17 Burst results for "Indus River Valley"

"indus river valley" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:34 min | Last month

"indus river valley" Discussed on EconTalk

"It's it's very possible. I just feel like there's a certain Academic Bent of that evolutionary psychology literature. It's like let's see how far we can push this. It just seems to be simpler expansion. Which really the. I think the way. I understand your book. Which is we're basically self interested. There is some non self restrained for our relatives and friends and sees me or close relatives. That's biologically driven but a lot of what drives us to be generous with our resources to strangers sculptural. It's something that we have passed onto. Our children accepted from our parents. Those around us our friends and I think without that it's kinda hard to explain a lot of the details in the real world but what are your thoughts. Oh i completely agree with you. I i think that the answer to why we're kind to strangers. While we take an interest in their in their wellbeing is largely because of a kind of cultural ratchet. That's been working over. You know many many millennia but that is interacting you know. The these twists and turns of history are interacting with an evolved psychology. That performs cognitive jobs for us. You know. I mean you can think of the sort of I mean ultimately. I think a satisfying answer to any question about human behavior is going to have to invoke genetics obviously But well maybe that's not so obvious to everyone invoked culture obviously yeah we're not robots instinct in every aspect of her life. Right right So you know. The cultural influences are enormous. But you do need a mind that's receptive to culture. You know you do need a mind. That's receptive to conversation. That's you know because not all minds in the world can do that. You minds can do it but You know there. There are people who might disagree with me a little bit. But you know you're not going to find a dog mind that's well tuned for culture cultural learnings. Mish a great. You're right so let's let's do what i think is the is the tricky part of this which I'm not sure is in the book. Which is i think. The economists way of writing about this is we're which is totally sterile by the way. So i just want to defend it exactly the way. I'm going to say it but the economist view is well. We do things because they they make us feel good And i think that rather banal and hard to argue with argument hides a lot of what is actually going on so let. Let's take the golden rule which you spend a lot of time on Do unto others as you would have done to yourself. It's also the silver rule which you didn't mention but it's a it's sort of the flip side don't do to other people wouldn't want dundee you and these ethical mottos. Ah why do we follow them. In your view you talk about them as they're very important It became very important in western certain western civilization and eastern civilization elsewhere other religious precepts came into people's minds. Why do you think they're import. Well i think The reason they the reason they became import. I think is is is a really interesting story. And then we can talk about why they're still important. They have causal power. Now you know. I mean the reason. They became important is because in the last few centuries Before the common era a variety world religions popping up in the indus river valley The yellow river valley in china Ancient israel classical greece. All discovered assembled a new kind of religion and spirituality that was more cosmopolitan less tribal more universalising More devoted to putting putting our moral preferences into law. Codifying our ethical intuitions or ethical. It hard one ethical experiences and in the midst of that all of these traditions discovered arrived at the idea that the way to be right with god was or to achieve enlightenment or satisfaction or spiritual wellbeing was through concern for everybody and karen armstrong the writer. She writes a lot about religion Her her way of describing this kind of ethical discoveries that somehow for spiritual fulfillment and all of these traditions. Somehow you have to stretch your compassion so that it can embrace the entire world so this was deeply yoke to spirituality to sort of the formalising of ethical thought in a way that people hoped would be generalized at least over the if not over the entire universe of human beings at least the people in your civilization society. So that's how it came about. Originally i mean all of these details are lost to time. obviously These are special. You know these are exceptional changes in how people thought about compassion. And it was really up to spirituality in a deep way so the question. I wanna pro for a little bit. Which is tricky is the thing about how self in how altruistic that is because you can easily say this again. The way economists thing. I think it's wrong. But we're economists would describe it as okay well. Nothing's really changed. So there's just self interest rewritten. Because i want to go to heaven or i want to be right with god the way you phrased there too like So i do these things. I don't like them in themselves. But overall it's worth it. Because i want to get this other benefits and investment.

china indus river valley last few centuries yellow river valley israel karen armstrong greece Ancient
"indus river valley" Discussed on Mythical Monsters

Mythical Monsters

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Mythical Monsters

"Of all the legendary creatures and places mentioned incestuous Indika or history of India, the manticore in particular, seems to have drawn the attention of later Roman writers, some like the first century, naturalist and philosopher, plenty of the elder took the story at face value. Others accuse catas-. JASA exaggerating or theorized that he saw some other animal and only thought it was a manticore. A second century, geographer named Pulse alias says he's inclined to think that. CA- Tessie Oss is actually describing. Tiger Katiba served as the physician to King Arches Desert sees the second during the period when the Persian empire occupied much of northern India, it's. that a tiger might have been brought to the court and presented as a gift to the areas new sovereign given that contest is role at the Persian court was not a particularly important one. It's also likely that he may not have gotten the best look at it. Archaeologists have found images of human tiger hybrids in the Indus River valley, dating all the way back to the year twenty five hundred B C e, The tiger is the largest of the big cats and Bengal. Tiger can grow to be five or six hundred pounds. Tigers are denser in the Indian subcontinent than anywhere else on earth, leading to an unusually high number of attacks on humans. They're hunting. Method is often described as feast or famine, though they'll sometimes go days between meals when they do eat, tigers gorge themselves sometimes consuming as much as sixty pounds of meat in a single sitting. This survival adaptation has earned the tiger a reputation as a particularly voracious eater. It's entirely plausible that CA- tessie US might create a manticore out of an ordinary tiger, perhaps poor translation, or a gullible nature helped form Ketosis, description of the strange man, eating figure of the Manticore, both are creatures of unparalleled might with a nearly godlike status in an ancient Indian culture there also sharp-toothed killers with an astonishing appetite of course, only one of these creatures had a particular taste for human.

Tigers Tiger Katiba India Tessie Oss Indus River valley tigers gorge Persian court catas King Arches Desert Ketosis Pulse Bengal
"indus river valley" Discussed on Mythical Monsters

Mythical Monsters

02:51 min | 7 months ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Mythical Monsters

"The first recorded mentioned the manticore comes from Greek doctor named contest, Yaas who was born in the early fifth century BC as a physician who served in the Persian royal court for nearly two decades catas- encountered a number of visitors from the neighbouring lands of the Indus River Valley. He collected their stories into a book titled Indika or the History of India. In that tax to Qatar? CEOS tells of the legendary. Marta Cora an animal that he claims to have seen firsthand when it was presented as a gift to the Persian King Archer. The second, the description that could tessie US gives, is of a bizarre monster with the body of a lion, the head of a human and the tail of a Scorpion. It catches careless travelers by waiting in the bushes, and raising its long thin neck above the foliage, when people pass by, they see only the face of a blue-eyed old man popping up out of the greenery when they approach to help the man. The manticore pounces shooting them with the Stinger from its tail and ripping them to shreds. The existence of Ketosis Martin Cora was hotly debated by the Writers and philosophers of Ancient Greece and Rome some took catas- at his word, while others questioned whether the beast he saw was nothing more than an extraordinary tiger. Most of Ketosis works were forgotten long ago, but the story of the manticore was kept alive by the scholarly community of the first and second centuries, medieval writers would draw on these works when creating their popular best. Yaris, the unsettling illustrations that accompanied these tax would solidify the image of the creature forever fixing the picture of this strange Primera in our collective cultural consciousness. The word manticore derives from the Persian. Word meaning man eater that this creature was literally named for the consumption of men speaks to its identity as a monster of untameable appetite during the Middle Ages. The manticore came to symbolize the idea of animal, voracious nece equality associated with the sins of lust and greed, part of what makes the Manticore, so unsettling is the incongruity of a human face imposed onto a dangerous animal. When we look at a manticore, we worry that we're seeing a reflection of the insatiable appetite for violence that exists within ourselves..

Ketosis Persian King Archer Marta Cora Indus River Valley catas India Martin Cora Yaas Qatar tessie US BC Ancient Greece Rome
"indus river valley" Discussed on Strange News Daily

Strange News Daily

03:31 min | 10 months ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Strange News Daily

"Is rightly consumed by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. This does not mean that other news or global threats just suddenly stopped the threat of rising temperatures and climate change for instance remain and if anything the recent research indicates that our previous calculations about the climate crisis maybe woefully incorrect. It all goes back to something. We'll call the human survivability limit you see humans are pretty amazing at adapting to our environments we have a number of biological superpowers. One of those oddly. Enough is sweating as temperatures round US rise. We excrete sweat. This sweat evaporates cooling our skin and helping to keep our bodies from overheating. This somewhat smelly sticky at times. Superpower is a huge part of why we have spread to so many of the planet for thousands of years humans adapted and survived in a comfortable climate with an average annual temperature range of less than twenty eight degrees Celsius. That's less than eighty two point. Four degrees Fahrenheit this temperature range has been considered ideal for livelihood human health and Agriculture for the last thousands of decades really but now within a short span of just five decades billions of people could find themselves living in areas with extreme temperatures much much higher than what was seen over the past. Six thousand years you see even our superpower has limits when the environment gets too hot and humid for example. Our sweat trick doesn't do the job anymore. This limit which scientists refer to as the wet bulb temperature is pretty easy to explain when an old school bulb thermometer is wrapped in a wet towel and reads thirty five degrees Celsius or ninety five degrees. Fahrenheit that indicates temperature where even the most in shape best sweating human. Being on earth would probably die within just a few hours for a long time. Scientists believed these extreme temperatures. Rarely occurred if ever on earth but as our globe warms. Recent climate simulations suggest the wet bulb temperatures around thirty five degrees Celsius again. Ninety five degrees Fahrenheit could become more common toward the end of the century in certain regions this would endanger hundreds of millions of people. It's already a grim for booting story. But there's a twist it seems. The timeline has accelerated in a recent study published in science advances researcher. Call and Raymond conducted an analysis of Global Weather Station Data. That shows this. Human survivability limit has been briefly surpassed at least a dozen times in the past four decades mainly it sites along the Persian Gulf and Indus River valley in India and Pakistan. The study also shows slightly lower but still dangerous wet bulb. Temperatures are increasingly familiar features of summer across swaths of the Middle East South Asia and the Gulf coast here in the United States. Matthew Huber Climate scientists at Purdue University in West. Lafayette.

Lafayette Purdue University Persian Gulf Matthew Huber researcher Gulf coast United States Middle East Raymond Indus River valley South Asia West India Pakistan
"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:39 min | 10 months ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"We're back, so we're talking about ancient complex latrine systems. Yeah, I was reading about this in a book by Brian Fagan that I've mentioned on the show before the seventy great inventions of the ancient world and he points to one of the earliest examples we have of of latrine technology, being that of a latrine drainage system in the Neolithic period. One, example, being scar, bray on the Orkney Islands of Scotland from roughly thirty, one hundred to twenty five hundred BC. In the site featured six houses each with a buried duct that drains from small toilet rooms to a single duct. They're removed waste from the houses, so it's simple, but basically in that you have the roots of modern of sewage technology. Yeah, and so we see things kind of like this and other ancient civilizations, like for example one of the Great. Ancient civilizations in terms of civic design and and technological advancement in the way cities or put together is the Indus River valley civilisation like including sites like my Jo Daro and Harappa, where they had buildings with these sort of toilet holes that rested over an underground brick drainage pipe, and these sewer drains could be washed out with water to carry the waste away cesspits right. This would have been about twenty, five hundred BC and another interesting bit about the Darrow site is that there appear? Appear to be channel junctions in the sewage system. So that you could, you could easily be cleaned. You could go in there and to prevent blockage, so it would seem to be in an advancement from from earlier designs. Yeah, and another advancement of course comes if you have a good source of flowing water like the ancient Romans made use of their aqueducts supplied water to power sword of flush toilet. I think is not quite a flush toilet. Guess it depends on how you define it. But it consisted of in in ancient Rome, basically a bench with multiple holes in it, so this would have been a very communal affairs. Right next to each other, so you'd go and sit next to a whole bunch of people and I guess just sit around talking while you were pooping, and these holes in the bench were suspended over a drainage ditch with running water, and the flowing water below the toilet bench would remove the waste, and it would also help. Limit smells so this is great. You know it doesn't stink in there. Because stuff's getting while it might stink a little bit, but it's not as bad as it could be because it's all getting washed away immediately by the running water. Yeah, there's running water. There's there's there there are mosaics and frescoes there is there's probably live. At some of these. I didn't know that yeah. That was a detail. I was reading in I believe. It was Smith's book. P- pointing out the this would have been just kind of a fun place to to hang out and have a poop yeah I mean it does seem like it was the thing that it's. It's like with modern Western sensibilities about like embarrassment you know..

Brian Fagan Orkney Islands Indus River valley Scotland bray Jo Daro Harappa Darrow Rome Smith
"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:38 min | 10 months ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"We're back, so we're talking about ancient complex latrine systems. Yeah, I was reading about this in a book by Brian Fagan that I've mentioned on the show before the seventy great inventions of the ancient world and he points to one of the earliest examples we have of of latrine technology, being that of a latrine drainage system in the Neolithic period. One, example, being scar, bray on the Orkney Islands of Scotland from roughly thirty, one hundred to twenty five hundred BC. In the site featured six houses each with a buried duct that drains from small toilet rooms to a single duct. They're removed waste from the houses, so it's simple, but basically in that you have the roots of modern of sewage technology. Yeah, and so we see things kind of like this and other ancient civilizations, like for example one of the Great. Ancient civilizations in terms of civic design and and technological advancement in the way cities or put together is the Indus River valley civilisation like including sites like my Jo Daro and Harappa, where they had buildings with these sort of toilet holes that rested over an underground brick drainage pipe, and these sewer drains could be washed out with water to carry the waste away cesspits right. This would have been about twenty, five hundred BC and another interesting bit about the Darrow site is that there appear? Appear to be channel junctions in the sewage system. So that you could, you could easily be cleaned. You could go in there and to prevent blockage, so it would seem to be in an advancement from from earlier designs. Yeah, and another advancement of course comes if you have a good source of flowing water like the ancient Romans made use of their aqueducts supplied water to power sword of flush toilet. I think is not quite a flush toilet. Guess it depends on how you define it. But it consisted of in in ancient Rome, basically a bench with multiple holes in it, so this would have been a very communal affairs. Right next to each other, so you'd go and sit next to a whole bunch of people and I guess just sit around talking while you were pooping, and these holes in the bench were suspended over a drainage ditch with running water, and the flowing water below the toilet bench would remove the waste, and it would also help. Limit smells so this is great. You know it doesn't stink in there. Because stuff's getting while it might stink a little bit, but it's not as bad as it could be because it's all getting washed away immediately by the running water. Yeah, there's running water. There's there's there there are mosaics and frescoes there is there's probably live. At some of these. I didn't know that yeah. That was a detail. I was reading in I believe. It was Smith's book. P- pointing out the this would have been just kind of a fun place to to hang out and have a poop yeah I mean it does seem like it was the thing that it's. It's like with modern Western sensibilities about like embarrassment you know. When you when you have to go to the bathroom, they, it's just hard to imagine sitting around talking to people while you're all pooping on the same bench, but when in Rome, you know Poop poop on the bench but of course this this had some limitations, also because it relied on a certain kind of infrastructure right, it relied on the constant running water supplied by the aqueduct system, and they had to be done at the end of the water. Water, supply system or else he would of course foul. The water sources downstream of you, so this SORTA had to. You know you wouldn't WanNa. Put this toilet side at like the first place. The aqueduct water supplied water gets in the city right now. Certainly, we're GONNA. Talk some more about Roman toilets here. Because the Roman plumbing situation was fabulous, it was really it was wonderful creation. They were really proud of it, too. Oh, yeah, but at the same time. There's a problem with thinking too much about ancient toilets in light of our our modern concept's. Because we're standing at the end of a long journey, in which in innate a Sensibilities about cleanliness or confused with concepts of purity right. Augmented to varying, but hopefully significant degrees by public health concerns right so like you know for a fact that exposure to human feces can actually be a public health risk, but there's also like this weird kind of primal thing where you think of feces as morally bad or Yeah and that's one of the major trends, and in Smith's book about hygiene that these two things just become. Interwoven. It's hard to to to to take them apart. But the ancient understandings of public health were very unlike our own. We've discussed before on your mind. How Roman civil engineer the truce advised against building towns near marshes, because of the the fear of the MIASMA right right? Yeah, which there's some truth to that and also just. Like he obviously upon truth, but at the same time there's no magical fog. That's GONNA come out and give you an illness while he was right for the wrong reasons right like so the idea that you might get malaria because there are bad, smells and vapors coming off the marshes is wrong, but it might actually be corrected that you don't want to be too close to the marshes, because the standing water produces disease vectors, mosquitoes the vector for the malaria. Now he also advised that latrines should be positioned so that odor is directed away from public spaces sounds reasonable..

malaria Smith Brian Fagan Orkney Islands Scotland Indus River valley Rome bray Harappa Darrow Jo Daro engineer WanNa
"indus river valley" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"Then the next innovation we get isn't even a new innovation it is a reform on Hinduism where there were people who started to reject the veteran tradition and reject the scriptures of Hinduism Okay and they were shunned San the non believer Johnnie became the genes the genes yes J. A. N. E. S. J.. in and JANA SOM is actually the religion Jimeta from friendly atheist grew up in it is one of the smallest religions in that's not considered a tribal religion in India and Jane's are the if any you can you can imagine almost any religion if somebody gets to fanatical it's dangerous the most fanatical Jane would probably commit suicide before actually harming anyone these are the people who strain their water to make sure they don't swallow a bug they sweep the ground in front of them while they walked to make sure they won't step on a bug because they believe all life is so interconnected and Karma rules everything so heavily that you must protect everything wow and they take do not kill to not just the most logical extreme they take it beyond the most logical extreme he grew up that way yeah wow yeah next we have we're GONNA have to move from the the Indus River valley in what is Modern Day India to ancient Persia Modern Day Iran and we have zoroastrianism form around the century BC so Jameson was around the eighth century BC Zoroastrianism is about one hundred years later where's Oh astor or what's been ascribed to a theoretical person who disaster when you're dealing with historical figures that far back and it's very difficult to actually prove that that person was actually you have a sure Mazda who is the the good God and then you have the bad gut and you have these two dueling deities.

Johnnie J. A. N. E. S. J.. JANA SOM India Jane Indus River valley Iran Jameson Oh astor Mazda San one hundred years
"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yes we're back and as as we were saying. Some of these quieter religions have survived in the corners of the world in places where you may not expect to find them and <hes> we're gonna talk as well about some of the oldest existing religions where we're going to jump into a lot of statistics as you mentioned right now about what our religious world world looks like today right so according to all official sources and even to <hes> anecdotal stories you can find in oral royal traditions. Many ancient religions have more or less completely died out. They were supplanted by newer spiritual rival or they were as you as you mentioned earlier manner grocery store analogy. They were absorbed into a more popular system. It's it's interesting to when you listen to or you read transcriptions shinzo of <hes> oral retailing's and folktales because religious wars are sometimes depicted not as arguments over ideology or spiritual values. They're depicted as wars of survival and attrition against strange range people right like when we did our episode on the <hes> the people the takashimaya right oh yeah in north america or what's now called north america america they the antagonistic people the so-called giants see takata were not depicted as people who had a different lifestyle or rich spiritual culture. They were just a rival group competing competing for resources and then later this kind of stuff gets <hes> gets airbrushed gets the made for t._v. Treatment and then some some of their community leader comes along and says oh no no no no no no i mean the war wasn't really about fresh water or grazing land i and it was that our god told us to do it and that's why we did the right thing. Yeah morrow took told us to go over here. <hes> we we babylonians took over all of this land because he we were told right right and i love you point this out because the the rule is usually that religions will die or be absorbed into a different model over time you will not for example find a ton one of at least publicly accessible temples and churches dedicated to worshiping more look or murdoch or marta talk yeah exactly you will however find that despite that despite that unpleasant fact that many religions of ancient ancient ancient times have enormous staying power even today people will usually say that the oldest known existing religion extent religion is hinduism hinduism it originated in the indus river valley part of modern day pakistan sometime around two thousand five hundred b._c. Possibly earlier and just a stop on that point for second. It's a little bit difficult to pinpoint the origin of hinduism because unlike some other religions it doesn't have a particular founder that one can point to new mazda no moses abraham jesus and so on it also doesn't have a single text a bible a torah koran and this leads scholars to conclude that what we call hinduism today is an amalgamation of a great number of pre existing traditions shinzo and beliefs the question then becomes how far back to those traditions and beliefs date is five thousand years is is this a situation where some of these these beliefs and practices predate the written word does it go back to the via mawas and back to the stars right like this is this is the thing that people probably drop acid and talk about all the time but as far as proving that it's it's very difficult so we just know that at some point around at least two thousand five hundred b._c..

north america morrow indus river valley mazda official takata community leader founder marta murdoch five thousand years
"indus river valley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Your online sportsbook experts so i want to shift gears to a super important topic that i've been keeping my eyes on and actually i was thinking of actually going personally and visiting this very crisis and i got some advice from somebody i really trust one of the top financiers and one of the biggest critics on china he said charlie. Have you ever been critical of china. Uh i said yeah i i've been pretty critical. Chinese said do not go to hong kong. I said why not. He said they might not win. They'll have their eyes on you. You will not be safe in hong kong so the protests that are happening in hong kong right now is one of the most important things happening geopolitically on earth and so many of you have probably heard about hong hong kong in general some. You've probably heard of what's going on. We're gonna give you the straight facts right now and i'm going to tell you something that the hong kong protesters wish they had that they're totally and completely missing so first of all just fast facts about hong kong current hong kong's population right now seven point eight million people seven point eight million people so to put that in perspective <hes> that's smaller than the population of illinois just give i mean that's just about the population of a mid mid size state so <hes> they're not not huge population there. I learned they became a colony of the british empire. At the end of the first opium war in eighteen forty two followed by co loon. I'm probably mispronouncing eighteen sixty after the second opium war and the modern territory was completed in eighteen ninety eight ninety nine year british lease over the new territories which comprise eighty nine percent of the hong kong island silence. I just have to laugh for a second you sign these ninety nine year leases mr producer and you think they're never going to mean anything and all of a sudden the least comes up and guess what in one thousand nine hundred seven the lease was up and so guess what sovereignty over the territory was restored to china in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine year lease was up it it actually functions as a special administrative region hong kong maintains their own governing and economic systems separate from those of mainland china <hes> it it it. It's people tend to identify moore's hongkongers than chinese hong kong as a special administrative region an essay of china with executive legislative and judicial powers that are devolved from the the national government so hong kong. There's really not an american equivalent of this <hes> but i'm trying to think of what the texans often refer to themselves first as texans and actually the founding of the country. A lot of americans used to call themselves a you know i. I'm a virginian. I'm then i'm an american and that has over the years become unless of obviously a thing we we ourselves to be americans. They're not in hong kong when you have these really powerful kind of semi galactic empire type countries countries like china that are created you kind of have these external countries that are always just kind of a stick in the side if you will right mr producer of the country so what was is it for the soviet union was east and west berlin that was kind of their store in in the side of their soviet empire that they were trying to create and hong kong. Is that for the chinese yes. They've never been able to totally control hong kong. It's always really bothered them. Same with taiwan taiwan is just an eternal problem for the chinese. They think that they governed taiwan. The taiwanese want their own government their own structure. They don't consider any sort of <hes> allegiance at all to china so here's a really important thing and this is from a history st textbook says quote although britain transferred sovereignty of hong kong hover hong kong nonetheless maintained some institutions that were separate from mainland china such as legislator independent judiciary <hes> this framework known as one country two systems has existed for twenty two years but protesters and hong kong are worried that the proposed changes for the extradition bill would give beijing greater influence over the region before going further just some top line facts about china really quick china right now is america's greatest enemy right now. There's millions of muslims and concentration camps simpson china china's trying to take over the world. Our trade policies have heavily benefited china china's g._d._p. Is growing rather slower today than it used to be but generally very very very quickly. <hes> china has total goals takeover most the sub saharan african ports of entry around the world and as well in south america china. It has no freedom of expression for its individuals. China is a very atheist secular country china has contempt for the west and the more that we've trade with china china's actually become more more authoritarian and more aggressive towards the west and so here's a little bit about the extradition agreement that was kind of struck in february two thousand nineteen hong kong security borough proposed changes to regional extradition laws that would allow people to be extradited from hong kong to mainland china reuters reported critics feared the bill would undermine the independence of hong gongs legal system and put hong kong citizens and foreign nationals at risk by allowing suspects to be sent to mainland china for trial and that's from reuters protesters believe that mainland china per play a role in drafting law and order to gain more control over hong kong citizens and they're right hong kong chief executive carry land denies this claim protesters demanding demanding her resignation due to what they perceived to be dishonesty to her citizens and loyalty to beijing so you kind of have hong kong that is having seventeen seventy six moment mr producer so this is their seventeen seventy six moment they are literally flying american flags in the streets and singing the national anthem and i'm telling you right now we should do even more to support the people of hong kong china is evil country. China is a evil country. I'm so sick and tired of this quote unquote alliance that we have china not saying we have to go to war with them not proposing being that i mean there's a lot of evil countries out there. I hope podcast about how evil iran was and how we should go to war with them. I mean i've spoken time and time again about countries that are evil and countries that are not our friend that we should stand up against north korea's evil but i think it's good that we're talking to them. I think that for example in other contra i've been very critical love and mr producer you know this saudi arabia funded nine eleven fifteen and nineteen. The hijackers were saudi arabian. I mean saudi. Arabia funds madris's all over the world. Saudi arabia's is behind a lot of the rise of islamic tears which would award them just because i think china's evil does not mean. I think we sh- want again. There's a distinction between the government of china and the way that the one point arana's the same way a lot of the people in iran are credibly liberal progressive. People purchased a great. There are persons are great. They live under a dictatorial oppressive regime and a lot of the chinese. Can you get them on the street. They talk. You know very sensibly. They want more openness. They want more freedoms and the same thing's happening in hong kong precisely and so and so the demands of the hong kong among people are this they want democracy that universal suffrage so hong kong residents have the right to elect their own leaders through general elections without the intervention of the chinese communist government mr producer producer. This sounds like seventy seventy six the sounds like a petition to king george they want an autonomous government duly elected by the people so they can achieve the rights and freedoms. We have in the united states including living free speech and the right to keep and bear arms. Can you believe it. They want the right to keep and bear arms this extradition bill which started the protest to be complete withdrawn now. I have to take a step back and your this. This is guess what mr producer for those you listen to the trolley kirk show. This is charlie kirk show exclusive commentary. I've not heard this anywhere. This is charlie kirk exclusive commentary number one. Let's go back to the brilliance of the founding fathers. The founding fathers studied human history. They started the greeks. They started the romans. They said the chinese that's right. They started the indus river valley. This out of the addition of mashed potatoes about below means the as the mines the incas and they found us that human beings are rather predictable creatures that we will act in certain ways and that we we will time and time again unfortunately embraced tyranny and one of the best ways to prevent against tyranny is to have some capacity that there can be equilibrium within the the people and the rulers and mr producer. What did they put in place to make sure of that. Will they put in place to make sure that citizens this could be armed. Could you imagine right now if every hong kong protester had an a._r. Fifteen sitting at home all this this wouldn't be your protest. This would be what mr producer. This'll be a negotiation and i we were talking about. This and show prep and i take is is is brilliant honestly. This is the best argument for the second amendment. You're ever going to funny. It's an in the contrast between the new york times trying to rewrite our history and these hong kong. This is real in real time. The clinging to the true story of our founding freedom fighters of the spirit of seventeen seventy six is alive and well in hong kong. Meanwhile it's dead and gone in the new york times editorial editorial. It's totally dead and so right now. Imagine if every honked is the best argument for the second amendment you're ever going to find because the second amendment is not the hunt deer and it's not for personal protection those things these are important but what is the second amendment really about to fight government tyranny and mr producer every single this this really upsets because every time i say this on a college campus people say oh. There's no more government tyranny. You're talking about something that's ever exist right now. In hong kong there's government tyranny and people are standing up against it. There's hundreds of thousands of young people well that want freedom they want freedom from tyrannical government and for the leftists out there that are totally silent shame on you for the liberals in the meteorite. They're they're not covering this appropriately. I condemn you completely and categorically. Here's what's happening. You have these people that want what they want. Democracy they want freedom expression but what have i always said mr producer. There is no first amendment without the second amendment and you're seeing that against the hong kong people unless the west comes to their aid unless america says definitively. We stand dan with the people of hong kong. They're going to lose this. What are the gun laws in hong kong right now. According to section thirteen of up to thirty eight the firearms and ammunition ordinance essentially no no person shall have in their possession any arms or ammunition unless he or she holds a special license for possession of such arms ammunition or dealers licenses such items james. Those in possession of illegal firearms can face up to fourteen years in prison. Smuggling of guns is punishable by death. You are recommended by your club to possess essentially have to be part of a gun club. There's no private ownership of guns. Why is this the chinese government knew that if one million people in hong kong had a._r. Fifteen for example the gun the left hates all of a sudden. They wait a second. We wouldn't have protests. We could have a civil warner has now. I don't want a civil war. I don't want armed. Conflict understand is the reagan doctrine of peace through strength in a micro lens. This is peace peace through strength when a million people all of a sudden have negotiation power. They have no leverage so if the chinese bringing their military right now you know what it is. It's a hostage hostage. Situation is not a negotiation but if the chinese military walks into hong kong with their tanks and you got a million people they are fifteen waiting for you all of a sudden. You're like wait a second hold on we we might lose our lives here. We know we're not really. We love this guy but i don't know about this right now. They know that they're gonna be unopposed. The chinese military can go door to door and kill whoever they wanna kill they can mow down whatever apartment building they want to that anyone getting in their way however with an armed citizenry it changes the entire dynamic of the conversation and changes the entire hire dichotomy of how the entire process happens instead of protesters trying to create attention against the citizens. They're going to be treated as equals. They'll be treated a sovereign beings because there will be the imbalance that happens when there's no armament of the citizens is so remarkable and cannot be ignored. This is the argument for the second amendment and if hong kong embrace the second amendment for the last hundred years and older citizens were armed like the israeli citizens were armed and the swiss citizens were armed and the american citizens were armed my goodness they wouldn't have this china would say yet. You can have your own hong kong. You can do your own thing. You can have your own separatist government. We don't want a civil war. We don't want an uprising. We don't want carnage in the streets. We don't want we don't we don't want to lose one hundred thousand people because these hong kong people are ready to die the ready to but they don't have the ability to die. They're just going to die as smarter as victims but if you have the ability to shoot back and they're coming with tanks and they're coming with guns good luck trying to to to try to quell the kind of rebellion absolutely i think i think the on on the whole electoral argument for the second amendment point of having the guns is so you don't have to use them this ended of course that's what i'm saying and and look the chinese are kind of smirking because they're like well. If we bring in the military we will and if we have to shoot a couple of people we will but they're not gonna shoot back because they don't have guns they know they don't have guns because they put these ordinances in they know.

hong kong hong hong kong hong kong island taiwan producer hong kong china charlie kirk china china opium iran saudi arabia new york times chinese government north korea illinois america indus river valley
"indus river valley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

16:33 min | 1 year ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Your online sportsbook experts so i want to shift gears to a super important topic that i've been keeping my eyes on and actually i was thinking of actually going personally and visiting this very crisis and i got some advice from somebody i really trust one of the top financiers and one of the biggest critics on china he said charlie. Have you ever been critical of china. Uh i said yeah i i've been pretty critical. Chinese said do not go to hong kong. I said why not. He said they might not win. They'll have their eyes on you. You will not be safe in hong kong so the protests that are happening in hong kong right now is one of the most important things happening geopolitically on earth and so many of you have probably heard about hong hong kong in general some. You've probably heard of what's going on. We're gonna give you the straight facts right now and i'm going to tell you something that the hong kong protesters wish they had that they're totally and completely missing so first of all just fast facts about hong kong current hong kong's population right now seven point eight million people seven point eight million people so to put that in perspective <hes> that's smaller than the population of illinois just give i mean that's just about the population of a mid mid size state so <hes> they're not not huge population there. I learned they became a colony of the british empire. At the end of the first opium war in eighteen forty two followed by co loon. I'm probably mispronouncing eighteen sixty after the second opium war and the modern territory was completed in eighteen ninety eight ninety nine year british lease over the new territories which comprise eighty nine percent of the hong kong island silence. I just have to laugh for a second you sign these ninety nine year leases mr producer and you think they're never going to mean anything and all of a sudden the least comes up and guess what in one thousand nine hundred seven the lease was up and so guess what sovereignty over the territory was restored to china in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine year lease was up it it actually functions as a special administrative region hong kong maintains their own governing and economic systems separate from those of mainland china <hes> it it it. It's people tend to identify moore's hongkongers than chinese hong kong as a special administrative region an essay of china with executive legislative and judicial powers that are devolved from the the national government so hong kong. There's really not an american equivalent of this <hes> but i'm trying to think of what the texans often refer to themselves first as texans and actually the founding of the country. A lot of americans used to call themselves a you know i. I'm a virginian. I'm then i'm an american and that has over the years become unless of obviously a thing we we ourselves to be americans. They're not in hong kong when you have these really powerful kind of semi galactic empire type countries countries like china that are created you kind of have these external countries that are always just kind of a stick in the side if you will right mr producer of the country so what was is it for the soviet union was east and west berlin that was kind of their store in in the side of their soviet empire that they were trying to create and hong kong. Is that for the chinese yes. They've never been able to totally control hong kong. It's always really bothered them. Same with taiwan taiwan is just an eternal problem for the chinese. They think that they govern taiwan. The taiwanese want their own government their own structure. They don't consider any sort of <hes> allegiance at all to china so here's a really important thing and this is from a history st textbook says quote although britain transferred sovereignty of hong kong hover hong kong nonetheless maintained some institutions that were separate from mainland china such as legislator independent judiciary <hes> this framework known as one country two systems has existed for twenty two years but protesters and hong kong are worried that the proposed changes for the extradition bill would give beijing greater influence over the region before going further just some top line facts about china really quick china right now is america's greatest enemy right now. There's millions of muslims and concentration camps simpson china china's trying to take over the world. Our trade policies have heavily benefited china china's g._d._p. Is growing rather slower today than it used to be but generally very very very quickly. <hes> china has total goals takeover most the sub saharan african ports of entry around the world and as well in south america china. It has no freedom of expression for its individuals. China is a very atheist secular country china has contempt for the west and the more that we've trade with china china's actually become more more authoritarian and more aggressive towards the west and so here's a little bit about the extradition agreement that was kind of struck in february two thousand nineteen hong kong security borough proposed changes to regional extradition laws that would allow people to be extradited from hong kong to mainland china reuters reported critics feared the bill would undermine the independence of hong gongs legal system and put hong kong citizens and foreign nationals at risk by allowing suspects to be sent to mainland china for trial and that's from reuters protesters believe that mainland china per play a role in drafting law and order to gain more control over hong kong citizens and they're right hong kong chief executive carry land denies this claim protesters demanding demanding her resignation due to what they perceived to be dishonesty to her citizens and loyalty to beijing so you kind of have hong kong that is having seventeen seventy six moment mr producer so this is their seventeen seventy six moment they are literally flying american flags in the streets and singing the national anthem and i'm telling you right now we should do even more to support the people of hong kong china is evil country. China is a evil country. I'm so sick and tired of this quote unquote alliance that we have china not saying we have to go to war with them not proposing being that i mean there's a lot of evil countries out there. I hope podcast about how evil iran was and how we should go to war with them. I mean i've spoken time and time again about countries that are evil and countries that are not our friend that we should stand up against north korea's evil but i think it's good that we're talking to them. I think that for example in other contra i've been very critical love and mr producer you know this saudi arabia funded nine eleven fifteen and nineteen. The hijackers were saudi arabian. I mean saudi. Arabia funds madris's all over the world. Saudi arabia's is behind a lot of the rise of islamic tears which would award them just because i think china's evil does not mean i think which want again there's a distinction between the government of china and the way that the one point arana's the same way a lot of the people in iran are credibly liberal progressive people purchased a great. There are persons are great. They live under a dictatorial oppressive regime and a lot of the chinese. Can you get them on the street. They talk. You know very sensibly. They want more openness. They want more freedoms and the same thing's happening in hong kong precisely and so and so the demands of the hong kong among people are this they want democracy that universal suffrage so hong kong residents have the right to elect their own leaders through general elections without the intervention of the chinese communist government mr producer producer. This sounds like seventy seventy six the sounds like a petition to king george they want an autonomous government duly elected by the people so they can achieve the rights and freedoms. We have in the united states including living free speech and the right to keep and bear arms. Can you believe it. They want the right to keep and bear arms this extradition bill which started the protest to be complete withdrawn now. I have to take a step back and your this. This is guess what mr producer for those you listen to the trolley kirk show. This is charlie kirk show exclusive commentary. I've not heard this anywhere. This is charlie kirk exclusive commentary number one. Let's go back to the brilliance of the founding fathers. The founding fathers studied human history. They started the greeks. They started the romans. They said the chinese that's right. They started the indus river valley. This out of the addition of mashed potatoes about below means the as the mines the incas and they found us that human beings are rather predictable creatures that we will act in certain ways and that we we will time and time again unfortunately embraced tyranny and one of the best ways to prevent against tyranny is to have some capacity that there can be equilibrium within the the people and the rulers and mr producer. What did they put in place to make sure of that. Will they put in place to make sure that citizens this could be armed. Could you imagine right now if every hong kong protester had an a._r. Fifteen sitting at home all this this wouldn't be your protest. This would be what mr producer. This'll be a negotiation and i we were talking about. This and show prep and i take is is is brilliant honestly. This is the best argument for the second amendment. You're ever going to funny. It's an in the contrast between the new york times trying to rewrite our history and these hong kong this is real in real time <unk> clinging to the true story of our founding freedom fighters of the spirit of seventeen seventy six is alive and well in hong kong meanwhile. It's dead and gone in the new york times editorial editorial. It's totally dead and so right now. Imagine if every honked is the best argument for the second amendment you're ever going to find because the second amendment is not the hunt deer and it's not for personal protection those things these are important but what is the second amendment really about to fight government tyranny and mr producer every single this this really upsets because every time i say this on a college campus people say oh. There's no more government tyranny. You're talking about something that's ever exist right now. In hong kong there's government tyranny and people are standing up against it. There's hundreds of thousands of young people well that want freedom they want freedom from tyrannical government and for the leftists out there that are totally silent shame on you for the liberals in the meteorite. They're they're not covering this appropriately. I condemn you completely and categorically. Here's what's happening. You have these people that want what they want. Democracy they want freedom expression but what have i always said mr producer. There is no first amendment without the second amendment and you're seeing that against the hong kong people unless the west comes to their aid unless america says definitively. We stand dan with the people of hong kong. They're going to lose this. What are the gun laws in hong kong right now. According to section thirteen of up to thirty eight the firearms and ammunition ordinance essentially no no person shall have in their possession any arms or ammunition unless he or she holds a special license for possession of such arms ammunition or dealers licenses such items james. Those in possession of illegal firearms can face up to fourteen years in prison. Smuggling of guns is punishable by death. You are recommended by your club to possess essentially have to be part of a gun club. There's no private ownership of guns. Why is this the chinese government knew that if one million people in hong kong had a._r. Fifteen for example the gun the left hates all of a sudden. They wait a second. We wouldn't have protests. We could have a civil warner has now. I don't want a civil war. I don't want armed. Conflict understand is the reagan doctrine of peace through strength in a micro lens. This is peace peace through strength when a million people all of a sudden have negotiation power. They have no leverage so if the chinese bringing their military right now you know what it is. It's a hostage hostage. Situation is not a negotiation but if the chinese military walks into hong kong with their tanks and you got a million people they are fifteen waiting for you all of a sudden. You're like wait a second hold on we we might lose our lives here. We know we're not really. We love this guy but i don't know about this right now. They know that they're gonna be unopposed. The chinese military can go door to door and kill whoever they wanna kill they can go down whatever apartment building they want to that anyone getting in their way however with an armed citizenry it changes the entire dynamic of the conversation and changes the entire hire dichotomy of how the entire process happens instead of protesters trying to create attention against the citizens. They're going to be treated as equals. They'll be treated a sovereign beings because there will be the imbalance that happens when there's no armament of the citizens is so remarkable and cannot be ignored. This is the argument for the second amendment and if hong kong embrace the second amendment for the last hundred years and older citizens were armed like the israeli citizens were armed and the swiss citizens were armed and the american citizens were armed my goodness they wouldn't have this china would say yet. You can have your own hong kong. You can do your own thing. You can have your own separatist government. We don't want a civil war. We don't want an uprising. We don't want carnage in the streets. We don't want we don't we don't want to lose one hundred thousand people because these hong kong people are ready to die the ready to but they don't have the ability to die. They're just going to die as smarter as victims but if you have the ability to shoot back and they're coming with tanks and they're coming with guns good luck trying to to to try to quell the kind of rebellion absolutely i think i think the on on the whole electoral argument for the second amendment point of having the guns is so you don't have to use them this ended of course that's what i'm saying and and look the chinese are kind of smirking because they're like well. If we bring in the military we will and if we have to shoot a couple of people we will but they're not gonna shoot back because they don't have guns they know they don't have guns because they put these ordinances in they know.

hong kong hong hong kong hong kong island taiwan producer hong kong china china china opium charlie kirk iran saudi arabia chinese government north korea new york times illinois america indus river valley
"indus river valley" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on KTOK

"Merkel bulls to fix related to plants and us like we're part banana or something like from Jamie and it's called the freak out so Jamie regality it got this week man okay this is this is not like a super weird thing but it's just something that makes you think a little bit is that there are thirty five thousand around edible species of plants in the world only thirty five thousand down got thirty five thousand and so bet sixty percent of all the calories consumed by the world population our three crops he guest yes corn yep of wheat yes yes and I'll say soybean because I don't know what all right yes yeah yeah yeah yes the think about that it's like like so sixty percent of white but people eat are those three things and those of those have been you know does have been bred yes since early civilization and they are like so different than what they start off being so because I mean they're all like there's like grasses you know I mean it it doesn't so we're so completely different than what they're what what would be be created by nature so I'm just amazed I don't know why thirty five thousand doesn't seem like very many edible things because it will take about this way and it is always because when people are like I mean I I love natives I do I have tons of natives but I also like what what what you eat natives what do I tell which I have knee it's been people say the end plants that involved here I'm similar no no no no no not like that no no no he's not a cannibal cannibal all my god made it creative date of plant species overall I love day okay I love Nate is everything the people or the you know but I I do gross and ornamentals I mean at some exotics too and sometimes people give me a hard time about that and I'm like okay you're right let's let's only grow natives so the first thing you need do is you recall your vegetables because basically the only thing that's native to North America vegetable wise our son chokes that in a bowl some flour and like melons or like you know we're squash the squad squad there's washer righties and centex and that's about it really yep huh so corn wasn't native to us does it America potatoes sent South America peppers and I miss heard the tomatoes and peppers or Central America potatoes or South America what else is give us about tell you will of course it's almost all citrus is gonna be tropical maybe tropical subtropical yeah I mean everything they did theirs there wasn't that mean that at and where his rights come from Asia Asia and that and India well asus Indies probation this formation so when it came from that China Southeast Asia may come delta area and then Indus river valley okay went out yet toward we'd come from we came from Europe yeah every new premier of your Europe and the parts in the least right wow like god Lebanon Turkey well and love rice comes from the foothills of the Himalayas yes yeah but money rice comes from the foothills America that this money okay it's okay freak out so we did take a break hurricane talked to Terry hello okay hello Terry eight thousand Katie okay hi how are you doing today great about you okay I'm very good at I don't want to get from the plant I use that as accent plants around other buyers it is simply a call AS your slow it starts with the city yeah related what will give another you will give you a second time yes but think about it it's it's something planned with coleus a whole bunch but it's got a heart shaped leaf and that's what you grow up for starts with the C. S. R. to the sea I got it hi well I think for dry hands Terry by and Jamie gave me a burning heart one yeah it S. DC heartburn burning her bread earning high I can't believe all of our master gardeners has led to the white version of this goes really is sold out early in the summer time your white because it pulls out the shape use bright silvery white plants really pull out of shape so are you don't necessarily what a black plant in the shade but if you do use a black plant in the shade like black montagraph just me that yes you need to put something white hind our yes at the bright behind it so you can see yes we got someone trying to call eight four oh one thousand star one thousand the plant of the week has not been guessed exactly there's still time for you to win you're listening to what thousand Katie okay GT I. T. makes today secure and tomorrow smarter explore the.

Jamie regality Merkel sixty percent
"indus river valley" Discussed on Why Won't You Date Me?

Why Won't You Date Me?

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Why Won't You Date Me?

"Out. How to be perfect without putting someone else down U2. or not for each other. You're not. But also, I wanna say that the world gas lights women in a way that they don't gaslight man like act that this woman thinks that she has to even question meeting. You don't like if someone makes you feel uncomfortable leave you don't have to question that feeling if you think that you'd might not like this person imagine spending more time with them. They're not going to be better than this date. No, they're putting their own gonna get worse. There'd be very listen to yourself. That is your body giving you like a fighter flight. And it's like go time. Listen to yourself. Don't question if you don't like someone did it for so long. Yes. And it's you're wasting time. Just leasing time bounce. He's a piece of shit. He's he's. Shit shit. He's conditioning. What I try to do every morning. I look in the mirror, and I'm like, you're a bad ass bitch look up today. And I think more people need to do that. And also like just that you have to wait through a sea of fucking idiots. You do. That's what I'm telling myself. It is hard. But also take a break. If you need a break, I'm gonna break right now. And I feel like I needed it. Yeah. Okay. So Charlotte, you have anything that you want to promote? Yeah, I'm going to be doing recording an album my very first album at the Pasadena ice house on April third at eight thirty. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Working get tickets Pasadena. Dot com as house dot com. Yes. Yes. Website at Charlotte arson tickets. There will be the to hits wanna treat what a dream Charlotte. Thank you so much for doing it. I've wanted to have you on for such a long time since you met someone on an app that I'm having so much trouble. Oughta gives me, but if you like this podcast episode you fuck in on keep listening. I don't know. I don't know people subscribed to podcast. I don't listen to them. But if you send me some nasty, I will read it this person said girl gonna get that pussy so wet you start in Indus river valley civilization next to it. Here's another one. I wanna eat roast beef, mashed potatoes off your booty using my hands extra gravy. Okay. I don't think I've read this one is his Nicole. This is for your podcast love. You don't read this part? Ha ha. Well, I read it. Sorry. I want to put my big hairy platypus. I suit on it makes we'd love to you. A slap my homemade raccoon tail to your big sweet bubblicious, but in worship at the way deserves will make the folks of the animal planet blush. I want you to lick my Bill while I find my way into your plot pussy. I'm not really into furry. That was a little while. I think the fact that we don't know how to feel good. No, I think it is maybe worse than his crackers. Yeah. Thank you for listening. Okay. That was a hate gum podcast.

Charlotte Pasadena Indus river valley arson Nicole
"indus river valley" Discussed on Invention

Invention

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Invention

"All right. We're back. So we're talking about ancient complex latrine systems. Yeah. I was reading about this in a book by Brian Fagin that I've mentioned on the show before the seventy grade inventions of the ancient world, and he points to one of the earliest examples, we have of of latrine technology being that of a latrine drainage system in the Neolithic period of one example, being a scar Bray on the Orkney islands of Scotland from roughly thirty one hundred to twenty five hundred BC in the site featured six houses each with a buried duct that drains from small toilet rooms to a single duct. They're removed waste from the houses. So it's simple. But basically in that you have the the roots of modern sewage technology. Yeah. And so we see things kind of like this and other ancient civilizations. Like, for example, one of the. Great ancient civilizations in terms of civic design, and and technological advancement in the way cities or put together is the Indus river valley civilization like including sites like my Joe Daro and Harappa where they had buildings with these sort of toilet holes that rested over an underground, brick drainage pipe and these sewer drains could be washed out with water to carry the waste away to cesspits. Right. This would have been about twenty five hundred BC and another interesting bit about the Mahindra Darrow site. Is that their peer to be channel junctions in the sewage system? So that you could you could easily be cleaned. You could go in there to prevent blockage. So it would seem to be in an advancement from from earlier designs. Yeah. And another advancement, of course, comes if you have a good source of flowing water like the ancient Romans made use of their Ecuador supplied water to power a sort of flush toilet. I think is not quite a flush toilet. I guess it depends on how you define it. But it consisted of in in ancient Rome, basically bench with multiple holes in it. So this would have been a very communal affairs. Holes are just like right next to each other. So you'd go and sit next to a whole bunch of people, and I guess just sit around talking while you were pooping and the these holes in the bench were suspended over a drainage ditch with running water in the flowing water below the toilet bench would remove the waste and it would also help limit smells. So this is great like, you know, it doesn't stink in there. Because stuff's going. Well, it might stink a little bit. But it's not as bad as it could be because it's all getting washed away immediately by the running water. Yeah. There's running water. There's there's a there. There are mosaics and frescoes there is there's probably live music at some of these relays. Yeah. I didn't know that. Yeah. That that was a detail. I was reading in. I believe it was Smith's book pointing out the end, this would have been just kind of a fun place to to hang out. And and. Have a poop. Yeah. I mean, it does seem like it was the thing that it's it's hard to like with modern western sensibilities about like embarrassment. You know, when you when you have to go to the bathroom. It's just hard to imagine sitting around talking to people while you're all pooping on the same bench. But when in Rome, you know, poop poop on the bench. But of course, this this had some limitations also because it relied on a certain kind of infrastructure, right? It relied on the constant running water supplied by the aqueduct system, and they had to be done at the end of the water supply system or else. He would of course, foul the water sources downstream of you. So this sort of had to you know, you wouldn't want to put this toilet side at like the first place. The aqueduct water supplied water gets to in the city right now, certainly we're gonna talk some more about Roman toilets here because just the rele Roman plumbing situation was fabulous. It was really. It was wonderful creation. They were really proud of it. Two. Oh, yeah. But at the same time. There's a problem with thinking too much about ancient toilets in light of our our modern concepts because we're standing at the end of a long journey in which in in eight you know, since abilities about cleanliness or confused with concepts of purity, and they're augmenting augmented to varying..

Rome Brian Fagin Smith Indus river valley Mahindra Darrow Orkney Ecuador Scotland Harappa Bray Joe Daro
"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"That have been found there so it's kind of an interesting examination of how it makes me think a lot about how our current culture will be misinterpreted by the archaeologists of the future presumably from space so mahendra daro is in the indus river valley in the sindh province of present day southern pakistan it's it's about two miles or three kilometers away from the indus river and the city was built around twenty five hundred bc and so that means it's construction was happening at the same time as the great pyramids of egypt the size organization and evidence of an industry of regulated trade have all led archaeologists to believe that mahindra daro was one of the most important cities of the indus valley civilization also called the harrap in civilization the other ancient indus valley city you may have heard about is her up which is in the punjab province of pakistan mahindra daro is four hundred miles it's about six hundred and forty kilometers southeast of her up and it's unclear whether mahindra daro her up oh were active at the same time or whether one came before the other but mahindra daro is one the first known urban centers and it is the largest and best preserved of the ancient indus valley civilization cities the name mahindra daro you'll sometimes see written out a number of different ways that vary in how they use spacing and hyphenation sometimes it's no hindered our with a hyphen sometimes it's all together as one word it means mound of the dead but that is of course not the name that the city was called when it was inhabited that's the name that was given to it by archaeologists and we really don't know what people living there called it while they were living there one of the things that's unique to mahendra daro is its lack of governmental structures there is a marketplace and there are trading spaces and their public spaces but there are no palaces there is no clear evidence of any sort of hierarchical leadership structure based on its well organized and thoughtful layout and design mojo daro may have been a seat of power but we still can't quite figure out exactly with any certainty how it was.

indus river valley mahindra daro mahendra daro sindh egypt punjab pakistan mahindra forty kilometers three kilometers
"indus river valley" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hulo back my name is dr christopher generic this is great big history podcast thank you for coming by today we talk about decolonization and the british raj and india and the making a pakistan bangladesh sri lanka south asia the british raj was huge it stretched from southern afghanistan from the desert of iran all the way to the jungles of burma a held some three hundred million people and one of the oldest civilizations on earth the indus river valley and the ganges river valley civilizations go back for five thousand years which brings us to gandhi there were independence movements of course before gandhi before the second world war but gandhi was the man who was able to take the british constitution and our use it to argue for indian independence he was a british train lawyer and he used the british constitution and the european alignment those ideas we talked about of lock of freedom and self determination to argue for independence his methodology of this was nonviolence now that's a misnomer because it's not just you don't you protest and you don't commit violence is that you allow violence to be done onto you that you gain a moral victory the british argument for holding on to india was a moral one even though it was an economic situation the idea was india the subcontinent south asia was a colony and britain was extracting the resources at of low price manufacturing those resources into high value goods and then making the profit.

british raj afghanistan burma indus river valley gandhi india asia dr christopher pakistan iran ganges river valley britain five thousand years
"indus river valley" Discussed on Bunny Ears

Bunny Ears

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Bunny Ears

"Yeah it makes you sound old fashioned makes you sound wait it's quainton and cute what are some of your favorite like if you could go back to any time in history and check it out you know gush i mean here's the thing is like a bulletproof vest you can't get weird history std's that don't exist and that was what i was about to say is that like you know you know look thomas jefferson is a great man and all that stuff pretty shitting a bucket you get the glam through history yeah exactly okay little rv by okay cool i'll get like toilet paper and speak luxury clamping okay glenn glaspie i'm trying to think wolfing the nice pun history in glam food industry yeah mystery you know yeah i've been there's that whole exceed people kind of thing that kind of wanted like just like that's kind of a weird mystery like early like i civilizations were talking about links mess a potato yeah the hittites like exactly indus river valley kinda shit also ratio of life i think they call it civilization i i was naming the tomb raider shout out also you know we want you on the show come on through what else ono alexander the great always had a big thing hard on human and napoleon for me weirdly to really yeah dude and funnily enough when i came to a few years ago when i visit you in paris and the only leg tours thing i did was go to invalids to see napoleon's.

thomas jefferson napoleon indus river valley paris
"indus river valley" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"indus river valley" Discussed on Giants of History

"The first of these four civilizations is of course message mya mess batavia sprung up between the tigris and your phrase rivers around thirty three hundred b c e mess battaini actually means between two rivers and if you look at where mess batavia was on a map you would see comprised mostly of parts of modern day iraq iran syria turkey and kuwait the earliest coherent form of writing was called cuneiform which used wedgeshaped characters carved into clay tablets and shoot a form originated with the sumerians in southern mississippi tame taymiyya now the second civilization to emerge out of recorded history was egypt in the nile river valley around thirty one hundred b c e this ancient civilization obviously a focal point of this particular series existed primarily in the same geography of modern day egypt and as we all know it was hieroglyph fix that the ancient egyptians used as their primary system of writing and recording and before we move on just to round out the other two of the four earliest civilizations which arose on the world scene and also to mention that there is some mild dispute around the dates when these two civilizations emerged but we can safely assume that they came together soon after message tame in egypt and these two civilizations were the indus river valley civilization and the yellow river valley civilization the indus river valley civilization was made up of parts of modern day india and pakistan and then the yellow river valley civilization existed in what would be today modernday china.

batavia mississippi nile river valley egypt india pakistan syria kuwait coherent indus river valley