35 Burst results for "Induce"

Post-Pandemic Cities Might Actually Want Airbnb Around

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:58 min | 9 hrs ago

Post-Pandemic Cities Might Actually Want Airbnb Around

"Has been a roller coaster year for a lot of businesses. Few more nausea inducing than airbnb. The company saw an eighty percent drop in business. Last spring is the pandemic hit. It laid off a quarter of its employees raised. Two billion dollars in private funding hurried the heck up and introduced online experiences like virtual cooking classes to try to make any money at all but by december airbnb had recovered enough for a blockbuster. Ipo and a profitable third quarter now. The companies facing the return of its core business plus. It's pre existing challenges like being blamed for housing shortages and new ones like whether to house rioters planning to storm the us capitol. Brian jesse is the ceo of airbnb in the wake of the january. Six insurrection in washington. Dc thought occurred to us and the thought was. Where are these people staying. And the next thought occurred us weight. People are gonna come back to dc and we said we're going to cancel all reservations for the weekend gration dc. That i think we learned the lesson a longtime ago that we have to take more responsibility because our product is in the real world and that's led to us having agreements with more than thousand cities around the world. I want to ask you about that. Actually because that is been that was sort of the other bubbling thing with airbnb. Is this relationship with cities and weather. Airbnb is partly to blame for the lack of affordable rentals as you sort of prepare for that part of the business to come back in force. How view rethought your relationships with cities and housing. I think kobe allowed everyone to take a breather. Think we got a bit of a reset and the relationship with some cities city started approaching us. Some actually said they wanted to get more demand because they said we have major budget shortfalls. Now we have major tourism shortfalls. So you think it's the kind of reset where cities were like. Oh we need you as opposed to you erin. Pnb have to do more to deal with the question of how things play. maybe not. They need us but they say oh. Maybe we can work together. I feel very optimistic about our ability. Have great relationships to cities. And i think the other thing that's going to happen travel. People aren't just going to travel the same fifty cities anymore. And that has had a way of redistributing travel to more communities because primarily. A lot of the conflicts are too many people one place at the same time. You've also said that you think this idea of digital nomads could be big people booking longer term stays do you think that could improve relationships with cities and neighborhoods too because people are not coming and going so quickly. Yeah i mean. I think the other trend is our businesses becoming less transient monthly. Rentals is one of the fastest growing parts of our business. But but i think the other shift is stays are going to be longer. And i think there's going to be this blurring of the line between traveling and living. It means that people a lot of people saying that they don't live anyone place anymore or they used to be. You live on place and you go one or two nights for a business meeting and like one or two weeks vacation now a world where you work from home means the world you can work from any home and so i think you're seeing people where i think i think three day weekends. We'll be every weekend for a lot of people. i think. Some people will take five day weekends. I think significantly more people will live in a different house over the summer than the house. They currently live in where they use in the same house. I think it'd be very normal for people to go to a different house for the summer. I mean it just makes by the way total sense. Why one would do that. And if you could say well how do they ford it where they can rent their house and they're gone so you can net it out. So these are things are going to happen but you're going to also have people. They're just purely nomadic. Maybe not people families but retirees and an empty nesters or you know young people single people people who like can move. I mean i always had a dream of like what. If i could go to like you know a different city every month in live there. This would be super interesting. Think about all the people you would meet all the connections you'd have By the way in this new world you can still stay connected. All the people used to know. So i think this is where travelers going. Travelling living blurring together

Airbnb Brian Jesse Nausea Kobe Washington Erin United States Ford
Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

Let's Talk About Digital Identity

04:09 min | 5 d ago

Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

"Hi roland oscar. Nice looking with you on and really happy to hear what is going on in germany in terms of identity in or ever seen related to that and happy to know more about very me very baheren hearing berry meal ready for the last year. San diego need to hear more details. What are the are building offering today so. Please tell us your journey how. You became the managing director very me. Yeah thanks you can. The many thanks for the invitation. Let's here and talk to you a little bit about the markets in germany. So yeah what was my journey becoming managing director of very me. Actually my journey professional. Johnny started twenty five years ago. When i started my career in consulting. Then some stations cashed out which is a department store group. And then i founded multi-platinum loyalty scheme together with start at telecom and from there. I moved to payback. Which actually is janis leading multi partner loyalty scheme. They are quite some markets worldwide than india mexico italy. Us and from all the travel. I got introduced to lose tons of course and became the ceo of lufthansa mice and more during that time. Actually i realized that the future is more. And more about seamless customer experience. Because if you look at lofton's in many cases the real loyalty benefits that you can get there. They actually translate into a real seamless customer. Experience that you get you look at all the tracks for security and immigration priority boarding presort seating in the plane actually the customers tend to reward benefits in their experience much more then any loyalty currency and so at the moment where then lufthansa invested into very me idea for me. It was very clear that this would be an exciting next step for me personally. So i decided to switch over to meet to be the ceo of me and push forward at digital identity to provide seamless customer experience for the users and i can induce that lufthansa is one of the funders organization behind very me. But let's more place for the ones who are not familiar with very still bear me does. In fact lufthansa there's actually one of the investors and we have altogether thirty very large companies in germany that invested into the very idea and a lot smaller companies are really known brand. Names such as liens deutsche. Bahn dot eubanks lufthansa dodger taylor com dime la some song fox button so all very large companies that invested into very me to establish of wallet of digital identities so that was the driving force and i think when we will talk about the market later on we will see that it was a very good moment to invest into such platform because the market urgently requires the platform and there's pretty much empty space currently in germany. And what we provide as bury me as this one click digital experience for very fight identification was in a pop. Misuse cases and at the core of it on is an identity platform. Of course that matches all the regulatory requirements for our anti money laundering or either substantial. And this comes along with the solution for strong customer syndication because the critical part of such a platform is not the identification of customer itself. Actually the critical part is the reuse. And that means the access to the digital identity

Lufthansa Roland Oscar Germany Janis Berry Lofton San Diego Johnny Italy Mexico India Deutsche United States LA
Are we going to meet our vaccination target or what?

Coronacast

04:57 min | 6 d ago

Are we going to meet our vaccination target or what?

"Hello this is karina. Cost a daily podcast. All about the coronavirus. I'm health reported teigen thailand physician and journalists dr norman swan. It's wednesday the third of march and norman. We're already more than a week into our vaccine. Roll out here in australia. Which makes us old hands at it now but there were reports over the past few days. That strategy hasn't quite met the targets that i was expecting to in terms of numbers. Vaccinations delivered in this first week. And we've got a pretty big target for october as being sort of the end of the roll out the end of the first big sizes of the rollout. What are some of the issues that have cropped up. I mean it's such early days. It feels a little unfair to stop critiquing the performance when we're on the awakened but what are some of the issues that have been identified as maybe slowing us down a bit. So far rove is clearly been a major cities of hiccups with the commonwealth rollout in aged care. As we've been saying in current cast in fact the main game is boorda. Workers airport workers flight crew and hotel quarantine workers and what we should be doing but we're not as their families in households. So that's the main game securing our borders. And doing that hyper quickly. And you've really got to do that with the vaccine because it's going to take you twelve weeks to complete it with the astra and it's not going to be as good coverage with the with the new variant possibility so there's been a cold up in aged care because the commonwealth doesn't run anything have his own services therefore they've got a contract they probably should have contracted it to the states. But they've going into private providers and been cups which have been well publicized so it's to take the commonwealth a bit of time to get their act together and also some of the states have been a little bit slow so this combination of supply of scene. But also as marion kane or imply. Just today the bookings haven't gone quite as quickly as they imagined. And they could cope with more bookings. And i think there's been a hint of that in some other jurisdictions so people have got to come forward when they're booked and have that but around the world there has been a problem with people. Not turning up for bookings people don't turn up for their appointments and that means that you have a system in place where you've got people on standby people that you can take a. We've got jobs over. can you. At five o'clock in unexpectedly get your vaccine. So we saw we had the new south wales primary gladys and yesterday criticizing the maybe lack of communication between the states and federal government. Is there improvements. That could be made there. Probably and the minister of sought yesterday to have a press conference which is probably in part induced. By the new south wales premier having criticized the federal government for not being clear with the doses. And how they're going to arrive. I mean i think some of the surprise here is that if i had a long time to develop this. And it's still not clear how the next phases are going to be rolled out how people are going to be told what booking system is going to be like. Gp is still not clear how they're going to work into it. They've had their letter saying they've been accepted as a as a center for you know the practice to deliver vaccines but even then the ph primary health. Networks are often not clear whether or not the four thousand six hundred practices are indeed the ones that will end up doing it. So there's a fair bit of uncertainty another area of uncertainties that third pretty good administration stopping doctors commenting on the relative efficacy of vaccines. Because they're calling it. Advertising saying the vaccine come to my practice sits behind that there's a lot influx. We'll get our act together. We're good immunizing country. People will come. Forward is just that. We don't want to lose momentum.

Dr Norman Swan Boorda Karina Marion Kane Norman Rove Thailand Astra South Wales Australia Federal Government
Interview With Caroline Gorski Of Rolls Royce

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:10 min | 6 d ago

Interview With Caroline Gorski Of Rolls Royce

"Caroline I think we're gonna be diving into the topic of logistics today. And i think what people think about applying ai. Logistics are often thinking about tracking where trucks are tracking our inventory levels. But for you folks who've worked on some ai. Applications leveraging nlp for logistics and supply chain purposes obviously rolls royce of massive industrial organization. You have a lot of supply chain needs. Can you go a little bit into what the problem was. What you guys have kinda built to help your cause. They're sure dan absolutely so. Yeah i mean just a little bit of context rolls royce overseas a hundred year old company and as a result we are also company that manufactures highly complex and very high value physical things and as a result. We have a very complicated supply chain structure. We also have certain parts of our supply chain where there are very few companies around the world who can actually make what we need from all supply chain so they're all points in our supply chain weather arrow some quite quite high levels of risk in terms of sourcing strategy. Because we don't have an infinite number of supplies you cannot and on top of that we have or certainly did have a real challenge with the presence of what can really only be described described as incredibly dumb unstructured data across our supply chain so information held in pediatrics information on contracting terms on supply standards or capabilities or even designs on top of that an awful lot of our supply. Chain information is either engineering drawings or it's mathematical notation tabulated information and those are three categories off of data which is very hard for existing kind of simplistic optical character recognition tools to actually extract reliably. So over the last couple of years we've been working to develop a natural language processing computer vision capability that she allows us to extract intelligence from all of those kind of dumb unstructured data sources. So that we can use not intelligence to be much more adaptive much more flexible much more responsive in managing risk across supply chain and clearly given the challenges that we faced in some of our markets globalization being one of them over the last twelve months with the covid nineteen pandemic having that increased capability for managing supply chain risk flexibly being able to understand using machine intelligence to actually understand induce scenario modeling across ask supply chain that has helped to support our business in making very significant financial savings in terms of its response to the pandemic but also broadly in terms of ensuring businesses fit for purpose as we become out to the pandemic in terms of managing complex supply. Chain starches for the future hansard. There's so many ways that this can come into place we we've done a lot of One of the sectors where we do our ai. Opportunity landscape research. Every year is chain. Logistics looking at everything in terms of matching loads two vehicles for for transportation to inventory prediction an and arrival times and whatnot. Nlp in this space is interesting is novel and i can imagine so many ways that it might be leveraged can imagine you reading news and information about your various suppliers. Maybe it's the weather in the area. Maybe it's something about them. Having a bad quarter whatever the case may be and i can see that maybe being factored into what production volumes you think they may be able to do or what arrival times you might be able to expect or i could even say a system that just puts the most important news in front of a human analyst who can put it in broader context. Because of course there's so much context for that dumb data to actually speak to business needs on how specifically is nlp sort of working here. And what's maybe an example of where this is starting to be able to inform our processes inform our prediction. Or whatever it's doing yeah. I you're absolutely spots on that donna. Interestingly some of these cases or those areas that you've just mentioned there are exactly where we want to take capability next cohort of the work that we've been doing for rolls royce as a global entity in the first phase of development of this capability. We have been working with those tricky types of data that exists in manufacturing and engineering supply chain unstructured data sets. So those would let me give you an example much of what we communicate while supplies is communicated through drawings engineering drawings. So these these two d drawings which then need to be rendered into three day geometry's in order to be able to understand way to no debate able to understand how much waste material might be generated from from making components. Nfl which the supplier that component of will reimburse us for of course because they charge us for the bulk weight of the material and then the machine material they reinvest because they resell out secondary market so for us to understand for example you know how much is something away how much we're gonna cost to ship and transport How much rebate should we be guessing from from the waste material. That's been resolved by the supplier on. We need to be able to render a to d draw ring into its three d geometry now most of the during dumped exist in cat they only exist to droids so using a combination of competition and alpay. The nlp helps to extract the numerical information. That geometrical information is written around the drawing and the computer vision helps to manage the actual rendering of the drawing itself. You can actually turn your community station into three d rendering virtually and that of and allows you to couch might understand always questions about white about pricings about costing about justice about waste material might be generated for manufacturing

Royce Caroline DAN Donna NFL
The Biden stimulus is admirably ambitious. But it brings some big risks, too.

Raleigh's Retirement Coach

03:53 min | Last week

The Biden stimulus is admirably ambitious. But it brings some big risks, too.

"Stimulus plan. Now Congress Brian they're working on a $2 trillion stimulus plan economist Larry Summers. He was an adviser for the Obama administration. He thinks that's just too big, and it's gonna bring back more inflation, The top of inflation that we haven't seen in a generation. So, Brian a big stimulus package. Is this good or bad for our retirement planning? Well, I think right now the Simmons box. Obviously good rights, propping up a lot of businesses. Lot of liquidity out the market and you see the markets hitting new new highs almost on a weekly basis. We've got some volatility, but One of them's that Larry was talking about. He was a talk economic adviser for former president Obama. He warned President Biden's proposed covert 19 relief packages too big and it could overheat the economy. And it Z. Not the only one to say that. But Summers was Treasury secretary under former President Clinton. He wrote that the proposed $1.9 trillion Timmons could ignite inflationary pressures. Off a kind that we have not seen in a generation and went on to say that Hey, this risk of inflation could have consequences for the dollar and financial stability in general and said stimulus measures of this magnitude contemplated our steps into the unknown. His remarks are really notable because Biden has received almost no pushback from Democrats in pursuit of his legislation. He has begotten a little bit on the Republican side of the aisle. But some progressives have griped about by did not go Big enough. Believe it or not, But Democrats are largely united behind the bill. But what's really interesting with this is that he's getting and hearing from the same side of the aisle for people that aren't in Congress that saying, but historically served under Democratic presidents and saying, Hey, this is probably a little bit too much Republicans have been, you know, kind of saying that, but it is going to jump start our economy. There's no doubt this is going to increase spending is going to prop up our economy. But it is probably going to lead to inflation of what we haven't seen in terms of the level in quite some time, right. But you mentioned the common, you said, overheat the economy to find that for me. Well, it's not real growth is not genuine growth. It's basically artificially induced by all the money that we're printing prior to cove in 19. Our economy was cooking on all levels, and but there was nothing that was stimulating that we had good growth. Independence on energy manufacturing was up real estate. But now, ah lot of the stuff that's being supporters being supported by government dollars While we need to get these businesses propped up and we need to give businesses open and things like that the amount of money that we're printing And pumping into this economy. It's going to inevitably lead to inflation it it has to when we're printing this much money as we are, and all I'm saying is, it's overheating because it's not real, in terms of where we were a year ago with this time, Hey, that was a lot more legitimate before the government basically just pulled the breaker on the whole economy and You know and manually shut it down. So do we need t Get back? Yeah, absolutely Do we need to keep putting this much money into it? I think it's going to depend on on where you're sitting right now. Right? If you're a technology, and you're here Cos been going great. And it's okay to work remote from home. That's great. If you're a restaurant guy he's been, you know, operating at 25% capacity and you were closed for out of the past eight months, because hey, I need I need to pee Pee pee plan I need Relief for my employees, So it really depends on what side of the island and you know where you are in the spectrum of how this pandemic has impacted you from a business standpoint from a personal standpoint, and that's not equal for everybody for sure. Okay, Michaela, I

Obama Administration President Biden Brian Larry Summers Congress Timmons Simmons President Clinton Summers Larry Treasury Biden Barack Obama Michaela
FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | Last week

FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

"Panel. But advisers, the Food and Drug Administration unanimously says go for it authorized the Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccine for emergency use. An FDA analysis has found it to be 66%, effective overall in to have a quote, favorable safety profile. Doctor pull off. It has advised the FDA during the vaccine approval process, he's director, the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr Offer. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. The Madonna and and Fizer. Vaccines have a much higher effective, right, Don't they in the mid nineties? So what makes the Johnson and Johnson version a good idea? Just 66%. The return in five for vaccines were tested in the U. S. Only. The Johnson Johnson vaccine was also tested in several countries and South America as well as Mexico and South Africa. So it's not exactly the same population, so it's sort of comparing Apple. Sarge is also the strange that were circulating in South Africa is primarily the South African variant in this strange circulating in Brazil is primarily the Brazilian variant. So there were different strains really that this vaccine was tested against I gather from reports of senior fellow Panelists asked whether Johnson and Johnson's vaccine might be more effective if it were given his two shots, not just one. And that the company is studying this. What's your view on that? So if you look at the studies, they did the pre clinical studies they did in nonhuman primates, as well as the phase one to a studies. They didn't people. What they found was that second dose did increase the tighter or quantity. Virus specific, neutralizing Anna by suggesting that it might be more effective. It's very effective, though it preventing severe disease after a single dose, And it induces the kind of response so called sailor immune response that looks like it's going to have a fairly long that memory, which is all good. But that second off, maybe more effective. I think we'll probably know that by the second half of this year in which case then one could get a booster does. But this certainly provides protection against what you care about, which is hospitalization. I see you admission and death. It's it's virtually 100% effective at doing that. And if authorization follows soon, when one might the vaccine come to pharmacies, another vaccination sites and and how much right so it was follows the pattern of what we saw with the visor and then Madonna vaccines. Usually the FDA advisory committee, in which I said makes the recommendation. The FDA usually follows that recommendation within a day or two, And then it goes to the CDC, which then makes their recommendations about which group or groups might best benefit from this vaccine. That all happens within about a five day period. And then the vaccine can sort of roll off the assembly line into the arms of the American public. Doctor. Often you're a pediatrician. What do you tell parents who are concerned about vaccine for their Children, Andreas tely getting it and also concerned, for example, about what seems to be an increase in multi system, inflammatory syndrome and Children. Were rare but serious disease that's connected to covet. Truthful. I think the Children can suffer from this disease and with that multi system inflammatories is and they can occasionally dime. It's rare, but about as many Children have died of this infection is died of influenza a couple years ago and as typically dive influence every year, so I think we do need of actually, but we can't give that vaccine so we've tested in Children. And I think you're now seeing studies done for in the 12 18 year old. I think when those studies As we lost Dr off it. I think, I think, Doc. I think Dr effect. Well, Dr Paul off it. Remember the FDA vaccine advisory panel? We thank him for being with us if he can still hear us and our regret that apparently, the line

Johnson Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Dr Offer Fizer FDA Johnson Johnson South Africa Sarge Fda Advisory Committee U. South America Brazil Mexico Apple Andreas Tely Anna Inflammatory Syndrome
Randomized Trial of C5a Receptor Inhibitor Avacopan Shows Promise in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Randomized Trial of C5a Receptor Inhibitor Avacopan Shows Promise in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

"C five a receptor inhibitor. Of copan is being studied for the treatment of anti neutral fill. Side of plasma antibody anca associated vascular itis in the advocate randomized trial. Three hundred thirty one patients with anca associated vascular litis were assigned to receive oral evacuate pan at dose of thirty milligrams twice daily or oral prednisone on a tapering schedule. All the patients received cyclophosphamide followed by as thia prynne or toxic. Map remission at week. Twenty six the first primary endpoint was observed in seventy two point. Three percent of patients receiving vacco pan and in seventy point one percent of patients receiving prednisone own sustained remission at week fifty. Two the second primary endpoint was observed in sixty five point. Seven percent of patients receiving vacco pen and in fifty four point. Nine percent of patients receiving prednisone serious adverse events excluding worsening vascular. Lettuce occurred in thirty seven point. Three percent of the patients receiving a vacuum pan and thirty nine percent of those receiving prednisone in this trial involving patients with anca associated vascular. Itis a vacco pen was non inferior but not superior to prednisone taper with respect to remission at week twenty six and was superior to prednisone taper with respect to sustain remission at week fifty two the safety and clinical effects of vacco pan beyond fifty. Two weeks were not addressed in the trial in an editorial kenneth warrington from mayo clinic. College of medicine and science rochester. Minnesota writes that. The advocate trial heralds a change in treatment of anca associated vascular lightest that was previously unthinkable. The possibility of inducing disease remission without glucocorticoid however all patients in this trial did receive a brief course of glucocorticoid during the screening phase or early in the trial. As press own was being tapered off and discontinued and also could receive glucocorticoid as rescue medication. An innovative aspect of the advocate trial was the use of a glucocorticoid toxicity index. That captures common glucocorticoid related. Toxic effects including change in body weight glucose tolerance blood pressure lipids myopathy neuro psychiatric features and infection

Vacco Thia Prynne Copan Kenneth Warrington College Of Medicine And Scienc Anca Mayo Clinic Minnesota Weight Glucose Tolerance Blood
The number of seated diners at New York City restaurants on Valentine’s Day fell about 56% from the corresponding Sunday a year ago

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:20 sec | 2 weeks ago

The number of seated diners at New York City restaurants on Valentine’s Day fell about 56% from the corresponding Sunday a year ago

"Restaurant industry finally has something to cheer about. After its first weekend of indoor dining this year, the number of seated diners at restaurants on Valentine's Day was down about 56%. In the corresponding Sunday a year ago, But that was the smallest decline since pandemic induced lockdowns began. According to open table well,

Budget deficit totals record $735.7 billion through January

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Budget deficit totals record $735.7 billion through January

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the federal deficit hits a record totals through January with the pandemic induced recession cutting tax revenues and massive covert relief outlays the deficit for the U. S. government for the first four months of the budget year hit an all time high for the period the treasury department reported Wednesday a federal deficit of seven hundred thirty five point seven billion dollars since the budget year began on October first that's an eighty nine percent hike in the shortfall over the same period a year earlier the report shows spending through the first four months of the budget year hit one point nine two trillion dollars an increase of more than twenty two percent over the previous year Mike Crossey up Washington

Mike Rossi U. S. Government Treasury Department Mike Crossey Washington
Pilot in deadly Kobe Bryant crash was disoriented in clouds, NTSB says

KYW 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Pilot in deadly Kobe Bryant crash was disoriented in clouds, NTSB says

"Blames the helicopter pilot for the crash that killed NBA legend Kobe Bryant last year. CBS is Errol Barnett says the pilot flew into a wall of clouds that left him unable to tell which way was a federal investigators say the pilot flying basketball star Kobe Bryant is 13 year old daughter, Guiana and six others. Experience spatial disorientation when he crashed his helicopter into a California hillside in January of 2020, the National Transportation Safety Board said it found no evidence The NBA legend pushed his pilot to fly into folk that day, saying that our is ABI and likely felt self induced pressure to please Bryant. The

Errol Barnett Kobe Bryant NBA CBS Guiana Basketball National Transportation Safety California Bryant
NTSB says pilot in Kobe Bryant crash was disoriented in clouds

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 3 weeks ago

NTSB says pilot in Kobe Bryant crash was disoriented in clouds

"Him. From penetrating the clouds. NTSB chair Robert Sumwalt. The board also says the pilot likely felt self induced pressure to finish the flight for his star client. America is listening to Fox News. It's 303 news Radio 1055 w we are see. Friends and family remembering the teenager killed

Robert Sumwalt Ntsb Fox News America
Pilot's poor decisions blamed in Kobe Bryant chopper crash

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Pilot's poor decisions blamed in Kobe Bryant chopper crash

"The pilot sport decisions are blamed in Kobe Bryant's chopper crash Thomas Chapman is a member of the NTSB the probable cause of this accident was the pilot's decision to continue flight under visual flight rules into instrument meteorological conditions which resulted in the pilot spatial disorientation and loss of control and Chapman adds the pilot really wanted to get Kobe Bryant to a youth basketball event contributing to the accident was the pilot's likely self induced pressure and the pilots plan continue continuation by US which adversely affected his decision making an NTSB chairman Robert Sumwalt ads there were opportunities along the way to have reversed the course and prevented this crash by simply landing I'm shelling out there

Thomas Chapman Kobe Bryant Ntsb Chapman Robert Sumwalt Basketball United States
South Africa suspends Oxford vaccine rollout. What does it mean?

Coronacast

02:24 min | Last month

South Africa suspends Oxford vaccine rollout. What does it mean?

"So we heard. Yesterday that south africa's suspending the rollout of the oxford astra zeneca vaccine because it's a recent study. That's showing that. It's not as effective at against the strain that circulating widely widely in south africa at the moment which is being called the bay one. Three five one. Lineage doesn't quite roll off the tiny as easily as south african variant and. That's the vaccine that most liens are on track to get at the moment so there is so we're getting hates a questions from the audience about this and we're wondering if you might answer a few of us festival. What is it about the south african variant. That makes it different. Why aren't people fighting it off if they've been vaccinated with the vaccines that have been developed. So far sorry. The main changes to the south african variant are in sequence. And what it's done is quiet. Some changes in that spike retain and that spike preteen again is the one that the virus uses to get inside ourselves. And there's a particular bit of it if you imagine it like a hand and repenting door handle those changes a right on the fingertips so they they enhance the way. The virus binds to the cell to the receptor. As you say. We think that that might be why. It's more transmissible just because it's better at getting into ourselves. The other problem is that. I guess against the fingertips. If you're still imagining that analogy thought. Swear the antibodies that are immune system makes to stop the virus from. that's where they tend to bind. Sorry if the south african variant has changed some of these particular spike protein. Bits to get into the cell. Those antibodies bind against it ada. Sorry it's better at getting into ourselves in the first place and then the antibodies that we've made against the spike prating can no longer bind to that bit. So that's the main problem and that's actually a problem. That's not just unique to the oxford astrazeneca vaccine sorry older vaccines a made against the spike protein. And the sequence used for that was from the original wuhan isolate because as soon as the the virus was sequenced in january. Last year in china scientists started making the vaccine then and there But of course we know that the virus has changed over time and it's made these variants like the k. variant like the south african variant. And that means that the vaccine induced immunity that we're all gonna have potentially white whack against some of these new variants and that's actually what's coming out in these trials

South Africa Oxford China
Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | Last month

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
Robinhood to allow buying fractional shares of GameStop, AMC

CNBC's Fast Money

03:06 min | Last month

Robinhood to allow buying fractional shares of GameStop, AMC

"But we start off with game stopped or game on check. Today's price action on wall. Street's hottest stock maybe one out of stock game. Stop gaining more than two percent while other heavily shorter names like costs. Amc and blackberry also posted gains robinhood easing trading restrictions today allowing users to buy fractional shares in game stop and amc but these socks are still down big for the week. So what is the current state of this read rebellion that has captured wall street's attention let's bring him back bassani so we got a couple of big questions for you number one here. Can we actually say that. The rebellion is over based on what we've seen over the past couple of days when we know that restrictions have still been in place on trading the stock. I found a the main is over. But it's found a level and. I think it's subsided. I mean just look at the the volatility today remarkably low and i know you mentioned restrictions but what restrictions there's someone robin hood but trade. It almost fifty million shares. I mean heck of a lot of people are trading robin woodstock. It's not a bunch of russian sitting out there so there's very few restrictions out there and i don't think that's a big inhibition for the stock right now has short interest. Come down enough to the point where we say that short-squeezes over we know that it's dropped significantly over the past week or so down by more than fifty percent or something like that but it's still pretty high. It's it's a moving target. I see different numbers every day. And it's actually fairly difficult to get a real accurate number. Clearly we can say it's way down. Now here's my bet. Bet see new shorts on this story coming in. I wouldn't be surprised if we gotta level at fifty percent and it stayed there for a long time because a lot of people still feel even ninety dollars this thing. This is ridiculously over-priced. There are plenty of people who had ten dollar bloat numbers on this just a few months ago. So it's a moving target. But i wouldn't be surprised if there were new shorts coming in in the weeks ahead last question we have for you tonight. Regulation where would it come from. Who would be the target. Yellen really being smart here. She's being a leader. She's going to channel all this energy and she just knows what she's doing. I'll tell you what the concern the street has is. This could morphine. Do some kind of broader investigation. So finra has always been there the regulators of the brokers finres already said. We're looking at game of vacation of trading that's a hornets nest because immediately you can start saying it's the site you have suitable for your investors. Do you have a balloons going off. Or when people make a trade you have hot trades of the day at the top with this induce people. Who would not normally make these trays to do that. And engage in behavior. That is not suitable for their type of investing. That's a real hornets nest. Melissa i know the sec is looking at mark manipulation. That's a different story. I think that's going to be a very tough case to prove. I'm not sure that what happened here with red confines with the normal indications of some kind of pump and dump operation. I think they're gonna have a hard time proving that particular one. Yeah thank you.

AMC Bassani Robin Woodstock Robin Hood Yellen Finra Melissa SEC
New Results From Monkeys Infected With SARS-CoV-2 Suggest COVID-19 Vaccines Will Be Successful

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:51 sec | Last month

New Results From Monkeys Infected With SARS-CoV-2 Suggest COVID-19 Vaccines Will Be Successful

"The success of covered 19 vaccines, Researchers at UC Davis have discovered monkeys that developed immunity to the virus gave because Angelica Rubio hot tells us more, and the study carried out of the California National Primate Research Center. The races macaque monkeys were infected of the stars. Kobe to virus specifically the California strain studying these so inhuman challenging because they're typically not found in the blood as this in professor at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Smith higher, says animals These are critical because they indicate a which immune cells triggered by the vaccine are protective vaccine then simulates this very same immune response, It is unlikely to induce long lasting protective immunity. The researchers followed immune responses in the animals over two weeks and found that they produce various anti bodies, including those associated with long term immune protection. Angelico be Oh ha!

Angelica Rubio California National Primate Re Uc Davis School Of Veterinary Davis Kobe California Smith Angelico
Pandemic support at center of Yellen confirmation hearing

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

Pandemic support at center of Yellen confirmation hearing

"President elect Biden's treasury secretary nominee is already facing off with Republicans at her confirmation hearing Janet Yellen says Congress must do more to help fight the pandemic induced recession without further action we risk a longer more painful recession now and longer term scoring of the economy later Bivens pitched a one point nine trillion dollar relief plan but many Republicans like finance committee chair Chuck Grassley say that's too expensive and spends too much on non virus measures like boosting the minimum wage now is not the time to enact a laundry list of liberal structural economic reforms Yellen's expected to be easily confirmed as the nation's first female treasury chief after serving as the first woman to head the federal reserve while Biden was vice president Sager made Donnie Washington

President Elect Biden Janet Yellen Republicans Like Finance Commi Treasury Bivens Chuck Grassley Congress Yellen Federal Reserve Biden Sager Donnie Washington
Yellen Calls for More Aid to Avoid Longer, More Painful Recession

Mark Levin

00:25 sec | Last month

Yellen Calls for More Aid to Avoid Longer, More Painful Recession

"Nominee Janet Yellen is calling on Congress to do more to fight a deep pandemic induced recession, in testimony prepare for a Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday. Yellen says the threats of a longer and even worse down Turner too great to cut back on support. Now, she says that without further action, the U. S risks a longer more painful recession now and long term scarring of the economy later. Helen was head of the Federal Reserve

Janet Yellen Yellen Congress Senate Turner U. Helen Federal Reserve
"induce" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

05:43 min | 4 months ago

"induce" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"Mean you know that guy gets some you're saying that there's a contingency of haram plus groupies. Yeah but probably not for a couple days because he's pretty battered up at the end of the day. There have been like severe injuries bruising. Broken stuff you know right off. Your root vegetables and there is a museum of plus fully interactive. The festival is explained through panels and digital screens. The air is also a sounds in different types of music that's played during the festival theories about the origin of the festival. It also has a collection of festival related objects lake previously worn masks and costumes. And there's also a life-size around plus model in the center of the attraction it that is typical of his. You know representing posture which is kind of hunched over. Because it's really happy. I would imagine really heavy costume. I wonder if they have like practice sessions before the actual event where they dress up like hover plus. I'm sure that there is some practice time because you have to be the driving range. You have to be able to run away. Sure and It since the armor has been added. I guess it is a lot harder to run away. So it kind of equals out You can't toodle quickly. In the mid twentieth century as spain's pagan festivals began to be seen as old fashioned and people wanted more modern things and the haram plus almost died out in the nineteen seventies. There was year when no one had wanted to be the haram. Plus the person chosen was like now and you signed me up for what they were. There was The person who had done it their year prior volunteered to do it again so they did it still. It has been going on continuously every year degrees but more recently. It's become a very popular festival and going we absolutely have to go. I got most of my information. Ford this from therese. Mo- extremadura from tourism. Atlas obscure cardinal. recall information. Wait no that was a whole different. That's a whole different story. We need to tell no. We got a notification from sam's club. Because you know with this pandemic and everything we stocked up on paper in in but wipes balk. We've been buying in bulk. Well you know. We're not hoarding or anything. We're just preparing for the for the winter. And we bought some of those continental but wipes and apparently there's been a recall because they're laced with some sort of bacteria. unfortunately you'd already used some of them. Yeah you had to go to the doctor. Did i did. It was really fun. Because i called the phone number that was given and a lovely young man answered the phone. He was like kat. Now how can i help you. And i was like So i bought some contaminated wipes and i put them all over my vulva and itchy. And he was like ok okay and we went through the whole thing and i was just like the whole time. This guy has to be just mortified. That repeatedly he has to answer the phone. Imagine being given that job woman after woman after woman is calling going. Put this on my parts. But the good news is fine. Just really skis doubt anyway. Wanna thank thank a few people for some stuff that they did l. my gosh. We got a wonderful package from olivia and apple. Lovely combo of beer and coffee. Like two of my very favorite things in the whole wide world king state years We haven't dipped into. Because i'm doing sober october. So i'm making you wait for me. It's not fair but okay also. We just got a box from crafty beer maven. Who is globally renowned beer blogger. We haven't opened yet. Crafty beer maven. But thank you so much. Yeah we just picked it up. We'd like legit an hour ago. Just picked it up also. Big thanks to josh vidmar. Who is an author who wrote the striker books There is a v. After striker and i don't know if that's supposed to be pronounced vee or five. And i should've asked but i didn't Because i'm a failure as a human but oh my gosh. So the third book of this series. The he put little flags in to the pages of the book and on each of those pages as reference the box of he's woven inbox. variety 'isms blew my mind i cannot. I'm overwhelmed over well-named. With how amazed balls that is and i cannot wait to read these. Also thanks to those of you. Who are supporting us on patriotic. If you have not supported us on patriotic and you have a desire to perhaps support us on patriae on then you can go to patriotdepot dot com.

josh vidmar Mo- extremadura spain sam Ford therese apple
"induce" Discussed on Morgellons Discussion

Morgellons Discussion

02:13 min | 5 months ago

"induce" Discussed on Morgellons Discussion

"So I'm going to read you. this quote in this article that I wrote the exploitation of morgellons because we do have factual data about what Morgellons could be associated with and that is just a bacterial infection with common spirochetal bacteria, and we have evidence also that when people take antibiotics the condition resolves it a lot of people when you get so far out with any kind of spirochetal infection, it gets more and difficult to remove the bacteria as its head opportunity to colonize and we don't have any way to measure that biofilm inside the body. While the horse is neighing at the stable door zebras such as fungal diseases parasites arthropod infestation are proposed wage. Although there is no evidence to support them as causative agents. Not only are zebras proposed in the horse neglected but unicorns such as GM does Chemtrails nanotechnology an alien bacteria are proposed as ideological factors unicorns are ridiculous possible myths unicorns cause confusion and hinder legitimate peer-reviewed research from being accepted by the mainstream in that quote was from Marion Middle, Dena. What do you guys think? Did you find some insight from the exploitation of morgellons? Is it kind of making a lot more sense why Morgellons is generally considered a delusional instead of a actual condition with a biological basis. A lot of the struggle that we have is just gaining recognition for what is actual evidence against what somebody's belief about an idea. I could possibly be.

morgellons Dena Marion Middle GM
"induce" Discussed on Morgellons Discussion

Morgellons Discussion

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"induce" Discussed on Morgellons Discussion

"This is definitely a topic that is dear to my heart is something I've written about life and it is at the core of why doctors think Morgellons is purely a delusional disorder. So what happens is people get weird symptoms particularly skin symptoms and then automatically somebody says, oh, that's Morgellons. And so they look it up. They find the Chemtrails. They find aliens the GMOs the black spiders and then they're like, this is gotta be real and this is what I have. Now. I'm going to tell you something and some of you out there might get it some of you out there. I think you're going to be like well what's wrong with that but, there is absolutely positively one hundred percent. No such thing as fiberless Morgellons off. And you would be surprised at how many people come up to me and try to tell me that every month. It's going to be at least one or two every single month. Come. Look. I got stuff I gotta I'm like, okay, that's great. I'm sorry your Skin's bad and you're going through some problems right now, but can you show me more gallons? What are you talking about us right there? That's the McGillis don't you see it? Are you crazy? No, no, no. No. No my friend. That's a skin sort problem. Morgellons is a condition of microscopic filaments embedded in the skin tissue likely inside those sores. But you can't see that without at least 50 times magnification. And so people they've heard the term they've seen the sensationalism and they've come to believe that that is definitely what their problem is dead. And so to expand on this I'm going to read from my article which of course will be in the description below. But if you're looking it up on the internet, it's the exploitation of morgellons on Morgellons. Survey. Org and what I did was I broke down every single thing that people have about Morgellons that's been promoted on the internet that has turned out to be false because people still to this day want to perpetuate those idea bulbs that's become a part of their persona. And that's why it's hard for them to accept the evidence that Morgellons is associated with spirochetal bacteria. A lot of people come up to me and they told me that the scientists who are doing these Morgellons study that show a bacterial etiology are somehow involved in the New World Order. They're just working for Bill Gates and none of that. That's true. But that's how dire they hold on to the idea. They formulated about Morgellons outside of what the research has demonstrated and they're not ready to let go of it to move forward. Let's talk about this. So I think top of the list of disproving ideas in regards to what created with Morgellons would be GMO. Now I actually reached out to GMO expert. Dr. Vitale Sadowski and sooner versity stayed in New York State University of New York because originally he had found agrobacterium and some more gallons patient specimens. So I reached out to him and I asked him. Hey, can you elaborate on your findings? What happened? How do you know that agrobacterium is not associated with Morgellons disease and this is what he had to say about you said quote GMO plants contain. No agrobacterium specific sequences, except for several nucleotides that remain for the T DNA borders after integration off. Us cannot serve as a source of any bacterial factors or affects the bottom line is that we found no DNA of a bacterium that is involved in genetic transformation in the patient samples also vast experience of thousands of people working with agrobacterium everyday shows no passage Jake effects. Finally based on the well-known agrobacterium biology. There is no biological pathway that it has That can be even envisioned to produce Morgellons symptoms. That's from dr. Vitale satoski is very kind to contribute that quote that response that statement for my article. So once you trying to say basically is agrobacterium is not involved and there's no way they could figure out how it could be involved and there's a real reason because Morgellons fibers are created through a process that can be observed. And in that observation. It was determined that agrobacterium is not even associated with the symptoms the conditions the The material evidence of the Morgellons condition the filaments embedded in skin tissue. He said and this was interesting. He said people were working with it every day and not come down with more killings and I want you to think about how much of our food supply is genetically modified and you know what the process for genetic modification is. It involves using antibiotics basically, but there are Industries employing thousands of people across the globe probably ten years. It's not even hundreds of thousands that deal directly with agrobacterium. And you know if Morgellons was breaking out if these people were coming down with fuzzy sores it we would not know about it because nobody would go to work dealing with that stuff. They've been doing it for decades now and they have not come down with the Morgellons. So. Just the top ski nailed that idea shuts GMO is not involved in Morgellons. The next one was weather modification and this one actually got me because when I got online, I found the carnicom Institute, they have a lot of they have a lot of articles on their website. That say things about Morgellons, but it turns out that those ideas don't have anything to do with Morgellons the car, Institute and this is I don't know how they're allowed to do this, but they're saying basically that airplanes are dropping fibers from the sky people are breathing them in and all that's coming out their skin off. Now we know that has never happened. We have never had one person of the millions of people on this.

Morgellons Bill Gates Dr. Vitale Sadowski dr. Vitale satoski carnicom Institute New York State University of N
"induce" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

15:44 min | 11 months ago

"induce" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"But yes sort of in if you think of it as a dictionary definition part B. would be in the sense that win more economic activity has begun to cause more problems than it solves. Well that's on economic growth. How are these benefits affecting different groups of people and I ask this because of how this shutdown my alter land use patterns specifically for those living in rural parts of the world mainly by maybe increasing pressure to clear more for us or for agricultural purposes? Yeah that's a super tough question and I mean it leads to very tough questions about how difficult it becomes politically to advance the steady state economy in the midst of a recession points. Out that we've lost valuable time ever since the nineteen sixties when there was a lot of talk about limits to growth and periods of time since then when it would come back just about into public discussion about limits to population growth and GDP growth. It wouldn't manifest in public policies to move away from the suicidal obsession with GDP growth. So we never have been able to make Hay while. The Sun shines in policy terms when everybody had the ability to think about it. You know they're making a decent living most people and they could have instead of going to NASCAR races or watching the super bowl things like this. That are sort of indicative of such a high consumption society. There should have been more public dialogue about where we're going in the long run in terms of the size of the economy. So now we're in this really tough situation. Where yes there are. GonNa be people that don't have the benefit of telework type of job and they're going to be in real tough straights at the end. This covert caused recession at the end. One thousand nine hundred and then for some time during the remaining recessionary period. And it's what happens at the end of that. That's going to be so crucial in terms of the long term policy reforms and in terms of the Public Welfare. With the right responses people won't be left out in the cold left their places of residence kicked out because they couldn't pay the rent or the mortgage with the right response. There will be things like job. Sharing and there will be a recognition that we can't abide by the old regressive sorts of tax structures that allowed so much fat to accumulate at the top instead because of scenarios like this on we're now bumping up against the limits to growth. There does have to be a better a more equitable distribution of wealth and most importantly from our perspective at Cassie. We just have to cease and desist with that nonsensical perpetual push for GDP growth so the pain that many people are feeling now isn't proof positive that you're wrong. This isn't proof that we must have GDP growth in order to have everybody's needs being met certainly not. There was article recently about some of the leading ideas from five top economists about how to prevent a catastrophic economic developments and if we notice one thing that was very interesting about that is that none of them talked about GDP growth. It's SORTA like you know. When push comes to shove they realized that's no metric for the well being of society the all talked instead about focusing on the proper healthcare incentives in arrangements and assisting those who like we were just talking about. Don't have the advantage of the teleworking types of jobs and so on there wasn't a word in there about the need to stimulate the economy so I found that very interesting. That's what gives us a little bit of hope that the silver lining will not be torn out at the end of the day and sold off rather that we will be able to learn enough from this covert caused recession to have steady state policies. Going forward but the pain is certainly a sign that letting nature dictate reorganizing. Our economy isn't the best way to do it. It would be so much better if we were intentional about it and said let's find a way to achieve study state economy. That doesn't cause kind of pain. Yeah I totally agree with that. Cova nineteen is basically a Malthusian scenario. It's something that growth has been more conducive in terms of its pandemic properties. We do have to remind ourselves sometimes about simply what economic growth is increasing population times per capita consumption and frankly the population part gets overlooked all the time. But it's really crucial in very nuanced ways to neoclassical growth theory. It's not just about the simple matter of okay. The more people we have the more consumers we have no population. Growth is crucial in neoclassical growth. Theory because we have to have according to the growth theories more and more technological progress to raise the bar for further GDP growth and the only way to do that at turns out. Pursuant to the theory is we have to have more and more people devoted to the research and development activities that result in the raising of the bar and those people why they are a subset of the population at large. So we have to have a growing population not only to grow GDP but to have growing per capita GDP it's really on astounding conclusion and astounding indictment of the ecological ignorance that runs throughout neoclassical economics in particular grocery and so where. I was going with that in terms of the mouth. Uzi in connection is here's an example. Where focus on population growth as a key process economic growth even in per capita terms. Well that leads to places like New York City like Wuhan places where the likelihood of rapid and rabid infectious disease spread and then that does result in receiving now but with Govan nineteen itself and the resulting recession Malibu's IAN scenario and. I hope that it gets translated. That we in enough of the media and so forth that this we always hear perpetuated by the Competitive Enterprise Institute for example. That mouth is was wrong. In some fundamental sense in that there's no limits either population or economic growth that that can be dismissed. So when you say it's Malthusian. Can you define that for us to use that to describe what's going on? Yeah well again going back to your probably familiar with Robert Thomas Malthus. You know the great classical economists from the early eighteen hundreds who wrote the essay on the principle of population and warned the world basically but especially Europe Western Europe. At the time that population growth was setting up things like wars starvation pestilence and disease outbreaks. And you know. It was a very stark in dire warning that resulted in a tremendous amount of anxiety among people in Europe. At the time that were reading. And that we're a political leaders for example as well and also resulted in a lot of arguments about well. Do we really need to worry about this? And in some ways mouth was ahead of his time but in other ways at a very fundamental level he was right on and you might say opponents of mouth this who find it very easy to get funding because they're naturally enough Wall Street for example doesn't want to hear anything about this. They want to just keep having more and more growth at the stock exchange and so big money then hires anti Malthusian types of quote Unquote Scholars Lake Julian. Simon was the best example of that back in the sixties and seventies eighties. I thought it should ask about that because it seems like these days. That word Malthusian is just used a lot of times in a lazy way. As a synonym I think the intended synonym is misguided debunked foolish without any real background attached to it. So thanks for explaining that brand. If I'm not jumping too far ahead I WANNA bring up. This anticipated connection between economic recession and the unemployment rate. Mainly because I did a little bit of research on economic recessions and my thought was that if the health of the ecosystem and the health of the economy are to be proportionate to one another than we should be rejoicing. The environmental benefits from this shutdown. But this is a lot easier said than done when you have a job that pays the bills and I'm going to come back to this. Just after reading a twenty nineteen article published by John Kennedy at the University of Oxford titled Economic Conditions and support for the prioritization of environmental protection during the great recession. Basically it says that if we want to society that prioritizes environmental protection. We really want to focus our efforts on lowering the unemployment rate and making sure that people at the very least have jobs to survive rather than focusing on economic growth. So my question is just. How do we make this possible in a steady state economy? What the American people have to look forward to your maybe other nations who might be adopting this steady state model. Well the first thing that comes to mind is that there's no greater job killer then overgrowth of the economy and pulling out the rug from tomorrow's producers and consumers. This is not an extremely simple thing. It does resonate with the common sense of a lot of people like farmers for example and just people with a lot of common sense or sense general but there is a little bit of thinking involved we have to remind ourselves that at the base of the economy is agricultural and extractive surplus. If we don't have that nobody else is going to be making a living. Nobody else even be surviving. So there must be more and more agricultural extractive surplus to have a growing economy with more and more jobs. Because that's surpluses what goes into paying somebody to mow your lawn or give you a massage or whatever the services are so Erica. You know we have to remind our listeners about what we call at. Cassie the trophic structure of the economy. And we're using basic term from ecology there to show the flow of goods and services. We don't have that agricultural and extractive surplus at the base. Then we don't have any other economy. I mean we don't have the rest of the economy and growth requires more April extractive surplus and it's so clear to see then how that is very impactful on the environment. In other words it takes more and more environmental impact to have GDP growth and at some point. It's not sustainable. And the limits to growth start to set in the most modest or mildest limit to growth is the reduction in total factor productivity in other words. You know it's not as easy to generate the returns that it was by investing in research and development in the past because all the low hanging fruits have been gathered already. You know the easy timber. The easy minerals too easy fuels. They're taken up. They've been used so now. We find that we're reaching ever further into the depths of the earth and into the laboratories to devise ways to substitute for resources that we've run out of and resorting to all kinds of non natural or synthetic sorts of chemicals and pollutants like the forever pollutants and so we have boxed ourselves into more and more of an environmental corner with the focus on growth. And we're making it harder and harder to support any jobs or to support the amount of jobs that would correspond with the very high number in the workforce now so I think that's part of the answer I think that's just part one though right. Yeah I may have lost track a little bit. I think Erica's point again goes back to that really tough dilemma between the need to transition from GDP growth to a steady state economy and the need to have enough employment so as to have wellbeing in society. And it's a good metaphor if you don't mind my saying because picture of the Wall Street bull growing and growing it. Those horns of dilemma were on are just getting monstrous. And now we've got to deal with it right in the midst of a pandemic that was from the process of overgrowth. So the more people we have you know in our population is still growing by more than eighty million people year. The more need there is for economic growth just to employ them right and yet that very economic growth is pulling the rug out from under those children that are being born today so I think. Part of the conversation may be today as well as their away then to emerge from this depression. I'm sure we're going to end up calling it a depression by the time it's over. Is there a way to emerge from it where we've begun to transition into a steady state economy but in some way were meeting all the needs of too many people for the size of the planet that we've got? Well this may be sort of a parallel silver lining the fact that if there was ever going to be a chance so far in history for what you said to happen in all the transition unintentional transition toward.

Erica Europe Hay NASCAR Economic Conditions Robert Thomas Malthus Competitive Enterprise Institu Public Welfare Lake Julian Cova Western Europe Cassie New York City Simon University of Oxford
"induce" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

11:31 min | 11 months ago

"induce" Discussed on Why It Matters

"Multigenerational Victorian family. Because we've got three generations. My Dad my gosh us to teenagers as a cross between a Victorian not generational family in a we work. Because we're all working away different desks. Different parts of the has definitely sounds like a full house so for the people at home which I guess is everyone right now including you and me. Can you just tell me what you do for the council? I work at the console relations as a senior fellow focusing on international economics. And so I follow what's going on in the global economy and I've written some books on the history of finance so I am in New York City and I would be remiss if I didn't ask you about the UK. How is it feeling there? What's going on right now. Well we're in lockdown just like New York so everybody's supposed to stay inside the has from nearly all the time you are allowed to take your one daily adding to do some exercise up to an hour you can get for. Walk or bike ride. We go on walks because the weather's been pretty great and London often be crowded and polluted but right now it's not polluted and crowded so you can have a very nice kind of expiration of this historic city so here in the US. There's been this push to go back to work and you know despite the virus and to fight throw and save the economy I mean. Do you think that we have to choose between saving the economy and fighting the virus for now? We don't have to choose because whether you're thinking about the economy or thinking about public health you would choose to lock down and to try to get this pandemic under control. I think abby that tough decision is going to be not now but in two or three months from now when the virus has moved on some people would have gotten it and therefore synonymous Dave survived. They're going to be immune and the more people who are immune the less. It's obvious that it's worth telling everybody to isolate you. See what I mean so I think as time goes by we will reach a point where it'll be fair to say people should go back to work even they haven't eliminated or the public health risk. I know here in the. Us have been reading that the government is going to be sending money to individuals and small businesses. So how does this actually work? What's the goal there? The goat is to try to keep everybody afloat so that when the virus finally plays itself out and may we get a vaccine a year from now people will be able to go back and resumed their lives with as little damage as possible. You don't want people to Numerous stats so that when the viruses gone festival desperately financially underwater you. This is an enormous financial. Hit would be the worst recession the deepest recession since the nineteen thirties. To be much less than two thousand eight. Two Thousand Nine. In terms of the reduction and economic activity because we're in a medically induced economic. You know most people are being told do not what do not produce stuff do not be economically active and when that happens of course economic activity will collapse. So you know the economy's going to shrink by twenty percent or thirty percent month-on-month in the second quarter of this year and that means that to get through that quarter when people are not any money you need to spend savings. Many Americans don't have savings so then they would have enormous hardship and if the ones who do have savings spend all their savings. They're going to be in a weak state afterward. Says Better for the government to give them money and for the extra data that you're creating because of this massive recession that should be public debt rather than private debt because the public sector the government is going to be better at managing that debt and paying it back and surviving despite the debt. But I mean is a one time payment enough to accomplish those goals that seems like a lot with one installment. No you're right. I mean I think it's got to be more than that and I believe it may or thereabouts. I wouldn't be surprised. To See Congress passed a supplemental stimulus to give additional help to go. I was in New York during nine eleven and I remember the big push. Was You know? Spend MONEY SUPPORT. The economy support your local places. Is that sort of the ideal situation with your stimulus. Check now too because line was come to New York. Watch a movie go out to dinner. Stay in a hotel. Now you stimulated the New York Academy and you've paid it back for nine eleven now you can't right because the movie the Broadway shows kind of the restaurants and hotels pretty much operating either so we have a simultaneous hit. Both to demont another word spending is going down but also certain types of supply out there either because businesses accusing down. They can't operate so I think the money this time is less bat. Go off and spend it. It's more bad take and trying to survive so a lot of people are losing their jobs. I know I have several friends and many more. That are going to face job loss and everyone's filing for unemployment so is the US going to run out of money to pay all these people for their unemployment benefits. You know. That's a great question. Gaby as it gets into a very very interesting experiment that we're going to be running in the next few months if you think back to two thousand eight. One of the amazing policy surprises was that the Federal Reserve could create unlimited amounts of money and use it to bail out the financial system and there was no apparent penalty for that in the past. You would have said. Hey if the central bank just prince money you're going to get inflation. This time. There was no inflation and without inflation. There was no reason that the central bank should stop printing more money and it carried on doing so called quantitive easing where basically creates money pumped into the economy? It went on doing that for quite some time after the two thousand eight crisis. Suddenly we had this realization that central bank power was way bigger than we had suspected before. Now this time we're running the next experiment which is a badge government budget power. The Treasury's power to have payments to American families and American businesses. Almost without limit cannot be done in the way that Central Bank Money. Printing was done almost without limit now. There are a lot of economists who think yes right now because inflation is nowhere in sight that for the Central Bank can create money and it can use that money to buy government bums and when the Treasury sells government bonds to the Central Bank. The treasury gets lots of cash and it can give that cash to Americans freely and this process could continue really to an enormous extent and they will not be inflation. They will not be crashing. The dollar that will not be any adverse consequence. And say you have this sort of free license to basically create money well? What's the potential downside to that kind of sounds a little bit too good to be true? It does sound too good to be true. The downside is that government debt will increase but the mitigating thing is that the government debt will be owed to the Federal Reserve which would have bought the debt and the Federal Reserve is ultimately part of the government so the government will be kind of earning money to itself and so that isn't actually Turbie damaging what happens is the government has a bunch of debt. The Treasury has to pay interest on that debt. It pays the under of the debt the owner of the debt of the central bank the Central Bank interest and under the rules of the Central Bank. It pays back. It's prophets guess where to the Treasury so the Treasury basically pays the money to the fat in guests from the Fed and it's the wash so it is very much like alchemy. You are printing money at nothing. It's creating gold by magic so it's kind of weird but it's one of those things where if you think about Kathy. You can't think of a reason why wouldn't work synonymous people okay with it. Of course if everybody decided to panic order once and run away from the dollar and Buy Gold. Bitcoin and the daughter would crash. We will be in trouble but I didn't think that's GonNa Happen so I think we may discover that you can increase government debt without actually crippling the economy. I mean it seems like it's worth a try at least in a situation this tough right because we have certainty about the cost of not helping people that they will be real humid hot ship and we have uncertainty about the economic consequences of racking up a lot of extra government debt. And so I agree with you. it's an experiment that we should be waiting to try nice so I can take at least one of my immediate worries off my long list. Not Worry as much about that specific thing and just focus on everything else. That is continuously worrying me. I'm giving you a silver lining day gear for that relief so you know. I am an eternal optimist even in the face of you know what's going on right now are there any other silver linings that you sort of see coming out of this so on Saturday. My sister had a birthday and she lives about how far from my house so I cooked up a plan where I went on my work. My other sister came on and woke to and We brought our kids long and a big banner that said Happy Birthday in huge letters and some gifts and we put the gifts on the doorstep and then we retreated a safe distance and called my sister on cell phone and when she opened the door what she could see.

Treasury Federal Reserve New York City US senior fellow New York UK London Congress Bitcoin abby New York Academy Gaby Dave Kathy
"induce" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

11:46 min | 11 months ago

"induce" Discussed on Why It Matters

"So the Wyatt matters team like everyone else is home and it's hard things are scary. I don't know about you but I've been having endless video chats with my friends and family and aside from drinking wine while showing off completed puzzles or homemade bread. We're mostly talking about two topics health and the economy we bounce back and forth what starts as a question about how someone's feeling turns into an update about who lost their job. These conversations are happening everywhere. Nobody wants to get sick. Nobody wants to lose their job. And it can feel like it's one or the other as people deal with these worries. Some politicians and business leaders have called for a return to work in order to save the economy even at the expense of lives. It just keeps coming up and so we decided. Hey let's pick up the phone and ask two of our fellows to help us understand the problem. One an expert on health and the other an expert on the economy. Just a heads up that this episode is going to have a different style than our other shows. It's essentially two conversations without most of our usual music and narration and possess. Don't worry though we'll be back to our regular format and non corona virus programming for a season to premiere in two weeks. But for now I'm Gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today saving the economy and saving lives. Do we have to choose okay? First Tomboy key senior fellow for Global Health at the council. He's getting a lot of these calls so hopefully he's not tired of answering Tom. Blakey how are you? I'm okay grappling with the shutdown. Like everyone else. Yeah what is your work from home situation? She asks while sitting in her closet so he answers while sitting in my in my bedroom where we have three small kids. So you know. That's a challenge and we live in the city of DC so there is no great backyard for them to run around in so they bounce around the house. More or less like excited molecules at this so we have officially made it to April. Felt like we would never get here. Longest MARCH ON RECORD. I believe is the expert opinion. Do you think April is going to be worse than March April in the United States will definitely be worse than March? That's because by and large it takes about three weeks for people to start showing clinical symptoms so starting to get physically ill from having contracted the virus. It spreads as everyone knows at this point exponentially with a lot of cases occurring among people who have unreported infections. So I wanna ask you about something that I keep seeing people arguing about on social media even though I'm trying to avoid some of this stuff pretty pretty hard but do you feel like we have to choose between saving the economy and saving lives. No I think saving lives or more specifically keeping people from getting infected is really the only way to save the economy. The reality of this is is that we are not going practically to be able to go back to work until we get this back under control so the best economic policy. We have is health policy. At this moment we can have a bad. Economic impact of this pandemic with good policies will still end up there or we could have a much worse. Economic impact of these with bad health policies plus all lives lost. And I choose the former. But I've heard people say that if we don't spend money saving the economy. Many more lives could be lost in the long run due to recession. So do recessions kill people? They do recessions. Do Kill people. There have been a number of studies that looked at the great recession. We saw health impacts deeply for men and racial and ethnic minorities and it ranged from a lot of our Diseases of despair that exists out there already in terms of suicide or alcohol or substance abuse traffic fatalities safe harm declining fertility. You name it. You see that in recessions and we just saw a dozen years ago so we're going to see that again but again. The option here is not preventing recession by allowing this virus. Free Rein to run rampant. It's we want this to be a shorter recession or we want this to be a deeper and longer recession so the idea is to focus sort of on the immediate and the short term and that will help naturally the long-term absolutely know China's starting head back to work South Korea which had its first case the same day the United States head. Its first case is back to work. You know we can do this. We got off to an awfully slow start but it can be done in the sooner we can do it. The better for us both from an economic and health perspective. So I've read that half. The national stockpile of ventilators has already been sent out. Which sounds really scary. So if we want to stimulate the economy and fight the pandemic at the same time. I don't really understand why we can't put more people to work making masks the protective gear the ventilator is the things we need so we can but we need to mandate this. They're going to be still supply chain issues about. Can we make all the components? Can we get all that but you know we can manage that? What is difficult to manage is to be doing this in April instead of doing it in January February. You've in early March. So what choices has the US made in situations like this in the past? Are there any past success stories? We can emulate USO in the past in World War Two and in the Korean War. We granted the executive branch broad authority to regulate industry so that we could ramp up supplies that are needed for the nation's offense. We are in that kind of moment now. The president is talking about doing that this week. On a limited basis. And that's great and I'm glad for it and we should but we are awfully late for this wave but here's one thing. I do emphasize unfortunately. Is that even when we get this under control? This isn't going away. This is just the first wave of this now. If we can manage to get ahead of it we can do what some other nations have done which is have good surveillance and testing and really minimize the effect of future waves. But until there's a vaccine are really effective therapeutic set can reduce people from getting sick from this. We're going to keep seeing waves at this point. There're more than a million cases globally. It's a virus said isn't going to go away. There's signs that it's going to go away with weather so ramping up production is good for those second ways. I'd just wish we had done it earlier. So is good for this wave two. So has the timeline on a vaccine. Become any clear so it's a year and a year and a half away. That's what we're looking at. The other thing to know about the vaccine is once we have it. We still have to make it in the kind of volumes that can address people's needs you know how do we do that? But even once back scene becomes available. We'll take a little time for everyone to get it so I shouldn't be pending all my hopes to that vaccine Not In the short term in the long term. I'm a believer in human innovation. What I do think you need for that to have. Its effect is realistic and honest. Assessment of the challenges we face in the urgency in addressing them. But when you have that I fundamentally believe in us to have that innovation to address that we just need to mobilize it sooner than we have been. What does the endgame of this pandemic look like to you? The medium-term and people should be honest about this. So I'm going to try to be in. This podcast is that you know even in countries that have done well with this. They're still seeing cases. They get cases from people returning from abroad with infections like sparks. You know you need to control before they set off at wildfire. That's going to be the reality for a year or two years with this virus that we will have that risk so it. This is not going to immediately go back to the way it was. That's the medium-term this the long term is there only really to either. We develop a vaccine or at least sixty percent of the population needs to become immune the challenge with the latter route. Is it will come at a great human cost so I would like to bet on the former. I guess this is a hard question to answer. But do you see any silver linings in all this. Let me put it this way. Pandemics put a mirror to the societies they inflict and what they expose about ourselves in terms of her moaner abilities. In terms of the limits of our health systems in terms of the dysfunction of our politics in the past. Those have spurred reforms whether it's to building of our public health systems or the construction of her great sanitation networks in cities. All these came as a result of past pandemics of cholera or tuberculosis. In the like we will have those opportunities here. We will not be better for having experienced this. Pandemic could affect as many as forty to seventy percent of the world's population. We will not be better off for having had that experience but we will have an opportunity at the end to at least learn from it and I hope we take it. Thank you so much. I hope you and your family are. You know good and don't drive each other crazy but take these moments to be together and Yeah that you stay safe thanks you too take her so according to Tom. We don't have to choose between saving lives and saving the economy for the time being there. The same thing. The best way to help economy is to stay home and prevent infections. And that's a hard pill to swallow what's good for the economy. As a whole has real costs people lose their jobs. Businesses fail so to understand the best way to contend with this double edged sword. We decided it was time to call someone who has spent his life thinking about the economy. Sebastian Mallaby Hello. How are you GonNa Great 'em in London? I'm in what? My wife calls across between.

Pandemic United States Tom senior fellow for Global Healt Sebastian Mallaby USO Blakey Sierra China DC South Korea London president executive
"induce" Discussed on ANPT Stroke Special Interest Group

ANPT Stroke Special Interest Group

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on ANPT Stroke Special Interest Group

"Accredited trainer at one point and acs. I'm lot my my background was looking at Training and the acs guidelines and things like that. That's what i brought to the table. When i when i heard my fellowship in new jersey My interest in it was especially as a non therapist. This literature was coming out on this promising therapy. Was what would happen if we does it out. And the other part of it was My background is actually. My is actually motor learning. So i was already aware that differently dosed Therapy programs can have different Effects on Outcome so i think i was coming out of in both ways from from a dosing standpoint. Just wondering what. Can we do for something like my mom or someone someone else's mom who's in a small town and You know does. It doesn't have a lot of resources And wants to get therapy but Either can't or won't do sport. Tenths of therapy can we it differently and get the same treatment effects so some it was personal but a lot of it was just sort of where my training was coming from and looking at intervention from a practical standpoint weather could be Administered or not that is a very interesting background To kind of take it and look at it in a different way from being non clinical at that point in your career so that i'm glad you shared that so in an ideal world what do you think this type of treatment should look like wow. That's a great question Well i should. I say that. I don't have cleaner. I don't Sell constraint loose. Be i you know. I don't care if people use it or not. I think they use therapy. That works best for them. And from a scientific standpoint. I'm sort of like consumer reports. Something comes across my table. You know we tested as best we can and civilised diamond works some time. It doesn't I ended on its ways. You know And that's not necessarily always how the scientific field ob works best in different therapies and whatnot. So i don't necessarily Have a have a skin in the game as to what it should look like you know. I think that there's enough evidence out there. There's enough therapies out. there Both published an what people do on a daily basis showing that you can get good treatment of facts and thirty or forty five minutes Of therapy so. I don't think we need to necessarily adjust the parameters of our therapy. I think that what the therapy starts to need to look like Which is self evident is. It needs to be task. Specific it needs to be focused on What the patient wants to do. What's meaningful to them. What is salient to them You know. I have yet to meet a professional cone stocker. Yes i see patients all the time stacking cones and All those kinds of things i think wrote movements are good once in a while i think stretching and facilitating is fine. But you've got And it has a place but Home exercises should probably have more than just sort of moving your arms up and down and and strengthening they range emotion. They should probably be progressed. St more challenging. So that learning takes place so i think If i were to pick one little word out of about pop's possibly when. I think it should look like what did he base. I think leading drives the brain is green. Drives the function. The changing drives function andrew. I look at our home exercise programs and we've got a look at why patients are doing in the room when they're not with us As was what we're doing with patients to make sure that there's there's learning taking place alerting That's gonna try to change that task specific tests specific test specific. Sounds like i know. I'm a broken record. Aren't i know. I agree with you in a so a lot of other people in a lot of other research. And you know it's about how we get it out to the masses and presented in a way that's Enjoyable for patients to to do as they progress exactly. That's exactly my. My dad used to say that teach people hate to think and requires a lot of thought when you're sitting there with a patient and you're You could the the bar or cone or whatever's is sitting right there on the shelf and you're electing instead to to do something that's meaningful to the patient every fires maybe some more props or some different positioning or something like that. That's hard to deal devastating. Well thank you for joining us. That is our episode. I'd like the hall and dr steven page for giving us a lot of great information about constraint induced movement therapy and cleese do keep an eye out for our next coming up this year hopefully have several new episodes coming this year until next time. Your host jason ds..

new jersey andrew dr steven cleese jason ds
"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Loophole in the the Bible Belt is that right. The buckle of I mean buckle of the Bible Belt as much that would be fun to sign and play. It was the center though that it would be the bulwark of it. That would the bulwark buckle of the Bible Belt. I feel like there's no. There shouldn't be any traffic in Salt Lake because the streets are one mile across and no one lives there. Thank you Brigham. Young for making sure that a covered wagon turn around at any point at the intersection of First Avenue. First Avenue and First Avenue the next block the next crosswalk will. We'll be one mile that way because all the city blocks are going to be the size of a sugar beet field for any future. Lean it hasn't been to Salt Lake. It is really a sight to behold there are a traffic issues in salt. Lake congestion is beginning and so in the nineties. The seemed like a terrible idea to start putting train light light rail but they're kind of got Mormon conservativism where he Mormon Industriousness Tae. Here's something else we can do to make this uninhabitable place Nice. We found like spacey trains. And so do they have like broom fights. I mean how do they. How did they resolve those issues? They hit each other with with with with rascal sticks. Actually everybody gets out there. Rascal beater now. The thing about Salt Lake is it actually is like this. Incredibly Liberal Island rights takes pride on how about. It's you know it's great. LGBT culture and so forth. I should say that Salt Lake has an extremely progressive homeless housing program. Ram Yes they they. They build houses for cheap. The first places to have a However housing first model? Yeah and it worked there in in places where building new housing is cost prohibitive. It's trickier but any who different boring omnibus. We're doing this boring. Yeah so they put it in the light rail and I think there wasn't deuce demand people were like. This is a train. This is cool right. Ridership immediately outstrip outstrip projections. And now. It's a beloved city symbol. It's been expanded to the airport ahead of schedule. It's been expanded to the university. Had scheduled extensions have been built all the way down onto the county north of it and the county south of it so that's regional heavy rail essentially and the and the one of my big platforms in in in advocating for light. Israel was that rail is cool. Don't like taking the bus. But they love taking the train. Unfortunately Seattle only has one light rail line and currently still a backbone like Salt Salt Lake City in one thousand nine hundred seven and it takes fifty five minutes to go from the airport to downtown. So it's so you really have to commit to. They built it at grade through the poor parts of town. Yeah because they could get away with it and now they're building it in tunnels through the Nice white part of town. Yeah something's never changed. Robert Moses the the heart of the libertarian objections to the canoe conventional wisdom on induced demand. I cannot be resolved by methodologically because they are fundamentally philosophical. Blah the libertarian. Take care would be. Hey sure the these new are still crowded. But there's eight new lanes that's more people out doing what they want to do. Yes independent lead making choices. Doing their business okay. Maybe they're going to costco three times a week instead of one. That's good right as American. Exactly that's their God given right. And that's that drives the economy. You know this this idea of the city as as a busy anthill. That's still seems very futuristic to us that's what we want but those is busy metropolis by all have have like trains. Moving around in lecture track like Fritz Lang never had traffic on his on on his weird elevated tunnels Zoom Zoom. So on the one hand. You've got them saying. Hey this is clearly what the market wanted. Therefore it's right and I think it's crowded that's also right right right you know. There's an invisible hand making traffic and you gotta respect it so I don't Wanna I don't WanNa introduce my dystopia in philosophy into this already Super Boring podcast. We're really talking but my But you know. I think you don't have to look very far into the future to see that these to see two things Self driving vehicles and a growing monopoly on control over self driving vehicles vehicles because self driving vehicles are I mean. There's a reason that Google Apple Uber that all these companies are are currently pouring a lot of resources into building the technology of self driving. They want to get there. I want to get their first because there is the opportunity to have a monopoly control. You think it will basically be infrastructure. It'll be like it'll be like okay utility but it will meet who runs our self. Driving cars privately owned utility privately owned companies that are using publicly funded roads four or a hat but effectively having a monopoly over them. So if you can no longer drive into a city in your car. If you're libertarianism is at least truncated when you get within the city limits because you can't have self driving cars and manually driven cars on the same roadways after a certain point because the efficiency if grandma is looking it has turn signal on in his driving around town you know. You're you're superfast robot cars can't it's too expensive to deal with her systems can only repack them in if everybody's a robot right. So but once those robots start if the if global governments have not have not regulated access assess than what you have is Google controlling her or uber controlling who has access to the roads right or they could merge informed Guber goop guber Google control everything. But then they're going to say if your credit rating is below six hundred. You don't get a car and at that point. The only way you can move around a city is if if there's a public transit network that shares this this burden and of course there's no right now. There's no plan in place to tax these these private companies to pay for the roads that they're exploiting because it's not happening yet but governments are thinking this foreign advanced ten years from now we're building tunnels and whatnot and twenty. Eighty six lane freeways ten years from now there. It's possible or within twenty years that the roads congestion that's going to be completely different equation. That's dominated by this very small number of of private contractors and without some regulation without some government oversight public option. Sean if you will right up either both a public option and also some sense of some sense that these companies are are using doing what we want. They're doing what we want but they're also exploiting Our roads right wizard of the the day that you have to park your car out in federal way because you can't drive into town and all you can do is either choose between a light rail that takes an hour. And a half. Or get hovercraft from apple that will get you either in five minutes but you need a six hundred fifty credit rating to rise Ari Cato Institute like we'RE GONNA have to regulate these things like once. These are effectively the only way of moving around be because is it requires a system right you can't you can't it has to be an integrated system well. I mean even in our time. The arguments around induced demand say a greater the market is being served. The market is not aware of things that cities in fact the market is running counter to things that cities will want on the larger scale. That want to reduce sprawl sprawl for environmental reasons. Though you know they want to reduce pollution they want to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Electric cars. Don't Pan out off. It is is not the only factor right and convenience is not the only factor cities may not want to develop a certain place where people would wanNA drive if there was a costco. You know they're maybe well that's the argument that we don't lose all the farms right around the city just because people want to build big developments there so the question becomes do you trust trust these technocrats to make the right planning decisions than I do. I've always been I I. I was always sitting in the front row in elementary school. We raising my hand. I I making sure. All the rules got enforced at recess. I like to be told what to do by the smarts one of the things that one of the things about old school liberalism is that you do fundamentally believe that people to go into public service are people of goodwill now. That isn't maybe necessarily which ever been true or or certainly isn't true now the charade that the whole thing runs on them but I know a lot of people in public service and almost to the to to the person I believe there are people of goodwill who've dedicated themselves to To the public good and so I still do believe that. A technocrat who's WHO's working in a in a you know in public planning isn't there for money and I don't think they're there because they're power mad or ideological even but I thought you'd be the rebel like I thought so you don't feel like your Your rebellious rock and roll character makes you. I'll do do what I want. The market is right libertarian. No but I am a rebel in the sense that when you build your super system I'm still going to drive my seventy two corvette with no mufflers right into into the heart of it park on the sidewalk and go into a coffee. No guber is GonNa shut you down immediately let them try and that concludes induced demand entry. Six three seven dot easy one seven zero four certificate number three eight nine three eight in the omnibus future leans in the unlikely event that social media still exists in your era facebook book twitter instagram. Google and Uber are archived at Pat Omnibus Project. Do you have do you have an account uber social media platforms our credit ratings. Were seven ninety. Four and eight twenty two. All transactions are as well with their concomitant emojis at Ken Jennings and John Roderick. I just recently connected my instagram To my twitter with twins to grant with if vis then that the program that allows my twitter feed to show my instagram previews. So you don't have to click the link so I saw this before you were just doing doing this manually. The whole time I was doing manually but of course all it did was show the show the link and half the people don't WanNa follow link to a different platform. I never did I. Thanks thanks man. All my best content. I had to go to instagram separately to look at your content and it hurts physically. Because you don't post there I used to have my facebook and twitter linked where everything the thing I put on my twitter. We're on phase two and then I was told don't do that. You're annoying people who don't want on facebook but the problem is I don't post on facebook anymore so all those people people are over there yelling about the economy and talking about white but white national all or nothing my tweets are a gas and they expand to fill any social media platform. You can turn it on or you can turn it off. The Faucet might tweets used to get a lot of facebook comments. But I'm just off that platform. Now people still.

Salt Lake facebook Google twitter Bible Belt costco instagram Salt Salt Lake City Brigham Seattle Fritz Lang Israel Ken Jennings Robert Moses Pat Omnibus Project Sean
"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Third billboards about believes situated on the beautiful cable beach mar is a spectacular. Learn new resort destination in the Bahamas with your choice of three oceanfront hotels. The Grand Hyatt S. L. S. and Rosewood. This is the place to find your perfect blend of luxury relaxation and a lot of fun. Whatever you're looking for you can find it at Baja? Mar The Bahamas most exciting culinary destination. The resort is home to over or forty restaurants bars and lounges ranging. From casual waterside eateries to high end chef driven dining experiences eleven glorious landscape pools acres of Pristine Beach Front and a soothing. SPA offered endless relaxation. While guests find thrills at casino an array of high energy nightspots and end at the royal blue the most acclaimed new Gulf wars in the Caribbean just a short flight from the US and a fifteen minute drive airport Baja Mar is an easy getaway any time of year. Book your next vacation at one of the resorts three iconic hotels and to explore winter specials including up to thirty five percent savings on your stay yes. Thirty five percent visit Baja Mar dot com. That's Baja Mar dot com B. A. H. A. M. A. R. dot com. The only other area. I've seen research on induced demand applied to is insurance especially in our time. Now that we're we're talking about applying health insurance two broad groups.

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Million new trips across the East River just by giving people more bridges to. That's fantastic it's fantastic. I think if you want more trips across the East River I mean it's just a fantastic statistic fantastic statistic. That was wonderful. It really is nice. You know in nineteen eighteen thirty. The population earn. Let's nineteen forty. The population of New York was seven and a half million in two thousand and ten. It was only only one million or not even one million more people so so we're looking we're thinking of one thousand nine hundred forty New York as being kind of a smaller town but but it's not. It's already interesting. It already had seven point five. We can vision. The density of of a lot of that is obviously the skyscrapers offers of Ghana but also people have moved out. Sure there's been sprawl hormonally. Yeah and we see this weird. They called it traffic traffic generation. And it's it's a phenomenon. Cities are starting to see time and again unexpectedly you know L. A. Widens the four. Oh five and was never within and weeks. The newlands are just as backed up as the lanes Meet the meet the new traffic jam. Same as the old traffic right. Boston does the big dig. And it's a Boondoggle by the time it gets done at least we've got these new lands for the city and then cramped day get just as craft. Have you been stuck in traffic in the big dig. I haven't the one time I used it after after flying in it was after hours. So it's not so bad duck in traffic in the big. Why did why are they still calling it? The big dig does no. It's it's like the freedom him tower they can call it whatever they want. It's always going to be the freedom. Why did they decide? It's one World Trade Center now. Do they hit the freedom they do hate the freedom. It's precisely why was it was. Is it called French tower before and they had no I think maybe they thought that calling it. The Freedom Tower was like taunting try and fly planes into it and so it was originally called. We dare you to fly planes into this tower top yours. No the big is awful to be stuck in under under because because you're because you're very conscious it's like being stuck in the Hudson stuck under the Hudson claustrophobic yeah you just. You're aware of there being a giant body of water over your head and that's at least for me uncomfortable. It's one thing to be speeding through there at one o'clock in the morning at and seventy one delusion of safety that comes speed starts to collapse. I'm going to zoos ahead of a of the of the wave of water in a movie. But you're just sitting down there like choking on other people's exhaust. There's nowhere to run. Got No options. I don't like it. This audio book is terrible that I'm listening to give me out of here. Yes so the. You know the thinking about traffic doc was always that it was just like a liquid. You just gotTa give pipes to pour through and you're gonNA make the pipes bigger one if it wasn't what if it was a gas well as we expanded to fill larger pipes mean more liquid. It's a it's related to an economic phenomenon called induced demand and people are going to say can you didn't mention induced demand manned until over half an hour into the show but people won't unlucky actually Iguana Iguana Squid hybrids complain. But look doc we've been talking about India's demand the whole time. Did we call it by its name. No no we're just be us about our cats know. We certainly were not. We're talking about induced demand in in a in a roundabout fashion. Just didn't know what the word was and now now we're there. It was not a roundabout fashion because we didn't discuss roundabouts which is another European city planning initiative initiative butter a city planning initiative that is amazing but in implementation in in Washington. You often see them with stop signs. I love coming to a roundabout stops. Somebody just wanted to put us in the middle of this intersection. Apparently and that's fine. Okay stuff done. Also Americans don't know how to use them. I always stop in applaud when I see when I see perfectly constructed roundabout that somebody was like no we have to put a traffic light here. The The phenomena induced demand works like this people. Want something only because people want more of it if you give them more of of it. There's not a lot when you look in the research on induced demand. There's not a lot of goods that economists apply it to Interesting because it seems seems like it would be applied. Broadly yeah I mean. Do people want coffee more if they seem more starbucks. Maybe but there's not a lot of research on it. Let me ask you this. Did you ever want to go to a bar. Where you through axes avatar? Yeah did it's really the only thing I wanted to. Every time I walk into a bar I thought another says fine socializing. They're selling drinks. There's a jukebox. I'm into all of this. But where are the axes. It smells smells like ax over by that Guy Ding. I think economists would argue that. Maybe that's the case of latent demand that there was this untapped desire clearly because once they're there are people do it right but I think this is a good example because yeah if you had pulled this question should bars have axes in two does five you would have got one hundred percent agree. No affirmative right reasons but now if you pulled people there'd be a certain percentage uh-huh of people maybe a large percentage that say. When does the axe throwing far in my neighborhood? Hope Right which nights of the week is xtra which nights or trivia because I want to be there an axe throwing throwing night but I do feel like induced demand applies to starbucks or starbucks. Little if there's no there's not. There's not thirty coffee shops in your neighborhood. You won't think of that as a as coffee as a social signifier right before. There was a meeting type before there was a starbucks inside of a supermarket across the street from a free standing starbucks across the street from another starbucks I. I don't think people needed that much coffee. And now they do they really do. It was coffee wasn't liquid. No way coffee was a guess. Coffee was talking liquid in the pipe and aerosolize coffees floating into our bodies caffeinated. Our Desire Zaire for more and more starbucks the latent demand means pent-up desire for a thing that didn't exist and that that's easy to see you know people maybe people did did want phone with a better camera and that's why they get excited about the new iphone. It's something that people already wanted. People wanted a flight to a new new location and so the airline introduced it. But you know with the new product can come advertising and awareness that build up maybe people didn't want to go to Belize but now there's nonstop and people will think instead of Hawaii what if I just go to Belize. I've seen billboards right. I've seen fire. I've seen rain. I've seen the following three things. I five second rate.

starbucks New York East River axe throwing Coffee Freedom Tower Ghana Boston French tower World Trade Center India L. A. Belize Guy Ding Washington Hawaii
"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Results were not what people expect it in. Nineteen thirty six. Robert Moses unveiled these amazing new thoroughfares to Long Island the Grand Central Expressway the expressway. The Lawrenson Expressway thirty-six ninety-three six. Yeah and there was all talk about how we had solved solved. Manhattan's traffic problems a long island for generations. We've got these three new wide expressways heading out into the hinterlands and within three weeks seeks traffic returned to previous levels which surprised the hell out of the city that had just paid the equivalent of billions of dollars for those new expressways so by nineteen thirty eight. They're already building new expressways out to Long Island. It happened with bridges as well in nineteen thirty six. Robert Moses Opens detri- Borough Bridge to relieve terrible terrible traffic on the Queensboro Bridge. It's a new way to get across the East River and again within within a matter of weeks or months. Traffic is back to as bad as it was not just on the old bridge but on the new bridge as well so bad that in nineteen forty they have to build the Bronx Whitestone Bridge to relieve traffic on the Queen's driver and then then within Within a matter of months all three bridges are as bad as one bridge used to be the city's trying to figure out what's going on here. They've estimated that within in one year they managed to create six million new trips across the East River just by giving people more bridges to. That's fantastic it's fantastic. I think if you want more trips across the East River I mean it's just a fantastic statistic fantastic statistic. That was wonderful. It really is nice. You know in nineteen eighteen thirty. The population.

Long Island Bronx Whitestone Bridge East River Robert Moses Queensboro Bridge detri- Borough Bridge Lawrenson Expressway Grand Central Expressway Manhattan
"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"I had a roommate in college. who had a car that was you know with the floor had rusted through? Maybe we all have made you or drug dealer hydro across the country and you can see the freeway with and I just remember thinking you know. We're very close to a flintstone stone solution here like if that all gets a little bigger we can literally do that. But one of the solutions one Seattle was tearing down the viaduct offer again public code collapsing freeway reasons. was a tunnel and the city kept voting down owned multiple billion dollar tunnel but a bunch of different options were moved to the city voted. No on all of them and one of the options could have been just do nothing to get rid of this main arterial through downtown Seattle and a lot of the discussion said that this will not be as catastrophic as you think. Now what we're what was your take on that at the time as voter think I voted no on everything. I think maybe wander here Seattle Way. I'm a straight ticket ticket voter. Nope the Party of no not that one either. nope sorry good space guy. Hey Miles it's me Jack uh-huh right here right next to you next to me. Yeah just like a work. Hey I wanted to join with you to tell people to tune in to a very special episode special up yeah of TD. The News I is this is actually it. Look I know you saw the social media is at the Elliott. Oh so so he said what are these two juggernauts podcasting doing their when Mazda calls me up and they say miles. We know that you're loyal. Mazda owner we want to align with you um because you get it yet you know what I'm willing to answer the call and help Ding Dong help. People understand the power of it so we did. Is We actually got to record A special episode inside the new Mazda C X Thirty where we talked about Kinda like flow states and feeling alive and how we feel alive. What makes us feel alive live? Yeah it was really doped actually record inside the car. I got depressed. A lot of buttons. Make them mad because of like please don't fumble around in here but I said I like to explore the less if you actually want to check out the first ever see X.. Thirty check it out and Mazda. USA DOT COM slash IHEART. Or if you're trying to check it up. Irl then pull up to the local dealership today The because I had been convinced by you know probably some new urban type in the stranger who had told me we can just get rid of this thing thing. We're convinced of that. Yeah it seemed. I liked the fact that it was counterintuitive and I had discovered some new secret that other people who had not read some wired article did not know sure hurt which was hacked. The freeway you can just you can just get rid of stuff. And it's not as bad as anyone thinks. Well I think the Embarcadero is the is the thing that everyone uses to demonstrate. Yes right they tore that entire freeway down and it was the only thing that connected One Oh one the only way to get from one. Oh one to to the major freeways anyways to the to the Bay Bridge on paper. This was a terrible idea. You just GonNa you're GONNA come off the Golden Gate Bridge and have to drive through the streets thing the street think. I think what will happen to downtown. You come up. You're very angry through the streets where my children play with their toys. Streets of San Francisco where Michael. Douglas does cop stuff tough but they did tear it down and they they rebuilt the embarcadero as A. I guess they say. Pedestrian friendly have having been a pedestrian on it many many times very wide. It's not super friendly. I mean if you try and if you try and run across it going against the light it's your basically like really you're on your your bombing run through the death star. It's frogger and that's going to happen on. Our waterfront is well. It's GONNA be a why it's GonNa be replaced by a wide surface boulevard a wide boulevard where where people are driving faster than than probably but but the embargo is nice. and honestly you don't basically Vancouver is D- San MM Franciscan said right. Is that what they wanted will vancouver. Never never had a freeway going into the town. It just had a super wide boulevard. That was that were traffic when really fast but had stoplights but Vancouver had had a the first lush which was where you bought soap. That looked like food and three by your bath bombs. And that's exactly what San Francisco one. I go up to Canada and I sneak bombs across the border. But they're bad ball balm's do you have any bombs uh-huh officer are you saying with silent l like people who say almond get out of the car so so I was very much in favor of tearing down the viaduct and doing nothing and doing nothing. Leave the streets as they were build a park in that space and let the chips fall not literally in early. The chips were falling. The chips were already fallen right. Let's that's why you couldn't turn it into a high line types park because again it was going to collapse super unsafe. A lot of people wanted it to be a highland highland park and I was because I'm on the Seattle Music Commission or although I got an email the other day the didn't exactly thank me for my service but the email included the line. You know All of our emeritus members. Hey I was like am I one of those now. Am I am an emeritus. But as a member of the Seattle Music Commission possibly emerges we possibly marriages we We had a very vested in the redevelopment of the waterfront because there are lots of opportunities to build venues places where musicians can ply their trade. There's a big psychological barrier to building it elevated freeway through a neighbor through an area right. You know like you'd think it wouldn't change the underlying vibe much to just scared of a freeway but it does. It does in a major way and and so I went to a lot of meetings of the waterfront redevelopment people and boy when that idea of of turning the elevated freeway into a park came around you know some citizen initiative the waterfront redevelopment people were more opposed to it and more more like circle the wagons to make sure this doesn't happen than almost any other aspect of the project. Do they know. It would be catnip into Seattle voters. Yes they we're going to have a thing like Chelsea they absolutely felt like this thing that if it gets out of hand people will really wanted and it's a terrible idea and we have to stop it was it was a behind the scenes. Glimpse of how municipal politics sometimes worked around when I seen it was a terrible idea for structural reasons. If you don't want cars up there during earthquake you don't want a bunch of Pedestrians Austrians and cotton candy vendors. It was a bad idea but what they what the reason they didn't like it. Is that Seattle. SEATTLE LOVES TO GET A bunch of well-meaning people together with a vision and the vision they had for redeveloping. The waterfront did not include a decrepit. We've chosen the division was just like no and once they had the vision. It's different from an Old Testament version. I work out and God had given our committee this we have all seen it and now we must make it come to pass yes. This happened in Seoul Korea my own my own home you see daylight through the Kimchi. The Alaskan Bush pilots come in the accidentally to Korea. There was a freeway right through elevated for right through the center of downtown Chengguan freeway a and I think it was the main arterial hundred sixty thousand cars a day pouring into downtown on this thing and they built it. I think through the only sometime in the post Korean War seventies or eighties. Maybe we built it in only stretch where they could which was where the river used to go through downtown so they had covered over a nice stream and giving us in a dirty smelly noisy elevated. This was the Providence Rhode Island's philosophy of urban develop whoever the Korean Robert Moses this exactly and sometime in the two thousands the new urban EST movement in some vision of urban renewal daylight. The rebel day decided we the stream would be amazing. This could be a all you have to do is get rid of the only arterial into downtown Seoul. And they did so on freeway they just tore down and last time I was in Seoul. It was like a paradise like part of town. I hated to go to now. Had this beautiful park lined and streamed kind of babbling. Its way through the one of the biggest cities in the world with lined with fountains and vendors and public art and they had just turned turned it into Portland or San Antonio River walk or something for for one block of Seoul This is a phenomenon called reduced demand where you get rid out of a good and once the good is gone. There's no supply demand drops people decide. They don't want it. You see it in. There's a movement now to you turn a lot of urban thoroughfares into pedestrian streets. They turn Broadway through Times Square into a pedestrian street a couple of times a year. Now I think and everyone everyone tells them. Don't do it every other street around. There's going to be a disaster right and it isn't because demand is not fixed. It varies according to the Policy Changed Changed Surrounded Dallas did the did the opposite or a different version of it at that we hear about Seattle to which is cover the freeway. We're hearing about this now. Everybody wants to live. I five through Seattle and Dallas did it and and what had formerly been a big GNARLY. Early freeway. Scar through town is now one of these food. Truck rivers farmers market catalyzes. Everybody's up there just completely like there's no. We have no big freeways. It's all just watch for you. It'd be times I would like the freeway scar to be gone it really. I was thinking about this the other day. I live near Era Lake in Seattle and their stuff just on the other side of the lake. That seems to me a whole different neighborhood. Inaccessible in an approachable and in fact I could walk there from my house except for the fact that they put I five right through ninety nine. No I'm talking about on the east side of the lake when they put five maple leaf. Oh I see maple leaves should be a quick walk walk from Greenland those neighborhoods should consider green like their park destination. But instead there's you know there's ten lanes of freeway through this is amazing radio. uh-huh programming for future links. That live in Tasmania. We're like maple leaf okay. We really should explain this one time in human.

Seattle Mazda San Francisco Seattle Music Commission Seoul Vancouver Jack Golden Gate Bridge Seoul Korea Korea Greenland Bay Bridge officer Ding Dong Douglas Dallas Era Lake Elliott Tasmania
"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Nine three three eight induced demand. Excellence the whole correct. Today's the very first day that I drove here to our recording bunker through Seattle sprint. spanking new toll tunnel. Oh that's right. It costs money now to go through the tunnel that they kind of They you gave us a little taste for a few months of of not charging. It's pretty smart. It's like the gateway drug right. It's like standing outside at a school near kids. You on this free tunnel and how was it Was it less congested. As a result of now costing two dollars it. It was a buck twenty-five this morning it's variable so outside of rush hour cheap. Good to go bleeper. I had to buy a little sticker. I'm not clear on how it works. You know they have put a sticker behind your review mirror and a surveillance camera and they have the cameras in there. It's it's a little bar code or something I don't know just seeing it visually with its little retinas. Like if I were in the camera could I tell everybody's cars and charge them. I put it has an RFID. If I D chip in it yeah it probably does right. I think it probably does. I was going to say infrared but we don't are all RFID. Now Yeah I don't even know what that is. It just means that somebody can read my credit cards. It's a phone. It's it's frogs related. Yeah that's right you need to. That's why I keep my wallet wrapped in seven layers of aluminum foil. I have one. I have a cap that I wear under my wig. That's GonNa Affect Your posture at some point having just six inches of aluminum foil in one of your pockets. My Wallet has this Little Flap that says rfid on it. No it doesn't but I don't know what the flap even. What even is this of its I do I have to put that flap over the security does this symbolize that? The whole wallet has amazing. Maybe maybe is it like when Superman can't can't see through lead like Lex. Luther has to hide his operation behind A. That's exactly what it is detained. Because you're sitting there at the you're at the gas station you no longer have have to put your credit card in because it's just reading the apple pay off of your retinas or whatever but the person is willing to pay for gas. Read Your brand and it takes that much out of your your bank account. The guy in the in the Ford explorer parked on the other side of the of the pump is has a has some sort of you know electromagnetic addict Superman that. He's just got an APP on his phone. His download the ninety five cent after this turned his phone into a rooted steeler. He's the roofing. Bandit of of Arco Station. These are really complex and perilous times. I feel like I. It doesn't trouble only because it hasn't happened to me yet. Oh nothing bad has happened. You've had your your identity theft. Did Not in a big way. I've had to change credit card numbers a couple of times because people bought big ATV with them. I guess or they always buy small things. I'm very confused. I tried to donate to public radio. Last week will never do that. There's my first mistake. No I support support the incredibly well funded Seattle public radio and I just want to pour more money on their huge pile that they have in the back room and I wanted me to prove I wasn't a robot just to give one hundred bucks two. Oh Yeah Is that a problem for a lot of robots donating to to NPR. Well you you know how half the things I do on the Internet now. I have to prove I'm not a robot but then I'm I'm I guess I'm doing some fairly sketchy things on the Internet and would I want to just ask you. I like it when it's just like a euro at. Here's a box. If you're a robot you legally happened to tell me by checking that box no robot would know to check this box. It's it's the ASIMOV's test. I hate the ones that I fail like. Pick out every traffic light in this picture. And it's like really I don't I can't and I was like a second level sometimes. Oh good I'm on level level. Two of picking out a traffic sign. I think you go to level two if you fail. Is that what it means. I thought I was just really good. And getting to the fossil finding finding stop upside more find more crosswalks can cross box. I I think the reason why even charities have to do this now is because people were still in credit card. Chart numbers will test the waters by giving fifty dollars to a nonprofit and that's how they know the number works and it's just because all these crooks because they just love supporting the impartial journalism of of public radio so the tunnel was great The tunnel was ten minutes cheaper or ten minutes cheaper ten minutes faster than the freeway. Now listen ten minutes. Faster is ten minutes cheaper time. China's money it. In my opinion it is and your time is worth more money than the average bear should have a huge money. My H- goals balloons that I swim through my house. What I need is time time with my beloved children before they turn thirteen and hate me time? But you really have to do that equation now. Because you're thinking the tunnel is GonNa Mukasa Buck twenty-five ten minutes quicker. What would I rather have right? I'm not getting ten more minutes of my life. Do you think your time is worth twenty dollars an hour. But I'm getting the same amount of time all this time. Saving thing is kind of Bolt. Let's just do I wanNA spend it staring at my phone on the freeway. If I'm stopped behind another car and my glances toward twitter. My terrible person. Yes maybe no you are. Maybe I haven't how many times have you impeded the flow of traffic even briefly. Because you were focused on something and you know I'm good. I'm such a people pleaser that the very first time someone had to tap on their horn because I was looking at my phone at a light I'd decided I'm never doing that again. Ever again so I'm still getting my phone but I'm nervously glancing up at the light like literally every three years the first one to go the light turns. Because you're like me. Are you really good at this at at being a non phone driver who know I'm also bad. I what I try to do is every every week or two I I. I swear. I'm not going to carry my phone with me anymore. I'm GonNa just use some other technology the sun to me so I'm GONNA use the John I'm gonNA use my shortwave radio that carry around in a headset. I have a hat. I have a helmet has to a beer cans in it and also assure wavering. That's amazing. That's where coach calls in your signals. You GotTa have that. But I but I'm the same like if I sit at a traffic light. I'm nervously glancing all the time. Not because anyone has ever honked stop me but because I am so infuriated when someone else does it and I don't want to. I don't want to you. Got The internal Hong Kong debut. Your conscience do them just like do not be that person does. There's a lot more responsibility. When you're the first person you're behind someone I feel like I have amazing peripheral vision and maybe everyone America thinks they have above average criminal leading? Not because it happens. Sounds to me all the time but I feel like if I'm behind somebody I'm looking at my phone. I can tell when the guy ahead of me brake lights go off but if you're the first one in line if you can't see the red-green change out of the corner of your unless you're right you'd have to have one or you have to hold your phone up directly in front of the traffic signal like but then looks like you're taking a picture of something that's not. That's not really bad. I mean if you if it appears that you are monitoring the traffic signals with some APP on your phone that makes you even more complex and compelling this cool guy. WHO's somehow hacking the traffic? What's he doing? He knows he's got a back door into the ribs. Got Do you remember the old. I've still don't know if this is hundred percent true but fire engines and ambulances always purportedly had the power to a change traffic lights and I sometimes just a week ago. I saw it. I think happened. Yeah but who knows if the light would is going to turn green anyway for a long time. When I was in in my teens and twenties the rumor was that if you're coming up on a traffic light and you flash your brights in imitation of a of a you know of a of a of a flashing light of a of an emergency vehicle? Do you have to have red and blue headlights. No I think it was just flash your headlights and that there are sensors answers in the traffic lights. That will change if you flash your rights and so for a decade when I was on a a road at night. Can you give me the date range here when when when Save Save between one thousand nine thousand. Six Hundred Nineteen ninety-six. I if I were the only driver I would flash lights at at a red light and what about. It seemed like there was a there was some causality the light would turn. And how much did you need. Economists would like to know is how. How often does this have to happen to keep going one second term? I think it'd happened thirty percent of the time and thirty percent of the time I felt like there was probably rigged for some other reason and thirty percent of the time I felt like it was my timing was off the rest of the time. You're like this one's broken but thirty percent of the time I feel like the light would change on my behalf offended that I had a secret hack in hindsight. It seems unlikely that they were putting low light. Sensors would have existed in the late eighties. But would they'd been putting them in every the traffic signal. Probably not although you know the I mean I haven't read every page of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. There might be in there. I did the same thing but I just thought it was a speaker so I just stuck my head out the window and went to turn turn. I tried the other thing if he driving you. Just say under your breath Lake Turkana. Dan I had. I just do an Improv exercise where I would feel more like a fire engine or an ambulance like just Kinda give the impression maybe carry myself. It'll method that is like an ambulance to see if I could trick the intersection. Lee Strasberg method. Exactly if you were. We're in firearms. And what kind of fire engine would you be. But this is the kind of When they built that tunnel they tore down our big waterfront freeway anyway? One thousand nine hundred forty s era viaduct earthquake damaged built on swampy Phil viaduct and it was exactly for earthquake. Related reasons reasons. They weren't like one of new vibrant thing. We can add to the city. Let's get rid of this awful elevated freeway from the era of elevated freeways no the thing had decrepit cracking so badly that the next quake was gonNA knock I think the big quake in San Francisco where the Embarcadero freeway fell down on. People and pin cake to them was the next day we all drove on the viaduct with a lot of trepidation on the upper one odd. I definitely thought that many times. I'm just going to ride it right into the bay when it when it starts to fall but But from the timer we had our last nerve quake in two thousand one last big earthquake. That really rattled things and when they finally tore it down was a period of eighteen years. Right up where we were driving on a on a thing where we had been told visible the next break. It wasn't visible cracks chunks chunks were falling out of this thing and I'm not an expert infrastructure but is that not what you want chunks falling out of era elevated free ways. Did you go walk. You walked on it right. After they closed it I did and walking on it was the most terrifying thing I've ever done in the sense that I've been driving on this thing every day or or as many times a week it had a beautiful view. That's how you could look at the Olympics. You could look at the water you can take your mind off the possibility ability of imminent death but walking on it you really were stepping over giant missing pieces of this concrete freeway where you could look down forty feet feet to the ground. It was like flying in one of those One of those Bush Airlines and Alaska in the nineteen eighties. There were a lot of there still are a lot of Bush appealate airlines up there. These are all your all your symbolism metaphors are related to Alaskan Bush pilot and there were a lot of progress in war was like this one Alaskan asking Bush pilot. I remember there were a lot of planes and this is probably still true but there there was less regulation than a lot of planes that were very old and held together with Baling Wire. I remember getting on a plane down to Seoul dot now from Anchorage one time and it was a it was not a small plane. There were ten passengers on it and and you can absolutely see daylight through the floor playing in the in the in the crack between the door and the and the fuselage and take through multiple places in the plan you can see daylight. We're all used to being on airplanes. That had no installation in that were very loud but but I had never been in one. That was so this this was an airline right. It wasn't just a guy on his plate but they were not flying at some elevations where they had depressurize. Oh No no no no yes you know. They're they're all up. Just puddle Jumpers from Anchorage to Gary Airlines. Yeah get down and just flies fifteen feet off the road if you wanted the Albatross from the rescuers. It's exactly what was the. We'd like to go rescue a little girl. Oh It's pretty windy out there. I had A..

Seattle Bush Anchorage China Ford NPR Lake Turkana twitter Bush Airlines Hong Kong Alaska Arco Station Olympics Lee Strasberg Luther apple Seoul
"induce" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

Bellwether Hub Podcast

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

"You have clients you have potential sales tells you have all of these people you know that that have needs you want to be able to introduce them to other people when you make those connections that that will come back to me no come back to you and your constantly looking for people to reiterate your commitment to clients people who feel the same way that you do about reciprocation hip rotation helping other people doing the right thing when you have your network of like minded individuals. You're happy to refer. Eventually things will work out. Networking is not about you we. We don't work we don't Refer for the expectation that something is coming back too much worry to track about it and everything else do it. Because it's good business and I promise I miss you. I promise you when you do it with no expectations. Something will come back. Maybe not right away but it will be there. There's a book called mm-hmm relationship economics. About how the more you put out the the more you can get back. And it's almost like you're depositing your good Good actions into a bank. And eventually you could pull out if you need to. You can pull stuff out of that bank in order to to get whatever it is you need and you could leverage that later. But that's not the point of not the point of doing it but it we'll help you get your helping people get you more business just by helping other people and so. Let's talk about how to network and some of the little tips that I like to give to people who are Induced with anxiety and having a difficult time walking into a networking event before you walk into a networking event. Remind yourself why you're going there. One of the great epiphanies for me with networking was that I wasn't selling to other people. And so my only job when I walk into a networking event is to learn about as many people as possible. That's it I'm not rushing a business card into someone's hand. I want to learn about how they can help my clients and then that person is going to have a much more enjoyable conversation with you. That's it you're just having fun conversations you want them to like you. That's IT and sometimes I have to put myself up. I have to get my head into the mode. You know five my confidence and say yes. This is who I want to be. And this is the person I want to be when I walk into this networking event. And you remind yourself of wire there and what you do and how you're capable capable and give yourself a little pep talk but when you're anxious about meeting New People and walking in with a room full of strangers remember this. Everybody in that event can't feels the exact same way that you do. which is a little comforting? Everybody has anxiety when it comes to networking so when you go up and just strike up. Hi I'm new. Everybody says yeah I get it me too okay. And they'll just start talking to you. It's great it's easy. The easiest way to strike up a conversation rather than walking in front of a group of people who seems to know each other other for like fifteen years find person standing by themselves and introduce yourself and then you're not that person will love you for taking them out of the corner and and they can be. I mean if you just want to sit and chat with that person for a day. That's fine set a goal when you go in if you're starting in ads wanted me to people me to people and then you can take off if that was really they like amped up do it and then take off and what did you learn and then try it again and try it again and try it again and when you're going for the first time there are a lot of first-time requests because I feel like the first time you go to a number game as one of the easiest times you can do it because you can be a learner and you could save things to people hi. This is my first time here. Who should I mean? Have you been here before do other networking events. What made you pick this one? What brought you here? That's great type of business and then the conversation just flows so when you have first time or questions it just admitting that your new. That's that's simple right. There are plenty of other Plenty of other new people as well so thinking thinking about networking as we enter into the holiday season and next week. I'm going to talk about how to ask your network for help because we want to be very specific in that we need to build relationships and don't damage them by trying to sell the people right in front of you build your network into one thousand fifteen hundred two thousand people everybody you meet and make an introduction reduction for them that will help them with no help for you and you will build your network into a way that can help you immensely. That's the point of your network to help other people title and with that. I'm going to leave with that. Think about your network. Think about all the people that you would never think about in your network. The people on the bus the people on the train the people at your library whatever never does everybody has a way to help other people and everybody likes to help other people. That's an important thing to remember so have a great week be productive. Give and I look forward to seeing you next week when I talk about your big ask thank you for listening..

fifteen years
"induce" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

Bellwether Hub Podcast

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

"Welcomes about the weather. It's podcast day. Thank you for listening. Today we're GonNa talk about networking and networking this week and next week is one of. It's very misinterpreted. A lot of people need help with it. I get asked all the time about how to network and how to reduce the anxiety from networking and all of this stuff. And and so. I thought I'd do. A Pakistani networking is one of the most anxiety. Inducing things in the corporate world that I have ever seen it. Nobody likes to do it Well back off on that. Most people don't like to do it. The people who like to do it have figured out how to do it and they realize it's not so bad so oh from anxiety inducing perspective. We put so much pressure on ourselves when we network. What is my elevator pitch? And do I look right in a room full of strangers. And how do I strike up a conversation and will they like me and I'm an adult. I can't make friends and all of this stuff in the back of our minds and we and we Kinda kill ourselves before we even get in there. The reason I wanted wanted to do networking now. If you're listening to this as it's you know I coming out. We're about to enter into the holiday season. which is the perfect time to network? If you're thinking about oh I need to do some networking things. The holiday see. You can ask for a better time than the holiday season reason reason reason being a few one. You're going to be seeing a lot of people that you know in big groups whether a corporate they might have a holiday party and you're getting together if you're in the US you're getting together for Thanksgiving Around the world. You've got your end of year holidays are Hanukkah's your Christmases. Everybody's having some kind of holiday get together. There are people getting together other and big groups to celebrate something and it's a perfect opportunity to get in front of as many people as possible but the other reason it's a great time to network is because people people feel very generous and gracious and are very open to helping at this time of year. So it's a great time to talk about yourself to other people and and to help other people so I'm going to talk to today a little bit about the point of networking But also there's another one I'm going to cover next week is there's two aspects number one is the point. Why do we network? And how do we network but the other aspect is how to make an ask of your network which will cover next week but today I want I want to talk about just networking in general. It's a great time of year to network the end of the year. And now we're getting doesn't have to be this big arduous thing I feel like networking is so anxiety inducing for a couple of reasons this is one of them is that it's misunderstood can network. Doesn't you don't have to go to these big networking events and walk into a room full of strangers and everything and it's a good thing to do just to challenge yourself But I know a lot of people who are these high powered executives who can run anything but they walk into a room full of strangers. They're standing in the corner by themselves and they don't know how to strike the conversation they don't know what to do and it's very uncomfortable but it's actually easy to get going when you think about your network and and so I wanNA pause and say what is a network because when you understand what a network is it actually takes the shine off it a little bit and it doesn't make that difficult a network. Is Your people your relationships it could be. Anybody could be people you see on the train every day. It could be cousins. You see once a year it could be people used. I used to work with it. Could be people from Your Bridge Club or knitting club or whatever it is. All of these people are in your network because your network is a group of people that you have some kind kind of relationship with and that's it and the point of networking when you go out to network and meet new. People is to just add those people into I know these as individuals. It's not to sell. It's not to get them to do something for you. It's none of the point of networking is to meet New People and expand your web lap and the challenge. The reason networking is so anxiety inducing because wanted missing or misunderstood but people generally make mistakes. One people wait to network until they need something and people don't like that when you wait to network and say oh I need a job so let me start networking. You are too far behind the eight ball. Aw you sound desperate I need my sales target. And I'm at the boom let me start networking and see what I can who I could sell to you. Sound desperate people could smell desperation from a mile away And when I refer someone that I met a narrow gate you are a representation of that person so if I refer you to a client you are representing me and so when I feel someone who's desperate and not very you know not together. And they're struggling. They waited too long. And that's not a person I'm going to refer K. We want to make we want to meet people when we are at our best. And so don't wait to until you need something. I think all of the time when I talk to people now and I've been talking about this for a while. We have a recession around the corner. It's no secret and I know. A lot of corporations are out there already offering packages to people to prepare for this. If you have not started building your network to help you in this potential situation you're gonNA be screwed find a network start talking to people about what you do meet these individuals. You're not trying to find a job now but when you have these relationships in place and you get that letter from the office and you are finished you already have the people that you can send some information onto. Hey Dino this person do you know that person on again. We're going to talk about the next week. But so that's one big mistake. We wait until we. We need something to start a network when we are riding high. And we don't need anything. That's the best time to meet people when things are going well because we're confident and we're putting our best self self forward. And then that aligns with another point of networking which is helping other people and too often were focused on the short term. So this is the other mistake that people make take one. We wait too long and too we try to sell to the people right in front of me right in front of us and you walk into a networking event. And you say hi Gem An I do executive coaching. And do you WanNa be my client and that's completely the wrong way to do it. Okay because you're thinking very short term you're damaging the relationship your little to to Intense when you create your network when you think about creating a network you're thinking about a long term relationship and here's why you you're listening to this right now you know at least a thousand people you know a lot of people and when I meet you and I say to you hi. I'm going to sell you this. I'm I'm just selling to one person but if I just learn about you and you learn about me and we're just talking about no cell. No pressure nothing. We're just learning about each other. You one of your thousand thousand people that you know may say I need an executive coach later and then you will think about me. And that's the point. You're not selling to the person in front of you. You WanNa tap into their network a thousand the people you meet ten people. You've just met ten thousand people and a good network is going to last you ten fifteen thirty forty years. You Wanna be able to tap into people that you met twenty years ago and say Oh you know what. I wonder if this person still doing this. Let me reach out because your network is about relationships and relationships are a reflection of the circles. You run on it and it's a powerful tool not to sell your business but to help the people around you which by the way is ultimately the best way to get new business by helping others when someone says oh I need a real estate agent. I know exactly who. I'm going to refer.

executive US Your Bridge Club Dino ten fifteen thirty forty years twenty years
"induce" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"induce" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"To the you are not so smart podcast episode one sixty six I've always been interested in the ways that the most fundamental the mental processes in people's brains how we see how we interpret information in front of us all that low level stuff connect to kind of more high level difficult decisions and concepts that we think about all the usual stuff that we think of thinking and you know going about our lives so anytime that there's a connection in between you know low level stuff in high level stuff in the brain and behavior that gets me very excited that that psychologist David Lavori so my name is David Lavori and I'm a social psychologist. I research human behavior and right armed based at Harvard University in Psychology Department in the business school there earlier this year Lavar along with colleagues Daniel Gilbert Timothy Wilson Bo Devers David Amadeo and folly a wheatley produced a study that revealed just the sort of thing he loves to research a connection between the way we process information formation in general to the way we approach larger phenomena like institutions social problems and everything from war to policing to teaching a musical instrument Lavori and his team found evidence for something they call prevalence induced concept change when we set out to change changed the world by reducing examples of something we have deemed problematic and we succeed a host of psychological phenomenon can mask our progress and make those those problems seem intractable as if we're only treading water when in fact we've created the change we set out to make to understand what this means we need to build up to the idea by first discussing another idea in psychology called creep yes yes a creep is definitely not a term that we came up with it's a term that's been used for a long time to describe any situation in which kind of a concept or more a set of goals or really anything at all kind of grows or shift its boundary outward overtime in the military sorry this is called mission creep when a unit enters a country with a narrow set of goals over time the scope of the effort expands to include goals that had never been considered part of the original mission or in technology and software development they call this feature creep you can start out with a product piece of software that does one very narrow thing play songs and then over time you just inevitably end up adding more and more bells and whistles and features to it that makes it slower and takes longer to come to market and more complicated a few years ago a psychologist named Nick has them wrote a paper that introduced another form form of this phenomenon he called concept creep the idea that not only do missions and products and software start with narrow goals and and then expanded in scope over time but so do ideas abstractions and definitions concepts he said undergo semantic chefs the boundaries of concepts creep outward over time the more familiar we become with them and they begin to include a broader range range of examples as we begin to notice the signals in the noise so for example something that a lot of a psychologist study is bullied to worry about and and a few decades ago bullying was mostly considered you know the the basic definition of bullying was like if I pushed you over on the playground bullying physical I'm harassment among kids concept onset creep expands in two directions horizontally it encompasses new phenomena that we begin to see as examples of the concept that we didn't see examples before and vertically it creeps downward encompassing less extreme phenomena that we want didn't think of as examples of the original concept the category in our minds in our shared consensus reality dilates covering more of our overall conceptual framework than it did in the past so with bullying for example bullying now you can also think about adult bullying in the workplace or emotional bullying or cyber I believe so it's not always automatically considered a problem but it's just a the way in which as has them observed it seems like a lot of these concepts just tend to kind of naturally incrementally grow bigger over time without anyone necessarily trying to do that on purpose concept creep is a natural phenomenon and it's neither good good nor bad it's just what happens when brains spend a lot of time interacting with other Breen's trying to make sense of the world they argue about what's right and wrong and they work together to try and reach common goals and our concepts of those things that we're talking about they expand one of my favorite examples is the concept of dignity in kwami Anthony Pious book the moral code he shows that in the fifteen hundred people in the West shared a concept of dignity that said some people just had more of it than others defined as the state of deserving respect from others to a person in the fifteen hundreds hundreds it was literally unthinkable that a person who made candles that have animal fat had as much dignity as a king but after the Industrial Revolution Asian certain members of the working class had accumulated great wealth and they demanded more of a say in politics and as they got that say their newfound respect back lead to a widening of the idea of dignity and once it encompassed class it expanded to encompass gender and race and then all the humanity once we agreed that every person deserves respect and has dignity by the virtue of their humanity ideas like slavery Korean child labor and so on became difficult to accept as a new form of cognitive dissonance spread to the culture when we're talking about concepts that creep sleep on that can range from very a specific kind of narrow simple things like in our case some of our studies were on the concept of what color is the color blue to what are you described which is a a a much more complicated enrich and almost philosophical concept like something like two Kennedy so that's concept creep but there's another another feature of human cognition that complicates things and that's our tendency to make evaluations of degree or kind not on an objective active standard but by using comparisons yes so this is probably one of the most fundamental and oldest findings and psychological research on which is basically that when your brain is looking at something when you're looking at something and evaluating it anyway trying to decide how big or small it is how much you liked it or not anything you're not like a computer that has a reliable objective rating of it every single time I'm your ratings will change over time based on things about you and the also change based on your surroundings so one example is about how heavy things spiel there's some classic research which I'm for example if you hold something very very heavy and then you hold something light the letter thing will seem way later than it would up if you hadn't held the heavy thing I so that's an example of how you're judging how heavy something thing is in part compared to the happiness of the things you help before not like a scale would which were we'll just give you the same pounds or I'm kilos every every told we can also see examples of this and optical illusions like the tilt illusion in which perfectly straight lines appear normal until surrounded by lines at an angle aw when the brain looks at these lines an angled context they appear as if they shifted and they angle in the opposite direction from the surrounding lines in short brains are not objective they make sense of the world by judging phenomena in comparison to surrounding phenomenon and this leads us us to another aspect of psychology comparison phenomena also occurs we noticed there relative prevalence okay so when something becomes more rare over time what does that mean in terms of its context because like we just said it seems like brains the judge things according to their context in one of the Lavar as previous studies he asked subjects to identify threatening faces now we were asked to do something like this if we see only one face we judge it based on our internal estimation of what that face looks like in comparison to some imaginary example of threatening wing or non-threatening faces but in the study people saw face after face after face one after the other and what they found was that if people were shown a series of non-threatening faces and then a slightly threatening want appeared after that people would rate that face as much more threatening they had seen a series of highly threatening faces before they saw that same image whether or not the face was identified as threatening depended not only on some inherit in quality but on how it compared to other faces in their recent memory so in the world where threatening faces are very rare any threatening face is going to look more threatening than it would have in the world where there were a lot of threatening there's an example of this from personal which is that I grew up in Pittsburgh which is the city but are a pretty friendly smaller city kind of in the Midwest not quite the east coast of the United States and it's a pretty friendly place you know it's pretty normal there to walk down the street and doc smile at people and one thing I experienced when I moved to a big city I went to school in Chicago is that there were fewer people smiling on the sidewalk it's this was a great town but there just weren't as many people smiling at each other when I would walk down the street so what I noticed for me personally was that what I would count as a smiling person person on the street a friendly person was a way more liberal definition in Chicago than it was in Pittsburgh because I was seeing fewer and fewer from the so even someone who look Kinda friendly seemed way friendlier than they would have in Pittsburgh where everybody was so when these three psychological psycological phenomenon combined concept creep evaluation by comparison and the change in prevalence over time brains do something very odd and the demonstrate this in the lab Lavori and his team came up with a really nifty experiment and you'll hear all about it after this commercial break own I don't know if you've noticed this but it seems like there is sure as a whole lot of information out there on the Internet and it's kind anyb- hard to figure out what is accurate if you are not an expert that's why I love having the great courses plus it gives me in-depth content and most importantly I know I can trust it this is a streaming service that offers thousands of objective unbiased unbiased lectures from respected professors who really know their stuff they cover topics ranging from human personality traits to microbiology from stress management to building a better vocabulary and much more you will find something that you are totally obsessed with their and you'll be we surprised by something that you didn't know you're bout to develop an obsession for I promise I have found so many crazy things on there my cue is enormous I love this thing and the.

"induce" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"induce" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"When you're sick sometimes all you feel like doing for the days napping that lethargic feeling is actually not triggered by the infection you're grappling with but your immune system i'm here with amita segal to talk about a gene that links sleep and immune function hey amita high i could you talk a little bit about the processes that regulate sleep the truth of the matter is that we understand very little about sleep we do know that it occurs with a twenty four hour rhythm is through kadian rhythm and that's driven by a clock biological clock that's within us we know that there's this other system called the homeo- static system and the homies static system is the system that ensures that you get enough sleep usually the two systems worked together to determine when sleep occurs but the home static system can sometimes override the circadian so you're up all night sleep in the morning even though you're doc is telling you to wake up we understand a lot about the circadian process we understand very little about the homeo- static process like what is it that makes us sleepy when b been awake for a long period of time how did your team approach isolating molecules that modulate sleep and wakefulness we developed several years ago a fly model for sleep and the reason we did that was because we wanted to really get at molecules in you know the genetics of sleep which is harder to pakelle in mammalian models in the fly lenders are beautifully to those types of approaches where you can just is the animal and then look for ones that have a baron see patterns what was your study trying to figure out that previous studies didn't address in previous studies we had found genes that affected sleep but for the most part we found that those genes were required for the animal to sleep with the one drivers of sleep so you couldn't like increase sleep above the normal sleep amount so what we wanted was you know what is the trigger would is there a gene that when you just increase it the animal will become speak and that's what we tried to do in this study right in your team was successful and identifying a single gene that induces sleep called nitty how are you able to isolate the specific gene so we basically took you know different genes across the whole genome and over expressed them like you know increase levels of those in adult neurons and we find that when we turn on this gene so that it then makes makes protein the animals sleep and no other gene from the twelve thousand or so that we tested did that so what normally triggers the expression of this gene normally it turns out that when be animal has very high need to sleep like if the animal has been awake all night or if the animal is sick during sickness you know you'll need to sleep increases 'cause leap is restorative is the sleep induced from this protein any longer deeper or different than normal sleep it is deeper and longer so what happens when we increase expression of this molecule duration of each episode is increased saying they're sleeping more but they're also sleeping in a better consolidated fashion so each episode of sleep is longer deeper sleep is actually referring to the arouse ability so we find that when you over express this molly if you increase levels of this molecule that is harder to wake the flies up how exactly does this jane promotes sleep in fruit flies so this particular protein it turns out to be an immune molecule and it is produced in in peripheral tissues right in the body and it actually kill bacteria but normally you don't even think if these proteins is being in the brain will do they are and this particular molecule gets turned on in the brain and it gets turned on in the brain in very few sows like probably just to cells and what he does is act to the normal known scape circuitry as in the neurons that normally affect sleep we don't know how it does it but it seems to be connecting to that circuitry so at addition to the immune benefits from inducing sleep it also has other properties that help it boost the immune system it is also promoting immune function and so we think that that when be animal is sick it has a twofold function on the one hand it's killing the bugs on the other hand it's increasing sleep both of which are hand helping the animal recover from the infection so it was the most exciting part of this discovery being of the very fact that we could get a molecule that would trigger sleep was really exciting for us the fact that it was secreted was also really exciting because the sleep field has long believed in the idea that there are secreted molecules that can increase sleep so many many years ago these experiments done where people sleep deprived sheep and goats and then they took their cerebrospinal fluid and put it into animals that had been allowed to sleep and they injected animals became sleepy they basically were transmitting sleepiness from one animal to the other by just taking fluids secreted molecules have there been any other genes discovered that are similar to this gene you found in fruit flies people have tried a lot over the years to figure out what it is that transmits that seeping from animal to animal and it's unclear i mean for wild people putt that it might be the molecule called dennis scene which is a breakdown product of energy utilization but beef exa for damascene on sleep ready restricted to certain parts of sleep in certain areas of the brain but importantly some of the molecules that have been implicated our immune molecules one of the reasons us fruit flies is because it's easier to isolate the genes that in mammalian models but what would be a potential approach to figuring out if a gene like this exists in humans there are similar classes of molecules in mammals anti microbial peptides molecules that kill bacteria so for starters what i would do is work with the mouse or arrack model and inject them with different anti microbial peptides that are normally made in those mice and rats and see if they can induce sleepiness thanks so much mita thank you megan amita cycle is a muster professor of neuroscience at investigator of the howard hughes medical institute at the university of pennsylvania you can find a link to her research at science mag dot org slash podcasts and that concludes this edition of the science podcast if you have any comments or suggestions for the show right to us at science podcast at eight eight eight s. dot o._r._g. is a reminder we're looking for a book reviewer so if you have science and radio experience please do get in touch you can subscribe to the show and you get your podcast or you can listen on the science website that science mac dot org slash podcast to place an ad on the science podcasts contact mid roll dot com the show was produced by sarah crespi meghan cantwell and edited by podgy jeffrey co composed the music on behalf of science magazine and its publisher triple a._s. thanks for joining us

twenty four hour one hand