17 Burst results for "Indira Lakhshman"

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:18 min | 10 months ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"How do you get the bureaucrats in the health Ministry to approve something like this? Unless the science is really solid unless the tracker profound platform is very solid. Choice. You heard him say, time will tell. There seems to be little doubt now that Russia did do something right and did to it faster than anyone else. A number of experts did cast doubt on their claims early on where they wrong. I mean, Russia definitely took a risk and releasing the vaccine before the face trialing number three was was completed, but but the news we saw on the Lancet article I think it's good news for global immunity. We already have 15 countries that are using the Sputnik vaccine for emergency purposes. But as you said, I'm not. There are still unanswered questions from scientists and experts, basically that the trial design did not follow international standards for safety and efficacy. And that that was an issue all along. The second issue was the lack of transparency on that the positive findings were presented without the level off detail needed And appropriate be review that we saw with other vaccines approved by the FDA, For example, the authors of the Lancet article. Actually, they do say that the trial and Moscow lacked ethnic diversity to make sure that the vaccine is safe on non white groups. So Uh, that what we saw with you know, 91.6% is good news. Uh, but we don't have enough data at this point. And, uh, the U. S and Britain are saying today that they're not in a hurry to approve the Sputnik vaccine Joyce given some of those concerns around Russia's processes, are there other concerns about some of the other countries you mentioned who are using it for emergency purposes now. We haven't seen many red flags, for example, from the U, a E or Argentina that are using this vaccine, but it's still you know front when it comes to the U. S. When it comes to Europe. Only handful off countries have approved it, so I think the jury is still out. But they have good reference now with the Lancet. Uh, you know, uh, approving them, and, uh, commanding their their efforts. I'm a man of Oz. You're listening to one, eh? A reminder. We are speaking with Nancy use it from the Wall Street Journal. Joyce Carol, Washington correspondent for the National and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. On Wednesday, the United States and Russia agreed to extend a crucial nuclear arms control treaty until 2026. That agreement was due to expire today. Indira. That treaty is called the Start Treaty. Tell us what we need to know about it and what you took away from that announcement. Yeah, absolutely. It's really some of the biggest news this week. I did want to just add one thing. To the good information that Joyce was giving us about the Russian Sputnik five vaccine, which is from a scientific point of view, One thing that's really interesting about that vaccine is that it is a different process. It's a regimen that uses two different, harmless cold viruses called the dental viruses. As opposed to the M R N a technology being used by Madonna Fizer by on tech, which were approved here in the U. S. And so it's really interesting. If that turns out to be a good and valid vaccine, which the Lancet reports seems to show. We've written a lot about this at National Geographic about the science behind it. And obviously the whole world wants to broaden the number of vaccines that are available, particularly in poor countries, and the Russian vaccine is one that was being used in a low income country and guinea in West Africa on the start treaty. This is really interesting because the Trump administration Somewhat controversially in the last months of it's administration was basically trying to use its leverage on the renewal of the U. S. Russia New Start Accord which verifies limits on Russian and American intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine launched ballistic missiles. And heavy bombers. And essentially, the Trump Administration was trying to say We're not going to renew this deal unless you bring in all of your nuclear posture into this, and they wanted to make it a three way treaty with China's nuclear arsenal included in it, too, which, by the way is not a bad idea. Because right now, the world knows about Russia and the United States checking each other, But you know, there are no checks on China and that respect. Um but But, you know, Joe Biden had campaign saying he was going to renew it. Without conditions, and he did renew it for five years until 2026. So when the good news side of the ledger it does keep in place this mutual verification regime in the could be better side of the ledger. It certainly would be better toe have you no more visibility into other forms of you know, nuclear weapons? From Russia, but I think this was seen as an important thing because there's so much tension in the US Russian relationship over cyber Navalny. S so many other things on do Trump Administration harder. You pulled out of two other treaties that were designed to reduce the chances of accidental war. Nancy let me ask you about Indira's mentioning their of us trying to bring China into this there. The man who represents the U. S on the UN's disarmament conferences, Ambassador Robert Wood on Thursday. He called for a new arms control, Dr saying, quote. United States will also seek to engage China on nuclear arms control and risk reduction. As Indira just mentioned Nancy when it comes to nuclear weapons..

Russia Lancet Trump Administration United States Joyce Carol Indira Lakshmanan China Nancy National Geographic health Ministry FDA UN Europe Joe Biden Wall Street Journal Moscow Oz
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:09 min | 10 months ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Friday News round up on one A. We're hearing from Nancy Yusef from the Wall Street Journal. Joyce Carol, Washington correspondent for the National and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. In Myanmar Police have now filed several charges against the country's elected civilian leader on Song Souci. This follows the military coup on Monday. The exact whereabouts of the Nobel Peace Prize winner remain unclear. She has not been seen nor has the country's president since the military seized power. Indira. There has long been tension between the military and the government. Talk to me about the timing. Why did the army choose this moment to do this? Yeah, well, um as the listeners to this show, or where, in November, just a couple months ago on Sun Suit, Cheese National League for Democracy and L D, the main opposition party won more than 77%. Of the seats in parliament in what international observers were calling the country's first free and fair election. Well, first in 2010. That was the first free and fair election in 25 years. Now, 10 years later, they want an even bigger amount of support, which was there for giving on San Souci in a way Backing and a mandate for the kinds of reforms and lessening of the military's role that she has been pushing for cause. Remember in these last 10 years suit she has You know, sort of been running the country, but not really. She's been a state councilor alongside the Myanmar military, which has maintained significant power. In some ways, you know, she has really tainted her reputation in the eyes of the world. As you mentioned she was a Nobel Peace Prize winner for her very brave and determined willingness to be in her home country. When she could have been sitting pretty and safely in Britain. She had a British husband and kids, but instead, she came back to her home country and endured Many, many years of house arrest in her fight for democracy. But in the last few years she's tainted that reputation by supporting the Myanmar military not only at home but in international courts in what most of the world considers to be a genocide of the Muslim Rohingya minority People in me and Mar Bond. She went along with it and basically endorsed it and said it was not a genocide campaign. But I think the spark for this at this point was that the military didn't want her to have this mandate to roll back their power, Limited and move Maurine the direction of parliamentary democracy. And they've arrested her. They've charged her with some pretty thin charges about you know, Importing some walkie talkies on day have absolutely no proof that the November elections were falsified and fraudulent, which is what they've been claiming, and U. S. Officials have now weighed in late On Thursday, President Biden made his first public remarks on the military takeover. And he called out those in power just to note U. S official policy is to use the country's former name of Burma. They say that they use Myanmar as a courtesy in certain communications. But here's what President Biden said the Burmese military should relinquish power they have seized Release the advocates and activist and officials they have detained, lift the restrictions on telecommunications and refrain from violence. Nancy President Biden also threatened new sanctions. We know the United Nations has also condemned the coup. What's the latest that we know about what exactly is unfolding on the ground in Myanmar? And what happens next? So let's start with on the ground. We've seen that the government is blocked Facebook after residents there started posting photos of people banging pots and pans and support of on sushi on Santucci of people hold up three fingers, Hunger games reference, signaling resistance. And it's a big deal there because Facebook is used by half the population is the most dominant social media platform. And, of course, um, it's signals and effort to suppress any protest. This is Relatively, Um uh On the streets of Milan, where we haven't seen protests. I think the way that some would expect out of fear and this was sort of the first step towards speaking out and the military controlled government shut that down immediately. You mentioned sanctions earlier in the world response. What's been interesting as we've seen sort of two tranches of responses. If you will, from the U. S and the EU and France. We've seen a demand that that the On song She she and her colleagues be released. But we've seen from other countries in the region in particular, stop short of that and say that they want the Sustainment of sort of a democratic system in Myanmar. The most. I think important response comes from Japan because they have close ties with Myanmar, and in the last years, Japanese businesses have expanded their investment there. We saw protests in Tokyo in response to what happened. They're calling for their government to do more, but from the government's perspective, they see sanctions as something that could push me and mark closer to China. And what was interesting is the top government spokesman there sidestepped that question about whether they Japanese government would support sanctions. And so I think Japan will be the leader in terms of setting the world reactions. Response. In Myanmar specifically whether sanctions are effective. And, uh, um, effective response or not, and remind our listeners that saying passed sanctions were against the very military commanders who who launched this coup so that certainly as a data point, an indicator of How effective they could be well. Meanwhile, a crackdown in Russia has also caught the world's attention. Street protests last weekend led to more than 5000 people being arrested on Tuesday, Another 1400 people were detained for supporting jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. America's new Secretary of state, Tony Blinken, was asked earlier this week to respond to allegations made by the Kremlin of quote unquote gross interference by the United States. Here's what he told NBC's Andrea Mitchell. The Russian government makes a big mistake. If it believes that this is about us, it's not. It's about them. It's about the government. It's about the frustration. That the Russian people have with corruption with kleptocracy should the U. S sanction the backers of Vladimir Putin as punishment for what has already happened to the volley. Actually, we're revealing a serious of Russian actions that are deeply deeply disturbing, Nancy. We know President Biden had his first phone call with Putin last week. We know he's taken a tougher stance. You hear Blinken saying they're reviewing all of these actions. How much pressure can the U s exert right now? Well, that's an interesting question, because, um, technically, we could see more sanctions on on Russian response to this. Um, but the balance I think is on one hand supporting democratic exercises of speech and other processes happening in Russia. At the same time, you'll hear Russians exploit that and say, and call Navalny, a Russian agent in their push to signal to their population that Navalny does not speak for for the Russian people. And so I think that's the sort of fine line that the U. S will find itself. Trying to walk. I think in the most in the more immediate period, we could see more sanctions, but again are those effective and stopping what Russia seizes as one of the biggest threats to Putin's Putin's tenure. Reminder. We are speaking with Nancy Yusef from the Wall Street Journal. Joyce Karen, Washington correspondent for the National, and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic, while another piece of news from Russia that gave some reason to pause last year, Russia was the first to claim It had come up with a covert 19 vaccine this week. Results published by The Lancet in the UK said that the Sputnik five vaccine gives around 92% protection against covert 19. We've pulled this clip from August of last year. That just gives you an idea of how quickly Russia moved on developing a vaccine. CNN spoke then to cure. Oh, the Mitri a view was chief executive officer of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, which backed Sputnik fives, development. I've given it, Toto off my 74 year old parents. So time will tell. If it doesn't work. You'll be building a major embarrassment. Flower tells ministry lots of people jobs will build the line and you have to understand. How do you get the bureaucrats in the health Ministry to approve something like this? Unless the science is really solid unless the tracker profound platform is very solid. Choice. You heard him say,.

Myanmar Nancy President Biden Vladimir Putin Nancy Yusef Myanmar Police president Russia Indira Lakshmanan Wall Street Journal Alexei Navalny Russian government National Geographic Tony Blinken Song Souci senior executive Facebook Cheese National League for Dem U. S Joyce Carol
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:58 min | 10 months ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The PBS news hour in for Jenn White in Washington after a coup on Monday. Teachers and doctors are now part of growing protests against the military and Myanmar. They aren't the only country facing unrest. Thousands have been arrested during anti Putin protests in Russia. Diplomats are now being expelled, and India's government tried to squash demonstrations there with a massive Internet blackout. How will the U. S handle all this? We'll see if Joe Biden gave us any hints during his first public remarks on foreign policy since becoming president. Joining us this week are Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Nancy. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me Joyce Carol is also with us. She's Washington correspondent for the National Choice. Happy Friday. Welcome back. Do you two and them and we are thrilled to welcome back. Indira Lakshmanan Sheas, senior executive editor at National Geographic, Indira, Great to have you back Great to be here on the Well. On Thursday, President Biden announced plans to halt US support for a Saudi led military offensive in Yemen. This war has to end And to underscore our commitment. We're ending all American support for offensive operations in the war in Yemen, including relevant arms sales. Now that move fulfills a promise that Biden made on the campaign trail. Nancy for those who haven't been following along with the details. What has been the impact of that Saudi backed offensive in Yemen? What are they doing? And why was the US supporting them? So the Saudi led coalition was fighting a war against the Iranian backed Houthi is in Yemen. It is lead to a catastrophic human disaster there. A quarter of a million people killed mostly by starvation and real no real progress and the status of governance in that country. And so many blame the United States for the exacerbation of The human rights catastrophe there, And on day again, it became a proxy war for regional control. And so I think there was a feeling that the United States effort hadn't led to any enduring gains for any aside, but rather protracted this conflict in which Millions of civilians found themselves in the middle and then see when you say many blame the US. What do we mean, when we talk about support weapons money? What? So it started as intel sharing, helping coordinate strike campaigns, And the problem was that many saw those strikes rather than killing. Um Houthi back rebels, military leaders. Killing civilians. And then the remember the story back in the Obama administration and then the United States push back a little bit and by 2018 and halted, um It's a aerial support of four for those strikes and has really retracted since then, but in the early phases of the war, rather than sort of gearing Saudi Arabia some salt as enabling a military campaign that was doing more harm to civilians than two adversaries. Well, Joyce Biden's national security advisor Jake Sullivan, says the U. S. Plans to quote, play a more active and engaged role in the diplomacy. Efforts to end that conflict. What role is the U. S currently playing on that front? What would change? Yes. And the full sure e mean what we saw yesterday from the administration. The whole thing of the offensive support. We still don't know. Actually what they mean by that, For example, the Saudis considered all their war efforts as defensive. So does that mean our sales? Does that mean drone supplies or internal sharing? We don't know yet to what Sullivan said yesterday. I think what came out from the administration. The appointment off Tim Lender King as envoy to the war in Yemen is significant by the Biden. Team. This is the first American envoy that will be addressing the conflict for those who know him. He hey, has worked on the Middle East on middle at the State Department. Since 1993. So he's definitely eyes in your figure in that role, but at the same time, you know, saying we're holding support we want to resolve the conflict is easier. Said. Then done. I mean, as Nancy mentioned, it's a big humanitarian catastrophe Catastrophe. Um you have, for example, save the Children estimates that 85,000 year many Children. Under the age of five have died since 2015 in Yemen, so American policymakers have to address the humanitarian problem ongoing in Yemen. But they also have to bring all the many stakeholders to the table. Those have different interests between the northerners and the southerners, and at the same time work with the tribes and with the outside stakeholders, including Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Hopefully we already beginning off complicated diplomatic process to get to a settlement for the four year war over there. Indira Nancy mentioned the Hootie's the Trump Administration. We should remind people had labeled Houthi rebels, a terror organization that Biden administration says it wants to review that decision just to remind folks who are the Hootie's. What should we know about them? Right? The HOUTHI czar tribe in Yemen who have gotten support in this war from Iran. And that is really the reason why, you know the sort of irony here. Beneath all of this is that it was under the Bide administration and Tony Blinken, now secretary of state. But you know, President Biden's long time Ah, foreign policy adviser. It was during the Obama administration that Iran allied Hootie forces took over Yemen's capital in the fall of 2014. And it was at that time that the Obama administration perhaps somewhat reluctantly, but they did go along with supporting the Saudis, with all the kinds of weaponry, logistical and intelligence support that Nancy outlined. On DSA. So you know the Saudis as well as the Gulf allies, including the U. A. E. The United Arab Emirates began all these airstrikes bought all these billions of dollars of American weaponry, and the idea was to oust the Hootie rebels from northern Yemen. Part of the issue here is that I think the Obama administration went along with supporting, you know Saudi Arabia and U A E on this because Iran you know the Iran nuclear deal was ongoing in 2015..

Yemen President Biden Indira Nancy Saudi Arabia Obama administration US Washington Nancy Yusef Indira Lakshmanan Sheas Iran Myanmar Jake Sullivan India Russia Jenn White Putin intel Middle East president
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

"With Nancy Yusef from the Wall Street Journal. Joyce Carol, Washington correspondent for the National and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. Well another piece of news from Russia that gave some reason to pause Last year, Russia was the first to claim it had come up with a covert 19 vaccine. This week. Results published by The Lancet in the UK said that the Sputnik five vaccine gives around 92% protection against Cove in 19. Now we've pulled this clip from August of last year. That just gives you an idea of how quickly Russia moved on developing a vaccine. CNN spoke then to Kyoto. The Mitri of you was chief executive officer of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, which backed Sputnik fives, development. I've given it to do off my 74 year old parents. So time will tell. If it doesn't work. You'll be building a major embarrassment to our health ministry. Lots of people. Jobs will build the line and you have to understand. How do you get the bureaucrats in the health Ministry to approve something like this? Unless the science is really solid unless the tracker profile platform is very solid. Choice. You heard him say, time will tell. There seems to be little doubt now that Russia did do something right and did to it faster than anyone else. A number of experts did cast doubt on their claims early on where they wrong. I mean, Russia definitely took a risk in releasing the vaccine before the face trialing number three was was completed, but but the news we saw on the Lancet article, I think it's good news for global immunity. We already have 15 countries that are using the Sputnik vaccine for emergency. Purposes. But as you said, I'm not. There are still unanswered questions from scientists and experts, basically that the trial design did not follow international standards for safety and efficacy, and that that was an issue all along. The second issue was the lack of transparency on that the positive findings were presented without the level off detail needed And appropriate the review that we saw with other vaccines approved by the FDA. For examples, the authors of the Lancet article. Actually, they do say that the trial and Moscow lacked ethnic diversity to make sure that the vaccine is safe on non white. Group. So the what we saw with you know, 91.6% is good news, but we don't have enough data at this point. And, uh, the U. S and Britain are saying today that they're not in a hurry to approve the Sputnik vaccine Joyce given some of those concerns around Russia's processes, are there other concerns about some of the other countries you mentioned who are using it for emerging See purposes now. We haven't seen many red flags, for example, from the U, a E or Argentina that are using this vaccine, but it's still you know front when it comes to the U. S. When it comes to Europe on Lee. Handful off countries have approved it, so I think the jury is still out. But they have good reference. Now with the last set, uh You know, uh, approving them, and, uh, commanding their their efforts. I'm on the Nova's. You're listening to one, eh? Reminder. We are speaking with Nancy use of from the Wall Street Journal. Joyce Carol, Washington correspondent for the National and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. On Wednesday, the United States and Russia agreed to extend a crucial nuclear arms control treaty until 2026. That agreement was due to expire today. Indira. That treaty is called the Start Treaty. Tell us what we need to know about it and what you took away from that announcement. Yeah, absolutely. It's really some of the biggest news this week. I did want to just add one thing to the good information that Joyce was giving us about the Russian Sputnik five vaccine, which is from a scientific point of view, one thing that's really interesting about That vaccine is that it is a different process. It's a regimen that uses two different, harmless cold viruses called the dental viruses, as opposed to the M R N a technology being used by Madonna Fizer by on tech, which were approved here in the U. S. And so it's really interesting. If that turns out to be, um, a good and valid vaccine, which the Lancet reports seems to show. We've written a lot about this, um at National Geographic about the science, but Find it. And obviously the whole world wants to broaden the number of vaccines that are available, particularly in poor countries, and the Russian vaccine is one that was being used in a low income country and guinea in West Africa on the start treaty. This is really interesting because the Trump administration Somewhat controversially in the last months of it's administration was basically trying to use its leverage on the renewal of the U. S. Russia New Start Accord which verifies limits on Russian and American intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine launched ballistic missiles. And heavy bombers, and essentially, the Trump Administration was trying to say We're not going to renew this deal unless you bring in all of your nuclear posture into this, and they wanted to make it a three way treaty with China's nuclear arsenal included in it, too. Which, by the way is not a bad idea, because right now the world knows about Russia and the United States checking each other, But you know, there are no checks on China and that respect. Um but but, you know, Joe Biden had campaigned, saying he was going to renew it. Without conditions, and he did renew it for five years until 2026. So when the good news side of the ledger it does keep in place this mutual verification regime in the could be better side of the ledger. It certainly would be better toe have you no more visibility into other forms of you know, nuclear weapons? From Russia. But I think this was seen as an important thing because there's so much tension in the US Russian relationship over cyber Navalny, um so many other things on but Trump administration harder. He pulled out of two other treaties that were designed to reduce the chances of accidental war. Nancy Let me ask you about Indira's mentioning their of us trying to bring China into this there. A man who represents the U. S on the UN's disarmament conferences, Ambassador Robert Wood on Thursday He called for a new arms control, Dr. Saying quote the United States will also seek to engage China on nuclear arms control and risk reduction as Indira just mentioned. Nancy when it comes to nuclear weapons. Is there any sign that China might be ready to come in from the cold? Well, I mean, they conversation started between the United States and China under the Trump administration, and it really stalled. There was no indication that China was, um, um, ready to jump on immediately. I think, um, well, Ambassador Woods Commons are illuminating. I think that the devil becomes in the details in terms of who's going to lead those negotiations. How aggressively will they go after them? I think this will be a long term effort. Rather than one that can be turned around immediately. I think on one hand, China wants to be seen and respected as an international player in treaters like this, But I think the indication so far is that it will play tough in terms of the specifics of the of the deal itself. Well, you're listening to the Friday news round up. We're speaking with Nancy Yusef from The Wall Street Journal with Joyce Carom, Washington correspondent for.

Russia Indira Lakshmanan Nancy Yusef United States Trump Administration China The Lancet National Geographic The Wall Street Journal Joyce Carol Joyce health Ministry Washington CNN senior executive Kyoto UK editor chief executive officer
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In American energy, biotech AI advanced materials, etcetera. Large scale government research investment in research, all of which would give the United States more leverage in its negotiations with China and efforts to in the long term address these long standing decades Long's practices by China about stealing I P and forced technology transfers, etcetera. Returning to you. Other news this week. The killing of Iran's top nuclear scientists called these calls the international fall out. In the weeks since Iran's president Hassan Rouhani has said the country will take revenge against those responsible but in its own time share a real fashion initialed Medic. This Savage Act shows that our enemies feel that global conditions are changing, and it's important for them to make the most of the remaining few weeks that they have to create uncertain conditions in the region. But our brave nation is smart. And to fall into the trap of Zionists. Jennifer who was the man killed and what do we know about what happened? So he was basically you said a top level nuclear scientist and was essentially the architect of Iran's nuclear program. You know, he you know, was one of the kind of Main leading thinkers and and scientists behind kind of the high level technology in terms of enrichment of uranium, and s. So we're talking about the nuclear program rather than the military kind of missile program. But what we know so far is not much in terms of you know what actually happened. The Forest News agency, which is Iran is kind of state run news agency. Has made some pretty strong claims about what actually happened. It seems that there was a remote controlled machine gun that was used. It's not totally clear what actually happened. Whether whether it was exactly the case or not, in terms of who was behind it, right. We don't have anyone who's publicly claimed responsibility for it. Of course, Iran has already blamed Israel. Israel does have a long history of being known to be involved in the assassination of Iranian nuclear scientists. This is Nothing new. This is a something they have been involved in for a long time for many years, so it's very likely that Israel's behind it, but there is no official claim, and they're likely never will be. But we do know is, you know that Iran is very angry about this. This was a very dramatic escalation. In terms of the nuclear program directly. This is it a strike. You know, within Iran on, you know a essentially a civilian, though involved in a very highly technical, military scientific endeavor. But this was very much a very serious kind of escalation here, so we're going to see a lot of fall out. It's the Friday news round up. We're here with Jennifer Williams, senior foreign editor at box and co host of the podcast, Worldly Robert Moore, The Washington correspondent for ITV News in the UK, and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at the National Geographic will be back with more in just a moment. I'm Jenn White. This is one, eh? Celebrate 25 Years of cake, You ladies, The California report with a live stream event on December 8th featuring California stories, music and beloved show alums like NPR's Tamara Keith and KQED Scott Shaffer on We Want.

Iran Israel Jennifer Williams Long Forest News agency China United States California NPR Jenn White Indira Lakshmanan Hassan Rouhani Tamara Keith ITV News scientist editor president UK Scott Shaffer
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What will it take to To shift this forward to get this moving in a forward direction. Or the real worry is that Boris Johnson eyes not just the prime minister of Britain and therefore interested in Britain's best interest in getting a good deal. He's also the leader of the Conservative Party, and it's a conservative party that he turned into an overwhelmingly Hardline pro Brexit posit. That's how he won the party leadership. And that's how he wanted something majority by picking up working class British seats that had not voted conservative for a long time because they liked his idea of kind of taking back control and sorting out Brexit and getting Brexit done so he is juggling. Not just the national interest but also fairly shabby political interests that he can't be seen to back down and be humiliated Watch, which is why we're seeing this small but in, you know, symbolic sexual fish coming so important if you are an optimist, and there are very small band of optimists left In London when it comes to Brexit. Then maybe Boris Johnson because he has this credibility as a kind of you know Churchillian figures, saying that Britain's glorious future outside Brexit outside Europe will be kind of The best thing that's ever happened to us that maybe he's the guy who conceal Actually a compromise to his more hardline fanatical supporters. But people are leaving it or feel it and one of the really dangerous things. It's because it seemed like a smart idea for successive conservative leaders to say to the country that No deal is better than a bad deal, which just isn't true. The British public heard that all right, Okay, so no deal isn't as bad as all that. But it really would be unbelievably destructive and you will be back talking in a year about Lori cues several 1000 long as Trucks can deliver food to British supermarkets. The whole deal with Jennifer very briefly. I have to ask you mentioned Boris Johnson eyeballing a trade deal with the U. S. We might have Ah, New President after this presidential election. Where does that fit in? Yeah, it looks like that. You know Boris Johnson and Donald Trump. We're kind of getting fairly chummy. They certainly have similar kind of political ideologies. In terms of portraying themselves as thes populists, trying to restore their countries to greatness again looks like Boris Johnson and his his allies were starting to kind of hedge their bets. And definitely reached out to the Biden campaign and say, Hey, just in case he is our president. You want to have a chat? Eso. It's definitely something that is top of mind for Boris Johnson on DH whose party right now. Well, it's head to China next, a country that continues to bounce back from Corona virus. It saw its economy grow by just under 5% between July and September compared to the same quarter last year. David, you can imagine the Chinese Communist Party must be happy giving the liking performance of other world economies. Is this GDP figure giving us the full picture? It is, And it's not just a kind of a zoo say nearly 5% by historic Chinese sounds, that's pretty slow, but it's amazingly higher than other countries. It's also slightly more balanced recovery than the second quarter of the year. So when they had their first recordings, they sort of People talk about a V shaped recovery. If you imagine the graph with kind of the shop down in the shop up the beginning of that V shaped recovery the previous quarter there was a real concern. Most of that was coming from things like big ticket infrastructure, spending the government basically opening the spending taps and starting to build stuff. And factories coming backto work. Remember, the big difference here is we had an incredibly tight lock down with hundreds of millions of Chinese basically staying indoors for several weeks in February March. And that basically killed the virus just died out here, So we haven't really had a serious covet outbreak here that allowed factory workers and construction workers to go back. But that was a very imbalanced recover. You weren't seeing people coming back to the shops. You weren't seeing people coming back to restaurants, tourism all of those service sectors. People are too scared to come out and spend. This latest number looks a lot healthier because we're now seeing, you know, we just had a weeklong national holiday the beginning of October. The country was not quite as full as usual, but hundreds of millions of people went out when I was at the Shanghai disciplines like and tell you I killed a long time with my teenager to get under any ride. It felt like a recovery in full swing, so They are very proud of themselves. They're certain things proves the superiority of Chinese communist rule. I think there's in that a really interesting political difficulty for them, which is that I think for a lot of governments that are still in economic agony. Who believe that China at least, was way too slow and cover this up in the beginning, and maybe, as a result caused this pandemic to see China boasting about doing so well now is pretty provocative. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? It's the Friday News round up with David Renny Beijing bureau chief for the Economist. Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at the National Geographic and Jennifer Williams, senior foreign editor at box Well a little closer to home. The news about China wasn't all about how much money the country is making more who might be making money out of the country. Can you imagine a fire that a secret Chinese bank account When I was running for re election? You think Fox News might have been a little concerned about that they would have called me. Beijing, Barry. Indira President. Obama couldn't resist talking about this story first reported this week by The New York Times. Can you quickly help us fill in the blanks? Right, So The New York Times has been, you know, really looking into Donald Trump's taxes in a way that no one has been able to no one else because Trump himself has not released them. But they have obviously gotten them from trusted sources and have been able to go through many, many years worth of his taxes. And one of the things they found out is that Donald Trump, who spent a decade trying to pursue business projects in China, but not having much success. Actually, he had forged a partnership with a major Chinese government controlled company that he had this, you know, unreported, unknown to the U. S Public bank account in China, which was held under Trump International Hotel's management, which is why it was not on his own financial disclosure records. Which have to list personal assets but not corporate assets. What's fascinating about this is the tax records show that he paid $188,561 in taxes to the Chinese government while pursuing licensing deals there in just two years from 2013 to 2015. Which is so many orders of magnitude beyond the taxes that he paid in the U. S. According to his tax filings that the New York Times has made public and gotten hold of and verified, so that is stunning in its own. You heard those who were listening to the debate last night. Heard it come up in the debate. A little bit of backstory is that Trump had pursued an office tower project in Guangzhou that never got off the ground. He tried to open a Shanghai office in 2012 claimed $84,000 in deductions that year, So that is something we know. He also has company accounts in Britain and Ireland as well for his golf courses, etcetera. Well, Jennifer, it again raises questions about exactly what President Trump has been doing with his money, and the truth is We don't really know. Right..

Boris Johnson Donald Trump China Britain Jennifer Williams Conservative Party Brexit Shanghai David Renny Beijing Chinese Communist Party President London Europe The New York Times Trump International Hotel Indira President prime minister Fox News
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Guests this week, or Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic, Jennifer Williams, senior foreign editor at box and David Renny, the Beijing bureau chief for the Economist. On Wednesday, the director of National intelligence, John Radcliffe, delivered a briefing on US election threats and he revealed that Iran and Russia are trying to interfere. You said the U. S. Now believes Iranian and Russian operatives have obtained voter record information and are using it to intimidate voters and sow distrust. Jennifer. What are some of the instances of election interference that the intelligence community communities reporting right now? Right. So one of the big incidents recently where these thes e mails that were sent to some voters in Florida and a couple other places that claimed to be from the proud boys. Now, this is that far right organization You may remember in Trump's Town Hall recently, hey, was asked whether he denounced them. Hey, kind of was wishy washy on that He had previously said that they should stand standby and basically stand ready, He says he met that they should stand down, but they essentially kind of took it. Is this rally and cried that they should go to the polls and, you know, help guard Against whatever kind of, you know shenanigans Trump thinks is going to happen on election Day. But so that's the kind of background in this group. So a bunch of voters seem to have gotten these emails saying that they were from the proud boys that they were really threatening. They could've bizarrely said things like, you know, we have your voter information. We know you're a registered Democrat. You better go and change your registration to Republican and vote for Trump. And if you don't we'll know and we'll reveal all your information and we can get you You better take this seriously is really this like odd over the top kind of Is our email on DH. It turns out that according t U S intelligence officials those were actually sent buys People affiliate with Iranian government trying, Tio. And the idea was not that people would actually go do that would actually switched their affiliations from Democratic to Republican. According to officials. They believe it was essentially meant to harm trump into further tie trump closely to this far right organization. Kind of paint him is, you know, catering to these extremists. There was also eat within some of these emails. There was a link. To a video that seems to be disinformation that was essentially trying Teo to show that there was some sort of fraud. But the's federal ballots a mail in voting turns out not to be true. The video was sent to Metallica's Enter, understand, man. Yet so Iran is putting together disinformation videos listening to Metallica, apparently, and that's where we are in the 2020 election. But you know if it's really bizarre, but it's also kind of these ham handed attempts to To do this kind of meddling that we saw. And you know, according to intelligence officials and experts, Russia is still much better at this. You know, they're much better at having these kind of more insidious, more legitimate looking kind of interferences. And we saw the creation of this. So ostensibly a progressive new site called Peace Data. Turns out it was actually backed by the Russian government that they had hired all these kind of American bloggers who are thought they were just writing for a progressive news site, And that's the kind of level that Russia is operating at. Versus these kind of bizarre videos and emails that Iran sent. Everyone immediately was like, Okay, there's something smells off these dear, have Iran. Russia responded to these allegations. They have not other than denying it. I mean, there was an official denial that came out of Iran's U. N office. But you know this is not the first time is Jennifer says that Russia, Iran and by the way, China have all been accused by U. S intelligence agencies. Of doing all sorts of things from probing various local voting systems. You know, we know that Russia did this in 2016 without necessarily going in and actually changing votes, but probing where the weaknesses were so Again is, Jen says. I think the bigger threat is from Russia's state. Hackers targeting dozens of state and local governments, apparently also aviation network starting in September. Which raises eyebrows and you know, makes makes everyone worry there. According to the FBI and homeland security officials, they stole data. From at least two unidentified people's computer servers, and we're crawling through affected networks. You know part of this attacking voting related systems. As I said, It's not even that They're necessarily changing votes, but they're certainly sewing concern and worry and undermining The credibility of and trust in our voting system. The fact that we're even talking about this on a national NPR program means you know, people are worried people are thinking about it. People are going to worry about whether their vote was counted. You know, there is a greater concern that on election night itself If the presidential race is not called quickly that these Russian groups could deface websites, they could release nonpublic information or they could do other things sowing chaos. And remember, this is all against the backdrop. Of a president Donald Trump, who in 2016 was using the word rigged and fraud all along. Even after he won. He was arguing that the vote was rigged and that there was fraud and that people who voted for Hillary Clinton had actually voted for him, even though he won, so I do think we have to keep a really hard I on this. I know the government is doing so and being more public about it Surveillance Intelligence agencies. I mean, I'm not quite understanding how this is hurting trump thes, You know, websites that air saying or these emails that air saying you must vote for Trump. But I see Jen's argument that people are saying well that affiliates him with those extremist groups. I think the real question is to make sure first of all, By the way. A lot of that information that was released is public. A lot of voter registration information your affiliation with your party. Your address. All of that is publicly available so you wouldn't need to hack into any system. To find that in a lot of cases, But the really important thing is for authorities to keep watch on this and make sure that vote's themselves are not changed and and that there isn't sort of further distrust in the system being so during the elections well during the press conference, DNA Iraq Cliff, make sure to let the American people know that their votes are safe. These actions are desperate attempts By desperate adversaries, even if the adversaries pursue further in attempts to intimidate or attempt to undermine voter confidence. Know that our election systems are resilient. And you can be confident your votes are secure. Let's move along to some other news, A documentary about Pope Francis made monumental news during its premiere at the Rome Film Festival on Wednesday in the documentary for the first time as the leader of the Catholic Church. He revealed that he's in favor of same sex civil unions. David tell us more about what the pope said. All. He was being interviewed about a whole bunch of things to do with kind of big moral issues and how his views have changed over the years since he was a reasonably progressive, at least liberal, sending archbishop of Argentina when it came to the question about same sex unions. What he said, which clearly made big headlines was what we have to create a civil union law. That way they're legally covered. Of course why that is so interesting and resonates with people is that it plays into what we know about Pope Francis, which is that, although he hasn't actually dramatically shifted The Catholic Church doctrine that, for example, same sex marriage would be unacceptable to the Catholic Church. And although he has never actually said that he thinks it's a it's a non sinful lifestyle. What is what is offered? Is this very kind of forgiving, humane voice that who are we to judge Remember that comment that he made about about gay people, the very beginning of his Papacy? So this comment about offering this kind of legal cover of a civil union that doesn't involve the church, Endorsing the idea of gay marriage plays into that idea that, within the constraints of someone who actually is on Orthodox sort of figure in terms of doctrine tries to inject as much humanity intolerance. Into that doctrine, as he can that that that resonates to think what's fascinating is that seems to now the backstory..

Donald Trump Iran Russia Jennifer Williams fraud David Renny Florida Jen Indira Lakshmanan Metallica Beijing Russian government US editor Catholic Church Pope Francis director Town Hall National Geographic
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

"I mean, I I'm not quite understanding how this is hurting trump thes, You know, websites that air saying or these emails that air saying you must vote for Trump. But I see Jen's argument that people are saying well, that Affiliates him with those extremist groups. I think the real question is to make sure first of all, by the way. A lot of that information that was released is public. A lot of voter registration information your affiliation with your party. Your address. All of that is publicly available so you wouldn't need to hack into any system. To find that in a lot of cases, But the really important thing is for authorities to keep watch on this and make sure that vote's themselves are not changed and and that there isn't sort of further distrust in the system being so during the elections well during the press conference, DNA I Ratcliffe made sure to let the American people know that their votes are safe. These actions are desperate attempts. By desperate adversaries, even if the adversaries pursue further in attempts to intimidate or attempt to undermine voter confidence. Know that our election systems are resilient and you can be confident your votes. Are secure. Well, let's move along to some other news, A documentary about Pope Francis made monumental news during its premiere at the Rome Film Festival on Wednesday in the documentary for the first time as the leader of the Catholic Church, He revealed that he's in favor of same sex civil unions. David tell us more about what the pope said. Or he was being interviewed about the whole bunch of things to do with kind of big moral issues and how his views have changed over the years since he was a reasonably progressive, at least liberal sounding archbishop of Argentina. And when it came to the question about same sex unions what he said, which clearly made big headlines was, what we have to create is a civil union law. That way they're legally covered. Of course why that is so interesting and resonates with people is that it plays into what we know about Pope Francis. Which is that, although he hasn't actually Dramatically shifted the Catholic Church doctrine that, for example, same sex marriage would be unacceptable to the Catholic Church. And although he has never actually said that he The sort of things it's a It's a non sinful lifestyle. What is what is offered? Is this very kind of forgiving, humane voice that who are we to judge Remember that comment that he made about about people the very beginning of his Papacy? So this comment about offering this kind of legal cover of a civil union that doesn't involve the church, Endorsing the idea of gay marriage plays into that idea that within the constraints of someone who actually is unorthodox sort of figure in terms of doctrine tries to inject as much humanity intolerance. Into that doctrine, as he can that that that resonates to think what's fascinating is that seems to now be a backstory. So this new documentary, which has this quote from the pope, presented by the documentary maker as a new interview given to him. There is now reporting that there's actually was said by the pope in 2019 to the big Mexican TV station, Televisa to television as ah, very well known, very veteran, well respected and well connected Vatican correspondent and when she interviewed the pope in 2019, the vast insisted on having using their cameras and having the power to edit the footage, and it seems now certain, according to Televisa. That he actually said this coming about civil unions in that interview, But at the time, the Vatican's editors silently cut it out. So how that gets off the cutting room floor now? Into this new documentary is a fascinating mystery. Well, Nancy emailed us with this. I disagree that the pope has made a big change in his thinking. He is still demanding a second class method of civil union instead of a regular marriage, how many Catholics and non LGBTQ people would find that an acceptable alternative to marriage? He's still encouraging fewer rights for a lot of people. And dear. How are other leaders of the Catholic Church Reacting to this Yeah, it seems as David said that that the Vatican decided this was the time that it was okay to disclose this. I do want to give some important backstory here, which is that a decade ago in 2010, Argentina, legalized same sex marriage and as people remember, Pope Francis was then an Argentine cardinal named Jorge Bergoglio and he said That same sex marriage was a destructive attack on God's plan. But at the same time that year in meetings with other Argentine bishops, he urged them to support civil unions as a way to keep marriage distinctly between a man and a woman. So he had already for a decade. As far as we know, supported civil unions as an alternative, there's been some, you know, Let's say pretty in the weeds debate over this over this interview because in the clip the pope in Spanish uses the term convinced CIA Seville Which literally means civil cohabitating. So some people are saying he's not actually supporting civil union. But in fact, in Argentina that term convince US evil is used interchangeably with civil union and the archbishop of La Plata, Argentina. You know, reaffirmed that this week so In fact, the pope has even once he became pope has spoken positively about civil unions for same sex couples and interviews in 2014 2017. Perhaps even now, we know in 2019 But it hasn't been as strong as the footage that was released. Now. I also think it's important to remember, though, that there is no altering of official doctrine back in 2003, the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith, which was run by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who later became Pope Benedict Actually came right out and, you know, did not support gay marriage and that has not been changed. But certainly this pope has been much more tolerant and accepting. Remember when he said that famous statement Who am I to judge about gay priests, and he's talked about God loving LGBT. You know, people and families. So I think this is a big step and, most importantly, a big step that the Vatican is officially willing tto let the footage be out there. I'm Jen. Right here. Listening to one, eh? It's the Friday news round up. We're talking to Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. Jennifer Williams, senior foreign editor at box and David Ready Beijing bureau chief for the economists..

Pope Francis Argentina Catholic Church Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger David Trump Jen Televisa Ratcliffe editor Indira Lakshmanan David Ready Beijing Nancy Rome Film Festival La Plata CIA Jennifer Williams
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We'll talk about whether and how schools should reopen. If you're a parent or student. How do you feel about your school's reopening plan? Are you happy with it? Leave us a voicemail. 8552361 A one A. If you're a teacher, How do you feel about the choice of returning to school in person or teaching entirely remote? Tell us your story. 8552361 A one. A. You can send us an audio file with our at one a box pop, and we'll share some of your stories. Monday on one A. Let's get back to the roundup with Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal, and from the PBS NewsHour. Nick Shifrin. I'm going to apologize for this ahead of time. The rain in Spain might have stayed mainly on the plain, but the former king has not Indira one, Carlos abdicated the throne in favour of his son six years ago. Why's he now fled the country. Right. He's fled the country because of a number of court investigations into business contracts and also a money laundering and tax evasion probe happening outside of Spain in Switzerland. So very embarrassing. He essentially has you know there is a $100 million gift that was given by the king of Saudi Arabia to a foundation that the king is linked to in Panama, and prosecutors are trying to figure out whether that $100 million was connected to the awarding of a contract. It's Spanish companies got to build a high speed rail link between the Saudi cities of Medina and Mecca. There's another foundation that's being investigated that's registered in Liechtenstein, and investigators are trying to find out. How did it get so much wealth? But you know, King Juan Carlos is a really interesting character. Because he's been very much a fixture in Spanish life for the last 45 years. He came to power right after the death of Franco the long time decades long dictator, But surprisingly, he actually helped usher the country into democracy. And you know, he's had a mixed record because in recent years he's had a lot of lovers and these investigations and questions about his spending, so it has now turned from not just embarrassment over him. But questions about the role of the monarchy in general because the junior coalition partner in Spain's Coalition government is a leftist party that wants to abolish the monarchy anyway and turn Spain into a republic. Nancy does anyone know where he is and what the future looks like for him? Well. The initial suggestion was that he went to Portugal. That doesn't appear to be the case, then the Dominican Republic until the foreign minister there said he was not in the Dominican Republican. Just before we went on the air. There was a report that he was in Abu Dhabi. And so the short answer is we don't know. But the possible places keep changing around the world, and even as we're on the air, we might hear of other locations because he hasn't said where he's gone. If I could just had real quickly to the point earlier about, you know his his leading the Spain towards a democracy. I think an important point that sort of trailed him throughout his tenure is because He had come in at a time when the monarch who is quite weak, I think there was sort of a baked into that original transition towards democracy. And unwillingness to really look at the monarchy and its spending habits because there was such a fear that any sort of close examination could could undermine a fragile state and one that even now there are questions over it. And I think what we're studying Sesay unraveling that it started in 2008 during the financial crisis when the mark he was spending so much money, and this is a continuation that so it's an interesting shift that comes From when he came in, and there was sort of an unspoken rule that you didn't examine the monarchy to now. Well, let's turn toe Ireland. There's a lot to say about the Nobel Peace Prize winner, John Hume. Tributes this week poured in from presidents and prime ministers. The economist says the lawmaker from Northern island it more than anyone else to help bring an end to decades of sectarian bloodshed. India right remind us why John, who mattered so much to so many people write well. He was seen at a time when Ireland was going through the troubles, you know, meaning the conflicts between the Protestants and the Catholics in Northern Ireland, which did then and still belongs to great Britain. He was seen as a figure who actually was above it, all willing to make peace not based on sectarian concerns between Protestants and Catholics. He did win the Nobel Prizes. You said he was one of the architects of Northern Ireland's peace process in the 1998 Belfast agreement and a CZ you mentioned tributes have come in from the pope, the Dalai Lama, several U. S and U. K president's because of Corona virus. They were limited to only 120 people masked up in the cathedral for the ceremony. But he really was seen as someone who focused on unity and peace and was able to put those ideas above narrow Sectarian concerns were to give some idea about how revered he was by his own people. There's a mural in his hometown dairy that Puts his image alongside Martin Luther King Jr. Mother Teresa and Nelson Mandela, and this is part of a speech he gave after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. All conflict is about the same thing. No matter where it is, it's about difference. Whether differences your religion or your wrists or your nationality. And the message that we have to get across that we have learned in our part of the world is a difference is an accident of birth. Difference is of the essence of humanity. And they're for respect for difference should be very, very normal and very common. But it is a first And deepest principle of real peace. President Bill Clinton talked about his persistence and unshakable commitment to nonviolent Nancy. How much has changed since the Good Friday agreement that he helped bring about? Well, I think if you look at his funeral, his his son really got it. I think the biggest change, which is The the sort of unwillingness of politicians too. Put there the interests of their nation ahead of perhaps their own party interests in one night, If you'll indulge me quote from his son, he said, Central to Dad's work was his deep appreciation of human interdependency. We all need one another. We all have a role to play. All of our roles are of equal importance. You know it during this feud only talked he mentioned his son mentioned John Lewis and Martin Luther King Jr. And they think the biggest difference you see is the absence and hunger for politicians who are willing to to put the the greater good ahead of their own personal good. You know, one reason he He lost his role as leaders, his his willingness to bring in vain and that actually led to their growing popularity over his own. And I think that's sort of his enduring legacy that he was part of a class that was willing to Publicly condemn violence and privately do the tough negotiations and all looking towards a greater good. You could feel that in his during this funeral that hunger for that kind of leadership. Mick. John Hume was seemed to be the right man in the right place at the right time when you think about it. Peace processes is having a sort of central key figure like him. How important is that? To the success of those of those movements, he quoted Martin's for King. He used to say an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind and then added, We have to start spilling sweat, not blood. On DH, so his voice as a moderate Roman Catholic as of course, a political leader, but as a person who called for moderation, who also combined the kind of tactics That one needs in order to succeed at some of these some of these movements, he publicly criticized the violence of the.

Spain Martin Luther King Jr Nancy Yusef King Juan Carlos John Hume Indira Lakshmanan president Saudi Arabia Northern Ireland Dominican Republic Abu Dhabi Liechtenstein Portugal Nick Shifrin Ireland Medina Northern island India Franco National Geographic
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And from the listeners who support this NPR station. I'm Jen white. It's the Friday News round up on one A. Joining us this week are Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Nick Shifrin, Foreign affairs and defense correspondent for the PBS NewsHour and Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. Early Thursday, President Trump signed a new executive order banning US transactions with we chat and Tic tac. The ban will take effect in 45 days. Nick, You've been reporting on Tic Tac for PBS. What's going on? So this is a ban on quote any transaction that is related unquote to reach at or Tic Tac, which is obviously very generally written, and so we don't know exactly who it's going to affect. But the implications are enormous and so to go quickly Through each one, we chat. It's really targeting a service that is at the core of Chinese life. Chinese commerce every day activity in China Depends on we chat. And so it's not clear whether this will affect Chinese using it abroad Americans in China, but it's a very targeted point at something that is the core of Chinese society. On with TIC Tac. Of course, we've been seeing how Microsoft and Tic Tac or now in negotiations for Microsoft to buy it. It does give Microsoft incredible leverage. Tic tac that is not band is worth billions a tic tac that his band as with considerably less, but I think the larger story Is. This is the first time the US has really created a virtual wall or tried to create a virtual wall, similar, perhaps to China's great firewall, and it's a kind of technical Berlin wall and the U. S. Is beginning to divide the world up. In the countries that have American or European or Korean or Japanese technology and telecommunications and other countries that have Chinese technology and telecommunications. And that's accelerating. With this effort last night with the band does go into effective TIC Tac is and purchased by Microsoft. Does that mean the APP disappears in 45 days? I spoke with business leaders and people who watch technology from the business side, and they said most likely, you know, Instagram has already filed some patents for competition. To tick talk and is pushing ahead with some of the features that TIC Tac has done so well. Easy editing. Andi access to music on the U. S. Has 100 million customers on growing Andi will, you know, basically become zero. If Tic Tac's ban Tic Tac has almost a 1,000,000,000 customers worldwide, But there's increasing efforts by other countries to ban Tic Tac. On the other hand, if TIC Tac is bought by Microsoft than obviously it will thrive and so technologically You know, there are competitors. But Tic tac right now has on audience that Microsoft would love frankly, and the U. S government fears all of those, especially young people who are giving all their data over to tic tac That data gets siphoned up by Beijing on Chinese intelligence services. Indira. What kind of push back if any, are we seeing from these companies? Well, tick Tock already released a statement saying it was shocked by these executive orders. But I think to dig a little bit deeper. And what Nick just started to say about the Chinese app sort of sucking up data. People's private data. As we all know, Tic Tac is incredibly popular among us teenagers. And you know, there's the whole question of privacy. And the kids are using these APS and people of all ages are using these APS without realizing that all of their personal data, their location data, all sorts of stuff is getting, you know, basically sucked up by the company and the U. S government has legitimate concerns. About what that means for us national security. If you know the Chinese government is somehow monitoring Americans, whether it could be a tool for Surveillance for control or for even trying to recruit spies in this country, So there are some legitimate concerns about privacy there that are very riel. In addition to that, in the executive order, the White House gave the reason that the TIC Tac is being used and we chat is being used to disseminate content. That is in keeping with the Chinese Communist Party's agenda. And they sighted TIC tac videos that were spreading debunked conspiracy theories about the origin of the Corona virus, which is ironic in the sense that had social media accounts tied to the Trump campaign have actually just the same week been blocked on Facebook and Twitter. Had either the video removed or been blocked on Twitter until they remove and a video that is actually misinformation about Corona virus. But don't forget that. Also, Some people are pointing to the fact that there was an embarrassment earlier this summer in June in Tulsa when the Trump campaign thought they were gonna have a massive turnout for a campaign in campaign rally in Tulsa. And apparently possibly due to the efforts of teenagers across the world. Working together on Tic tac. They got massive registrations, but then had lots of empty seats. So some people think that there's also an element there of getting back at organizer's who've used to talk against him in that respect. We chat is a whole separate thing. Which people in China really rely on for everything in daily life payment. Communication. Getting news, you know, sending money talking shopping, and it's going to really put a strain on Chinese ex patriots, who, you know, use this method to communicate with their families back home. Likewise with businesses, of course. We'll. Also this week rare video surfaced from inside one of China's weaker detention camps. The video shows a man in a small room, he's handcuffed to a metal bed. Middle bed frame as messages about Shean Jane's history plays over the intercom, Nick, What do we know about the man in the video and and why he's there? So this is a model a weaker model who moved east of Xinjiang where he was born, which is all the way in western China Name Magadan got bar on. This is extremely rare, firsthand account inside Chinese detention, and to me, it makes a couple of points one. Weaker Zehr still being detained, Hey was forced to return to Shin John in January. The Chinese government claims there is no detention highlights also the awful conditions. We can see the small room that he's in his hands and feet shackled..

Tic Tac China Nick Shifrin Microsoft Chinese government executive Chinese Communist Party US NPR President Trump Jen white Indira Lakshmanan Nancy Yusef The Wall Street Journal Instagram senior executive reporter PBS National Geographic
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With a rescue and cleanup operation underway. We have a lot to discuss. Not just about the terrible impact of those living in the city. But the wider concerned about possible repercussions in the region also will catch up on the latest spat between Beijing and Washington, and we have the case of a missing king. Joining us this week are Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Nancy. Thanks for being here. Great to be with you also with us. Nick Shifrin, foreign affairs and defense correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, Nick. Welcome back. Thanks very much, and we're excited to welcome back. Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic, India, India, It's great to have you back too. Thanks, Jen. So first responders in Beirut are still looking for survivors after a massive explosion Tor, the city's port on Tuesday, at least 150 people are dead and another 5000 are injured. Hundreds of thousands are homeless. Indira. What do we know about how this happened? Well, we know that there was an explosion that seems to have been two explosions on dit was really caused by a 2750 ton stockpile of ammonium nitrate. Which is a really explosive chemical that is often used as a fertilizer. To have this amount of ammonium nitrate stored in a port is really kind of stunning and I'm sure we'll get to it, but it's linked to protests that we've now already seen in Beirut among Lebanese who are already upset about government corruption. Government mismanagement, political and economic problems. And this just looks like one thing on top of that. That since 2013 so we're talking seven years this ammonium nitrate has been stored in a warehouse at the port when a Russian owned vessel stopped in Beirut, and then the ship was abandoned. So how is it that for seven years this has been sitting there. And no one has done anything about it. Even though Port officials had apparently written many memos asking, how is this going to be disposed of? I mean, just to give listeners a general sense. This is essentially like fertilizer, which you know, we know is quite explosive. And National Geographic had a really interesting story out yesterday where we talked about Just all the chemistry behind this and why it was so deadly and it's happened before in other places in this country, and by the way listeners may remember the horrible Oklahoma City terrorist attack that was an intentional bombing, but it was made out for the same chemical ammonium nitrate will French President Emmanuel Macron visited Beirut on Thursday to mixed reactions. For the past years. Mick Howard. Lebanon's leaders responding Very defensively. I mean, this is a level of governance, apathy, governance and aptitude that that is simply difficult to comprehend. You know, as Indira was saying, this has been In the port for six or seven years, senior Customs officials are saying claiming that they warned about the danger of having so much Ammonium nitrate at the port, a handful of times the judiciary onto port officials, and they got no response. So many people in Lebanon are talking about a level of criminal negligence. Today, authorities say that they're going to Interview the head of the port, the head of customs on We'll see what comes of that. But at this point, the Lebanese people are so sick. Of a level of corruption and the love of kind of a corrupt core of the entire political class. And that's why this was recently compared to share noble. The idea that this exposes that corrupt core of the government could lead to government and falling again. We saw the government fall again fall last year, replaced by a technocratic successor. This year. Or we could just see increased anger that leads to no reform. But at the very least, this is proving eso awfully so tragically, some of the in confidence at the core of the Lebanese government Nancy talk a little bit more about what comes next with the layer the level of anger so high with the government even before this disaster, What are you going to be watching for in the region? That's a great question. And I should say I have almost bias has spent five holidayed in Lebanon as recently as last year and holds a very special place in my heart and so to see the devastation is just breathtaking. You got it earlier. You know this is a country where people were suffering tremendously before this explosion. This is a country ruled the value of its current had dropped by 80% in the last year. People were hungry. The Lebanese cannot afford. To do the kinds of repairs to their country to their city. In the wake of this bombing, many could not afford to eat before this, And so I think long term, the question becomes, Will we see fundamental changes in the government? In the system in Lebanon because we've heard about port officials being on house arrest or having their assets frozen, but those air sort of on the edges in terms of the issues in Lebanon, the fundamental issues governance. You were asking earlier about the Lebanese reaction on Ly, the Lebanese mayor has walked the streets. There's been no resignations. There's been no sort of out point, even the trash that people are gathering from the debris pile up, and there's no government trash service to pick it up. And so these air Corps problems with the the governance of the country, and so I think for the Lebanese unless there are fundamental changes to that Such that when someone reports thousands of tons of nitrate is near the city center that it's dealt with and not ignored repeatedly over and over again, and so, what we're looking for is whether we're going to see fundamental changes and how the system Operates. We're talking with Nancy use it from the Wall Street Journal. Nick Shifrin, foreign affairs correspondent for the PBS NewsHour and Indira Lakshmanan from National Geographic. We got this question from Susan, who wants to know Has Donald Trump make any comment in support of age for Lebanon and era? Well, what he has made. Comments on that have been quite controversial is he's talked about this probably being an attack, and that has concerned a lot of officials in the U. S government as well as our allies in Lebanon because there is no evidence that we know of at this point that this was an intentional use of this highly explosive fertilizer to turn it into a bomb. And three U. S. Defense secretary Mark Esper actually contradicted the president on Wednesday, saying that most people believe the explosion was an accident..

Lebanon Indira Lakshmanan Beirut Nancy Yusef Lebanese government Nick Shifrin Port The Wall Street Journal National Geographic PBS Beijing reporter Washington Jen Donald Trump air Corps Mick Howard India
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

"If you're a parent or student. How do you feel about your school's reopening plan? Are you happy with it? Leave us a voicemail. 8552361 A one A. If you're a teacher, How do you feel about the choice of returning to school in person or teaching entirely remote? Tell us your story. 8552361 A one. A. You can send us an audio file with our APP won a box pop, and we'll share some of your stories Monday. On one A. Let's get back to the roundup with Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic. Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal, and from the PBS NewsHour, Nick Shifrin. I'm going to apologize for this ahead of time. The rain in Spain might have stayed mainly on the plain, but the former king has not Indira one, Carlos abdicated the throne in favour of his son six years ago. Why's he now fled the country. Right. He's fled the country because of a number of court investigations into business contracts and also a money laundering and tax evasion probe happening outside of Spain in Switzerland. So very embarrassing. He essentially has you know there is a $100 million gift that was given by the king of Saudi Arabia to a foundation that the king is linked to in Panama, and prosecutors are trying to figure out whether that $100 million was connected to the awarding of a contract. It's Spanish companies got to build a high speed rail link between the Saudi cities of Medina and Mecca. There's another foundation that's being investigated that's registered in Liechtenstein, and investigators are trying to find out. How did it get so much wealth? But you know King Juan Carlos is a really interesting character because he's been very much a fixture in Spanish life for the last 45 years. He came to power right after the death of Franco the long time decades long dictator, But surprisingly, he actually helped usher the country into democracy. And you know, he's had a mixed record because in recent years he's had a lot of lovers and these investigations and questions about his spending, so it has now turned from not just embarrassment over him. But questions about the role of the monarchy in general because the junior coalition partner in Spain's Coalition government is a leftist party that wants to abolish the monarchy anyway and turn Spain into a republic. Nancy does anyone know where he is and what the future looks like for him? Well. The initial suggestion was that he went to Portugal. That doesn't appear to be the case, then the Dominican Republic until the foreign minister there said he was not in the Dominican Republican. Just before we went on the air. There was a report that he was in Abu Dhabi. And so the short answer is we don't know. But the possible places keep changing around the world, and even as we're on the air, we might hear of other locations because he hasn't said where he's gone. If I could just add real quickly to the point earlier about, you know his his leading the Spain towards a democracy. I think an important point that sort of trailed him throughout his tenure is Because he had come in at a time when the monarch who is quite weak, I think there was sort of a baked into that original transition towards democracy. An unwillingness to really look at the monarchy and its spending habits because there was such a fear that any sort of close examination could could undermine a fragile state and one that even now there are questions over it. And I think what we're studying Sesay unraveling that it started in 2008 during the financial crisis when the Marquis was spending so much money and this is a continuation of that, so it's an interesting shift that comes From when he came in, and there was sort of an unspoken rule that you didn't examine the monarchy to now. Well, let's turn toe Ireland. There's a lot to say about the Nobel Peace Prize winner John Hume. Tributes this week poured in from presidents and prime ministers. The economist says the lawmaker from Northern Island it more than anyone else to help bring an end to decades of sectarian bloodshed in deer at remind us why John, who mattered so much to so many people Right? Well, he was seen at a time when Ireland was going through the troubles, you know, meaning the conflicts between the Protestants and the Catholics in Northern Ireland, which did then and still belongs to Great Britain. He was seen as a figure who actually was above it, all willing to make peace not based on sectarian concerns between Protestants and Catholics. He did win the Nobel Prize is, you said He was one of the architects of Northern Ireland's peace process. In the 1998 Belfast agreement and a CZ you mentioned tributes have come in from the pope, the Dalai Lama, several U. S and U. K president's because of Corona virus, they were limited to only 120 people masked up. In the cathedral for the ceremony. But he really was seen as someone who focused on unity and peace and was able to put those ideas above narrow sectarian concerns. To give some idea about how revered he was by his own people. There's a mural in his hometown dearie. That puts his image alongside Martin Luther King Jr. Mother Teresa and Nelson Mandela. And this is part of a speech he gave after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. All conflict is about the same thing no matter where it is. To buy difference. Whether differences your religion or your wrists. Or your nationality. And the message that we have to get across that we have learned in our part of the world. The difference is an accident of birth. Difference is of the essence of humanity. And they're for respect for difference should be very, very normal and very common. But it is a first And deepest principle of really peace. President Bill Clinton talked about his persistence and unshakable commitment to Nonviolence. Nancy how much has changed since the Good Friday agreement that he helped bring about Well, I think if you look at his funeral, his his son really got it. I think the biggest change which is the the sort of unwillingness of politicians too. Um Put there the interests of their nation ahead of perhaps their own party interests in one night, if you'll indulge me, Rita quote from his son, he said Central to Dad's work was his deep appreciation of human interdependency..

Spain Nancy Yusef King Juan Carlos Northern Ireland Indira Lakshmanan Nobel Prize president Saudi Arabia Martin Luther King Jr Dominican Republic John Hume Abu Dhabi Liechtenstein Portugal Ireland Medina Bill Clinton Franco Northern Island National Geographic
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KPCC

"With a rescue and cleanup operation underway. We have a lot to discuss not just about the terrible impact of those living in the city. But the wider concerns about possible repercussions in the region also will catch up on the latest spat between Beijing and Washington, and we have the case of a missing king. Joining us this week are Nancy Yusef, National Security reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Nancy. Thanks for being here. Great to be with you also with us. Nick Shifrin, foreign affairs and defense correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, Nick. Welcome back. Thanks very much, and we're excited to welcome back. Indira Lakshmanan, senior executive editor at National Geographic, and Dear Indira, It's great to have you back too. Thanks, Jen. So first responders in Beirut are still looking for survivors after a massive explosion Tor, the city's port on Tuesday, at least 150 people are dead and another 5000 are injured. Hundreds of thousands are homeless. And Jiro. What do we know about how this happened? Well, we know that there was an explosion that seems to have been two explosions on dit was really caused by a 2750 ton stockpile of ammonium nitrate. Which is a really explosive chemical that is often used as a fertilizer. To have this amount of ammonium nitrate stored in a port is really kind of stunning and I'm sure we'll get to it, but it's linked to protests that we've now already seen in Beirut among Lebanese who were already upset about government corruption. Government mismanagement, political and economic problems. And this just looks like one thing on top of that. That since 2013 so we're talking seven years, this ammonium nitrate has been stored in a warehouse at the port when a Russian owned vessel stopped in Beirut, and then the ship was abandoned. So how is it that for seven years this has been sitting there and no one has done anything about it, even though Port officials had apparently Written many memos asking, How is this going to be disposed of? I mean, just to give listeners a general sense. This is essentially like fertilizer, which you know, we know is quite explosive and National Geographic had a really interesting story out yesterday where we talked about just all the chemistry behind this and why it was so deadly and it's happened before in other places in this country, and by the way listeners may remember the horrible Oklahoma City terrorist attack. That was an intentional Bombing, but it was made out for the same chemical ammonium nitrate Will French President Emmanuel Macron visited Beirut on Thursday to mixed reactions for the last time. No, I'm not like you. Nick Howard. Lebanon's leaders responding Very defensively. I mean, this is a level of governance, apathy, governance and aptitude that that is simply difficult to comprehend. You know, as Indira was saying, this has been In the port for six or seven years, senior Customs officials are saying claiming that they warned about the danger of having so much Ammonium nitrate at the port a handful of times in the judiciary onto port officials, and they got no response. So many people in Lebanon are talking about a level of criminal negligence. Today, authorities say that they're going to Interview the head of the port, the head of customs on We'll see what comes of that. But at this point, the Lebanese people are so sick. Of a level of corruption and the love of kind of a corrupt core of the entire political class. And that's why this was recently compared to share noble. The idea that this exposes that corrupt core of the government could lead to a government falling again. We saw the government follow again. Fall last year, replaced by a technocratic successor this year. Or we could just see Ah, increased anger that that leads to no reform. But at the very least, this is proving so awfully so tragically, some of the incompetence at the core of the Lebanese government Me, Nancy. Talk a little bit more about what comes next with the layer the level of anger so high with the government even before this disaster, What are you going to be watching for in the region? That's a great question. And I should say I have almost bias. Suspend have holidayed in Lebanon as recently as last year and holds a very special place in my heart and so to see the devastation is just breathtaking. You got it earlier. You know this is a country where people were suffering tremendously before this explosion. This is a country repeat the value of its currency. Had dropped by 80% in the last year. People were hungry. The Lebanese cannot afford to do the kinds of repairs to their country to their city. In the wake of this bombing, many could not afford to eat before this, And so I think long term, the question becomes. Will we see fundamental changes in the government in the system in Lebanon? Because We've heard about port officials being on house arrest or having their assets frozen, but those air sort of on the edges in terms of the issues in Lebanon, the fundamental issues governance. You were asking earlier about the Lebanese reaction on Ly, the Lebanese mayor has walked the streets. There's been no resignations. There's been no sort of out point, even the trash that people are gathering from the debris pile up, and there's no government trash service to pick it up. And so these air Corps problems with the the governance of the country, and so I think for the Lebanese unless there are fundamental changes to that Such that when someone reports thousands of tons of nitrate is near the city center that it's dealt with and not ignored repeatedly over and over again, and so, what we're looking for is whether we're going to see fundamental changes and how the system Operates. We're talking with Nancy use it from the Wall Street Journal. Nick Shifrin, foreign affairs correspondent for the PBS NewsHour and Indira Lakshmanan from National Geographic. We got this question from Susan, who wants to know Has Donald Trump make any comment in support of age for Lebanon and era? Well, what he has made. Comments on that have been quite controversial is he's talked about this probably being an attack, and that has concerned a lot of officials in the U. S government as well as our allies in Lebanon..

Lebanon Indira Lakshmanan Beirut Nancy Yusef Lebanese government Nick Shifrin Port The Wall Street Journal National Geographic PBS Nick Howard Beijing Nick reporter Washington Jiro Jen Donald Trump
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning a slight chance of rain by afternoon with highs on Christmas Eve into the fifties it's currently forty two degrees in Hayward forty nine in San Francisco this is one a I'm Indira Lakshmanan in Washington China describes them as re education camps mass internment facilities in northwest China that the government says are necessary to counter terrorism and religious extremism over the last three years the Chinese government has corralled an estimated one million Muslim citizens the largest group of Homer known as Uighurs in what Beijing calls a people's war on terror she gin pings Communist Party says the cancer for education but two sets of internal Chinese government documents leaked to the media paint a terrifying picture of incarceration indoctrination punishment even death families of those relegated to these camps have been kept in the dark about what's happening to their loved ones on the inside including at least one of our listeners my name is available for I live in Henderson is already I am a leader so dissimilar in reverse and the concentration camp but all the readers and not since our region then because as your agent can cannot talk to their family member whole art and the outsiders China three years I have not talked to my family yet because they are scared to talk to me I don't know what's going on a live or die I don't know that distressing voicemail was left in our inbox by one of our listeners this hour we'll be talking about what we have learned from recently leaked to Chinese government documents and how the international community should be confronting these atrocities joining us on the phone from Hong Kong as Austin Ramsey a correspondent for The New York Times which last month published one set of leaked documents that reveal the Chinese government's years long plans and policies to oppress the Muslim minorities in the Xinjiang region Austin welcome to one day hi dear thank you here with us in studio is solid huda Yar he's the prime minister in exile from the government in exile east Turkestan the name that weaker separatists use for the Chinese region of Xinjiang separatist want to see that region as an independent country and Sally is also the founder of the east Turkestan national awakening movement a nonprofit human rights groups based here in DC prime minister who they are thanks for being with us hi under thank you robin also with us here in studio is Louise grievance she's the director of global advocacy for the weaker human rights project Louise welcome thank you so much we also reached out to the Chinese embassy here in Washington to participate in this conversation and did not hear back but that invitation still stands for them to join us so prime minister in exile who you are I want to begin by asking before we talk about these newly leaked documents please give us an overview of the history of this region so is Turkestan Uighurs stated that according to order historian totaling almost that we have a history of over six thousand four hundred years used truck stand is the homeland of the we wore another took people such as the cavs axe true give those back center part of this region was occupied by the Manchu Ching empire back in eighteen eighty four and renamed to Xinjiang which literally translates as the new territory I with the fall of the Ching dynasty nineteen eleven the region was governed by very Chinese warlords who implemented a sinus Asian policies by suddenly had Chinese filters this raised Uighur another took a grievances and they rebelled and declared the first east Turkestan Republic in November twelfth nineteen thirty three however this was overthrown due to Soviet intervention and the Republic of China invading the region and then again in nineteen forty four we years rebelled again and declare the second east Turkestan Republic which lasted until December twenty second nineteen forty nine R. yesterday is the seventieth anniversary of China's official the people's Republic of China's official occupation of east Turkestan since then China has been engaging in what we believe is a campaign of colonization and genocide well as you point out their various ethnic groups that make up the majority of the population in the Xinjiang region even though they are considered minorities in the rest of China large there obviously you know the biggest groups in that region with the weaker as the largest among them you yourself for a weaker who came to the U. S. with your family as a political refugee in the early two thousands what was happening in the region when you left so in the regional and we left in nineteen ninety seven we had a demonstrations pro democracy pro independence demonstrations and the Chinese government severely cracked down on that in fact in nineteen ninety seven the Chinese government claimed that they arrested a hundred thousand ethnic separatists lettuce and counter revolutionaries my uncle was one of those who had been arrested and the simple crime was for reading a book so this led many in our family to fear for their lives and so my father had fled the country already in nineteen ninety five and in nineteen ninety eighty came to the United States and applied for for asylum here and then brought us to the United States in two thousand but you still have family in the region what if anything have you been able to hear from them or about how conditions are for them now I would think particularly being connected to you as a very prominent exiled activist and promoter of a separate nation that your family would be targeted yes I have I eighty six male relatives that were detained and fifteen female relatives that were detained on the last time I was able to directly speak with anyone in the country was July two thousand seventeen with my grandfather on my mother's side and he told me don't call us anymore I'm too old to go to school referring to the so called re education camps since then I haven't been able to directly contact anyone inside the country we have a relative in Central Asia and he told us that there are bothering that I need to stop my activities because they're bothering a relative inside east Turkestan and I told them now just tell them that you don't know me because I'm not going to stop dot relative later ended up going to east Turkestan despite me warning him don't go back because you will be thrown into these camps and now we don't know anything about him or where he's being held and of course to remind our listeners when you referred to east Turkestan it's the same region that the Chinese call the Xinjiang autonomous region in northwest China just so people are clear the B. B. C.'s Jon side worth toward the camps when Chinese officials quote on quote open them up to journalists here some of his reporting over the past few years Boston network of high security facilities is being built across China's western region of Xinjiang surrounded by high.

Hayward San Francisco
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"He feeds off show camps what might that say about the places were not given access to with their watchtowers and barbed wire is still in place they look much less like school yeah and we have much less welcome have available for full of these China says is a response to date of sporadic separatist violence but sheen Jennings Muslims the week as the Catholics and others are being swept up it seems for the mildest of beliefs and behaviors Louisa griva of the weaker human rights project tell us from your study of this issue how his China tried to control the narrative around these camps the campaign against the readers another Turkic cop Muslims has been conducted under conditions of absolute secrecy and as we know from the New York times documents these were explicit instructions to officials to lie to family members if they found the missing they were going to be told they've gone to school it's for their own good we know of documents showing that the officials and employees responsible for maintaining these camps would be severely punished if they give out any information so right until very recently the information we had was from that very few people who survived and people like Sally's relatives who were able to give fragmentary information let me ask you briefly because one of our listeners Catherine are sorry Cristian emails I'm concerned about the frequent use of the word concentration camp versus what she believes is more accurate and realistic the term internment camp in turn meant more accurately describes what China's doing as it relates to our own misguided unjust and fear based actions when we in the US in turn the Japanese during World War two is cristiana right about this Louisa well there's another element here which is that the Chinese government is determined to make the Uighurs Chinese to exterminate the entire culture and identity you can't believe in Islam in fact in the camps are forced to repeat over and over again I don't believe in a slum I made a mistake believing in god I believe the Communist Party so the element of for about one of a better word for brainwashing extremely severe when we come back we're gonna be talking with Austin Ramsey The New York Times correspondent who wrote about the leaked documents from the Chinese government about their work and at policies regarding Uighurs and other Turkic minorities will also be speaking with Sally who DR of the east Turkestan government in exile in more with Louisa grief director of global advocacy for the weaker human rights project I'm Indira Lakshmanan executive editor at the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting glad to be with you you're listening to one eight from W. A..

China Louisa griva Sally Catherine US Chinese government Communist Party director executive editor Pulitzer center New York times Cristian Austin Ramsey Indira Lakshmanan
"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:53 min | 3 years ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The the select committee now is tasked with. With creating that detailed policy framework, taking general ideas and turning them into legislation and new law. We've got to create a clean energy economy that creates good paying jobs in time to avert the worst impacts of the changing climate. So we're going to press for urgent action dramatic reduction of greenhouse gases in defense of America. Well, let me ask you Representative caster. This is a select committee, which for listeners who don't know means it will not have the authority to approve legislation or the power to subpoena anybody. So what can you really do? Well, we'll we will innocence the quarterback or the maestro for the congress. As the standing committees a number of them move forward on climate action. You know, we have Democrats have really been stymied since twenty ten when the Republicans took the congress. The good news is this week. We're going to have our first hearings on the climate crisis. The then we've had in a few years now. So it's time to get to work to make clean energy a pillar of our economy and unleash American ingenuity with an eye to ensuring that we do not leave anyone behind well, Amy harder. I want to ask you because we all saw this recent UN report that warned that we as humans not just Americans have only eleven years until twenty thirty to start radically reducing our carbon emissions to be on track to halt rising temperatures that would bring catastrophic flooding drought, extreme weather food shortages, basically a pretty apocalyptic vision by the end of this century for all of our young children. And yet even within the Democratic Party, which is much more strong on the issue of climate change. There is friction over. What is the right way to achieve these goals? So how do you see this playing out politically, right? Well, the the eleven years framing. That we only have until twenty thirty to address. This problem is actually a framing that most scientists reject because it frames climate change as a black and white issue that if we reach twenty thirty and we haven't done anything. Well, okay, then we're less give up and just let the planet bake, but that's not how climate change works. And so I think that framing perhaps provides a level of energy and worry among a lot of young people and progressives. But it actually I think makes it more difficult to get anything done. I think it's safe to say that there won't be any serious legislating on climate change until after the twenty twenty elections Washington does politics better than anything else lately. Unfortunately. So I think what the green new deal is more than an actual policy is a rallying cry for progressives in the primary in the democratic primary and only after twenty twenty election, depending on how it goes if Trump wins reelection. Don't anticipate there to be big climate action. If if a democrat wins, then we might end up in the same place we were a decade ago when Obama was in office he pushed through a cap at climate Bill through the house, then it failed in the Senate. Because again, they could not get enough Democrats to support their own climate change bell. So I think it's important to to provide some little some flashbacks to how things happened when Democrats did control olive Washington. They couldn't get it through. I wanna read a text from one of our listeners who says I want one hundred percent renewable energy in ten years. So this person doesn't even want to wait till twenty thirty a green energy plan with the same urgency and commitment as JFK's goal of going to the moon, not because it's easy or hard. But because it is important and necessary in this case, it's extremely necessary to mitigate catastrophic disruption in food, water, etc. For millions including my descendants. So Representative I want to ask you, you know, this person certainly gets it. But a December poll by Yale and George Mason university's found that eighty two percent of Americans have never even heard the words green new deal. So how do you rally votes in congress for a plan that most of the public hasn't even heard of? Well, it's a new idea, and it's gonna take time just like Medicare for all took time. But I think Kathy castor is going to do a great job in the committee, and she's going to bring great leadership. It's not that unrealistic. I mean, look Iowa I was talking to Jodi Ernst, a Republican from Iowa Republican Senator and she said Iowa by two thousand twenty two is going to have eighty percent of renewable energy. And of course, a lot of people are going to be paying attention to Iowa in the next year or so there are states that are making tremendous progress. And what we need to do is figure out the best way of facilitating and expediting that I agree with Amy that the fight is not over after eleven years. I think the point is though that these eleven years really are going to be key in seeing how much of a hole we're going to be in. If we act now, proactively we can avert a lot of the disastrous consequences. Final thing. I think Ryan is one of the more thoughtful people in congress, and I know he's trying to get Republicans on board. And my my only plea would be on this attacks. The fee and give the money back to individuals. I'm open to looking at that. But the current bills couple that would deregulation of the EPA. So if it's a clean Bill that would be a fee and give it back to the individuals. But strengthens the I think you'd have a much better chance of getting Democrats than inserting language that's going to weaken the well, that's a really good point. Ryan Costello the minute that you add in, you know, loosening further deregulating the EPA, which has been a real issue for Democrats in the first two years of Donald Trump's term. You know, you're not gonna get bipartisan sign onto that. So let let me ask you, Ron Castillo. There are so many powerbrokers in your party, the president included who do not believe in manmade climate change and don't feel any urgency to address it as you know, the US is the largest per capita emitter of greenhouse gases yet, President Trump pulled us out of the Paris climate accord. So you want your plan? I think that Republicans will sign onto it. How do you get, you know, how do you light a fire under them to even support your carbon plan would your plan were quickly enough to avert the catastrophe that we could be seeing in a matter of decades? Well, congressman con is right about if in eleven years, we don't do anything. We'll be an even deeper hole. And so the metric the first metric is to make sure that we do get passage in the very near future of something that is bolt. So that we can start dialing back the amount of carbon emissions that we produce the carbon fee and dividend is fixing the broken price signal on the market right now greenhouse gas emissions. It's not intended to be or become a long term revenue stream for the federal government. Likewise, though, what we're what it seeks to do is incentivize our collective decisions toward the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. I would make the argument that regulation is not going to do that the carbon pricing mecca. Is what we'll do it. We have modeling after modeling. We just came out with a an economist statement last week, we will drive down carbon emissions much more ambitiously than the Paris accord, which I support, but as you noted the president does not much more. So than regulations would do and regulations are twice as costly as this plan, and they do not work as effectively. So I would I may respectfully disagree with Roe on this point. But we can agree on is the need to get something done rather quickly. I'm also mindful though, that I do I do not anticipate any major climate legislation getting signed into law until after the next presidential election. I do take issue with what the president says on the issue of climate as well. Representative Khanna has essentially said that he or other Democrats might support a carbon dividend plant. If it were a clean Bill without that deregulation of the EPA Amy harder number of big fossil fuel companies are backing the carbon dividends plan. Why is it because they want it to be mixed with deregulation of the EPA or what's their incentive for supporting this? There's a few reasons why big oil companies, namely, Exxon Mobil, and Conaco Phillips are getting behind. This proposal one is that they're facing a lot of pressure from their investors. They're facing pressure from big asset managers like BlackRock to be more front about this. Another big reason is lawsuits Exxon is and Konica both named in several lawsuits around the country blaming them and asking for billions of dollars of damage when it for when it comes to climate change. Now, those lots have been largely unsuccessful, but it's still part of this big environmental campaign to raise. Opposition to these oil companies. This proposal would in some ways limit some of these lawsuits. And lastly, they stand to benefit with a carbon tax with more natural gas, which is cleaner than coal and would actually benefit for a certain amount of time under a tax. I'm Indira Lakshmanan. And you're listening to one A. Representative caster. I want to ask you, whether you think the dividend plan that Ryan Castillo is supporting would attract more moderate Democrats than the green new deal. Now, it's -cerned too soon to tell we're we the good news. Is that here in America? We have the tools to tackle this crisis. We need to examine that whole brand all of the range the entire range of tools that we have what is different now. I think is that people understand the risks. It's all too real. For example, here in the Tampa Bay area. It was only a year and a half ago when an enormous category five hurricane Irma was approaching Florida. I rushed to evacuate just like, my neighbors, we boarded up our house. We packed family photo albums and pictures into a car and drove them to the top of a parking garage people. Are ready for very bold action. And this has got to be a bipartisan effort, I see a lot of change, for example, in the state of Texas where a lot of my colleagues would never want to discuss any kind of renewable energy. Now. Wind power is taking it taking a substantial percentage of their the way they generate electricity local communities businesses have taken the lead here. It's time for the congress to meet them his challenge. Well, we got a call from a listener who didn't express support for either the green deal or the carbon dividend planned. He thinks we need to go even deeper and attack the root of the problem, which is our consumption that drives carbon emissions. Hi, I'm Peter from Broomfield Colorado. The climate change issue is very important because the atmosphere's indeed warming up I witness it in the quality of the spring storms become in the normal January waitress. Terms of storms are warmer and wetter and January's they used to be I also want to say that that's a consumption problem. It's way people eat with a cheese and the meat and the high resource diets the way they live and their single family units. The way they drive the cars do not want to see any kind of taxes of green revolution. Still we address the consumption issues very aggressively after that we won't really even need to do that..

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"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"indira lakshmanan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Indira Lachmann of the Pulitzer center sitting in for Joshua Johnson with Democrats now in charge of the house of representatives. They've put the dangerous of global warming back on the front burner. House Democratic leaders have revived a select committee on climate change. Meanwhile, progressives plan to introduce a green new deal Bill as early as this week and several democratic twenty twenty hopefuls are jostling to champion a green jobs creation plan, though, the details are still fuzzy not all Democrats are on board, though, some believe it's a political nonstarter that will never win by partisan support and some moderate Republicans are pushing their own plan to slap fees on carbon emissions right given that others including the president dismissed climate change as liberal hysteria. Representative ro Khanna democrat representing California's seventeenth district. Sees a green new deal is a bipartisan crowd-pleaser and a smart way to revive American jobs. He's. With us here in the studio. Also, joining us to talk about the politics of the possible on climate changes Ryan Castillo, a former Republican congressman from Pennsylvania's sixth district. He's now managing director of Americans for carbon dividends. Ryan, thanks for joining us. Good to be with you last, but not least Amy harder and energy and climate reporter for axes is in a studio. Amy, thanks for being with us. Thank you for having me on. We'd love to hear from you to listeners. Do you support a green new deal or a fee on carbon emissions? You can comment on our Facebook page. You can tweet us at one A or you can Email us at one A W A M U dot org. So Representative Kana to follow up on the conversation. We had before the break you were one of the early supporters of the green new deal, and it is not a small concept. It seeks to be a dramatic overhaul of the economy. The title. Of course is a throwback to the FDR new deal economic reforms during the depression. Tell us more about what this plan aims. To do and whether one of your political supporters, California Representative and house speaker Nancy Pelosi is she on board with you. She certainly on board with a bold vision for dealing with climate change as she had appointed and Marquis back in two thousand eight to the select committee on climate change. Here's what we need to do. After the intergovernmental panel on climate change came up with a report that said in twelve years, if we don't get the temperature's rising at one point five degrees. Instead of two degrees were all in a world of hurt. And they gave some very specific things we needed to do from investing in solar and wind to planting trees in preventing deforestation to making sure that we were capturing carbon. And what the green new deal is a is a vision that says we really need to take bold steps to be able to achieve this, and we can do it while creating jobs, very, specifically and Markey. And I have a Bill that we're gonna come out with that's going to help make electric vehicles possible in the next ten years to get it to fifty percent fleet and provide a refundable tax credit to. Manufacturing in the United States. So that the GM factories can put people back to work to make electric vehicles. Those are the types of things that I think are win win. And this is the same Bill that you're saying democratic Senator of Massachusetts, Ed Markey. And also, New York Representative Alexandria, Cossio Cortez have been talking about introducing this week. They are introducing a broader Bill, which is the framework for the green new deal. And what they're saying is aspirational here are the types of things we need to do. So that we can deal with climate change in policies. Then the question is what are the specifics and more? Introducing one idea is a very very specific issue. Which is here's how you get electric vehicles. And I think we're going to see a lot more policy proposals. That fleshes out the broader vision of a green you deal. All right. Well, briefly Representative kaanai you wrote this book called entrepreneurial nation, why manufacturing is still key to America's future. So explain to us how you can create manufacturing jobs while at the same time cutting carbon emissions. Well, a lot of the new manufacturing is actually a good for the environment. Consider these two data points, the fastest growing industries twelve times. Other industries are solar and wind. These are creating a whole new generation of jobs in manufacturing. And when you go around the country as I did when I wrote the book, you see that. Most of the modern factories aren't the traditional ideas of dirty or pollutant factories. They're actually with often zero emission buildings. They're done with. Modern technology. They are very environmentally conscious. Apple's new campus in my district is actually a net producer of energy. And so those are the that is the vision for modern manufacturing. I actually think you can be competitive in this country and environmentally conscious. Amy harder as the Representative said Democrats, including Senator Markey and Representative Okaz Cortez are planning to introduce this green new deal framework as early as this week. But how does it come against up against the political reality of getting past? Well, I think it's going to be a set of really progressive policies. The details that are out there. Now include a goal of one hundred percent renewable electricity within ten years for context right now, we're about seventeen percent renewable electricity half of that slightly more than half of that has actually hydro-electricity which is not the wind and solar that most people think of today is there something wrong with it though. No. Hydro-electricity says renewable as wind and solar. But it's just not it's not as politically popular today. There's still there's environmental concerns about using water, particularly as climate change exacerbates droughts. There's been more environmental opposition to hydro electricity. So I I mentioned that number just to show that the very big challenge to get one hundred percent renewable electricity by twenty thirty or even sooner. And so I think and I would love to hear the congressman's thoughts on this is to what degree he thinks that the the democratic caucus itself. Putting aside Republicans if everybody in the Democratic Party could support something like this the new the green new deal as it stands the general details that we know now also include a federal jobs guarantee for everybody who wants to work on the transition to a cleaner economy. It might even include universal healthcare, which is far outside the the energy space. So it's a very very big idea. And I it's gaining momentum. Among progressives. I. Tend to think that it's going to be very difficult to get something that only has part of the Democratic Party. And no Republicans as you say, Amy there are many Democrats who don't support agreed new deal. Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio are not likely to support us Representative Khanna why not. Well, of course, different people have different politics. I think what you'll see in the draft if Senator Markey and Representative Okaz ios resolution is that it's aspirational. It's broad-based. It's not a catchall for all the progressive policies and on the website. They had federal jobs guarantee and Medicare for all. And there are things that I support the resolution is going to be more focused dealing specifically with what are the policies we need to get to a one hundred percent renewable energy within twelve years. Now, there's a recognition that that's going to be very very very difficult, but you have to start with a bold aspiration envision to address the the the crisis that we face, and I believe many Democrats will be on board with the aspiration where you'll find differences of opinion is on the specifics, and that will debate and see what we can get a majority of the house and Senate on board with well, we invited Representative Frank Pallone who's a democrat of New Jersey, and he's the chair of the house. Energy and commerce committee to join us. He had a scheduling conflict. But this is what he said when he was asked if he supported agreed new deal in a recent interview with WNYC's Brian Lehrer. We gotta bring the Democrats and Republicans together we didn't do anything. So there's an opportunity if we can do major infrastructure Bill to use that as a way of basically moving forward on, you know, either providing some kind of tax incentives, or or or or, you know, subsidies or something of that nature to do more with renewables to actually, you know, crackdown on these on leaky pipelines on on you know, to rebuild the electricity grid to actually move towards electric cars to do things that would actually make a difference. So, you know, I guess I don't wanna just lay a groundwork for something that might happen in five or ten years. And and and just talk about it. I want to actually get things done. The reality is that you know, we still have climate deniers in the White House. We have climate deniers in the Senate Republicans now are climate deniers. So we kind of have to convince. Them to take some action on climate even though they may deny it. And and those are the, you know, I think the infrastructure is is something that may actually be concrete and lead to some initiatives that compares on a bipartisan basis and be signed by the president that would move in that direction. Ryan castillo. You know, Representative Pallone is obviously concerned about climate change about the existence of Republicans in congress as well as in the White House who are climate deniers, but he also seems not to be a huge fan of the green new deal. He thinks other things are gonna get us there. What's your response to that? Well, I think a couple of things I he's correct about feeling that anything less than a bipartisan solution to this is not going to be something. That's durable. We do have a Republican Senate while the Democrats do control the house control of the house tends to shift back and forth every couple terms, and I think that a focusing on something that is more center oriented is appropriate. Let me just mention this about the term green new deal. I do believe the term itself is still ill defined. I don't mean that to be a criticism. I do like the fact that we're focusing on climate change and the need to combat it through policy mechanisms that will drive down carbon dioxide pollution. All right. Well, I mean, I want to say that we did invite several other prominent members of CONGRESS Republicans and Democrats with differing views to join this converse. Station, they either declined or didn't respond, but those offers to join us in future still stands. So in the meantime, Representative Khanna, you know, I need to point out that one of the disputes among Democrats is whether nuclear power, and we referred to it before hydropower should be included in the proposal and count towards the one hundred percent renewable energy. What is your position? And why? While the intergovernmental panel on climate change says we need to do all of the above. But I think that the focus for us should be solar wind, and and policies that will really get us to a clean environment without that. But we should rule anything off the table. That said I think that the real debate here is between those who want a bold vision. And what Frank Pallone is about is incremental pragmatism. But there's no reason we can't do both. We we can be for a bold vision. What it's really going to require to deal with this crisis. And at the same time, we can say, okay. Well, can we get in this congress? I think one excludes the other I'm Indira Lakshmanan. And you're listening to one A. Amy you wanted to jump in?.

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