I think it is probably going to land in a combinations are to the second station so You use an antiviral for the viral production side and then used steroids for the inflammation side and the sweet spot. It's probably multiple drugs, not just single drugs. The randomized World Health Organization's study, Ah, called Solidarity was conducted in more than 400 hospitals across 30 countries. More than 11,000 patients they use dream disappear and three other drugs individually and in combination and a number of patients were given placebos. So Noma County, rolling out a new

Rob December Gilead Sciences Noma County Peter Chen Donald Trump Foster City San Francisco President Trump World Health Organization
Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:04 min | Last month

Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

"So you grew up in East Germany like. Yes. Wow. How was that? What was that like? Does it seem like a distant memory now? Yeah. Because you know damned forty eight now but definitely you grew up in a in an environment where boggles matter friendship breeding matters inability matters no way that you can rely on on friends and. Thanks, you need a life. So I think it's a good upbringing. That's for sure. What do you think was most formative of childhood that you can kind of say that's why I am who I am today. You know I, think you entire life makes you the person you're obviously also what your parents teach you and what your parents live like and my parents from very much teaching ons too key both feet on the ground and. Always be kind respectful to other people no matter who they are and. That is something which you know. I think up to today by value by doing so. And I grew up like this and I guess out. So when you don't have a when you don't draw in extreme luxury, you know when you grow up just a few things, you become very creative and you resourceful intonations and. Keep. Going for the things you want I think that's also something. which gets less and less this society because the children for today pretty much everything from the board. I think it's a different generation. What is the most quintessentially? German thing about you I used to be always on time I'm pretty much on time still. One point it's very German, and so I think I'm sending for quantity and technology in science i. think that is something very German. I remember that Carly member we went on that navy press trip to Hamburg and it was to the second yeah. Yeah we were like Oh, my God, we gotta get to the lobby like. And then German. The wet lead you to get into medical school and you know decide you wanted to take that path. My mother was a lead doctor and she took me to the hospital. When I was a kid, you know to go on visit patients and stuff. So I got into this Medicare idea very early when it was four years already decided I won't be a doctor himself. And never changed. You know to score studied medicine. And I came Dr Early on i. read that when you were in medical school you you're also a young mum and a single mom at that time, and so that couldn't have been easy. Maybe not a lot of people know that part of your story. So was there a particular mantra at that time and you're juggling so much like what helped? You get through through that time. So I was mother was twenty three and I just had done my first big step in medical school and gratefully at that time as their had my mom to help me a lot with my kids but I, think it's just you know you go step by step I think one of my mantras really to take things. Don't look too much out what's going on in the future because then you definitely get around. So step by step and put a checkmark behind everything in Italic Sawed. So with having tried and going to school and do all these days are just doing them. Moving forward, I think that helps you know not stress about future. Just get it done and you become a manager yourself because you have to keep all the balls in the at the same time I'm really good at this now. and. So you became a medical doctor in the field of orthopedics. How did you meet the late great? Koby Bryant. So so I came into other pigs by chance originally wanted to get into pediatrician because at my chide I couldn't see the kids suffering. So I decided okay. 'cause also studied sports, parents, medicines. I win the peaks to do my doctor studied there and I like all the peaks but I was also interested in aesthetics and I had to wait for to get a place in the clinic I wanted to start working and I had to wait half year in this year I decided to go. clinic and then I loved you know working in science so much. Stayed there and didn't go to Tadic's pedic's than I did later but I stayed there pioneering this treatment, we the proteins from God's and decreed cometary proteins to stop the inflammation and the aging process in the joins and we had so many people coming for treatments from everywhere from the word courts, people and people with joint problems in Australia tried is in you know. So we got to meet a lot of people. Not just you know sports

East Germany Italic Sawed Koby Bryant Tadic Carly Hamburg Australia
Why is it so Hard to Lose Weight?

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:18 min | Last month

Why is it so Hard to Lose Weight?

"It is hard to believe, but this begins our seventeenth year of broadcasting, dishing up nutrition. For seventeen years every Saturday or most Saturdays I guess I should say. We have shared up to date nutritional information. Designed specifically to make a difference in the lives of our listeners and their health. So, each week our message has been about eating real food like that's the term. Now I think that we can kind of put our stamp on his eating real. So, that our listeners our clients can have more energy. Less, than for inflammation, better health and everything in between. So it isn't a message about the latest fad diet. It's about eating a healing plan of real food. This is just kind of an interesting observation and Clint Brittany. Maybe you've noticed this in clinic here in there but I've noticed with some of my clients at it seems that many people seem to like blame or really attribute many of their health problems to their genetics. Yes. I, agree with that Yup. And they haven't quite made that connection yet that food the food that they're eating is the cause of their health problems. So as Dietitians we work one on one with clients, and so we'll hear things like my father had diabetes. So I know sooner or later I will probably have that to or maybe it's my mom had arthritis so I will have it eventually also. one. They heard I think recently in the last week or two My grandmother had Alzheimer's disease. So I really worry that I also get Alzheimer's disease. And it is important to know our family history. What is in our family history? I mean, we even have this in our health questionnaire, an area where people can kind of talk through or list out what's in their family. But, it's also an important an important concept I think to say, the family history does not have to become our destiny. And we can be like, maybe we have some predispositions in the background or tendencies one way or another, but it does not have to be our destiny. So true and I think that what oftentimes people don't think about is you know maybe your dad had something your mom had something. And now you do what? About your lifestyle? No, you probably have a similar lifestyle. You know a lot of our habits come from childhood, and so I think often times it is more lifestyle and your food choices driving. Those conditions than than genetics yup absolutely I'll say that to my clients do it's like you know we probably especially as younger children ate a lot of the same things growing up as our parents did. So how much of an impact did the foods that we were all eating together then have on the development of some of these conditions it's kind of food for thought. That A lot. and so for you listeners out there maybe you've also said to yourself, you know I must come from a family there must be an obesity gene there because my dad was overweight his mom was overweight all of my brothers and sisters are overweight and now I'm starting to gain weight so it just must be baked into our destiny must be in our jeans. Though the question, we are going to address this morning on the show is, why is it so hard for many people to lose weight they're going to go through a couple of things per pretty much two main points that will address throughout this show. And maybe maybe you is a listener of this is something that you've wondered yourself and maybe you've said yourself, well, why can all my friends lose weight just by drinking less wine or less soda or less XYZ while I can't lose weight and I never even drink wine to begin with it's just not fair. Yeah we hear that time Yup. So. So this is these are the kinds of things we want to explore in today's show, and before we dive deeper into our topic, I want to introduce myself and my co host WHO's here in studio with me. My name is Leah Klein showed I'm registered and licensed Dietitian, and here with me this morning is Brittany Vincent who is also a registered and licensed Dietitian. And today, our goal is to share some new information but also some old information about weight loss and our hope is that you will really think about the information we're going to share with you about weight loss and perhaps then be able to take some that information and start. feeling out in applying in your own life where it makes sense for you and applying this to your own body. As we all know, it's one thing to know the information, which is what our show is about a lot of times you want to give that information out and make it as widespread as possible. But then it is a whole other thing to actually apply it and to do it and. Teaching choices are hard especially like you said of these are things that have come from our childhood. These are habits that have been deeply in green, and oftentimes this is the hardest part for people.

Alzheimer's Disease Licensed Dietitian Clint Brittany Leah Klein Brittany Vincent
20 - Children and COVID-19 with Infectious Disease With Expert Dr. Kristin Moffitt

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:04 min | Last month

20 - Children and COVID-19 with Infectious Disease With Expert Dr. Kristin Moffitt

"Of course, I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback. He's a quadruple board certified doctor of internal medicine, Pulmonary Disease Critical Care, and neuro critical care and he's on the front lines of the covert battle out in California, for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing. Thanks remotely tuning in. Hey Bill. Good to see. And a very special guest Dr Kristen Mufid. She's an associate physician in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division at Boston Children's. Hospital. And she's a multiple award winning physician and professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical. School. Christie is also affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital She's certified in general pediatrics and Infectious Diseases by the American board of Pediatrics Doctor Moffett. We'd like to thank you for breaking away in. Joining us today. All right. Thanks for having me. Tell me how is Boston Children's focused change during this virus Boston Children's like every hospital in Boston March and early April were all frenzied months as we were preparing like hospitals I'm sure all around the world for what we were anticipating to be a surge in Cova infected patients. It became fairly clear relatively early in the pandemic with data coming. Out of China that children did not seem to be suffering the same severity from this infection as older individuals in adults did we were not completely sure whether or not that data would hold true as the virus swept across the world. Luckily, that has actually held true but that should not be taken it all to mean that children don't get sick from this some children do get sick. From this some do require hospitalization in some studies up to a third of children who require hospitalization require ICU, level care. So Boston Children's was in a unique position in Boston as you know, Boston has an abundance of hospitals for people to choose from excellent hospitals, all of them, but Boston Children's is the only free standing children's hospital. There are several other children's hospitals in Boston but they all. have their physical spaces, their units, their hospital beds contained within larger hospital systems that treat adults. So a decision was made within the city for Boston Children's to be able you take care of all the after patients in Boston who required hospitalization so that the deatrich beds in those other hospitals that were within adult hospitals could be committed to carrying for adults with cooking seems like a good. Plan well, even you just mentioned that children are substantially less susceptible to this virus than people at risk of the children who do get seriously affected by this virus apparently more than seventy five percent of the fatalities in children related to this virus are those of minorities? Can you explain why that's happening? Yeah. That is very true. The disproportionate effects that this infection has had on black and individuals. That has been seen in adults is playing out very much children as well, and that's true. Both of Acute Kobe infections, and then as you may know, we were all surprised in the pediatric. Rome to start to understand this other entity called MISC or multi system inflammatory syndrome in children that seems to be overwhelming inflammation that occurs in children largely two to four weeks after a covert infection. So both acute colon and MISC are impacting minority populations in pediatrics substantially two ways that the most likely explanation is that children are most likely exposed in their households in in their communities, and those are exactly the households in the communities in which the adults are suffering the most serious consequences in highest incidents of covid nineteen infection. So I think that children really very much are reflective of that. So interesting statistic when you look at it, I know from the adult side, we certainly see in that population, there's a lot of multifamily housing multiple families living under one roof and that sort of social crowding a seems to have an impact but also of those people who are not financially immune. So to speak from the virus in that, they must go to work every day to feed their family. You can't be you know a day laborer and do. It via zoom, you actually need to show up in in any time. There is that expectation. There's not going to be a lot of social distancing at the workplace in. So we think that lower socioeconomic in general would be forced to continue their work in their jobs. In spite of the fact that the risks remain the same and the statistic is not percentages of people who get the virus it is a death toll of people who have the virus. So, is it biological that affects them differently or lifestyle or food or? Those are all definitely hypotheses that still frankly require investigation and I think that there may even be a multifactorial. For it. That is along the lines of what Stephen was mentioning is a difference in access to healthcare for these affected populations as well. It certainly is possible that there may be a biological explanation, our hospital in coalition with. The other hospitals are studying the genetics of children who are impacted by either severe ovid infection or by MISC but there isn't anything clearly being born out yet in terms of solid genetic reasons that make me immune response to these affected populations different. Necessarily, there's still some work to be done there. But as you suggested to bill the underlying potential complicating factors that might be called co morbidity in some are also higher in these populations and make them at higher risk in more susceptible to more severe sequentially of this infection.

Boston Children Boston Pulmonary Disease Critical Car Dr Steven Tailback Professor Of Pediatrics Brigham And Women's Hospital Bill Dr Kristen Mufid Pediatric Infectious Disease D China California Associate Physician Stephen Steve Doctor Moffett ICU Christie Harvard Medical Cova Rome
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

05:52 min | 10 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Has no other effects other than completely wiping out. One of the two primary pro inflammatory. Cytokines it just it kills inflammation which is why these drugs are so good for Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis psoriasis and stuff like that. We took sixty depress people. We gave half of them three infusions of this inflict some APP to block their inflammatory. We gave the other half three infusions of saltwater and nobody knew who is getting what and then we follow them for twelve weeks and and and you know the results were quite striking. The saltwater worked a little better than the anti inflammatory agent. It wasn't significant but to saw what had a very powerful antidepressant effect. You talk about the power placebo. 'cause he's where people that have failed other antidepressants but we saw something really interesting. This is important point the placebo and the anti inflammatory cytokine blocker the if you look at the the the two groups their effect on depression was almost identical. But it wasn't because they were the same they were actually opposite in so before we gave people the first shot we measured inflammation and we found that if you were depressed and had high inflammation the Inflicts Map. The Sadikin antagonist worked significantly better than placebo. But if you were just as depressed and had lower inflammation. This was two thirds of the study population. You did so much better with SALT WATER THAN INFLICTS. Some add that the only conclusion we can draw is that you know if you're really depressed. Inflammation is not elevated blocking it. Furthers doing some bad for you. It it it it. It's it's at the very least make you not able to respond to placebo. So it's it's interfering with your ability to hope and trust and whatever placebo response is and there've been a number of studies several studies after this that that sort of shown. Same thing one. In particular from Mark Rappaport is chaired at emory. He did the but will forever be probably the world's largest study of omega three fatty acids of just as a single treatment for depression no antidepressants just placebo or Omega. Three fatty acids and the fatty acids didn't work for squad. They they don't they. Don't have General Antidepressant Effects Buddy. Bet He took a page from our lesson book and looked at their inflammation levels before they started the Omega threes. He saw exactly the same thing that if you are depressed. Elevated inflammation the Omega threes worked better than Placebo. But if you're just depressed and had lower inflammation you placebo. You don't want to be taken Omega. Three fatty acids. So you know if those are true results you know Mega. Three fatty acids may help your heart. But if you're really depressed and you're one of the least half. Maybe two thirds of people that do not have elevated inflammation taken omega three fatty acids probably not doing yourself any favors. So no we may. I do not suggest that people routinely try anti-inflammatories for depression. At this point caveat. There is a good study found any Jonathan Savage at glory brains to relooked at low dose aspirin versus something called minocycline which is an antibiotic which is anti-inflammatory versus Placebo. The minocycline only worked in people with elevated inflammation. Just what you'd predict but the aspirin worked in everybody and it's not because it's an anti inflammatory at that low dose. It's doing something else. We don't know what you know so there's a little bit of evidence if you're going to do something you know off the grid that taking low dose aspirin may have some antidepressant benefit so that of course the next question. Everybody asks us. Well okay. We'll shoot you know. Should I go get my inflammation measured and my answer these days? Well maybe five years ago I'd say no it's preliminary but you know there's a thing called c reactive protein or CRP. You can get it easily done. It's a standard lab test is standardized. And it'll give pretty good. Read out on your inflammation you know if it's elevated you're more likely to die of a heart attack a stroke more likely to get diabetes and depression dimension and it's tends to be elevated depress people another reason why it's interesting inflammatory. Biomarkers is now a couple of studies including some work that I've done showing that it can predict whether you're going to respond to PROZAC or not and so there are now a couple of studies. One of them fairly large. Actually suggesting that if you just get to simple inflammatory measure she reactive protein or CRP if it's elevated elevated here is like a level greater than one one milligram per liter. You don't tend to respond. To Esera is the SEROTONIN antidepressants like PROZAC. Paxil Zoloft LEXA PRO selects UvA. Does the brand names. But if you're if you're syrupy is elevated. You're more likely to respond to something has dopamine properties of something like for instance wellbutrin which is the generic that is bupropion or in one. Study was nor tripling which is more of an effort drug. But it's a complicated. But it fits the pattern right but I think the key here is that you know. Almost all of us get depressed. Get stuck on a drug where the primary mechanism of action is blocking the Serotonin reuptake site. And there is now this gathering data to suggest that you know if you're inflammations elevated. You're not you're not as likely to respond to those. And then we've shown recently working with actually a large pharmaceutical company that CRP can predict people who don't respond to a very different kind of drug that used to treat bipolar disorder when people depressed as a drug called the Razz donuts marketed as la. Tuta atypical. Antipsychotic. It's a dopamine modulating agent and we measured CRP before before people started treatment with it versus Placebo and man. You know if you'RE CRP IS LOW. The the the antipsychotic Latour was no better than placebo. But if she was high it worked like.

Inflammation aspirin minocycline dopamine Mark Rappaport Crohn's disease Esera Latour emory diabetes Jonathan Savage mechanism of action bupropion
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And now back to the show so how. Why does our body when we experience psychological stress? Why does it create inflammation so I think people when they think of stress of Cortisol? They don't think my body's GONNA act like it's sick and send out signals. Yeah it's it's really interesting isn't it? I mean you'd think right that when the going gets tough the tough would get going and sometimes when I give lectures I will spend a whole beginning sort of trying to get people to marvel at this remarkable fact that we have this weird inflammatory bias. You know we think of inflammation making tired Sircana. Maybe not think straight. You know if you're being chased by the Sabertooth cat for God's sakes why would you want that but I think the answer is an and a number of us for the hit upon his it sort of the same time the the evolutionary answer we believe is that if you think about what stress has meant across a Malian evolution any before the mammals but we just a tour are ourselves here you know stress reliably meant usually one of three things right either? Either you're about to be eaten or more. You are chasing down some meat to eat and that thing has got horns and hoofs or you know you wanna make a baby and you're having to fight with the other guy with horns and hooves and so you know in all of those situations because other than that you know. Most animals tend to like Kinda hang out right sleep. Are they hang out? And and so so stressed. The argument goes that stress was so reliably associated with the risk of wounding over evolutionary history. That genes that evolve to pre potentally and an sort of jumped the gun activate inflammation in response to stress selected. Because you know if directly die from distressful encounter for no wounding. Well whatever you're dead but mo- many many times organisms would survive in a dive infection because skin is the greatest of all immunologic organs and and one of the absolute number one best ways to die before antidepressants was to get your skin opened up and of course now we know with the failure of antibiotics is becoming more and more of a risk again right. It's terrifying so the reason that inflammation distress activates inflammation is stress has been a reliable signal that you're in danger of having your skin opened up if your skin gets opened up. You're very likely to get an infection that puts you at risk for dying so rather than sitting around and waiting for it to happen. We're going to jump the gun. Smoke alarm principal right. And and we're going to turn on inflammation to be ahead of the game and to be ready for the the immunologic damaged or the pathogen exposure. We think it's going to happen right. And of course you know if you do false alarms a thousand times. Yeah you may you may occur some tissue costs from the inflammatory chemicals. But you know all you gotTa do is not respond once and you're dead and so it's like this color smoke alarm principle so what we're looking at here of course is an evolutionary mismatch in the modern world which is that for many of us especially in first world countries stress does not very often anymore. Mean that you're at risk for being wounded you don't. Humans tend to make things that are concrete abstract. That's one of the great things our brain does. And so now all these psychological stressors that are no longer associated with woundings still activate those ancient. Pathways they still activate those ancient reactions and produce inflammation even though the inflammation is of no value as far as we can tell and actually detrimental. So that's it's a good case of an environmental mismatch that we are the inheritors of because the the world has changed so fast in modern times. Evolution hasn't been able to catch up or is there psychological stress? But there's also other kinds of stress to like physical stress some exercise that creates inflammation in the body as well but also makes you feel good. So what's going on the dynamic there so this has been my little you know. It's funny how we all have our little sort of areas. That are fast nomads. For us that is true. That is a very fascinating observation. So we know that exercise. Acutely activates inflammation You know early on. You asked me what I who I wasn't what I did. I said I kinda studied ancient practices and one of the other antidepressant. Things we've studied is hyperthermia heat and we have shown announcement replicated by others that fact if you suppose humans to kind of a to really heat stressor for a time. Limited period produces antidepressant. Effects is why people go to saunas right steam rooms and stuff. So we measured inflammation before and after taking depress people and sticking them in this this hypothermia machine and low behold didn't activate the whole inflammatory cascade activated. Something that looked a lot like what excise does. And there was a signal in there that the more that inflammation got activated. The better people felt the less unimpressed. The more depressed. They were a week later. So there's a little bit of a mystery here and and but some of US including me think that the answer actually can be seen an exercise that you know what does exercise do it. Acutely it raises inflammation. What does it do chronically? It lowers inflammation and so I think for many of these systems. What happens is you can actually Strengthen them or toughen them or in some cases down regulate them by certain types of acute repeated exposure so so there may be cases in which brief exposure to stimuli that induce inflammation may actually have benefits for depression years ago back in ninety five and ninety six it was a small study out of Germany published biological psychiatry where they took a very small sailing. Took seven people but these were really really depressed in patients. They were in a psychiatric hospital and they they dismayed really cool. They shot them up with a bunch of inflammation into their veins and basically made the people sick and every single one of them had a powerful antidepressant response it. It didn't last in most of them but in several of them they actually continue for better for days and days afterwards. So you know what we can say is that when you're chronically inflamed it's pretty powerful risk factor for depression. There may be some instances for reasons. We don't fully understand where an acute inflammatory stimuli might actually have mood protective effects like the hair of the dog sort of like the hair. The dog while said. Yeah that's so this the sauna research is it? Have you guys figured out? Like how long you need a stain. Asana for to have that effect is like five minutes now. Well so so the the the the short answer is no. We have not figured that out my colleague Ashley Mason. At University of California. San Francisco is gearing up to do studies. Now the will the will really begin to try to look at that. We we got into. This is sort of interesting. I I had two young colleagues who were registered to mine and Austria of all places. Teach their sonically and they. They worked a sort of non traditional psychiatric hospital. That did my body treatments and one of them was an engineering founder. Old hyperthermia machine in a basement rebuilt it and we decided to stick depress people in it and we did we cook them up and we saw this really striking antidepressant response so as you can see it five six seven days after treatment so we brought one of the guys the United States and we we got another fancy machine and we did it really well with a control condition and all this stuff and we saw exactly the same thing now. The thing was though we in in in Switzerland we had treated people to.

inflammation psychological stress physical stress Sabertooth Cortisol San Francisco Austria Switzerland United States University of California principal hypothermia founder Ashley Mason Germany
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:12 min | 10 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Take you put you in a psychological stressful situation and I can show that it activates inflammation with an hour inflammation shooting up and if you're somebody who was neglected or abused or You know for traumatizes kid. Your inflammation is gonNA shoot up even higher way higher fact because that early adverse experiences prime your body to respond to danger with increased inflammation so these pathways came together and you know Wallah. That's why it has now become this sort of widely thought about idea that that that that depression inflammation have something to do with each other. Okay so let's talk. Want to track backtrack about this idea. That these Side is cited. Kipnes side kinds. So you said you get to the brain and they cause all the things that we see in depressive. So we're talking about is like disrupt neurotransmitter stuff. Is it changed? The brains is that what's going on. Yeah Yup they. They the inflammation wipes out a necessary. Cofactor for nor transmitter. Production does it change like structures the brains that you've heard those things. People who depressed have sensitive sensitive. Agnello the the almond shaped thing information effect that Yup. Yup It absolutely does. It also induces bring changes similar to those seen in depression absolutely. Does it change the structure of the brain? That's a good question I've You know it's like everything where you know. There's such a huge field now. I've never seen a study that it actually changes you know like the size of the brain Or something like that we but but but the activity of the brain absolutely and and my old mentor. Andy Miller at emory. Who's really I think? The King of this field so many ways has shown that if you take just a big group of normal medically healthy depress people. You measure their inflammation the people that are depressed too. High inflammation have very different patterns of brain function than people that are depressed without inflammation Wednesday quick break forwards more sponsors the year. Two Thousand Twenty shows up a lot in science fiction. Lot of people predicted that by now we'd be teleporting to work living on Mars so waiting for that Hover board allow those predictions..

High inflammation Wallah Andy Miller depression emory
"inflammation" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

06:25 min | 10 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"There's a lot out of studies of Anti inflammatories depression. We ran review of them a couple months ago. Carla report and counted thirty six studies. The main ones they looked at were were the end said particularly silcock zip but also aspirin cytokine inhibitors statins which apparently don't just lower cholesterol but also have separate separate anti inflammatory effects. monocytes cleaned the antibiotic Piazza's zone. The Diabetes Med and that Luca quarter quits. The gist of all this data was that anti-inflammatories seemed to help depression. But what struck me was. None of these studies looked at the kind of inflammatory biomarkers. That you're talking talking about and so we really don't know in what you would expect that. Individuals with high inflammation that drug would work in an individual's with low low inflammation. The drug wouldn't work problem in the literature with the use of anti inflammatory agents to treat depression. The problem is that they treat everybody body and earlier in the interview. I told the only thirty percent of people have increased inflammation. So if you're Cox two inhibitors working for the sample as as a whole what is it actually doing. If we come up with a medication that targets inflammation and. That's not quite there yet. It is somewhat of the Holy Grail and Madison Inflammation as as you now is associated with a number of diseases so although anti-inflammatories make accents for people with inflammation. Dr Miller wasn't able to endorse them clinically. Because we just don't have the evidence but he did go on in the interview to endorse several psychiatric. Patrick Medications that work better in depression with inflammation. That's all online at the Journal. Now Dr Miller outside outside of those psychiatric medications. What kind of lifestyle? Advice what you give to someone. With inflammation the biggest offender in terms of increased inflammation snus obesity and sedentary activity so losing weight would be a very important piece of the puzzle as would be increasing physical activity so does not an exercise. The Diet that people recommend is the Mediterranean Diet as being the most anti inflammatory of the various diets. That are out there. We actually published a study showing that the closer your diet was to add a trainee and diet the lower your level of interleukin six so there. There is data out there suggesting that these diets particularly the Union Diet are associated with reduced inflammation as well as reduced depression depression. The other things that one might WanNa think about is meditation and Yoga. Some of these techniques Taichi we have been associated with increased para sympathetic tone. And we know that activation of the pair of sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system is associated. Ed with an inhibition of inflammation. Of course whether or not you're successful you can determine by going get your CRP measure after initiative. Whatever lifestyle change that you've decided to initiate so there there really is an opportunity for people to monitor their inflammatory inflammatory status and get it get down because we can treat the downstream effects of inflammation with various psychotropic agents talked talked about that targeting dopamine for example? We can do that but at the end of the day. You really want to reduce your location because it's doing other things to your to your body the Of the justice influencing neuro circuits in your brain it's also influencing your heart. Bollock there perhaps. Is the practice changing part of this podcast in my own practice. I specialize in treatment resistant depression. Russian and I have had a lot of success with some of the medications that he recommends for inflammation long before I even knew that inflammation was a cause of depression. What Dr Miller went on to say is that markers of inflammation and inflammation in the body is not gonna go down when we treat these patients patients with such psychiatric medications and get their depression better? Those markers are only known to go down through the lifestyle changes so what that means for me is two things when I see patients who have signs of inflation and got better on those kinds of medications. I now need to speak to them. That that these medicines might be making them feel better and more motivated and driven. But they're not necessarily treating the inflammation in their body and we need to do something about their lifestyle. How of course we'd I check their CRP to see if they indeed have inflammation after describing the lifestyle options to them? I'll tell the patient today. Let me know when they've started the lifestyle changes because we'll give it a couple months three to six months and check their. CRP again to see if if the inflammation is going down. This provides a unique external motivator for them to make those changes and it also gives a little incentive for them to be honest with me about whether they're doing it. Andrew Miller is the William P timmy professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Behavioral Sciences at Emory University. Where he also serves as Vice Chair of psychiatric research and Director of the Behavioral Immunology Program? His full interview view is online at the Carlisle report DOT Com. It includes two very useful charts one lists all the psychiatric treatments that have evidence to work better and inflammatory Tori. Depression bore medications three natural treatments and six lifestyle and psychotherapy approaches. The other is a list of eight signs that your depress patient it might have inflammation with directions for how to order and interpret the CRP. Our podcast listeners can get thirty dollars off their first first year subscription to that site with the Promo code podcast in all caps net helps us keep the car let report free from the influence winsome advertisers industry donors and all other sorts of entanglements..

inflammation depression Andrew Miller Vice Chair of psychiatric rese Patrick Medications aspirin Diabetes Med Carla Psychiatry and Behavioral Beha Luca Behavioral Immunology Program trainee Tori Carlisle Emory University dopamine professor William P
"inflammation" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

Precisione: The Healthcast

06:39 min | 11 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

"Ran labs and labs you know occasionally we'll get a call from LABCORP requests. They'll you'll get these lab alert lows and we got a call for her for a lab alert low for her cholesterol and what they had done unintentionally. I am assuming was given so much of cholesterol. Lowering medications are cholestrol was really low amongst many other inflammatory issues. Going on as well as you know. Twenty five percent of all your body's cholesterol's in your brain. Your brain is sixty percent five. So she was unintentionally starving our brain from very nutrient that needed cholesterol and she had lots of inflammation like C reactive. Protein was high. Mississippi is yet math deflation impairment so we used the principles in the inflammation spectrum really at large in functional medicine to really improve this. We improved her cholesterol show panel and lowered or inflammation levels and over a course of months. Obviously these things are not quick fixes but rebound a relatively quickly when you compare her to similar Miller cases and she was walking with a cane or a walker Out of the wheelchair and she was so sharp and witty and you you would not have even recognized this lady and it was something that she said to me that stuck with me beyond her. Not being my typical patient is she. She said I was planning my funeral when I met you now. I'm planning vacations with my grandkids. I thought okay. Look how many people whether the ninety ninety or fifty or whatever age they're at how many people settle for feeling horrible and having the quality of life in the gutter because they think gotz normal just because something's common just because something's ubiquitous doesn't necessarily mean it's normal and she was doing the same thing because someone with the White Coats said take and no one was really looking into it because she's Inter nineties and they don't really question medications that government and I think just a few questions that really was her husband I give it a credit to is that he didn't settle for that he went outside of all sort of conventional wisdom to say no look. Let's get a different different perspective on what she's going through bitterly saved her life basically by bringing her in to see you for sure her quality of life without a doubt I mean the quality of life was transformed. And that's the power of the bodies able to do and if we allow it in most cases again we just have so much influence biochemistry. Chemistry that statement as you said to me like cut to the core of like what we do in in functional medicine is that we improve quality of life in so many ways. That's amazing. I mean. Her doctors probably said you know your cholesterol's good the medicines working and you're just demented because you're ninety years old. Well now it's probably that's why did anything about it. Yeah exactly and I totally get it from one end but we need to be thoughtful about asking. These questions of her husband knew her better than the doctors did right. I mean He. He knew he saw he saw the difference. And I think that's we need to going back to what we said how he started. The conversation is listening to people listening to what they're saying really don't de legitimize that it's so important exactly while it's been an awesome conversation conversation. Do you have any special paroles. You like to share with everyone before we wrap up anything extra special that they can leave with something that is a mantra in our clinic. Vinik that we say a lot to patients because it is so profoundly true is that you. Can't he labata you hate. You can't shame your way into wellness obsessive about food into health. Also you have to come all the stuff. We're talking about of lowering inflammation or proving health or whatever we're talking about in the space of of health and wellness and functional. Medicine has has to come from a place of self respect and self love and I don't mean that in a fluffy new agey sort of way I really mean valuing yourself enough to to do good things for it if you see yourself as Tesla how are you going to amuse. People tests their parking way away taking care of themselves. They their car. They are treating it with like the value that it is. If you're old junker beat up car you don't care where you park you're gonNA fill it up with whatever and you're going to bang I and It's not going to matter a we need to see ourselves to the test so that we are. We are all unique and we all are beautiful creation. I think that self care is a form of self respect in that to me. Is the Genesis for sustainable wellness. Because then it's not a diet. It's not a program it's that no. I love my body enough. I respect it enough to feed good things to do. Good things for whatever. The active wellness is whether it's food or a nonfood acted the wellness. Really that has to be The genesis of a wellness. I love it I love it so tell us where our listeners can find. Mind you if they want to have a concert with you or find out more information about you. Where's the best place for them to go? Thank you yeah. Everything's doctor will. Cold continents the R.. Dr W I L L C O L DOT com and they can check everything out there we have tons of free content can preorder the inflammation spectrum. Were Kita Terry in my I book. We have video classes. I'm really pumped for this online group class for holding once a month because my day job. He's insulting patients one on one online. which is still still the same? But once a month we're holding these online group classes to we can talk to a hundred people at once and enables us to lower our overhead just because the goal with the online group class is to continue to make functional medicine more accessible more affordable. The more people so We just launched that this year. Some I'm really pumped about all of that and all that information's at doctor will call dot com awesome awesome and. When does the book come out? You said preorder so when when can people ended the Barnes and noble. I mean I think by the time yeah right I think by the time people are listening to this. It'll be out it comes out to over fifteen okay. Cool whenever whenever you're listening to this in the future it'll probably be on Amazon and Barnes and noble in any place. You can get a book awesome. Well thank you so much for being a guest on the show. I totally loves the conversation. We had a lot of good discussion. I really appreciate the time you took. Yeah thanks so much for having me and thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in today okay to listen to another exciting episode of precision the health cast..

Barnes LABCORP Mississippi Amazon White Coats Miller Kita Terry Dr W
"inflammation" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"But the inflammation that you usually most Americans have, you know, when we talk about like, you have a highly inflammatory diet, or whatever it's usually because it's stimulating t NFL fan or Lucan interfere on NF Kappa. Beta, you know, these molecules that we're not even measuring and her blood tests, and that's what stem cells looking for they go into your blood. They're finding those sites of inflammation sticking in there and secreting things called axioms that are unique to that situation. And that's why it's difficult with X zones because you can patent next zome and say, look, let's do a clinical trial just this X zone, right which has one protein in it or one peptide or whatever. And that's positive right problem is like in a different person different situation that like stem cells secrete, different axioms based on the context, and it's too complicated for us to figure out so right now, we're just putting them in hoping for the best and some people works awesome. Some people doesn't work, right? It's not super well understood or characterized and I'm okay with that as long as there's not. We're not killing people in we're not causing harm, you know, love to see that research continue. But right now, you gotta go out of the free country. The you mentioned something about I think you mentioned C reactive protein. Correct. Or lemonade won't see all that stuff. Yes. Thought Syriac protein thought that was like kind of more check an inflammation of your heart. Or is it just checking overall body inflammation, period usually indicates overall? I mean, they they look at it in relation to your heart. Because you know, if you've got a lot of c reactive protein, usually leads to plaques in the arteries, right? But I don't know a whole lot about c reactive protein. And where it originates to be honest. Right. But I know that like if you have an infection, right? You could be through the roof. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I've had that before like, I get my blood done every about four months or so. And I went one time it was like just staggering. But I two weeks. Try like tore my calf or something like that. So they're like, well, yeah. Could be that you could have a cold. The next time. I got tested. It was in the normal range against it's, you know, check checking your blood is a really interesting thing..

NF Kappa Lucan NFL four months two weeks
"inflammation" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Of inflammation, and they looked they looked not deep into the fat. Let's say the let's say the the the diameter of the vessel was, you know, five millimeters. Will they look five millimeters out in a circle around the fat? And they. Came up with the scaling, and they, you know, it's a very technically complicated procedure, but certainly possible in large population what they did and found that if you had this attenuation, meaning the fat becomes thinner, and and the and the and the protective fat in their becomes more liquid. Well, that is a predictor of future events both retrospectively and prospectively in a short period of time in sort of three to four year range, which is which is a pretty good number to look at right? You're not in not days three days, but four days but over a series of years, and that's better than ten years. So what we understand about this process is that when the fat around the arteries becomes inflamed or the fat itself becomes kind of unhealthy. The that's really a marker of inflammation in the plaque itself that inflammation sort of seeps out into the fat. And that becomes a marker. Now is it a, you know, which causes which does the lack the inflammation in a fat then caused the plaque to be inflamed. Or is the plaque inflammation caused the fat to be inflamed? We we haven't answered that question that's going to be further down the line. But let's just say the two go together they're related. I think it's more than their their true and true and not related. They're related somehow that you have inflammation the plaque and in the fat. And so in the cat scanner you can measure this, and we hope that this would be one of those markers that we can do with a cat scan a low radiation cats game take a look at the fat itself and say, hey, this person doesn't have stable plaque. This person has hot plaque and the plaque when we say hot just like, let's say you cut your your finger. And there was inflammation redness around there will that same redness that same amount of white blood cells or would you would see in your finger sometimes might be possible. Would also be in the arteries and a microscopic scale, and that is what leads to probably cardiac events in the shorter term in the longer term. It's obviously all the other things that we talk about blood pressure cholesterol, inflammation, we can measure in the in the in the blood with a blood test called high sensitivity c reactive protein. So it's that those those other markers, whether they're biomarkers in the blood or markers on a diagnostic tests, like a cat scan that we can look at and say, hey, we have an idea. This is a person we want to be more aggressive with this.

inflammation three days four days four year ten years
"inflammation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Inflammation most doctors don't even check for that they're just going by your symptom and that can give you a a stand drug in this case so you got to determine the cause of the inflammation some other things that could cause inflammation of course is poor diet and yes that's true but the poor diet can be changed easily and you still have inflammation i got people that are eating fantastically well and they still have chronic inflammation and the consumption of course processed foods remember most processed food is is foreign to our body it takes a lot of work for your liberty breakdown processed food it's missing certain things so you gotta be careful with that eating a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables that helps but if it's if you haven't gotten down on a cellular level and you haven't taken gotten rid of the heavy metals and chemicals then it's not going to help that much of course exercise exercise helps everything and we were talking about your or hdl we know that exercise helps h hdl brings up your good cholesterol and i'd say that's probably the hardest thing to get people to do that have an exercise is to get them to exercise so and then managing stress in your life obviously that would be helpful yep yes yes yes i'm taking blood or when right four one well i'm now there's that on the insert to it and has aluminum in ryan it might shot yeah a lot of a lot of medications they do use aluminum in there yeah no i had s stroke.

Inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Of heart problems their hearts inflamed the heart is agent they have less muscle energy lesson doorns less stamina when you give these people ubiquonol they flourish there's been studies where they've seen that people were plenty of inactive co q ten the one that most of you were taking they still had a lot of inflammation in their heart and when they caved in the active form which is our formed ubiquonol at reduced inflammation in their heart that's significantly important that's the cause of about half of all heart attacks about half of all heart attacks are related to high cholesterol high levels of ldl statins do a good job lowering that but the other half are due to persistent low grade inflammation in the heart statins do not do a great job of that but ubiquonol is helpful with that very quickly it helps lower inflammation in the horn so when they canvassed about nine hundred people they saw those with plenty of inactive co q ten they had inflammation in the heart when they had act of coq ten they did not have inflammation heart so then they took people with inflammation and they gave them the active form and the inflammation in their heart went down it's a measure on your blood test called hfs crp hse r p measure team out of inflammation your heart that's good because that's a major cause of heart attacks they also found that in people when they gave the active form ubiquitous will form of coq ten have made their hearts much younger people will plenty of inactive co q ten their hearts were aging at had to be the active foreign made what younger there's a series of studies showing us when they looked at populations those with inactive co q ten too much inactive not enough active so it was a poor ratio of inactive to active they had more inflammation and heart their heart was much older when they reversed it by giving them the active form every houston formation heart a reverse staging in heart so how important is that it's very important they've seen that when they give athletes of any age the active form of coq ten ubiquonol to one we have on special today in fact this one was one used of most of these studies they did much better in.

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"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

"You know so when we started talking about paying their three categories i'd like to have put most things in you know so for those of you who have pain you know the three things in the three causes your we also want to say number one we said the the two categories are going to be these these kind of big things that happen these big traumas then we also have these micro traumas that can happen so a daily wear and tear oregon to like a big injury or big issue we pick up something the wrong way you those are usually the two big root causes of how these things happen you then once we get in east causes of pain you know we have number one inflammation which there can be multiple causes of inflammation pain that we have pain coming from muscles and the number three we have actually pain coming from nerves and ligaments so we'll be kind of look at these things all these are important understand we talk about the cause of pain as helping understand hey is my pain really cost from an inflammation issue is my pain may be caused for more of a muscle issue issue or is really my pain costumer nervous you so those are the three buckets we always gotta think about so we think are the process of how this works and we talked about the idea of how it you know maybe you sprain your ankle you know that's a process you that again begins to create a problem in your body because a crepe pain you're through this process of action ankle sprain so when we talk about inflammation let's talk about how inflammation works because you inflammation can work a lot of different ways and we talk about painting costs from inflammation inflammation is also at the root cause of so many disease processes now major causes of inflammation we talk about you know things.

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"inflammation" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Location right off the end but essentially what they found was that your teeth three levels while you are fasting which is your bioactive your form of thyroid that fiber hormone that is present at that point in time yes it does go down while you're fasting and that scares people fixed people out but what they found doesn't change is that your thyroid stimulating hormone and you're t four does not change and those are the precursors to your thyroid so with those not changing it goes to show us that any down regulation of the firearm is only temporary literally during a fasted state other than that you're you're golden and that makes perfect sense and that probably awesome is why i've noticed in a lot of people seem to notice this being cold on the first few days of a fast but if your teeth 3s down that would make sense the you'll feel more cold something like a point i would love it you could send us on make sure there in the show notes as well totally awesome so let's talk inflammation more indepth 'cause i feel like that seems like it was a huge part of your story and something that's a huge focus for your research now and i know i've seen a lot of studies about how inflammation plays a part in pretty much every disease in some way but to start let's talk about what exactly is inflammation and why are we seeing more but right now i think the reason we're seeing more but nowadays is mainly just because this is more awareness online period i think uh you know what the argument of like the whole thirty in some of these some of these other publications the talk about it we're just it's more top of mind the simplest way that i can explain inflammation is if you've ever bumped her elbow you bumped her new year you've got newspaper be staying you know it gets all swollen that swelling is acute inflammation which means that it is inflammation that is responding to a given stimuli now we had inflammation that's called chronic inflation this chronic inflammation is inflammation that is not necessarily respondent dini stimuli it's just constantly there so if you can visualise the swelling and the readiness of.

inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on House of Carbs

"Insecure than maybe people would leave me alone and i could go about my business and i could trick them will what i discovered once i cut out the gluten and in the weeks that followed um was something that i did not anticipate which is just as the inflammation in my body decreased so it appeared and it felt did the inflammation and my psychology so what would inflammation anisa college e b well if you think about the nature of insecurity it's taking some sort of a stimulus that could be ambiguous and nature and then going ahead an analyzing it as a threat so now you're scared of something that might not even be scary that sort of what insecurity is to a certain extent and um as it just so happened i became less scared of so many things i started to see the ambiguous stimulus as ambiguous rather than as threatening and suddenly um i was able to take people and to take situations um uh in at face value and they would consume mm far less anxiety or they would produce far less anxiety and consume far less energy for me so suddenly i found myself more confident and uh with the energy to tackle things that um in the past i had avoided part of what stuck with me from that revelation you know many years ago and the way that you share that with me that 'if i found soaked so compelling was that it also provided a sensible narrative to a lot of your experiences from from growing up where you didn't otherwise have a construct within which to kind of fit these experiences and you just described it in terms of the insecurity but also you know i i recall you describing it in terms of you know athletic endeavours and and you know a lot of different kind of interactions and how the path that you you ended up on was was steered by this food challenge that you didn't know you had we'll so there was a couple of things number one is.

inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Relations like that and i say look i'll give you access to my dropped box for hail away in what you need to do is you need to end of to write a book or read an article entitled something like uh people who who eat few calories but lots of sugar still gain fat and then just use all these all these tribes all these populations as examples yok i personally suspect that in addition it insulin are probably issues with inflammation with leptin dysregulation widow abc show again the the influence of of sugar potentially on circadian rhythm and on even like might oh qendra function right which is incredibly important for metabolism i think there's a there's a host of things even in addition to insulin that while be contributing to like like the inability to be able to like burn your own storage fat even if you're not eating a lot of calories hoeger and this is a question it's sort of i mean you've got this amazingly intricate unimaginably intricate home meals static system that's us and you start screwing with any aspect oliver all those things you mentioned the from leptin and inflammation everything the questions and what's what's causing what's a fact when everything is causing and affecting everything else in the system and so the easy question to ask is what the trigger some one way i talk about this is you know if i i hear myself over the head with a hammer the response is going to be amazingly complex i mean the swelling in the inflammation and the pain mediation and the the the the immune response to whatever you know there's gonna be a whole.

inflammation circadian rhythm
"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"So it really kind of checks and balances at first but i would say by and large from a mindset perspective being able to stick to something longterm i would say was intermittent fasting that really ended up making it easy for me to drop that much weight that fast now i returned to this role of of inflammation and fat loss i'd like to actually dive into that from a little bit more of a scientific standpoint because i i spoke with dr a k shanahan who wrote this book called deep nutrition and in that she went into some studies i think they were in mice where they found a lot of issues with the conversion of white fat cells in into metabolic lee active brown fat cells which basically will burn calories to generate heat if inflammation was present basically inflammation seemed to shut down i believe what's called cg mp signalling which which was you know basically she gnp is almost like a fat burning turbocharger and in a state of inflammation that didn't seem to be active and and what you shutdown inflammation you actually restore the body's ability to convert adipose tissue into something other than adipose tissue in those one thing that she talked about but in addition to that you know you you you talked about and tara cites a little bit ago hinted at that and and carries what else you found when it comes to link between inflammation and foul yeah and we can touch on this more when we start talking about sort of bacterial strain that i've been looking at two but a lot of on weight and we can jump into that right now if you so it circles back to that a lot of time so when you hearth different strains of bacteria in gut of course you can have a natural level of inflammation that's occurring there and you know backed what he had said i've read a little bit of her stuff i'm not super familiar with the white fat brown fat conversion that you're mentioning guides the simple point is that when you do have a level of inflammation yes it does disrupt that but also if you call inflammation too much it actually disrupt set to so there's a there's a fine line there and the same kind of have.

shanahan tara inflammation shut down
"inflammation" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"My recommendation though is that this this stuff is not difficult if you start to look into it and there's the underline recalls now one of the symptoms though for almost every disease named a man it will be hard right now to think of a disease or hell tissue or weight loss issue because weight loss as one of the same just keep in mind ju if you're trying to lose weight right now forget about losing weight it's too hard to get in your body healthy if you get your body healthy you will lose weight a healthy body it can't be overweight it's physically impossible to be healthy and overweight i don't care when airways says it's that's not possible and inflammation is a big reason why so here's the thing inflammation right now we're treating its popular right turmeric curcumin aloe vera cats clawed dg alec all these things are great they are and i don't want anybody who's suffering there so well i use things like turmeric and like phospholipid base curcumin absolutely but here's the thing i'll use it in the short term so someone doesn't have to suffer they don't have to take and says and other drugs instead but what i want to understand is this the inflammation is there for a reason and we're not going to treat inflammation with natural health mean like with turmeric like we would with advil okay that doesn't make sense that's called green medicine and there's a lot of doctors doing that and again is that better than using advil yes but you're still not trying to figure out you still not going deep enough why is the inflammation there in the first place and if we start to look deeper you mention it earlier and he said seventy seven thousand plus manmade chemicals the environment cosmetics the average woman right now is wearing over twenty eight cancer causing carcinogens 100 in moisturizers an spf they put it every day and hair products and shampoos and the plasticizers in waters and and i'm i'll tell you this right now.

inflammation advil
"inflammation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"But there is another possibility as to what's going on and i'd like to share that with you and and give you some recommendations as well any inflammation in the brain and and i've been talking about this a lot on the air it's just impossible for too much to be said on the subject any inflammation inside the brain is going to cause a failure or at least a weakness in the neurons that are affected by that inflammatory process how might this of happened in such a surgery well this this almost an infinite number of things that could have occurred that would have resulted in an inflammation but what i would definitely assume is that it's seated primarily this inflammatory thing is seated primarily within the motor cortex open perhaps sensory motor cortex which lies towards the top of the brain more frontally so if you for example draw a line up from the ears linking it up at the top so you're in the very centre of the heads between fronton back and you sought going forward from there all of the cortex forward from there is going to be sense remote or cortex up until let's say the very prefrontal which is like about the far area because that then becomes focus and attention multitasking brain so as we we have a neurologist and she's got a tested hopkins this tuesday in fact okay while i sure hope that that will shed some light and they're all things that could be seen in the traditional kinds of imagery so one of the possibilities than i said that the almost infinite i guess it's not infinite but there are quite a number of things that could have happened during the surgery to have caused this one possibility is that she did have a tea i a which sometimes can be seen on very high resolution mr i if they focus the mri very very closely in that frontal area to try and get the highest resolution possible in that part of the.

inflammation motor cortex
"inflammation" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"Because i don't have chronic inflammation but i have many girlfriends especially and friends that have chronic inflammation like my one fan she gets up in the morning and she's got to take a hot bat before she could started on the day just because of the aches what is causing this inflammatory condition that now seems to be an indicator in major degenerative diseases on on it is really the indicator and i think pretty much every disease that we have inflammation and something that we have done to art felt we leave incredibly struck whole lifestyle we don't eat correctly we don't we don't exercise we don't breathe clean air we are in on and contact with chemical or an hot and contract with light we don't ground the earth anymore i think it's a combination of all of that i know some that found a little out there aren't weird but a inflammation and you can't deny that inflammation causes heart disease or what causes diabetes or what causes it'll be headache or will call those eight and pain that your friend has every single morning it not normal wake up with eight and paint like that and it's normal to wake up and take a um alive and it's another day let's go to work or let go play tanit so let go do whatever it makes you happy but that really to me to be bogged down inflammation and let's not forget that imf one man who live and reside in at belly fat that most people have that belly fat is just one big alop of inflammatory what we call quite a kind.

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