19 Burst results for "Indra Nooyi"

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:57 min | Last week

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Job that's best for you. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. Rising up a corporation is a pyramid. It's very, very difficult, but not everybody should want to rise up a population. There are so many jobs with great purpose that can touch people in different ways. You know, don't always aspire to move up a corporate ladder. I'm Carly zakin, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hi, everyone. It is Carly. Today my guest is Indra nooyi. Indra was the first female CEO and chairperson of PepsiCo, which she headed up for 12 years. She oversaw some of the company's most important mergers, acquisitions, and strategic pivots, like moving to more environmentally sustainable production and making more health focused products. Injure has appeared on most influential women in business lists, multiple times, and was inducted into the national women's Hall of Fame last year. And she documented her legacy running a Fortune 500 company in her memoir, my life in full, which is on sale now. Finally, Android teaches leadership skills in her new masterclass leading with purpose. Indra, welcome to the show. Finally, wonderful to be talking with you. I am so excited. We have been trying to get you on the show for a long time. This is a big get for us. So just really honored to have you on. Thank you for having me. So we are going to open the way we like to do it every time, lightning round, quick questions, quick answers. Are you ready? Go ahead.

Carly zakin Danielle weisberg Indra Indra nooyi national women's Hall of Fame PepsiCo Carly
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

01:50 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"For better performance and my hard work, et cetera, et cetera, but I'm also a proud product of the many mentors and I'm an extremely proud product of America as we know it. That's Indra nooyi, former chairperson and CEO of PepsiCo. In 2018, Indra stepped down as CEO. She currently serves on several boards including the international cricket council. Indra is a huge fan of crickets. He actually helped start the first women's cricket team at Madras Christian college back in India in the early 1970s. Although since moving to the U.S. in the late 70s, she says she fell in love with.

Indra Indra nooyi PepsiCo international cricket council U.S. Madras Christian college cricket India
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:38 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Is it I mean, do we expect different things from women CEOs than we do from men CEOs? I think we expect different things from women period. You know, we think women are responsible for kids, women are responsible for families, not true. In my case, Raj and I both felt we were responsible for the kids and the family and our future. And so I think it's very, very important, everybody who has an idea designed to get married and have kids has a conversation with the espouse about who's going to do what have the honest conversations because it can not be done alone. And women in particular have to let go of perfection, because very often, we women want to be perfect at everything. It's in our DNA. And, you know, at some point, you may have to give up things that you want to do. They might have to say, you know what, I'm not going to keep the house spotless. I'm just going to let it go because I'm just exhausted. And many of us run ourselves ragged because we want to be viewed as getting everything right. And I think all of that is a formula for failure. So the best thing is for us to have the honest conversations with this pass, make sure that both are on the same page when it comes to who's going to do what to support the family. In my case, I had an added advantage a guy. I had my husband's family that unusually decided that they're going to support me whatever happens. So they were my biggest tailwinds. They would call and say, you know, don't quit your job without help you. And, you know, tell us what kind of help you want and we'll be so proud of you and what you've accomplished. And so it's not just my husband. I had wonderful in laws. And I think all in laws have to stop and think about the future and say, if you're going to let the women and men both fly. We have to also lean in. This becomes an intergenerational responsibility. Injured, it's amazing because of all the things you accomplished and the fact that you started life and where you got to. I mean, the top of the corporate world and yet you write that at times in your career, you really felt like you to downplay your achievements. Um. Why? I think that goes back to The Crown of the garage comment that my mother made. Way back in 2000 when I came home. And I just wanted to share my big deals and how point was you into the house and you leave The Crown of the garage. I think that we still live in a society where the woman's achievement is downplayed in the men's achievements are elevated. We are making changes, but we still live in that society. I think in our home, you know, the dialog and discussion was different. My mother grew up at a time when it was that way you know, you play up, the men's achievements and your downplay the woman's achievements. That's how you keep a harmonious family. In my family now, my husband was celebrated my achievements like it's all Nobel Prizes that I've won. Okay? Just as I would his. We both lift each other up. Maybe that's the future generation. Because if we don't do that, then what happens is we basically telling women, we're all going to keep one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. And the foot on the brake is going to be a little heavier than the foot on the accelerator, which I don't think is fair. When you look at the future of work, you one of the things you wrote when you stepped down after 12 years a sea of Pepsi record and amazing amount of time. I think the average CEO lasts for 40 years at companies, most companies. You wrote about how you wished you would have spent a little bit more time with family and you encouraged people to think about that in their own careers. And you've been more vocal more and more vocal about that since you've stepped down running the operations at Pepsi. About focusing on our lives. Thank you, even I think I'm perfectly our lives are short. We don't have that much time on this planet. And we have to focus on what actually matters. Work is important. Careers important achievement is important, but it's only one part of our of our lives. I think, you know, I sit on various future of work committees and we talk about how things are going to change post pandemic. And I have to tell you, one of the things that we never talk about in this committee meetings is the whole issue of care. Who's going to do all the caregiving? How is it going to get done? How are we going to make sure that we have a pathway for highly educated women to also contribute to the economy? As much as they are family builders and help nurture and develop the family. And I really believe that the issue and care is a big blind spot among global leaders. And I'm a missed opportunity, and I now speak as an economist not a feminist. A guy. Because when I was PepsiCo CEO, and I was in the rooms of power with all the men CEOs. We talked about the future of work as if it's about technology, the world, GDP growth, retraining of employees, we never mentioned family and care, and who's going to do the jobs and how are we going to do it? In a world where we've got a lot of aging people. My belief is that if there are more women in the room, in those groups and rooms of power, this would have come up sooner. It's a big missed opportunity. And I think that we have to elevate the discussion from quite discussions that don't lead anywhere, to make it in front and center to say, hey, with the aging population. And with a need to have children and young people to build families at the same time, the best and brightest to be deployed in the service of furthering the economy. If we don't focus on care as a critical support system for the country. We're not going to have a society that's happy. We'll have another Japan or South Korea where the birth rate is low and the requirements of jobs and children conflicts so much because what's happening is young people are now delaying having kids or choosing not to have kids at all. And if that happens, it's going to debilitate our economic system down the road. And so I think that we should stop framing this as female and says about families and is not a feminist argument is an economist argument. When you think about the journey you have taken and your book has really just terrific and inspiring story to have come from where you came and grown up where you grew up and not only to come to the U.S. and build a career in a family, but to get to the highest levels of business. Could you ever have a imagine that? Was there any part of your early life where you could have envisioned that? No, because I never thought I'd come to the United States. And I will tell you one thing. I don't believe my story could have been possible in any other country, but the United States. So it's only here that somebody like me can come here, work their tail off contribute, be acknowledged, promoted, mentor, developed, and then ultimately, even selected, to run such a big iconic American company. So in many ways, I'm a product of my upbringing my own drive.

Raj Pepsi PepsiCo South Korea Japan United States
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor Splunk. Today in business, unpredictability rules, so you need to be resilient, secure, and innovative. To do this, you have to make sense of massive amounts of data. Enter Splunk, Splunk gives you the data foundation to thrive in today's hybrid world. They help you handle complexity and clear the path to innovation. With one data foundation that gives you full stack observability and consistent security, you can be innovative and meet goals faster. More at Splunk dot com slash Y. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. So in 1994, Indra nooyi was recruited by PepsiCo CEO Wayne Calloway to join the company as a senior VP of strategic planning. And from an outsider's perspective, it might have seemed like an unusual move. After all, she'd been working in technology in electronics for more than ten years. And here she was, moving to an industry she'd never worked in. I didn't know the restaurant business one bit. And you know, interestingly, I did tell that the vein you know, when I talked to him, I said, wait, I don't know the restaurant business. And to me, you get deep into the business when you stop. I'm not even meat eaters. House is going to work with me and Taco Bell and KFC. Pizza Hut I can get by. His point is, I'm not hiring you to formulate products. I'm not hiring you to taste the products. I'm hiring you for a strategy position to help us think where Pepsi got to be going globally. He was right. All right, so you join PepsiCo. I'm in presumably the first two years or the first at least year. You kind of spend time digging into the business, trying to understand all parts of the business. To me, it doesn't matter how senior you are. If you don't spend the time, learning the nuts and bolts of the business. You're actually not doing a great job for the company. And I honestly believe that every point in time I had to zoom in to learn the details of the business and then zoom out to understand what the implications of your actions could be on the day to day operations of the business. So I was constantly zooming in and zooming out. So I spent the first I would say 6 to 9 months. Learning the nuts and bowls of each of the businesses. When you were sort of tasked with leading leading strategy from the beginning and that's a huge responsibility. So how do you approach it at the beginning? You mentioned obviously diving into the business and really kind of educating yourself about all the different aspects of the business, but did you also spend the first year or two kind of listening before you set out a plan or were you a kind of expected to deliver a plan fairly quickly? I had a big benefit in my first year one. Roger and RICO returned to the company and he was running restaurants and so I was working with him directly. So I was providing the strategic perspective, but roger was providing the implementation the practical perspectives, how to make it work at PepsiCo. So I kept my ears open and I learned as much as I could from roger. But then this is where the BCG experience comes in and is invaluable. Because we really think about consulting. What consulting does for you is provide you a way to approach an industry and understand the strategic levers of that industry and then that company. So it doesn't matter which industry of which company are thrown into. You know how to look for what drives competitive advantage. What drives superior profitability? What drives success? And once you approach PepsiCo that way, you learn the fundamentals of the business. At a 15,000 feet very, very quickly. And then you start tinkering at the implementation level. How do we land this? If, for example, in restaurants, same store sales growth is a critical driver of profitability. How do you drive same store sales growth? So now you go to the restaurants and figure out why is it your same store sales is not grown. So you take the value drivers then you land them into each business to understand why they're working or not working. So it's all of the entire set of experiences I had before PepsiCo. I could now apply and deploy at PepsiCo. You write that about two years in. You actually, for time, consider leaving PepsiCo. This is during roger Enrico's tenure CEO. And you had felt some tension with colleagues around metrics around your role in what was going on. Well, you know, I was in corporate and corporate is always a bad word in most companies. And the people before me were very, very qualified people who had the job before me. But they also tended to be hands off from the divisional heads. I wasn't intending to interfere on what the division presidents were doing, but if I felt that something was not okay in terms of the target was too high or too low, or I thought they were going to miss their forecasts. I spoke up. You couldn't just have me be a people pusher. So I'd say, well, I tell you what guys, you say you're going to grow ten. I ran all the models we do at corporate. I don't see you growing at ten. And they say, who are you to second guess us? I'm not second guessing you. I'm just telling you what the model saves. So don't question me question the models. And so there are a couple of people in the senior management ranks that would sort of destroy me at every division presidents meeting where there would be rude. They would say things like corporate planning is trying to run a company. We're destroying the culture of this company. And when roger was CEO, he would just listen, do nothing about it. And I put up with it for a while and then I said, okay, I've just finished this massive piece of work on restaurant strategy, which I'm going to present to the board. I'm going to present to the board and I've had it. I'm just going to walk out because I can't take this anymore. I was not afraid about walking out. So when I walked into roger's office and said, guess what, roger, the presentation's done? We're going to share it with the board tomorrow, but I got news for you. After the board presentation, I'm walking out. And it's been wonderful working at PepsiCo. I'm not expecting anything. I don't want severals. I don't want anything. I'm just leaving. Wow. He just looked at me and pencils started to twiddle on the table and he just gave me that look and he said, I'll talk to you later. He was furious. And he knew exactly why I told him why I was leaving, too. And the division presidents meeting that was supposed to start in the afternoon. The meeting that typically attacked me all the time a couple of people was delayed by several hours. And roger, I guess, had a chat with all of them. Then the meeting actually started, it was a love fest. Absolutely love fist. And the next day I presented to the board and then roger came to me after the board meeting and said, we're all in business. Let's get on to the next steps. I just looked at him and said, what next steps? He said the next steps, you're just in charge of all the next steps. All of the subjects are closed. And he just walked away. Wow..

PepsiCo Wayne Calloway roger Indra nooyi NPR Taco Bell KFC roger Enrico Pepsi RICO Roger
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:26 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"The best decision I made going to work in Motorola and really this was the first in a series of steps you took that was based around your family that was based around wanting to be closer to your home, your kids, and that begins as kind of real career trajectory working in the corporate world. What do you remember about that time working from a role? You know, Motorola at that time was just a fine, fine, fine technology company. I was writing the rules on wireless communication, was leading in pages and two way radio and the cell phone was first launched by Motorola. And it was just a company in a huge and semiconductor government electronics. It was a very, very exciting company. I know injure that you spent the next few years working in the corporate tech world first at Motorola. And then he moved over to a company called ABB, which is this sort of international tech and electronics company. You actually became a senior vice president there. And you've written about some key mentors who helped you along the way. But I don't think it's immodest to say that you did phenomenally well with these companies. And he's so well that you started to get noticed by a lot of other big companies, including GE and they did from what you write. They really wanted to hire you. But how did Pepsi come on your radar? Well, one fine day, I head into calls and says, will you talk to PepsiCo? I got PepsiCo. They own KFC and Taco Bell and Pizza Hut, and I don't even need meat. What are you talking about? They go, well, you know, it's a very youthful company, a fantastic company, and this is hell of a job, and you've got to talk to them. So I came in and I, my first interview was with the person who had the job as head of strategy. And he was moving on to a big business leadership job. And after an hour with me, he said, you're not going to meet bob Edmund, the CFO, and I'm going to get into you and he won't get along. I said, oh, that's a great introduction. I said, why not? He said, because you both are so different. He said, bob dymer is your quintessential New England wasp and you are just not that. You guys are not going to get along. I said it's too late. I'm here, so I'll go see him. What a strange thing to say. Well, I heard a lot of strange things at that time. So I went to see bob date bar and the one hour interview stretched to one and a half hours stretched to two hours. We both struggled to end the interview because we got along so well famously. I mean, bob, that mo was fantastic. Not only did he charm me about PepsiCo, we started to map out ways we could work together to make the company even better. He made me feel welcome. He and his wife embrace Raj and me and basically said, even if you choose not to come to PepsiCo, we're going to remain very close friends. And then I went to see Wayne calibrated CEO. Wayne is a remarkably quiet guy. Just a beautiful human being, but in my 60 minute interview with him, I must have spoken for 57 or 59 minutes, not because I wanted to talk. Let me assure you. Because Wayne has a habit of throwing one line and then waiting for you to talk and then talk again because he's not saying much. That was just rain. And then the conversation ended, and I met a couple of other executives. And I said, you know what? Let me go home and think about GE or PepsiCo. And I told both companies that give them an answer on a Wednesday or something like that. And then I get this most amazing call at ABB. And my secretary picks up and she says, interesting. Somebody called Wayne calories on the line. They're all somebody called me in California let me pick up the phone and I say yes, when we start talking. And then he's talking now for 5 minutes. Which, you know, it's an unusual amount of time for him. Yeah. And he ends by saying, you know, I just came out of the G board meeting because Wayne was on Jack's boat. And he said, Jack indicated to us that you are likely to join GE. And this is Jack Welch. Yep. And then he said, gee is a great company. And I can understand why you'd want to join them. Yeah. GE at that time was the hottest company on the planet. Jack Welch was the hottest CEO in the world at the time. Totally. And so when goes, I can understand why you'd want to join G and Jack and I would too if I were you, but he said, let me make PepsiCo's case one last time because you said you'd make a decision on Wednesday in today's Monday. He said, I'm going to assume you're still having made the decision. So I want to make my case. And he said, my case is simple. We don't have somebody like you and our executive ranks. I need somebody to come in here that has a global perspective. That things differently with the viewpoint of other industries and help PepsiCo get to a different place. And he said, I commit to supporting you, developing you and making sure you're successful in PepsiCo. And all that I ask you is give us a chance. That level of humility and outreach touched me enormously guy and I tell you what I did, I drove over to PepsiCo and I said, I accept your job. Wow. I mean, amazing because everything would have indicated that GE was the natural fit that that's the industry is you'd come from, you'd experience in those areas they were recruiting you hard GE was such a hot company. I mean Jack Welch was writing best sellers and everybody knew who he was. People didn't know who the CEO of Pepsi was at the time. I mean, that was an almost like a counterintuitive move, but it was that call. That pushed you over the edge. I will say something, this also made me realize that you can draw all kinds of matrices on companies.

PepsiCo Motorola GE Wayne bob Edmund ABB bob dymer Taco Bell Pizza Hut bob KFC Pepsi Jack Welch Jack Raj New England mo gee California
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:09 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"This message is brought to you by NPR sponsor, Airbnb. Millions of people earn extra income by hosting their extra space on Airbnb. Income that can help with home renovations paying for vacations or saving for retirement. Maybe you have questions about whether hosting might be right for you. You can now ask a super host and get free one on one help from Airbnb's most experienced hosts. Go to Airbnb dot com slash ask a super host and start asking. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy rise. So by the late 1970s, Indra nooyi had packed up her life in India and moved across the world for the chance to go to the Yale school of management. It was a bold move, especially because at the time, there were not a lot of people that looked like her, in corporate America. I read that when you one of your first internships, summer internships while at a student at Yale, was with Booz Allen Hamilton. The consulting, the management and consulting firm, you would come in to work every day in a Sari, because that was who you were, that was you were being authentic to yourself. And but it was also very different, right? Because people were not many people had never seen that before. But actually give bozal and Hamilton of those days, a lot of credit because I was the only one in a Sari, I think in the entire system. And I was wearing a Sari to say I was being authentic would be a little bit of an overstatement guy. I'd say that I desperately wanted to fit in. But I didn't have the money to fit in and when I did try, I had a dreadful experience because I bought the wrong clothes that didn't fit well, and I looked like a freak of nature. But I also realized that there was not one day that booz Allen made me feel different or unwanted. So I have a lot to thank both Alan Hamilton for. When you, when you finish when you graduated and you began your career because your first job was at Boston consulting group was did you could you have imagined at the time in your graduating class at Yale and when you started working at BCG, would you have imagined or could you have imagined that you would one day be running one of the 50 biggest U.S. companies? I mean, one of the biggest companies in the world. At that time, do you think you would have said that about yourself or people who sit around you like, oh, that's Indra, watch her. She is going to be one of the most successful CEOs one day. You know, it's interesting. When I was in my first year at Yale, people just looked at me as an oddity. Bright, when she speaks, she says the right things, but boy, these international students speak, we are in the dress we had. So we were viewed as, you know, nice people, but really don't belong. In a second year, because of my booze Allen Hamilton, credentials. I was looked at a little bit more respect, and people said, you know, she's more than smart. She got into consulting, and she did well and she's got another offer and consulting. So she must be pretty good. And so there was newfound respect for me, but give me a break. Being a CEO of a company, I'll be honest with you guy, even the week before I was appointed CEO of PepsiCo I didn't know I was going to be CEO of PepsiCo. So no, I mean, if I told you that, when I was born, I knew I was going to be CEO. I mean, no, this was just one of the most improbable trajectories. It sounds like when you thought about yourself and who you were at the time, you weren't thinking, I'm going to do something enormous one day. No, because my husband Raj and I got married in 1980, the year I graduated from Yale. And we both had nothing we were starting from zero. And so all that we are focused on is how do we pay off our student loan? Right. Because the fact that I had a student loan and I owed that money made me feel very uncomfortable. So any money we had we first tried to pay as much as we can towards the student loan, we always saved a little bit because we believed savings was important. And then we lived live for the rest of the money. And it wasn't about clothes, it wasn't about having a good time, it was just about living life within our means. I may balance that checkbook every week. I mean, we were meticulous in how we manage life. And at that time, you don't think about bigger and bigger jobs. You think about holding on to the job you have. Doing a phenomenal job in our respective jobs. Both of us were working. And figuring out how to make sure that, as a is interesting, I'm not going to use words that I hope don't come out wrong. I felt that I was at that time a guest in the country. As did my husband, and we felt we had to earn our way. To be a citizen of the country. So we worked very hard at that. You pretty early in your move Chicago to Chicago to work for BCG and your husband Raj was getting his degree at the University of Chicago. And I think at the time your mom eventually came to live with you and your husband in Chicago, your daughter was born a lot was going on in your life at the time. What do you remember about that time? I mean, you were presumed you were traveling a lot as a consultant. Was it I mean, it sounds like there was a lot happening, a lot to kind of handle. But, you know, when I became a consultant, my husband and I sat down and talked, consulting those days, especially in Chicago, all your clients were in different parts of the Midwest. And without Internet without face time without any of that technology, you had to rely on long distance calls in the night with your AT&T card, and you couldn't connect otherwise with your spouse. And so, you know, I was gone for three, four days at a time, but we both had an understanding. That we both were going to work hard to make some money so we could save some for our own future of something went wrong. We never had to worry about how the other one would manage. For both our sakes, we said we need to have savings. We need to pay off our loans. And we always wanted a family. And when we had kids, we wanted to make sure that they would be comfortable and they could do whatever they wanted to. And we just worked towards that. So there was a constant reinforcement of our relationship because we talked about what we both were doing. It seems very strange to even say this, but it seems like fate intervened in your life twice in similar ways in both were car accidents the first time, of course, was your father's when you were a young girl. The second time was your own in 1986 that was a pretty severe accident, but it sounds like that also prompted you to make some different life decisions about the way you want it to live your life. You know, it was tough leaving consulting. But at that point, with the accident with the two year old daughter at that time, I realized that being away from home constantly, even though my mother was not living with me and helping care for my daughter, I was just not going to work because first, I was on a walker and crutches for a good 6 months. The prognosis wasn't great. And I realized that traveling was not an option. And then Motorola came calling at that time. So a combination of factors made me sit back and say, it's time to hang up my boots and consulting. The best decision I made fate intervened and.

Airbnb Yale Sari BCG bozal booz Allen Alan Hamilton Indra nooyi Yale school of management PepsiCo Booz Allen Hamilton NPR Raj Chicago Allen Hamilton Hamilton India America U.S. University of Chicago
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:32 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Considered something to be very, very important. That was almost considered the right to exist in a way because exactly as you put it as priests as sometimes doctors, but teachers, people of that and administrators, not a brahmins with the administrators, accountants, the expectation was that you would study, you would uphold your groups, expectations of you. Remember, brahmins, those days were not wealthy. But we were learned, we had education all of us. We lived kinda sort of comfortably as a group, but we were not wealthy as such. We were comfortable. And so I think the best example would be when parents and relatives got together of all the cousins. The first thing they would talk about is the report card of their kids. What did you get in math? Mike had got a 98 and we're devastated. Oh, my daughter got a hundred. Did you get her help? How did she get a hundred? Everybody would talk about that. Wow. But I thought life was much more than just being a bookish person. I love to climb trees. I love to play cricket. I love to learn languages. I just love to do everything in addition to school. And so I was a good student, but I didn't focus on being a great student like my sister did. You really, really into debate as well. I love debating. I'm debating helped you build your skills in terms of communication, confidence. Being able to research topics and whether you're given the opportunity to speak for or against the topic, you had to develop a point of view and my ability to communicate, frame an argument, be pithy, argued out, get on stage and be confident. All of that came from my debating days, and I will encourage everybody to look at that as a building block discipline. Injury, you write about something that happened when you were a teenager, I think it was in 1968. Your father was involved in a pretty serious car accident and spent many months in recovery and during that time it forced your family to really burn through. To your savings and put you in a financially precarious position as a family. And you write about how that kind of made you start to think about how you as a woman needed to think about providing for yourself and in securing your own future, do you remember thinking about those things at the time? So to be honest, we went through that whole incident, as a nightmare, because to see my beloved father, I mean, my father and I were take a step because I was a favorite child for my father. And he would take me along wherever he went and I'd simply adored him, and to watch him in that state. At home in bed, struggling to walk, you know, those days there was no physical therapy. There were hospitals. So everything my mother was doing everything with my dad, besides running the household. In retrospect, had my dad not been able to come back to work for whatever reason. What would have happened to the family? How would we have lived? You know, what would be our education? It's remarkable because, you know, oftentimes we reflect on on how our lives turned out based on things that happened to us early in earlier in life, we can't fully understand them at the time, but clearly. That experience is connected to so much of what happened to you in the decisions you made over the rest of your life. Let's try it. You know, it sort of takes a place and the deep recesses of your memory. And it releases certain ideas for you to pursue. You never realize where it's coming from, but it does. And then one fine day, you unlock the whole thing and go, oh my God, this comes back to me vividly. And then, you know, you go through tears, you go through pain for a while, as you relive those days, and then you realize that, you know, when you have the ability to help make change in society, to benefit young family builders or young parents who might be facing unprecedented, difficulties, you better do something to help them. Clearly, you had ambitions to pursue a career. You went and received your bachelor's degree, and went on to receive an MBA in India. And your dad had worked for the state for the state bank in a management position. Was it your you went to the Indian institute of management in Calcutta, was it your ambition to pursue a path of management kind of like your dad in India was that what you had in mind? I actually, oh my zest for business and my desire to go to IM Calcutta to my sister. Because she's the one who set the stage by applying and getting into I am under bad. And once she did, it was inevitable that I applied to business school too because the two of us were a year apart and we were fiercely competitive. We were very close, but fiercely competitive. And once she gone down the bar, then went off to him about the study of business. I had no choice, because had I not gone to Calcutta, I would have been viewed as, oh my God, she's the failed sibling. So you get your MBA in 1976 and I think the first you're sort of first job out of that degree was for a textile firm, that's right. Based in India. Beard cell. That's right. And you're a sales person. You were like a door to door with an MBA. You were like doing door to door sales, right? Well, this is the beauty of training and entry levels in those days. In those days, if you graduated from business school, every business school graduate went through 6 to 9 months of a traine program. You did not start in behind a desk. You started as a traine. You learned the frontline job. You read on the factory floor. You were selling, or you were doing something else that related to generating business for the company. At the very basic level, because the belief was, just because you're a management graduate, you don't you don't get to start in the office and lord of the people. So my first job was selling thread, door to door and Bombay. And then when I was moved to Madras to the textile division, I went out there to all the wholesalers and retailers selling printed fabrics. And believe me, I.

Calcutta cricket Indian institute of management Mike India Bombay Madras
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:51 min | 10 months ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm guy rise and on the show today, Indra nooyi, former CEO of PepsiCo. I wasn't intending to interfere on what the division presidents were doing, but if I felt that something was not okay in terms of the target was too high or too low, I spoke up. So I'd say, well, I tell you what guys, you say you're going to grow ten. I ran all the models we do at corporate. I don't see you growing at ten. You couldn't just have me be a paper for sure. Indra neue went from selling textiles and thread door to door to running one of the world's biggest food and beverage companies, PepsiCo. As recently as 2020, there were more people named James and Michael running Fortune 500 companies, then there were women on that list. In 2021, the number of women leading Fortune 500 companies hit an all time record of 41, or about 8% of the biggest companies in the world. And when ingenuity joined PepsiCo in the mid 90s as a senior VP of strategic planning, there were exactly zero women on that list. In our first years at the company, she was frequently second guest by her male colleagues. She remembers being told that her ideas were quote destroying the culture of the company. But she had a spark, a super sharp mind and an intense determination to modernize and future proof Pepsi, which would help her push past the doubters and the naysayers. And in 2006, Indra was named CEO of Pepsi, becoming only the 5th CEO and the company's history, a position she'd go on to hold for 12 years. During her time at Pepsi, she was consistently ranked one of the 100 most powerful women in the world. Today, she serves on the boards of Amazon and the international cricket council, and she's just written an autobiography called my life in full. It's a storied career that started at the ground level. At one point, just out of school, Indra was selling textiles door to door in her home country of India. Intra was born in 1955 in Chennai. Then called Madras, and she was born into a world pretty far removed from where she'd end up. I was born barely 8 years after India got independence. So this is very early in the days of India as a young democracy. And the country was still getting its footing. And in those days, Madras and the south was really a nerdy, sleepy town. Social life was almost nonexistent. And the city came to life around four or 5 in the morning and promptly went to sleep at 8 o'clock. 8 o'clock would be stretching it. There was no restaurants that really were open on the streets. All stores were shot. The roads were absolutely empty. It was a whole different life and a environment that I grew up in. Your father worked for the state bank. He was a bank manager, then he became an internal auditor, and just had a very steady job and performed very well in that job. And your mom was sort of the manager of the household when you were growing up. My mother was the CEO of the household and he has a better name because she run around doing so many things at the same time while keeping music going and singing along with it. No task was too difficult for her. And that was my mother. Can you describe a sort of how your parents interacted with you? Were they very strict today, presumably they had high expectations for you and your siblings, but were they sensitive empathetic or they stand offish what were they like when you were a kid? Sensitive. That word didn't exist. I think the times that we were growing up and the society and certain environment culture that I grew up in, the emphasis was an education. As long as you studied and got good grades, you were okay. If you didn't, everybody came down upon you, like a ton of bricks. In my family, really, the head of the family was my grandfather, my paternal grandfather. He was a retired judge, very firm man, when he spoke nobody else spoke, and if he said something nobody dead, question what he said. The wonderful thing about my grandfather was that he believed that women and men should be treated equally given all the chances, and nobody should be held back from pursuing their dreams. And that philosophy permitted through the whole family. My father was that way, too. And he believed that, whether it was daughters or sons, I didn't matter the children should be allowed to dream, and we should enable all their dreams, as long as it related to education. If it's about going and having a good time in our party or a restaurant, that was not allowed. As long as you wanted to take more courses, study languages, do stuff related to school work, that's all great. My mother was a bit of a disciplinarian. But she was sort of a study in contrast because she had one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. I think the fact that she didn't go to college, and she couldn't realize her dreams. Made her want us to do all the things she couldn't. So she had her foot on the accelerator when it came to encouraging her daughters to do whatever they wanted to do. And she gave us the confidence to dream. At the same time the society around us said girls should be treated differently than the boys. And so she had a foot on the brake. And she always had to apply the break and the accelerator. Judiciously. So she allowed us to fly at the same time, he be careful. I'm going to give you a frame. You have freedom within the frame. Don't push the frame too much because that'll break the family. You mentioned that the brahmin culture that you grew up in, which, of course, is sort of traditionally the class of precent intellectuals and teachers in India. Was achievement. Absolutely, you know, Paramount at home was at.

PepsiCo Pepsi Indra neue Indra Indra nooyi Madras India international cricket council Chennai James Michael Amazon Paramount
"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Going to be one of the most <Speech_Female> critical things that you <Speech_Female> do going forward. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you. You're <Laughter> awesome. Thank you. <Laughter> Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Next time <Speech_Music_Male> I'm taken for granted. <Speech_Music_Male> Nobel laureate <Speech_Male> Esther duflo <Speech_Male> joins me <Speech_Music_Male> to talk about how to fight <Speech_Music_Male> poverty with <Speech_Music_Male> data, and <Speech_Music_Male> how to motivate people. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You wrote at <Speech_Music_Male> one point that <Speech_Male> economists <SpeakerChange> are <Speech_Male> like plumbers. <Speech_Female> When parameters <Speech_Music_Female> are really helpful, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> my father kept <Speech_Music_Female> saying that the best <Speech_Music_Female> for me to marry <Speech_Music_Female> would be a doctor <Speech_Music_Female> or a plumber because you <Speech_Music_Female> always need these people <Speech_Music_Female> near you. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Finally, <Speech_Music_Female> I found neither.

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"If you were writing a PepsiCo today, where would you start on that? You know, it's interesting. One thing I won't do is create hoteling systems and offices. Because if we're going to go to work, you need your personal space there. Because you're leaving home, which is, you know, kids running around the center of all the work required to be done. If you go to the office, you want peace. But now if you're sitting in a hoteling system, where it's not your place, you're plugging your computer wherever you want and start working. It doesn't feel quite personal to me. So hoteling which was in effect in the last few years may have to be revised into some workspaces. I think it would be impossible to hire to retain the best and brightest without some flexibility. I think it would be impossible to retain higher and retain young family builders and women without some flexibility. And so we're going to be writing the rules of the future of work quite a bit in the next two years. But I just hope Adam, all of these committees on the future of work, some of which I'm a part of. Don't just talk about robots and cryptocurrency and technology, but also talk about role of women, role of families. How do we go back and rewire the social infrastructure of the country? How do we do that? I hope all of that is part of the future of work. I hope so, too, which begs the question, what are you up to now? The moon shot just to set up a car economy. But beyond that, I said to the board of Amazon, which is, you know, a lot of fun, I'm learning a lot. I said on the board of Phillips memorial Sloan Kettering, the international cricket council. I teach up at the military academy at West Point. So my plate is full. I'm having a time of my life. The only thing I'm missing is my quarterly earnings pressure. That was a joke. Almost looked like you were savoring that for a second. The Hartford is an insurance company, but they're also human beings. They believe that people are capable of achieving amazing things with the right encouragement and support. As the first carrier to create a team dedicated to small business, more than 30 years ago, they really understand small business owners. They're here to help you succeed with insurance solutions that can be designed for small businesses like yours. To learn more about the Hartford's small business insurance and why over 1 million small businesses trust the Hartford, head to the Hartford dot com slash small business. So watching Amazon given that you sit on the board. I almost did a touchdown dance when Jeff Bezos finally after two decades committed to being earth's best employer, not just earth's most customer centric company. Why did it take him so long? And what can we do to accelerate more leaders down that path? I don't think look I've been on the Amazon board for two years. And long before Jeff articulated being the earth's best employer. I think it's very easy to put out a set of words. If you don't have the programs to go behind it, it's a problem. I think what Amazon is constantly looking at is if we say we're going to be the earth's best employer, what does it mean? And can we deliver on that? So the companies consumed by that on customer centricity, they figured it out. On the employer piece, everybody's focused on that. What does it mean? And is it an absolute number? Is it a relative measure? How are we going to make sure that I mean, Amazon was always one of the highest paid minimum wage? $15, Amazon committed first. Educating its employees giving them the opportunity to go get a college degree, major commitment. They're raising the wages again. And so Amazon is trying to figure out what's the basket of pay and benefits that their workers need to remain happy at Amazon. And so I think they have all the work done and the implementing it. So you're saying the talk followed a little bit of the work. I think the talk, the public talk, followed a little bit of the walk, which is I think the way it should be. Yeah. I think so too. So we're going to go to some audience questions. I've asked a few, but they're more coming before we do that. Can we do a lightning round? Sure. All right, it's up to you whether you want to give a word or a sentence or something in between. First question is, who is the living leader that you admire most? Lynn Manuel Miranda. Okay, I have to follow up on. The fact that he can wrap the way he does. Oh, play. I keep trying it, I can't do it. You've tried. I've tried, doesn't work. All right, we'll ask for a demo tape later. Okay, secondly, a company whose culture you really look up to. That you're not on the board of. But I'm not on the board of. Patagonia. Hard to disagree with that one. Okay, third question. If you were now going to have the challenge of running any company, which company do you think you'd be most excited to take the helm of? Oh, God. I'd take a healthcare company. Because the healthcare industry needs such radical reinvention so many ways. I don't know if I can pull it off, but I would give it a good shot. Well, we could certainly use your wisdom and talent there. If you were going to take any class in business school, what would it be? Data analytics. And finally, your best tip for dual career couples, you had a pretty complicated situation with your husband's work and yours, taking you to two different states and cities. And sometimes even multiple countries. What did you learn from that? First marry the right guy, very, very important. And early on in your life, make sure before you get married, just make sure both of you understand it's an equal partnership, not you're going to do all the work and your husband is going to be along for the ride. And also make sure the husband's family. In the Indian context, make sure the husband's family is supporting you. Because if they put pressure on the sun, you've lost it. So in my case, my in laws are bigger supporters than even I expected. They even today, my biggest supporter. So I had the lottery of life on this. It has been in the end. Perry for good in laws. Check them out too is what I'm saying. Check them out. There is nothing that you don't do, diligence on. I have to. All right, let's take some additional audience questions here. How did you become comfortable in your skin in a large company? You know, you never comfortable. There's always that unease. And even now, after having lived there for 42, 43 years, having been CEO been in all the halls of power, there's still that unease. And maybe that's what propels me to keep doing better all the time, but I'm comfortable, then I used to be, but you never get fully comfortable. And the big piece of advice I'd give people is, maintain your authenticity, maintain your roots, maintain what makes you, but don't come to a different culture than expect everybody to accept you for a 100% of what you are. You've got a blend into. You've got to blend into. The one story I tell you is that when I first came in here, in those days, the first question they would ask in a recruiting interview is about the ball game that happened the previous night. Sports was the language of business. So how was that touched down? What did you think of this playoff game? Everything was about sports. I can say can we talk cricket? No. They don't even know what cricket is. They think it's the most boring game. You know, I remember one C you're telling me cricket, oh yeah, you talk about cricket, I'll go shopping and come back. It does the most boring game, which is okay. You know, if you're not used to it, it can be. But I never watched baseball, please. Remember, cricket is 5 days. Without an outcome, all right? So let's just be clear here. It puts baseball to look.

Amazon Hartford board of Phillips memorial Slo PepsiCo international cricket council Lynn Manuel Miranda Jeff Bezos West Point Adam Jeff Patagonia Perry cricket baseball
"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Buy into it. The few that didn't, we had to work on them. I thought it was such a compelling example of what our own drew carton would study around creating a truly vivid vision that people can see the future. They can taste it, they can touch it as opposed to a bunch of abstract words. How did you get there? Because we know from Jewish research that so many people get promoted on the basis of their abstract strategic thinking skills. And then it becomes very difficult to tell the vivid story and really lay out the narrative for who we're going to become and what our products are going to look like. So how did you develop that over time? Did you just wake up one morning and say, ah, nourish replenish cherish my work here is done. Wow, God. So remember, when I was president of the company going back to 2000, I was still managing all of the corporate functions. I mean, I had 16 reports or something like that at every corporate function that reported to me. So I was already thinking about the future of the company. And there was some very interesting findings. Nobody consumed the PepsiCo product before ten a.m. in the morning. Because we didn't have a breakfast product. We didn't have a breakfast beverage. Tropicana was our first acquisition that got us into the pre ten a.m. day pod. And the one aha was prior to ten a.m. people need consume by and large, good for you products. So it was a healthy day part, and we needed our brands in the morning. So all of a sudden, the real start to move, saying, we were to get that day part filled in Quaker roads came in. Quaker was actually a more excited about the Quaker trademark than Gatorade, because it gave us an inroad into the morning day part. So once we filled out the morning data you start saying, what else do we have to do to keep this company healthy and growing? So as you go and piece by piece by piece, you realize exactly what you have to do. And at that time, we got a letter from some coastal senators in the eastern seaboard. All of the companies in the consumer space, saying that too much plastic is washing up on our shores. How are we going to address this? You know, I took it personally, because I said, this is our seashores. So we have to do something about it as opposed to let the others worry about it. Everything became personal for me. So we started to think about all of these issues and say, we have to do something. We have to do our part to make the portfolio healthier overall because obesity is becoming a big issue, address these issues like plastic. And I grew up water distressed in Madras. There was no water in Madras. And the fact that we had a plant in the outskirts of Madras, going deeper and deeper into the aquifer and taking out water to make Pepsi bothered me. So I realized we had to get much more water efficient. So the whole nourish replenish cherish was personal to me. And I concluded on something they added if I may. If you want to execute purpose and all these ESG things we're talking about each other, form of purpose. Either the CEO feels a deep down inside because of a lived experience. Or their convert because they've seen it all and now say, boy, I've got to do something different. The third group do it just because there's an external force. And if you take away the external force, I believe a large number of CEOs won't do it anything. And that is a problem. And we have to bring them back to business schools to teach them how to run companies, the right way. Well, I know, highly rated business school that would be very glad to have that class if you were to teach it. I think your next book should be on that. Not another bestseller, New York Times Best Seller. Every list bestseller. It's a valiant effort, but I think Indra has somebody who's actually led a Fortune 500 companies and much more qualified to deliver that particular message. So what would you teach? What would you say to those CEOs? I know you're doing a lot of this work as part of the B team. But what do you think is the most compelling message to start opening their minds? You know, one of the things I made some of my PepsiCo senior executives do, I said to them, look, if you're going to talk about obesity, don't talk about it from the offices. Go out in the communities and see what's going on. Look at markets where people are obese. Look at how they live. Look at what happens in diabetes clinics. You know, this is in spite of the fact that only 2% of the calories came from beverages from our beverages. So it's not that I was worried about just our beverages. I think it's a broader societal issue. And there's a downstream cost to society. And all companies have to work on it. So I took the bold step of addressing the industry association and saying, it's not one company that has to do something. All of us together have to act in unison to improve the food supply. And so we committed to the healthy weight commitment foundation, committed take out one and a half trillion calories in 5 years. In reality, we took almost 6 trillion calories out of the U.S. food system in a matter of about four years. And so I think that industry working together with a very clear idea of where we need to go can actually make a huge difference. And too often I think we've got to bring CEOs together and say you're better suited to solve societal problems than governments are. Because you know engines of efficiency, you're big. I've always said companies are little republics. A 160 billion put us up there. So you look at the statistics that way you go big companies, a little republics. They are engines of efficiency and effectiveness. They ought to be able to move mountains, faster than a political system can. So why not us band together to get to the right change? Well, I love that vision. The metaphor calls to mind, though another challenge, which is too many of those little republics are run by miniature dictators who are basically power hungry and trying to get their employees to sell their souls and work nonstop and not care about their families. This is another huge issue for you. I think the challenge is where to start. So are we going to reimagine organizations and say, forget the 9 to 5 workday, forget the 5 day workweek. Where would you begin if you were rebooting? I think the pandemic is forcing us to rethink everything. You can't take what people are saying today as the answer, because we went from everybody going to work. Everybody locked down. We're trying to figure out what's the resting point. We don't know what it is. The first CEO who comes and says, we're going completely flexible. Office space is going to come begging, and there's a game theory principle here, which is everybody has to say everybody is going to come back to work. And then quietly exit the office space market. So I think people are waiting to see how to play this commercial office space market. Wow, I had no idea that was happening. This is how she used to think. I'm a retired CEO. Please don't forget that without retired CEOs think. But really think about it, okay? Sorry. We get better with age actually. No, I think what it is is it is not possible for everybody to say a 100% come back to work, because people have got a taste of caring for families, having some flexibility. Technology has accelerated to a point which allows hybrid working flexible working and to make it work effortlessly. The issue is going to be our frontline workers. People are manufacturing people in retail. People who are driving trucks, people in care jobs. They don't have flexibility. At best we can give them predictability. So we should be careful not to create two classes of citizens. One group that has to get up in the morning get to work and another group that rolls out of bed and looks at zoom. So we can't allow that to happen. So we have to figure out how this is all going to work. I think this is the challenge for the next 12 to 24 months. I think so too..

Madras PepsiCo obesity Tropicana eastern seaboard Quaker healthy weight commitment foun Pepsi Indra New York Times diabetes U.S.
"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Us about some of the biases you faced and how you dealt with them. Well, you know, again, the time that I came into the corporate world, there were no women in consulting maybe two women in BCG Chicago, which is where I was. And the only other senior woman was in Boston and I'd never met her. So there were no senior women in BCG Chicago. And going over to client organizations, I don't believe I ever saw a woman in a client organization. So you enter rooms and there will be 50 people in the boardroom or a conference room and you'll be the only woman. And half of it was my problem at him, because I walked into these meetings always and said to myself, I'm sure they're all thinking, what is she doing in this room? You know, she's so different comes from an emerging market, woman and on top of that, what is she going to contribute to us? So right off the bat, I dug a hole for myself. And I said, I've got to dig out of this hole. Because I've got to prove to them that I have a right to be at this table. And so I would over prepare, I would have every number of my fingertips. I mean, I was like a walking computer, which didn't exist then. I was there at the laptop. I was in. I was in those days none of those existed, remember. So I would prepare and I'd earn a seat at the table. And as you mentioned, like clothes are pretty interesting. And so they look at me saying who is this person that you brought into the room? To advise CEOs of big companies and consulting. And so I had to get them to overcome all of those negative screens and view me as just a brain sitting behind a table. And after the first couple of meetings, they would always turn to me first. And so I think I benefited from the fact that people are willing to look past the superficial stuff and get to the crux of the matter, which again I'd say only in America. And I was a beneficiary of all of that. So the fact that I was the only woman in most cases, I probably experienced less bias than many people experienced today. Because people actually wanted me to succeed to say it's a novelty. Let's see how we can have a succeed. Wow. So this idea that you were going to prove yourself, and you had something to prove. I think you're preaching to the choir here. Our own samarina Muhammad, I think sitting right there. Has done some brilliant research on underdogs and how when people underestimate you or when people doubt you, if they're not credible, that fires you up. Yeah. And it leads you to say, you know what? I'm gonna show you. Where it's much harder is when the people above you are credible, where they've accomplished a lot where they're very senior. And they're questioning you. And who are you going to trust? Your own confidence that you can do it, or this very senior person who thinks you can't. How did you deal with being an underdog or being underestimated in those situations? End of the day, I can only rely on my competence, my knowledge. So like I said, I was over prepared. Let me tell you how I prepared. If this was the assignment I was given, I always levitated and define my assignment with that much bigger, because I wanted to understand every linkage between what I was given to how it was going to impact the enterprise as a whole. So I always zoomed into my assignment and zoomed out to see how the impact is going to measure the cross. So whenever anybody talked about something, I said just a minute. It's not going to help the company because if I took what I was doing, what personally and personally was doing, the combination that I'm suggesting is way better than the combination, you are looking at. But maybe I'm missing something. You know, in my youth, I'd say, I'm writing you're wrong. I do black and white and in your face. I was taught how to communicate in a more gentle way. So I'd say things like, you know, maybe I'm not understanding what you're doing, although in my head, I'm going you're wrong. Telling me, can you help me understand what I'm missing? And then at the meeting they say you're wrong, I'm the boss forget it. But a day or two later they'd come back and say, I think you were right. And they called me the dog with the bone because if I decided that I was right, I'd come back and reconceptualize it 5 different ways. I wouldn't give up, because at the end of the day, if I had done all the work and I thought my solution was right for the company. And I felt others had not done the kind of work. It behooved me to keep coming back to the issue to lead the showed me compelling analysis to disprove me, or accept what I said. So my CEOs would always call me. She's a dog with the bone, don't argue, because she's not going to give up if she believes she's right. I think you need that kind of conviction something you do. What if you're wrong, though? If they have better facts to prove that I'm wrong, I'm willing to completely accept it. Because remember, the goal is not personal showcasing. The goal is what's right for the company. But you've got to match me with facts and figures. Don't just say, my gut tells me this. Gut works, but cut works when it's backed up with some facts and figures. Ideally formed after the facts and figures. Ideally formed after the fact, but I tell you many senior leaders are president of the past. So their gut comes from what they've been doing all the time in the past. And if the world is changing, the situation is changing, you've got to change. And then they don't know how to change. So they always rely on my gut tells me this is what you got to do. Then you start to have doubt saying, oh, you're a prisoner of your path. Let me see how I can help you. So then you take over PepsiCo. And you have this bold, massive vision, to reinvent the business, essentially, and say, we don't want to just give people sugar water. We don't want to contribute to an epidemic of obesity or poor health. We actually want to make people healthier. Was that a challenge to get people on board with that vision or had the world changed enough that people were starting to come around? Can I just agree with that characterization at all? So please correct. I mean, let me reframe your question to say that the portfolio was made for a time when that's what people ate and drank. I came and saying consumer tastes are changing. I want to take what I call a fun for you portfolio and make it better for you and good for you also. So that the consumer had infinite choice. They could eat and drink whatever they wanted. And all that I wanted to make sure was the better for you and the good for your choices were not more expensive, tasted bad or not available. So they all had to be ubiquitously available, affordably priced and high quality. That's all I wanted to make sure. You know, I had to do that because that's where the consumer was going. And again, when I became CEO, we did a piece of work on mega trends. What are the big mega trends that will impact PepsiCo over the next decade or two? And then future back, if you work on it and say, what do I need to do today to cater to these trends? Because it takes a while to get the R and D and all of the disciplines in place. The product launches the innovation. So that megatrends work was my true north. And once I got the boat to bind to the mega trends, it was very easy for me to devise the strategies and the plans to address the mega trends. So it was relatively easy. And now just selling it to the rest of the people in the company. And the question is, what words to use? This is where I think using the words that speak to people's heart is more important than speaking to their minds. And so performance of purpose was born. And how do you continue to deliver performance? Because PepsiCo is a performance machine. But due to the way to ensure human sustainability, environmental sustainability and talent sustainable. And that was purpose, nourish, replenish, cherish. So when you put all of them together, you spoke to the employees and we got.

samarina Muhammad Chicago Boston PepsiCo America obesity
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Guilt are there. Is it. Do we expect different things from women CEOs than we do from men CEOs? I think we expect different things from women period. You know, we think women are responsible for kids, women are responsible for families, not true. In my case, Raj and I both felt we were responsible for the kids and the family and our future. And so I think it's very, very important, everybody who has an idea designed to get married and have kids has a conversation with the espouse about who's going to do what have the honest conversations because it can not be done alone. And women in particular have to let go of perfection because very often we women want to be perfect at everything. It's in our DNA. And you know, at some point you may have to give up things that you wanted to do. They might have to say, you know what? I'm not going to keep the house spotless. I'm just going to let it go because I'm just exhausted. And many of us run ourselves ragged because we want to be viewed as getting everything right. And I think all of that is a formula for failure. So the best thing is for us to have the honest conversations with this pass, make sure that both are on the same page when it comes to who's going to do what to support the family. In my case, I had an added advantage a guy. I had my husband's family that unusually decided that they're going to support me whatever happens. So they were my biggest tailwinds. They would call and say, you know, don't quit your job, without help you. And, you know, tell us what kind of help you want and we'll be so proud of you and what you've accomplished. And so it's not just my husband, I had wonderful in laws. And I think all in laws have to stop and think about the future and say, if you're going to let the women and men both fly. We have to also lean in. This becomes an intergenerational responsibility. It injured it's amazing because of all the things you accomplished and the fact that you started life and where you got to. I mean, the top of the corporate world and yet you write that at times in your career you really felt like you were to downplay your achievements. Um. Why? I think that goes back to The Crown of the garage comment that my mother made. Way back in 2000, when I came home, and I just wanted to share my big deals and how point was you into the house and you leave The Crown of the garage. I think that we still live in a society where the woman's achievement is downplayed in the men's achievements are elevated. We are making changes, but we still live in that society. I think in our home, you know, the dialog and discussion was different. My mother grew up at a time when it was that way. You know, you play up the men's achievements and you downplay the woman's achievements. That's how you keep a harmonious family. In my family now my husband was celebrated my achievements like it's all Nobel Prizes that I've won. Okay. Just as that would his. We both lift each other up. Maybe that's the future generation. Because if we don't do that, then what happens is we basically telling women, we're all going to keep one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. And the foot on the brake is going to be a little heavier than the foot on the accelerator, which I don't think is fair. When you look at the future of work, you one of the things you wrote when you stepped in after 12 years a sea of Pepsi record and amazing amount of time. I think the average CEO lasts for 40 years at companies, most companies. You wrote about how you wished you would have spent a little bit more time with family and you encouraged people to think about that in their own careers. And you've been more vocal more and more vocal about that since you've stepped down running day to day operations at Pepsi. About focusing on on our lives. Thank you even I think I'm perfectly short. We don't know how much time on this planet. And we have to focus on what actually matters. Work is important. Careers important achievement is important, but it's only one part of our of our lives. I think, you know, I sit on various future of work committees and you know we talk about how things are going to change post pandemic. And I have to tell you, one of the things that we never talk about in this committee meetings is the whole issue of care. Who's going to do all the caregiving, how is it going to get done? How are we going to make sure that we have a pathway for highly educated women to also contribute to the economy? As much as they are family builders and help nurture and develop the family. And I really believe that the issue and care is a big blind spot among global leaders. And I'm in a missed opportunity, and I now speak as an economist not a feminist. A guy. Because when I was PepsiCo CEO, and I was in the rooms of power with all the men sees. We talked about the future of work as if it's about technology, the world, GDP growth, retraining of employees, we never mentioned family and care, and who's going to do the jobs and how are we going to do it? World where we've got a lot of aging people. My belief is that if there are more women in the room, in those groups and rooms of power, this would have come up sooner. It's a big missed opportunity. And I think that we have to elevate the discussion from quite discussions that don't lead anywhere, to make it in front and center to say, hey, with the aging population. And with a need to have children and young people to build families at the same time, the best and brightest to be deployed in the service of furthering the economy. If we don't focus on care as a critical support system for the country. We're not going to have a society that's happy. We'll have another Japan or South Korea where the birth rate is low and the requirements of jobs and children conflicts so much because what's happening is young people are now delaying having kids or choosing not to have kids at all. And if that happens, it's going to debilitate our economic system down the road. And so I think that we should stop framing this as female and says about families and is not.

Raj Pepsi PepsiCo South Korea Japan
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"And that's what they would write about you. Yeah. So we're very sorry to work. I know we're sorry to work, but doesn't matter. You know at that time, they were painting me as absolutely exotic person who had come into the boardroom of the staid, prim and proper PepsiCo. I guess they wanted to draw a major contrast. To everybody else out there. I don't care in retrospect. I laugh it off. But at that time, I'm like, see me, I'm one of these totally conservative people who has long skirts and jackets and shirts and always the same kitten heel shoes and I don't smoke. I don't drink give me a break guys. Maybe a 6 o'clock kick off my shoes because the heels hurt and maybe when I'm stressed out or how much tune but relax, don't write about me as this hippie kind of a person. But it didn't matter. You know, they painted me in interesting ways. But to be honest guy, that's all behind me because as the company went on as my ten year as CEO went on, you know, there was supporters and detractors, the detractors are usually louder than the supporters. But then, as long as the board was behind me, I felt I could do anything, which is what I did. You had several big sort of initiatives that you put out while you were a Pepsi. One was reclassifying the products with a fun category for chips and soda and then a better category which was the diet and the low fat drinks and low fat foods and then the good for you things like oatmeal and other products. And you really push this initiative called performance with a purpose. What was that initiative about what was the idea behind it? This was way back in 2006. And we were beginning to do things to move the portfolio to a healthier mix. Quaker roads was an example of an acquisition that helped us get there. We had bought naked juice that was another example. Tropicana was an up portfolio. And so we were making all the right moves to add calcium to tropicana juice. Take sugary drinks out of the vending machines in schools. So there were a lot of actions that we were taking to make the company a better company if you want to call it that. And future proof it. But when I became CEO, the environment for companies like ours in the marketplace is very different. The talk on obesity was very, very high. There was a big noise about it all over society in every country. We were talking about suing beverage makers. Exactly right. And, you know, countries were threatening taxes, a portion control drinks. I mean, all kinds of noise on our industry in our industry. There was also human cry about plastics. You know, how much plastic was being. There still is. There still is, but then it had started. So, and then in many, many countries, we were viewed as a water parasite, used too much water. The town doesn't have water to eat or drink, and there's a Pepsi plant or a Coke plant close by using a lot of water. So we had to worry about water. We had to worry about plastics. And then those were also the days where it was very hard to get good people to come and work in traditional consumer products companies. People wanted to know what the purpose in life was. Why? Because they were going to the best people going to the tech sector. Totally take or someplace else. But there was a new found awareness about purpose and what do we want to do with our jobs? Why should we work at this company and give it all our time if the companies aren't going to do something to make the world a better place? There was a conversation that's happening that's happening again now today. And it needs to only it needs to and so because that consciousness had been awoken, you know, to me, the only way the future proof PepsiCo to make sure that we would remain successful well into the future. Was if I found a way for the company to deliver great performance because we're always about good performance good financial performance. But figured out how we can transform the portfolio to healthier products, more good for you and better for your products. How do we reduce our environmental footprint? So we reduce our costs, and we get a license to operate in societies around the world. And then how do we create an environment inside PepsiCo? So people feel they can really come in and feel like they brought themselves to work. So we worked on every aspect of purpose and performance and put the money behind sugar reduction, salt reduction, dialing up zero calorie products, making healthier products taste great and be ubiquitously available. We did a ton of work on water reduction in our plants. How to make thinner bottles, how to think about recycling in a whole different way. And what kind of programs you should be offering our employees so that they knew that PepsiCo looked at them as an asset for the company, not a tool of the trade. So we changed a lot of things in the company. And it did good things for us. Our performance was good over the period. Our attention rates went up. Our attrition rate was way down. And PepsiCo is once again viewed as a phenomenal talent bank for industry as a whole because we were so filled with outstanding leaders. You were during your ten year often the only or one of just a few female CEOs of a Fortune 500 company and with that came. As a symbol, a model, an example, all of the things that tend to happen when somebody is the only or one of a few of a group representing a larger group. And at the same time, you from what you write, we're kind of roiling internally because of your on the one hand you were incredibly successful running Pepsi. And sort of held up as a amazing model on the other hand, kind of struggling with your own feelings of guilt about the time or whether the lack of time you had with your family. That's push and pull is inevitable. Because every one of the jobs I was doing was a full-time job. Being a CEO was three full-time jobs, being a wife and mother was all full-time jobs, each one of them being a daughter was a full-time job. And the days till 24 hours, and believe me I was using that day to its fullest because I didn't sleep much. I learned how to multiplex. I could do three or four things at the same time. So I was going fast. But there is no way that you can do a job to satisfaction level that makes you feel great about it. There's a constant juggling act. And you had to do the juggling, maybe three or four times a day. Because some priority had to shift something at home, had to get precedents or something you're doing at work. So you go through this juggling. And because of this juggling act, you know, you don't feel guilty about work, but you feel guilty about home. Especially my two kids. I'd say my God, when I left home today, they looked at me long English saying, I wish mummy wasn't going. One of them has got the flu, I'd run home every two.

PepsiCo Pepsi Tropicana tropicana obesity Coke jobs flu
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. And guy rise and on the show today, Indra nooyi, former CEO of PepsiCo. I wasn't intending to interfere on what the division presidents were doing, but if I felt that something was not okay in terms of the target was too high or too low, I spoke up. So I'd say, well, I tell you what guys, you say you're going to grow ten. I ran all the models we do at corporate. I don't see you growing at ten. You couldn't just have me be a paper for sure. Indra neue went from selling textiles and thread door to door to running one of the world's biggest food and beverage companies, PepsiCo. As recently as 2020, there were more people named James and Michael running Fortune 500 companies, then there were women on that list. In 2021, the number of women leading Fortune 500 companies hit an all time record of 41, or about 8% of the biggest companies in the world. And when ingenuity joined PepsiCo in the mid 90s as a senior VP of strategic planning, there were exactly zero women on that list. In our first years at the company, she was frequently second guest by her male colleagues. She remembers being told that her ideas were quote destroying the culture of the company. But she had a spark, a super sharp mind and an intense determination to modernize and future proof Pepsi, which would help her push past the doubters and the naysayers. And in 2006, Indra was named CEO of Pepsi, becoming only the 5th CEO and the company's history, a position she'd go on to hold for 12 years. During her time at Pepsi, she was consistently ranked one of the 100 most powerful women in the world. Today, she serves in the boards of Amazon and the international cricket council, and she's just written an autobiography called my life in full. It's a storied career that started at the ground level. At one point, just out of school, Indra was selling textiles door to door in her home country of India. Intra was born in 1955 in Chennai. Then called Madras, and she was born into a world pretty far removed from where she'd end up. I was born barely 8 years after India got independence. So this is very early in the days of India as a young democracy. And the country was still getting its footing. And in those days, Madras and the south was really a nerdy, sleepy town. Social life was almost nonexistent. And the city came to life around four or 5 in the morning and promptly went to sleep at 8 o'clock. 8 o'clock would be stretching it. There was no restaurants that really were open on the streets. All stores were shot. The roads were absolutely empty. It was a whole different life and a environment that I grew up in. Your father worked for the state bank. He was a bank manager, then he became an internal auditor, and just had a very steady job and performed very well in that job. And your mom was sort of the manager of the household when you were growing up. My mother was the CEO of the household and he has a better name because she run around doing so many things at the same time while keeping music going and singing along with it. No task was too difficult for her. And that was my mother. Can you describe a sort of how your parents interacted with you? Were they very strict today, presumably they had high expectations for you and your siblings, but were they sensitive empathetic or they stand offish what were they like when you were a kid? Sensitive. That word didn't exist. I think the times that we were growing up and the society and certain environment culture that I grew up in, the emphasis was an education. As long as you studied and got good grades, you were okay. If you didn't, everybody came down upon you like a ton of bricks. In my family, really the head of the family was my grandfather, my paternal grandfather. He was a retired judge, very firm man, when he spoke nobody else spoke. And if he said something nobody dead, question what he said. The wonderful thing about my grandfather was that he believed that women and men should be treated equally given all the chances, and nobody should be held back from pursuing their dreams. And that philosophy permitted through the whole family. My father was that way, too. And he believed that, whether it was daughters or sons, I didn't matter the children should be allowed to dream, and we should enable all their dreams, as long as it related to education. If it's about going and having a good time in our party or a restaurant, that was not allowed. As long as you wanted to take more courses, study languages, do stuff related to school work, that's all great. My mother was a bit of a disciplinarian. But she was sort of a study in contrast because she had one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. I think the fact that she didn't go to college, and she couldn't realize her dreams. Made her want us to do all the things she couldn't. So she had her foot on the accelerator when it came to encouraging her daughters to do whatever they wanted to do. And she gave us the confidence to dream. At the same time the society around us said girls should be treated differently than the boys. And so she had a foot on the brake. And she always had to apply the break and the accelerator. Judiciously. So she allowed us to fly at the same time, he be careful. I'm going to give you a frame. You have freedom within the frame. Don't push the frame too much because that'll break the family. You mentioned that the brahmin culture that you grew up in, which, of course, is sort of traditionally the class of precent intellectuals and teachers in India. Was achievement. Absolutely, you know, Paramount at.

PepsiCo Pepsi Indra neue Indra Indra nooyi Madras India international cricket council Chennai James Michael Amazon Paramount
"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Rooms with healthy products. And I was so proud of it. And I thought if I showed all this to our CEO and the division presidents had fallen in love with it. And some of them did some of them said this is just not PepsiCo. You're taking us too far away from our core. And the time is not now and you're wasting our time. And you know, sometimes you reflect back on some of your failures, I should have stuck with it. Neurological Enrique always referred to me as a dog with a bone. That's the one time I dropped the bone. In my world, at least in organizational psychology, what you're describing is often called issue selling, where employees take on a personal passion and then they try to convince the organization that it matters. What have you learned about how to sell an issue effectively? You've got to be engaged in that issue, head heart and hands. Very often people just articulate an issue and try to get buy in without being emotionally committed to the issue. And the way you commit yourself emotion to the issues, convincing yourself, the right decision makers like the board in my case, that this way to address the issues is the best way to future proof the company. So you're not doing it because you have a pet project. You're doing it because this is the way to make sure the company is going to be successful. And even though it may be unpopular in the short term, you're willing to take the blows. You're willing to take confident and courageous through it all, because you're firmly convinced that this is the way this company is going to be successful into the future. Put the company ahead of yourself. You aren't content to sell sugar water. And when you brought in this new vision of performance with purpose, you said, we're going to take a traditionally, well, at least reputationally, junk food company and turn it into something that's better for humanity and better for the environment. I imagined you faced a lot of resistance, especially from old school, shareholder theorists..

PepsiCo Enrique
"indra nooyi" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"indra nooyi" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Whether things have changed what you're asking about change which within the music industry that constantly reinvents the generational wheel of appealing to people musically across genres genres all then subdividing constantly. And so you have this thing where it's it's a blaze society has to change the has to be Away which men are petrified through their own moral standards of actually doing some of the things that these men so five off kelly harvey warrants in. Any of these people are doing because what you end up ends up happening is as in two thousand eighteen when there was a screening of surviving kennedy surviving. Kenny dream hamptons of documentary series. Somebody that will somebody oral. Some people felt that it was right to phone through a gun threat that had that screening abandoned rather than have these women see themselves talking about the very things that they had either suppressed or at she felt. I must speak and the toll the all of these. These hours of confession had on dream hampton. The journalists tend talk humanitarian. Even she spoke about this much less the experience and so when we're talking about whether look as a watershed moment that was able to ship moment that somebody felt or some people felt that rather than have black girls and women listened to and have that screening take place in new york and twenty team. They were going to throw to to issue a level of domestic terrorism to prevent them being heard and that tells us something about the way in which that's disposable that they felt that that could actually succeed and also that they felt that they could defend arcadi. possibly somebody. they didn't even know we don't know who made those but those threats were given that because violence against women can be promised alleged unexecuted. An if you then come forward than there's also the idea that you're chasing money you're looking for fame not anybody who's enjoying a level of celebrity by being a victim of abuse. What we're talking about here with people like toronto Are people who actually had to bring themselves open in order to heal and they also use her own experiences to watch actually issue change this idea that people are monitoring. Their confessions is part of the the discourse of disarmer students jacqueline springer a lot music journalists in university electra reflecting on what this moment might mean as our kelly is convicted and facing a life sentence. Now you've been getting in touch with us about working and your life and how to do or do not go together and perhaps how that has changed during the pandemic. I want to read a couple of messages for. I go to my next guest. Heidi says i've been working from home since the pandemic began. During which time. I've had extensive surgery for cancer. Working from home has allowed me to continue working whereas otherwise i wouldn't have been able to do so yesterday..

kelly harvey Kenny dream hamptons kennedy hampton jacqueline springer new york toronto kelly Heidi cancer
Lamont adviser Indra Nooyi named to Amazon board

First Light

00:17 sec | 3 years ago

Lamont adviser Indra Nooyi named to Amazon board

"City, Amazon naming former PepsiCo CEO ingenuity to its board of directors. She's the second woman of color name to the board and just the past month. Google plans to build a six hundred million dollar data center in rural Minnesota, creating fifty firm. New jobs, but it's asking for fifteen

Pepsico CEO Amazon Google Minnesota Six Hundred Million Dollar
Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

The Takeaway

04:12 min | 4 years ago

Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

"Many ways save the takeaway we'll be, right back after these headlines Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor, Johnston testimony has resumed in the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort NPR's Ron Elving reports the, jury could hear from, manafort's longtime business partner Rick gates as early as today. Rick h is the key point he's the pivotal point the Lynch pin of this trial the prosecution has already put out a lot of evidence that Manafort made millions move them around to fool people about their source defrauding banks hiding them from taxation and what we're expecting from gates that he'll give us a great deal more detail. And he'll tell us perhaps a little. Bit more about the cast of characters the sources of that income and the defense is going to try to paint gates. As the bad guy who did all the bad stuff and hid the money even from. Paul Manafort whom they, will claim was not guilty of knowing, about any of this NPR's Ron Elving reporting. Metaphor does facing eighteen counts of tax. And Bank fraud. The trial is expected to last about three weeks several tech companies have started blocking content from controversial media personality alex jones from their media platforms joseph lahey from member station k. u. t. reports facebook says it's taken down four pages administered by jones for repeated violations of the company's community standards those included language glorifying violence and dehumanizing people who are transgender muslim or immigrants also today apple confirmed its i tunes platform will no longer offer five podcast series hosted by jones because they violated the company's hate speech guidelines spotify and youtube have also taken similar actions to block his content jones is facing multiple defamation lawsuits in texas district court for making false claims regarding the school massacre in newtown connecticut and parkland florida for n._p._r. news i'm joseph lahey in austin pepsi's long-serving chief injure a new ye is stepping down new He is a rare minority female CEO whose tenure lasted a. Dozen years NPR's, Yuki Noguchi reports she'll be succeeded by another Pepsi veteran Raymond LaGuardia, the sixty two year. Old new year stepping, down as. CEO in October and will remain as chairman into the early, part of next year during her. Tenure new you push the company to expand at. Snack and soft drink empire to include healthier foods as consumer tastes were shifting in that direction she. Helped add products, such as, HAMAs and coconut water to Pepsi's line and its. Stock rose, eighty percent. During her tenure the Indian-born new Ye grew up during food shortages and in a statement called leading Pepsi the honor of. Her lifetime low quarter who replaces her is president of. The company and has been there for twenty two years you can Gucci NPR news stocks are trading higher on Wall Street, at, this hour the Dow is up. Thirty four points the NASDAQ, up thirty, eight the. SNP up nine this is NPR news And this is WNYC, in New York good. Afternoon I'm Sean Carlson New York governor Andrew Cuomo is robust ping the National Rifle rifle association's claim that he tried to put the organization out. Of business by banning sales of an insurance product called carry guard the NRA, says it lost tens of millions, of dollars after New York regulators curb the sale of carry guard which is meant to. Cover the legal fees, for people, who fire weapon in self defense but on MSNBC's morning Joe today Cuomo said the NRA had. Been providing insurance of gun owners who had knowingly broke the law I believe this insurance product is going to be. Illegal from a public policy point, of view and most most states and, now that the NRA said this is. A major. Source of revenue I'm going to pursue it nationwide Cuomo says he's reaching out to other governors. And attorneys general to also ban the. Product city and state officials took a bus ride from Williamsburg to Manhattan this morning. To get a taste of what a commute during the l.. Train shutdown will look like, state Senator Brad Holman said after the ride that he's. Concerned about the pollution. From all the buses, that'll be traveling, up and down fourteenth street. In the morning making up for the loss of the subway we.

Paul Manafort Paul Manafort Npr Andrew Cuomo NPR NRA Austin Pepsi Yuki Noguchi CEO Pepsi Manhattan Alex Jones Ron Elving Chairman Rick Gates Senator Brad Holman President Trump Gucci Npr Washington Rick H Joseph Lahey