17 Burst results for "Indus Valley"

"indus valley" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"indus valley" Discussed on KPCC

"I replace him later in the hour we'll be talking about indigenous peoples and science but first this week as many of the democratic presidential candidates talked about their climate policies and the need for energy conservation and a seven hour marathon on CNN the trump administration announced that it would be rolling back energy efficiency requirements for standard old light bulbs those requirements originally set up during the bush administration were aimed at pushing the country away from energy inefficient incandescent lights and towards better options like LED lights joining me now to talk about trump's push to renew a one hundred eighty year old technology plus other short subjects in science is science journalist and author and only knew it's joins us from San Francisco welcome back. Hey thanks for having me nice to have you so what do these new rules say what's the big one of the big effect on consumers here. so these are rules that were set to go into effect in January of next year and what they would have done is extend the energy efficiency requirements from not just the kind of typical pear shaped incandescent bulbs that we think of a spring into our light sockets but also all kinds of other balls that are used in industrial applications kind of funny shaped balls that are used in chandeliers they're sort of candle shapes so basically it would have swept all other light bulbs that are not standard sized into the is already existing energy efficiency requirements and with the trump administration has said is that it just didn't make economic sense to do that right now. so is this going to go through this undoing of that law. so there's already been a lot of push back there are consumer groups such as the appliance standards awareness project which have said that this is probably gonna cost consumers as much as a hundred dollars a year because we will be able to buy these more energy inefficient light bulbs and also their states like California that are setting their own standards and there are a lot of groups that are going to sue because one interpretation of the laws around this is that you can't actually the government cannot write back energy standards so that may be a big point of contention in the court so I can't really see people saying oh grating contestants are back you know. yeah I mean and these are standards that are intended to help us stay abreast of recent technological developments in light bulbs you know once we have better more efficient light bulbs the idea is to push the market place toward them I don't see a wifi chip in an incandescent bulb anytime soon. I don't want your smart incandescent ball. okay. other news I know you I know you're in archaeology gegen this some big news this week about the Indus valley civilization tell us about that. that's right so let me set the scene for you about four thousand five hundred years ago it's incredibly sophisticated civilization rises up in the Indus valley which is this beautiful last long area river valley kind of at the northwestern border between India and the southern border of Pakistan today and it has you know at least a dozen big cities for the time I mean they're not Mumbai but they're big for the era and they have a sophisticated writing system which we haven't yet deciphered they have traded between cities they're trading with Mesopotamia and most important to me they have a sophisticated plumbing system and public fountains so this is a very very advanced civilization they have plumbing you know centuries before the Romans and their alleged fancy plumbing but what happens is about a thousand years after the civilization rises suddenly people just leave all these beautiful cities or abandoned and we think that now probably what happened was there was climate change rainfall patterns change it just became more difficult to farm the reverse change course so the mystery has been win this people laughed where did they go where did this urban diaspora take all of those people and now thanks to an intrepid group of scientists we have sequenced the DNA from one skeleton from one of the biggest cities in the Indus valley civilization so are you ready for that. solution I have only have my drum roll apparatus sound. so what they found is first they got sixty one Skelton's took little pieces of each one and powdered the bond and tested each of those sixty one samples one of them turned up positive for DNA and the DNA matches closely with the DNA that's common in people who live in South Asia today so modern day people in India are related to this one person from the Indus valley civilization so what that suggests is that people from the Indus valley when times got hard to climate change a lot of them journeyed south and they brought their culture with them because what we see at the Indus valley are kind of the beginnings of Vedic culture which eventually gets popularized as Hinduism and Buddhism all across South Asia and Southeast Asia so this is kind of the birth place of all of these important cultural movements and ideas and now we have at least one hint of where they all went so it's a pretty cool week for me as an archaeology if you find it interesting that have sixty six gallons they only found in one scale in that link yeah so it's this is part of the tragedy of people who are excavating in the Indus valley because the climate conditions there vacillate between extremely dry and very wet and it's just terrible for DNA preservation and is also actually terrible for all kinds of preservation a lot of these cities are highly eroded and so that's added to the mystery of the civilization because there's just a lot of it it's gone because of climate. let let let me jump to my last story here and this is a story about testosterone and empathy. that's really writing connection there tell us about. yes so there's been a kind of long standing idea that people with elevated levels of testosterone just aren't capable of experiencing human empathy as well as other people and partly this was based on just the kind of usual pseudo science and part of it was based on a study of a very small number of people just a little over a dozen people that suggested that people with elevated testosterone couldn't couldn't that read other people's emotions and so a group of scientists said hate what we actually do a real scientific study of this so they took about six hundred and fifty people are all men and tested to see if when they had a testosterone patch on the how they scored on tests common tests of human empathy so they had a group that didn't have elevated testosterone levels and they had a group that did have this testosterone patch and what they found was there was no difference between the two groups so what that means is if you're a person who has elevated testosterone it is not going to interfere with your ability to love other people and perceive their motion good to know good to know yeah. thank you for that. finally new it's science reporter and author based in San Francisco I have a good weekend. thank you to you thank you and now it's time to check in on the state of science. Louis public radio news local science.

San Francisco CNN trump California Louis four thousand five hundred yea one hundred eighty year sixty six gallons hundred dollars thousand years seven hour
"indus valley" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Science Friday

"All these beautiful cities are abandoned and we think that now probably what happened was there was climate. Change rainfall patterns changed. It just became more difficult to farm. The rivers changed course so the mystery has been win. Those people left. Where did they go. Where did this urban diaspora spread. Take all of those people and now thanks to an intrepid group of scientists. We have sequenced dna from one skeleton from one of the biggest cities in the indus valley civilization. So are you ready for. The solution appeared in the sound so what they've found is. I got sixty. One skeletons took little pieces of each one and powdered the bone and tested each of those sixty one samples. One of them mm-hmm turned up positive for d._n._a. And the dna matches closely with the d._n._a. That's common in people who live in south asia today today. So modern day people in india are related to this one person from the indus valley civilization so what that suggests is that people from the indus valley when times got hard the climate change a lot of them journeyed south and they brought their culture with them because what we see at the indus valley are kinda kinda the beginnings of vedic culture which eventually gets popularized as hinduism and buddhism across south asia and southeast asia so this is kind of the birthplace of all of these important cultural movements and ideas and now we have at least one hint of where they all went so it's a pretty cool week week for me as an archaeology approach. You're find interesting sixty-six skeletons. They only found in one skeleton that link yeah so it's this is part of the tragedy of people who are excavating in the indus valley because the climate conditions there vacillate between extremely dry and very wet and it's is just terrible for dna preservation and it's also actually terrible for all kinds of preservation..

indus valley south asia southeast asia india
"indus valley" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Science Friday

"Listener supported w in wisey z. studios. This is science friday. I'm sarah plato later in the hour. We'll be talking about indigenous peoples and science but first first this week as many of the democratic presidential candidates talked about their climate policies and the need for energy conservation and a seven hour marathon earth on on c._n._n. The trump administration announced that it would be rolling back energy efficiency requirements for standard old light bulbs those requirements originally set up during the bush administration or aimed at pushing the country away from energy inefficient incandescent lights and towards better options is like l._e._d. Lights joining me now to talk about trump's push to renew a one hundred eighty year old technology other short subjects and science is science journals to north avenue only new. It's joins us from san francisco. Come back. Hey thanks for having me nice to have you. <hes> so what do these new rule say. What's the big the big effect on consumers sumer here so these are rules that were set to go into effect in january of next year and what they would have done is extend the the energy efficiency requirements from not just the kind of typical pear-shaped incandescent bulbs that we think of screwing into our light sockets but also all kinds of other bulbs that are used in industrial applications kind of funny shaped bulbs that are used in <hes> chandeliers candles shaped so basically it would have swept upped all other light bulbs that are not standard sized into these already existing energy efficiency requirements and with the trump administration has said is that it just. I didn't make economic sense to do that right now. So is this gonna go through this undoing of that law so there's already been a lot of pushback there are consumer groups such as the appliance standards awareness project which have said that this is probably in a cost cost consumers as much as one hundred dollars a year because we will be able to buy these more energy inefficient lightbulbs and also their states like california that are setting their own standards and there are a lot of groups that are going to sue because one interpretation of the laws around this is that you can't actually the government cannot rule back energy standards so that may be a big point of contention in the court so i can't really see people saying oh great incandescent or back you know yeah i mean and these are standards that are intended to help us stay abreast of recent technological developments in light bulbs once we have better more efficient lightbulbs. The idea is to push the marketplace toward them. I don't see a wifi chip in an incandescent bulb anytime soon. You don't want your smart incandescent bulb okay. Let's move on to other news. I know i know you're an archaeology gigging. There's some big news this week about the indus valley civilization villas asian. Tell us about that. That's right so let me set the scene for you about four thousand five hundred years ago. This incredibly sophisticated civilization cassation rises up in the indus valley which is this beautiful lush long <hes> area river valley kind of at the northwestern border between india and the southern border of pakistan today and it has at least a dozen big cities for the time i mean they're not mumbai but they're big for the era and they have a sophisticated writing system which we haven't yet deciphered. They have trade between cities. They're trading with mesopotamia <hes> and most important to me. They have a sophisticated plumbing system and public fountains so this is a very very advanced civilization. They have plumbing in you know centuries before the romans alleged fancy plumbing but what happens is about a thousand years after the civilization rises. Suddenly people just just leave..

mumbai trump sarah plato indus valley san francisco california pakistan area river valley india four thousand five hundred yea one hundred eighty year one hundred dollars thousand years seven hour
"indus valley" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

Jenna & Julien Podcast

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

"The term was coined by Ivan t Sanderson who catalogue them as sites of unexplained disappearances and other mysterious phenomena Ivan t Sanderson asserts that the twelve Ortiz famously Bermuda. Triangle are situated along particular lines of latitude five of the voices are on the same latitude south of the equator and five around on the same latitude to the north the other two are the north and the south pole, which we've gone through that and other podcasts, or, you know, I'm sure a lot of, you know, this plenty of fun things going on in the north and south poles that people have theorized that the do with magnetic fields, and blah, whatever fun- fund, the idea has been taken up by other fringe writers who have argued that. The voices are linked to subtle matter. Energy laylines or electromagnetic aberration. The phenomenon is addressed as geometric patterns as explored by Plato in the book anti gravity and the world grid, which now I wanna read because I did not know that that was the book anyways here, the vile worries Bermuda triangle, which I think people are familiar with the Algierian megaliths south of Timbuktu the Indus valley, which is in the city of Mojo Daro in Pakistan on land. Okay. Yeah. So like, they're five of them are on the same latitude in the north and five of them are on the same latitude in the south while show, you a picture, and maybe I can link to these or something in the description, so you can see. I'm not telling you to think anything, I think, it's a fun picture. Okay. The hammock Kula volcano is east of Hawaii. And it's an underwater volcano some of these have written more about because some of them don't have a lot of information on them. Like, what exactly are the disappearances that you're referring to that you came up to these are vile sees some of them have more information than others like the Bermuda. Triangle has more information than the Indus valley. But this is just according to I've antique Sanderson. The volcano east of wise and underwater volcano that has been the site of.

Kula volcano Ivan t Sanderson Indus valley Bermuda Mojo Daro Ortiz Plato Algierian megaliths Pakistan Hawaii
"indus valley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"His website linked up for you at coast to coast AM dot com before us dot com. Couple of his books include deadman's secrets the weapon the globalist fear in arc of the covenant which came out in March of this year amazing book, indeed Jonathan I want you to paint a picture for us. And that picture would be when did we possess this incredible technology in what did it look like what did they have? Well. As far as can be confirmed. I I concerned after the great global catastrophe known as the great flood, and the survival vessel is is that famous now Issac spreading out all of the descendants of the survivors into a gypped into your Sumeria and into the Indus valley civilization now lease three great civilizations. Which came from the the the scattering of the people. Possessed technology that we have to die virtually everything we can do today. They were able to drinking would be roundabout two thousand three hundred BC three to about a hundred enjoying that four hundred year window was Thanh people were flying. Using t- television. He's using laser technologies using electrical equipment that. The naval filed building huge constructions with the least met. My main pale needed. Technology was being used medicine was at its peak everything we can do medically able able to do. That was a huge. Survival knowledge actually that record enough people to put it into practice. Many of the knowledge was from the pre flood willed in through the arc into the new world and really nicely civilization spring out from it by all headed EPA top. I didn't have to his long up with the talk and later on. Columbia, the invitations followed and civilizations went down, but natural disasters and men might disasters play their role in it told me I had nuclear warfare things Jonathan when we hear stories of ancient Vermont as flying machines. I had a point now where I think they happened. They had these things didn't they? Oh, yes. My head them Northern League. That's actually my had books on 'aeronautics, which described hell, you can you can know what's going on insulin intimate blind. And here comes the citations from the enemy now they had that kind of technology to listen into the I to another plane. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of our Tomek program claimed that he cited in episode from old Indian scripts that showed some kind of nuclear disaster or explosion or war that it had happened a long time ago. I find that to be riveting how about you. Yes. Just as you George is very riveting stuff and not only that George bring mine's a nuclear destroyed reminds have actually thing discovered in several places just just dramatics work now. Let's talk about the flood for second Jonathan I wanna get your take on what that was to. And again here we are with another biblical story that if the kid tells you again that things in the bible are true. What do you think the flood was what happened? Well, it was a global flood. It was one which in in which actually the canopy which surrounded. The us originally and kept the whole list sub-tropical from pole to pole was destroyed now for our water came up from under the ground, and it penetrated the the the canopy the canopy collapsed and counter land and seas were churned up together by water coming up out of the ground boasting and coming down and what a White Mountains. Strato stratified new deposits took place with the reminds of animal, life and human lives, and fora soul mixed up together and actually being discovered rediscovered in West Virginia. For example, a coal miners. Two miles below the surface. I think it was time across a whole patch where they were huge man all mixed up with with the cold that had formed around him. And this was reported to the boss. It was reported into the to the scientific and educational community. And very soon the mine was closed down by BULLDOGS the top of it, and I put a top to cover it up. So that could not become not become an attraction to be seen by people. Let's talk a little bit about prophecy. What have you uncovered with prophecy? What did they say? What's coming true? And how soon? Okay. Well, it's very very interesting. That's a week ago for us on this prophecy foretold the whole future of our planet. Now Inle boggling line there are more than one thousand he's not one of these has yet filed a hundred percent track record. Now one thing that was mentioned was that toward the time of the end. We will see I tr- fast travel and an increase in knowledge wheel vehicles will rise in the straits. They'll jostle one against another in the board wise, they'll seem like torches they'll run like Lightnings. I'm actually giving a quotation statement from one of the appropriate. He's a young peaceful pal will arise in the new world and attain global dominance and become a refuge for persecuted people from.

Issac Jonathan Indus valley George Robert Oppenheimer Sumeria Thanh West Virginia BULLDOGS EPA Vermont Northern League White Mountains Columbia four hundred year hundred percent
"indus valley" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on WLAC

"Gray. His website linked up for you at coast to coast AM dot com before us dot com. Couple of his books include deadman's secrets the weapon the globalist fear in arc of the covenant which came out in March of this year amazing book, indeed Jonathan I want you to paint a picture for us. And that picture would be when did we possess this incredible technology in what did it look like what did they have? Well. As far as Deitz that can can be concerned. I I concerned after the great global catastrophe known as the great flood and the survival vessel is that famous now Issac there wasn't spreading out all of the descendants of the survivors into a gypped into Sumeria and into the Indus valley civilization. Now, these three great civilizations. Which came from the the the scattering of the people. Possessed technology that we have to die virtually everything we can do today. They were able to do the dieting would they around about two thousand three hundred BC three doubts. I nine hundred enjoying that four hundred year window was time people were flying. You using television using laser technologies using electrical equipment that that that never filed. Building huge constructions with the latest met. My main pal needed technology was being used medicine was at its peak everything we can do medically able able to do that was a huge survival knowledge actually that record enough people to put it into practice. The knowledge from the pre flood willed in through the arc into the new world and very nicely civilization spring out from all headed EPA top. I didn't have to resolve upwards. That's the talk and lights on clumsy imitations followed and civilizations went down but natural disasters and men my disasters play their role in it. They had told me my head nuclear warfare ahead alleged things Jonathan when we hear stories of ancient Vermont as flying machines. I'm at a point now where I think they happened. They had these things didn't they? Oh, yes. I certainly had them Northern League. That's actually had books on 'aeronautics, which described hell, you can you can know what's going on in intimate blind and your conversations from the enemy plight. Now, they had that kind of technology to listen into through the skull. I to another plane. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of our Tomek program claimed that he cited in episode from old Indian scripts that showed some kind of nuclear disaster or explosion or war that it had happened a long time ago. I find that to be riveting how about you. Yes. Just as you do George is very riveting stuff and not only that George reminds nuclear destroyed reminds have actually thing discovered in several places just just dramatics work. Now. Let's talk about the flood for second Jonathan I wanna get your take on what that was to. And again here we are with another biblical story that if a kid tells you again that things in the bible are true. What do you think the flood was what happened? Well, it was a global flood. It was one which in in which actually the canopy which surrounded. The us originally and kept the whole list sub-tropical from pole to pole was destroyed now and water came up from under the ground, and it penetrated the canopy the canopy collapsed and katelyn and seas were churned up together by water coming up out of the ground busting and coming down and watching mountains strato stratified new deposits took place with the reminds of animal, life and human lives and forest all mixed up together. And he's actually being discovered rediscovered I've been West Virginia. For example, a coal Mona's. Two miles. I think it was came across a whole patch of where they were huge man all mixed up with with a cold that had formed around him. And this was reported to the boss. It was reported into.

Jonathan George Deitz Indus valley Robert Oppenheimer West Virginia Issac Sumeria EPA Vermont katelyn Northern League four hundred year
"indus valley" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on KTOK

"Live at CBD, plus USA and El Reno Leigh Matthews NewsRadio one thousand Katie. Okay. He calls himself these sensible environmentalists. He's a former co founder and director of Greenpeace and he's got a lecture series at Oklahoma City townhall tomorrow at ten thirty. At the church of the servant on north MacArthur. More on that in a minute. But Dr Patrick more. What do you mean by describing yourself as a sensible environmentalists? Well, it means that you know, I helped start Greenpeace in nineteen seventy one and we sailed to stop nuclear testing and save the whales and toxic dumping and all the other things that were important to clean up the environment and improve situation of our relationship with this earth, but by about the mid eighties. My fellow directors, none of whom had any science education. And this is true of most of the environmental movement started to refer to humans as the enemies of the earth, the enemies of. Nature, and I realized that the humanitarian aspect that I had begun with with Greenpeace. In other words to stop the destruction of civilization by nuclear war had been lost. And that people now considered humans to be apart from the environment, not part of nature, but a destructive force like as if we were invaders from Mars or something, and so I could not handle that. And I saw the movement was turning to sensationalism and misinformation and using fear to to to get people to do what they said because they made people afraid that they were doing their grandchildren by driving their car. And so I decided to to move forward as a scientist, which I've been all my life. I have a PHD in ecology and a science background since I was a kid I decided to base my environmentalism on science and logic rather than sensationalism and fear with a lot of misinformation to this day. And so I I I've developed a presentation just now to more or less debut at the town hall, titled twelve will actually it's thirteen now fake invisible catastrophes and threats of doom and demonstrate to people that may most of the so-called catastrophes that are happening are actually either invisible. Or so remote that you can't test it for yourself to St. it and have to rely on media and politicians and activists to tell you what's really going on like the Great Barrier. Reef, for example, how many people can go and check the Great Barrier. Reef to see how healthy it is. It's so far away, and it's also underwater, and I'm going to present thirteen not at not all of them in detail because there's not enough time in a presentation for that. But I'm going to give the audience an understanding of how the environmental movement today. So called green movement is using. Issues that nobody can verify polar bears is another good example. They're not invisible, but who can go to the North Pole and count all the polar bears. We have to rely on on people to tell us what's going on there. And they're all telling us that they're dying just yesterday. A report came out that the Inuit people that what what used to be called eskimo. Have got their own government part of it. It's called Nunavut. That's where a lot of the polar bears. Are they're saying the polar bear population is growing to the point where it's dangerous to their communities. And so there's quite a disconnect going on in this world about what's real. And what isn't and a lot of it has to do with the fact that the very basis of science is observation seeing something happened and seeing it happen in a way that you can see this caused this or maybe this caused this and the second is replication or repetition if you see the same thing happening over and over again under similar circumstances. You begin to be convinced that there is a cause-effect relationship here, and that is the basis of science. It's simple. It's not not complicated or something that you have to have a PHD to understand. And the church of the servant is where it's going to be held on north MacArthur boulevard. Doctor I have all kinds of I don't want to call them. Environmental scientists. But I have a lot of geologists in my in my family, and we talk about these issues all the time. And I have a hard time getting them to agree upon the causality of earthquakes in Oklahoma, let alone climate change or whether or not climate change is indeed man-made or if it's just a natural cyclical event. What what is your opinion on on climate change? And the man has on climate change. Well, there's no doubt that we have some effects with mainly during of land for culture are. Actively is on the land have had an effect on the evaporator. The solar and that sort these effects are largely local or regional though, I firmly believe mean we have good records from ice cores and ocean sediments going back hundreds of millions of years. So we have some pretty good idea about various levels of temperatures and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and other gases, and that sort of thing going way back, and there's no way had anything to do with people because there weren't any for one thing. Oh, I honestly believe that what we're seeing today is just part of the natural cycles of climate. And that this whole shame and blame thing as I mentioned about being afraid, you're killing your, grandchildren. Paul. You're driving your road, and then feeling guilty about it. Fear, but guilt, and those are two of the main psychological drivers which make people in their wallets and certain person at the polling booth. And so I honestly believe that this is largely a psychological, and what are the political game very little to do science. And unfortunately, the majority of so-called climate scientists as they like to call themselves climate is a lot more than just one thing. It's many many disciplines involved in it. But there's a cordray or a coat of climate scientists who are all on public funding, and the way you could say that the politicians some of them are basically happy to pay the bus to give them a message that they can use in the public sphere to convince people that they can save their grandchildren by cutting CO two or building windmills or whatever. But as far as I'm concerned, it's mostly fake news. And I'm gonna show people in the audience. How many examples of that? There are today, and that's the Oklahoma City townhall lecture series. It is tomorrow. Ten thirty. At the church of the servant, north MacArthur and tickets are available two to four to six to two zero two four to six to Dr thanks for joining us on NewsRadio one thousand K T. Okay, alive at CBD, plus USA and lucky.

Greenpeace Oklahoma City scientist MacArthur Dr Patrick El Reno Leigh Matthews MacArthur boulevard town hall North Pole USA co founder Oklahoma NewsRadio Nunavut Katie
"indus valley" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

13:26 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty. The president says these fires are California's fault. And the firefighters and the governor and all say, hey, that's not he shouldn't be saying that. They say. That the fires in this area are not due to cleared growth this area burn ten years ago. And that's one of the things that's really making this more difficult as grass catching on fire. Another thing you might want to debate is that the governor down out there says that climate change and the extremely hot dry temperatures contribute to this and many of you disagree with the whole notion of climate change. So you can factor that in there on your. In your response. The president said there is no reason for these massive deadly fires caused the fires in California. Accepted parse management is so poor. It seems to me like a strange time to be saying that but still. On Monday, Los Angeles County, fire chief, Daryl Osborne said I personally find that statement unsatisfactory and very hurtful for all. The first responders are putting lives on the line to protect the property lives lives and property. Yeah. Who Saturday one and this one firefighters. Chiefs. Oh, the president. I wonder if the rest of the Republican party is backing him on this one. Because usually it's the Republicans that are very much on the side of military, police and fire first responders or not this time. I wonder if this was a true gut response or whether it was designed as a strategy to take. Interest of something else. But now, I I guess that might not matter. Frankie vice president of California professional firefighters say the president's message attacking and threatening to withhold aid to the victims of Kavakaz isn't fires ill-informed. So there's clearly a two sided thing here whose side he one at a time when every effort should be focused on vanquishing destructive fires and helping the victims the president has chosen instead to issue an uninformed political threat aimed squarely at the innocent victims of these cataclysmic fires. At this moment. Thousands of our brother and sister firefighters are putting their lives on the line to protect the lives and property of thousands some are doing so even as their own homes lay in ruins. Am I view this shameful attack on California's attack on all that courageous men and women on the front lines? Pasadena fire association respond to the president's tweet. Mr President with all due respect your own. The fires in southern California are urban interface. Fires have nothing to do with the met up forest management. And. The international fire association. President fire fighters general, president Harold. Shape murder. Weighed in with his criticism to Trump remarks the early moments of fire such as these are critical time Las entire communities are wiped out. Wiped off the map and our members are injured or killed trying to stop monsters wildfires to minimize the crucial. Lifesaving work being done to make crash suggestions about cutting off funding during a time of crisis shows troubling lack of comprehension about the disaster at hand and a dangerous job. Firefighters do his comments or reckless insulting to the firefighters and people being affected. And in western. A spokesman for California's governor Jerry Brown said the statement. To San Francisco Chronicle, and this, you know, this could be political because it's a. Works for get Jerry Brown. I focuses on the California's impacted by these fires first responders and firefighters working around the clock to save lives and property. None of the president's uninformed tweets. Gavin Newsom governor elect over. There says it's not a time for partisanship is the time for coordinating relief and lifting those in need up. He says lives have been lost entire towns. Have been burned to the ground cars abandoned on the sides of the road. People are being forced to flee their homes. This is not a time for partisanship. This is the time for coordinating relief and response lifting those in need up. So this is where we're at. These days. Forest manager management. Not a factor in the campfire. That's one of the fires. According to the times, Los Angeles Times, it has been fueled by dry grass growing between the trees. The trees had been thinned by a fire ten years ago. J Keith Gillis chair of the California board of forestry and fire protection. And a professor of echina- forest economics. At the university of Berkeley, California told NBC news Trump is at best uninformed. California has always been a leader. You know, it's not about that. It's about who you choose to be at a certain time. And this is he is he's our president. And his. I mean, he's someone I think you can teach. But you folks right now war saying, yeah, I agree with you need to not agree as you need to contact the president or the president's people and say, we love you, man. But can you not do this kind of thing? Just gets in the way of what you want done. And some of the things that I want done. I think you'll see the president walking this back and admitting that it was a mistake. That's me. But Mike there Mike who called the first caller Bill. You guys will never ever ever. Even the president changes his mind. You guys will never say, hey, maybe you shouldn't have done that. Okay. Let's go. Let's go to. Thea in roslindale. Hello. It's six to four firefighters versus the president. But I expect that the president will win. So go ahead. Hi, bradley. I think that the issue actually, I mean, this is not about popular opinion. But. Is that climate the climate in California for many years has been extraordinarily dry. I mean, why don't we have forest fires here in the northeast? Well, we get a lotta rain. So. What what's happened is that the in in paradise in whatever in California day, it was like Tinder dry, and then there's the Santa Ana wind. And so I think we, you know, there's only so much. Can do and to to combat climate. And so that's one thing. The other thing is your issue about Trump and decency. I mean, please give me a break. You saw how he? Acted towards John McCain saying to Trump did he you know, we want you to be more have more simple decency. It's like. Honestly, it's a little short. In my opinion. Right. Thank you very much. So I guess I'm gonna put you down for the firefighters. Absolutely. Okay. So seven to four. That's interesting. Thank you. Interesting. Speaking of Veterans Day that veterans are upset about the president's lack of involvement in Veterans Day stuff. And. They are how about yourself six one seven two five four ten thirty. We have Joe in Pennsylvania Hijo. Hello. Oh, hi. Hi, Sean, Pennsylvania. I'm a frequent listener. And I think you have this fight all wrong. The president correctly pointed out that there's something wrong with with the management of the forest. The we have these multiple California fires that are killing people that are destroying property. I mean, if we can put a man on the moon, we should be able to do something about the fires in California that this requires the application of science, and and really good public policy and the right now, the I think the the state of California is trying to get Mr. Trump to blame for saying that that there's a problem with the forest management obvious. It's obvious that these fires keep going that. There's something wrong with forest management. And it's not the first responders. They they're not they shouldn't even be. Involved in this day are. They're not the ones that set the policy. They're not the ones that determine what science is going to be used to to try to stop these fires at and I feel sorry for them that they've gotten into. This is fight that you're having right now on the both on the radio and and and in the newspapers, but they're gonna try everything they can against Mr. Trump. All he said was that there's a problem with with forest management? I hit the nail on the head in other countries, Germany England, they can't afford to have these fires. They have such little forest, and so they have very complicated forest management. And I think that I think it's time that we take a good look at our forest management and see that it gets the right priority. Especially in the states that this is really a problem with. So let me ask you a question. Generally military first responders police and firefighters, and I'm sure many of these firefighters are fans of President Trump. And they're probably doubly hurt that guy would say this. And they're the ones that are saying, No, MR president, you have it all wrong. The thing that you think is the cause of it is not the cause of it. There may be mismanagement in the forest, but this they say is not the cause of this. And even if it were would it be appropriate appropriate time when people are dying to be to get political. I think that that sounds like a Hillary. They're jumping the gun by by saying that. That the forest management isn't the problem there, the firefighters they are there. But they don't really they're not the scientists that have to. Okay. Policy makers that have to stop the fires. And they shouldn't be they shouldn't be in this great people and they're doing a doing a wonderful job putting their lives on the line. But but it's not fair individual opinions. They might have some things to add to the discussion. But it's not their individual opinions that are going to stop these fires the, okay? So I'm putting on hold. You. See you telling me that the firefighters are not qualified to tell us the the cause of the fires. I can when your house burns down. Etcetera. That seems strange the president does. No, he's in DC didn't go there. Firefighters fighting the fires and not qualified to know what's going on. They're not qualified to know what's burning up. This is not dead wood in the forest. They say it's grass, and you say, they don't know that. And the president does Joe Wright say that I said, we're not scientists. And so they don't know what the car they don't have the ultimate say in what has to be done. But they do have a lot of input. And I think it's important that we you know, with all these fires in California. Instead of just reporting them and saying how many people were killed and how many houses were burnt down. We gotta have something to prevent these things. We're talking about. Now, we're talking about the cause of these fires. Let's take a break. WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty. I'm going to put him down for Trump Trump over the firefighters. So I'll give you the totals after this on WBZ, News Radio ten thirty. CBS news update. It is the deadliest the most destructive wildfire in state history. The death toll from the campfire in northern California is now at forty two Butte county sheriff Corey Honi. We're going to bring in.

president President Trump California Mr President Trump Trump vice president Los Angeles County Trump Joe Wright Republican party Jerry Brown Gavin Newsom Los Angeles Times San Francisco Chronicle CBS Daryl Osborne murder university of Berkeley
"indus valley" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"I just don't think that I don't like for this one task unless you like want this to be something that you do more of Scrimshaw other people's ribs. I think probably you're going to want to give your rib to a professional Scrimshaw artists. I totally totally agree with you. You go to the person who already has developed a talent for scrim showing human ribs. No. Now. Now not human. Eddie Scrimshaw at all. Don't invent the wheel on this would Rachel. Have you talked to your surgeon about the possibility that they might be an expert in Scrimshaw ribs. They have good fine motor skills. Presumably, let's hope boy. Oh, boy, I I'm glad that you have your rib. It might just be for the closet. No, no, no, no, no. It's definitely for display. The more you could make it look like an art piece, the better it gets the less. It looks like it was your rib and I have to say, looking at this picture with your ribbon ajar it looks a lot like it was your rib. The more you can do to cut a make it feel like art, the better. It's going to work when people are like, oh, tell me about that piece and you're like, oh, that's called spare rib. It's my rib. A lot of sculpture, you know. So there's a big wall of sculpture in your house and people be, and you can be like, this is a pot from the Indus valley civilization. This, of course, is a bowl from Han China, and this is spare rib my rib by rib Scrimshaw by legendary Scrimshaw artist. My surgeon Dr Dorf. What a great doctor Dorf callback. Oh, my gosh. Sure. Kasese. He works on ribs to all right. Hey, it's time for the important news from Mars and AFC Wimbledon the news this week from the world's favourite third to your English football team. The two pieces of news first off Hanke as you recently found out AFC Wimbledon has a new training kit sponsor. The sponsor of Wimbledon's training. Kits is an absolutely remarkable thing. Hit new novel coming out, September twenty fifth and available for preorder. Now. Thank you. John. That's very cool. Then weird and very cool to beard. I tried to focus most of the sponsorships on things that you like, and you would be proud of and not make it too much of a Homer gift, but just couldn't pass up the opportunity to sponsor those those training kits, not least because Wimbledon just needs extra money before we get into the new stadium. So anyway, happy to do it. I do prefer the sponsorship of the Dutch national quidditch team personally, and also all of the robotics teams which is just genius, but but also thank you for my Wilmington sponsorship. You're welcome. AFC Wimbledon in football league. One played juuling him last week and we won. We won one two, nil. Which is great. It means we kept a clean sheet and we won the game. So all around a good result playing against Barry filler, which was difficult. He was a, he played a great game actually, but we did win the game. We won on a goal from Joe Pigott. You know what the Wimbledon fans sing. When Joe Pigott scores Hank come on sing, feed the pig, feed the pig, the pig and he will score isn't true. It's true if you feed the pig scores. All right, excellent news, hang that win means that AFC Wimbledon have risen up from twentieth all the way to the dizzying heights of thirteenth in the league..

Wimbledon Eddie Scrimshaw Dr Dorf Joe Pigott Barry filler Indus valley AFC Han China Rachel Hanke quidditch John Wilmington football Hank twenty fifth
"indus valley" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Reached kolkata and he felt really bolstered by having the china leg of his journey behind him and totally had taken him six months to cross through china which was twice as long as he had an ticipant it'd he wrote quote god healthy unfortunate cycler or traveller who crosses china i could never do it again the burma bicycle club had welcomed him with open arms and they treated him like a celebrity he was treated to a banquet in the club picked up the tab for his lodgings this was of course before he got to kolkata and just before he sailed to kolkata he posted a letter to his friend saying that he was doing well he was repairing his bicycle after all of that damage from the roads in china and he was really happy to have the hardest part of his trip completed he eventually set out once again and made his way to delhi and punjab and he made the decision to head toward the arabian sea through the indus valley rather than going through afghanistan shortly after the new year which was eighteen ninety four he crossed into persia we made his way to the city of tabriz he had some minor problems at one point coming down at the long fever but nothing like what he had dealt with while he was traveling through china he was really eager to finish this trip so eager that he decided he would travel directly through turkey which was at that time also notice the ottoman empire to get to europe that decision was made despite the westerners he spoke with in persia saying that he should take the safer and longer route through russia they basically begged him like please do not go that way and he all he could see was it's so short if i just crossed this country albeit europe versus to go all the way around and he wrote to his friend charlie that he missed pie an ice cream and then he also wrote to his editor at outing magazine that he was desperately homesick and at the same time i should say when he would write to his family he always reassured his mother that he was doing great so there were kind of two stories of.

kolkata china burma bicycle club indus valley persia tabriz fever turkey russia charlie editor delhi punjab afghanistan europe outing magazine six months
"indus valley" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"This is the best part a coast let's just do this are you ready to go in order east of the rockies jane's in kansas city uri unopen lines older merson kurt how are you james ongoro endured a rupaul rewind were the aging aliens ogre um uh in in in northern india and aging city they found the a court driven atomic blast but of course that's right all of them who do you think it might of beer um so goes and leave the uh the uh oh the atlanta games jerry and the nuclear war with somebody um there there's culture from all over asia the supposedly had nuclear weapons of tiring flying vessels in such uh who you think that was in northern india basically the annihilated each other world james what and what you are referring to is the indus valley and the question is this and it's a very simple one when you have the vitrification of sand creating glass you know high temperatures of you know melting dirt together and melting rock and creating these layers that have atomic signatures in them that only indicate with what we know today certain things aside chas and what with the in these uh uh atomic uh signatures that were there what can only own created through nuclear fusion and fission right so that's what we know now if that is indeed the case the question is a simple one how did it happen right now eight cates it indicates that there was a nuclear exchange or ignition of some kind could it have happened naturally okay that's the question or railway natural mansour currents were be volcanic activity while there is no would i mean the uh i'm talking about a nuclear explosion caused naturally you know a couple of elements and came in contact with each other that were in stable and boom but it is is that it's something may be gases a bob ability of thumped wide bear happening though is so probably so astronomical or the but that's the skeptics argument tell ya board that's what the orioles alledges are going to tell you what happened naturally you know this morning it was a mere right the.

kansas city kurt india asia nuclear weapons indus valley chas mansour currents orioles james ongoro atlanta
"indus valley" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on WTVN

"Is best part a coast let's just do this are you ready to go in or reagan nightmare veered um the goalie re uh the uh oh the atlanta games do a nuclear war with somebody um their own verse culture from all over asia there supposedly hair nuclear weapons and uh a choices of an atomic blasts but took place that's right um my fear um supposed to leave the uh the uh oh the atlanta games and the nuclear war with somebody um there there's culture from all over asia the supposedly hair nuclear weapons of firing flying vessels such uh who you find that was in northern india maybe the annihilated each other yeah well james what and what you are referring to is the indus valley and the question is this and it's a very simple one when you have the vitrification of sand you know creating glass you know high temperatures of you know melting dirt together and melting rock and creating these layers that have atomic signatures in them that only indicate with what we know today certain things such as what with the in these uh uh atomic uh signatures that were there what can only own created through nuclear fusion and fission right so that's what we know now if that is indeed the case the question is a simple one how did it happen right now bait kate it indicates that there was a nuclear exchange or ignition of some kind could it have happened naturally okay that's the question or always natural mansour currents were be volcanic activity while there's no would i mean the uh i'm talking about a nuclear explosion 'cause naturally you know a couple of elements and came in contact with each other that were in stable and boom by it is is that it's something may be gases uh look bob ability of thumped wide bear happening though is.

asia nuclear weapons india indus valley mansour currents reagan atlanta
"indus valley" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Somewhere around three thousand two four thousand b c e rice travelled north to central china's yellow river basin about the same time rice also moved south to taiwan and vietnam meanwhile heat while evidence of a rice consumption discovered in india's ganji sally dates back to seven thousand to six thousand b c e but these greens were probably not cultivated so found in the wild inning yes but not grown on purpose by people the oldest evidence of that and india goes back to three thousand two two thousand five hundred b c e in a region once controlled by the indus valley civilization by one thousand b c e is a significant crop in sri lanka how yeah i hope you can see already why this might have been some confusing research um some perennial wild rice dating back to fourteen hundred b c still growth in assam and the paul the spread of rice cultivation through these areas has even been proposed as a way of tracing the development and interaction of south and east asian languages um the different words the different cultural groups have for for not just rights but rice at all stages of like planting and harvest in processing show how these peoples at may have a connected and unsettled but meanwhile meanwhile africa's o globo erima came into the rice seeing somewhere around somewhere around between one thousand eight hundred and eight hundred b c according to race screen impressions found in ceramic ware uncovered in northeast nigeria and charred rice grains nearby date back to one thousand two hundred b c.

china india sri lanka assam nigeria taiwan vietnam indus valley africa
"indus valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You are listening to discovery on the bbc world service with me angeles we're exploring the history of science in india through the lens of empire using objects being displayed in a new exhibition on india at london's science museum as i've seen so far long before modern science thousands of years before the european enlightenment asia had societies that will not the matichon illiterate then kit rahman round the kushner is a biologist and nobel prize winner and the current president of britain's most eminent scientific body the wall society he was born in india and lived there until the age of nineteen the him as a scientist the buck shali manuscript is the most sick nificant object being displayed in the science museum's exhibition he says it encapsulates india's profound contribution to modern mathematical thinking you know if you look at roman monuments and see how the romans wrote down their numbers now think about that and trying to multiply to numbers in roman notation a k and you will immediately see the problem and so the idea of having positional notations and having ten digits including zero which was not a trivial concept the idea that nothing is also actually a sort of a number and has a meaning in arithmetic that was a really profound contribution dramatically changed mathematics what's also interesting for me is that this precious manuscript is no longer in india just like the indus valley blades and no longer in india in fact neither of them have been for many many decades it's the manuscript has been in oxford that since 1982 the weights meanwhile were discovered by the survey of india a project the british to understand the history pratt and wealth of the realm essentially what there was to be gained from controlling this vast territory what could they take and what could they use it was crucial to the business empire at its height britain ruled over canada in the west as well as large swathes of africa asia and australia india with its vast natural and cultural riches was considered the jewel in its crowd on the survey of india set up in seventeen sixty seven is also being commemorated in the science museum's new exhibition on india curator matt kimberly showed me another key object from this survey excuse the noise in the pat ground it's museum staff installing the exhibits ashby spent.

pratt ashby matt kimberly australia africa indus valley nobel prize bbc canada india oxford roman monuments science museum scientist britain president kushner london ten digits
"indus valley" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Discovery

"As i've seen so far long before modern science thousands of years before the european enlightenment asia had societies that were mathematically literate then kit rahman ramakrishnan is a biologist and nobel prize winner and the current president of britain's most eminent scientific body the royal society he was born in india and lived there until the age of nineteen the him as a scientist the buck shali manuscript is the most significant object being displayed in the science museum's exhibition he says it encapsulates india's profound contribution to modern mathematical thinking you know if you look at roman monuments and see how the romans wrote down their numbers now think about that and tried to multiply to numbers in roman notation a k and you will immediately see the problem and so the idea of having positional notations and having ten digits including zero which was not a trivial concept the idea that nothing is also actually a sort of a number and has a meaning in the arithmetic that was a really profound contribution dramatically changed mathematics what's also interesting for me is that this precious manuscript is no longer in india just like the indus valley waits a no longer in india in fact neither of them have been for many many decades the manuscript has been an oxford since 1982 the weights meanwhile were discovered by the survey of india a project of the british to understand the history breadth and wealth of the realm essentially what there was to be gained from controlling this vast territory what could they take unbought could they use.

president britain india scientist science museum roman monuments indus valley nobel prize ten digits
"indus valley" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on Discovery

"In europe and in india police otago united set of cubes of different size the numbers on guess what looked like some very bland lumps of rock on first sight anyway i was incredibly infused when life so these are object store however while surrounded by insults of ancient greek artifacts returned a xix not fact these were what really got me excited because this is a set of eased whites made firm shot from stone from the indus valley civilization which is also of who the horizon civilization and this is one of the oldest civilized this is all the world yes absolutely one of the earliest civilizations in the world aids from around three thousand three hundred b c off until around 1300 b c when faded culture begins takeover in india so this predates the ancient greeks engine rooms and even the ancient egyptians the indus valley civilisation the is roughly contemporary news with the oldest parts of egypt mess play near as well so these are often thought was the three on the founding civilizations of the ancient world the cradles of civilized yes and of course egypt everyone is familiar with nothing again with initials of popular through film and television and collections it will ridley scenic brit the imagination the accused nineteenthcentury was much nearer to people as well of course moisy to visit and experience the pyramids and alike mess tomio we know of souma the place in which we thought get boycotting we have babylon believers famed hanging gardens to syria.

india nineteenthcentury syria europe indus valley egypt
"indus valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"indus valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Major finally sites mahendradatta and harappa were in parkistan just as narrow in the 1930s saw them as proof of indian antiquity the new nation of pakistan created in 1940s seven try to yolk itself to the history of the desailly civil aviation one wave conceding the industrial civilization ease to say this is an ancient civilization that separate from an indian civilization and the way take culture that finals leita and as such this separation of visit the territory around in dust is a natural separation and as such parkistan becomes a natural 'dinu meant so it is a new conception of case of people off the past and he's objects become important to this new kind of claim making bucks only nationalist argued that the indus valley culture was not recognizable indian they meant hindu and therefore to the embraced as pakistani as a result history books this likely a historical titles like five thousand years of pakistan became pipe popular nationalism creates certain kinds of boundaries and distinguishes between that which belongs to the nation and that which is outside in ways that don't always sit well with the many different ways in which identities haffkine forging a region but india didn't want to lose out those sites were important to both young countries so they struggle at that point of time india felt its rights to have a part of the indus london holiday were shot as it was as much says as it was by sons in terms of an approach but heritage what the partition commission said to begin with was they were going to do a sixty forty so because india was obligatory bigotry of the indians go get sixty patterson was going to get forty and then that said on on our can do it in the ratio of i mean they had various ratios on it was quite a fraught expedition there was also depositions by the indians that india would lose out of the plum objects from the industrialisation who who ooh.

parkistan pakistan india patterson desailly indus valley five thousand years