10 Burst results for "Indigenous Literature"

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

04:44 min | 5 months ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Unreserved

"That's very much like the process of oral storytelling actually. And so I think in a way we like to think about these stories as beginning in their own tradition and then actually sort of returning to a different version of the oral tradition when the adults sits down with the child to read that story together. Now the gift that the little people is a companion book to a larger project called the 6 seasons of the asina scout event a walk. And I know people are thinking, what do you mean 6 seasons? There's only four. Exactly. Tell us a little bit more about the 6th seasons of the assini scale at Dana walk. Yeah, well, this seasons are really based on land based life, right? Where in the north where you're from, the seasons don't follow that necessarily that sort of four seasons categories at all because the way in which they're delineated is dependent or is sort of explained by how you can get around on the land. So fall the breakup season or maybe the freeze up season, and then in spring, the breakup season, those are separate seasons because those were times when the rocky tree would not be able to travel on the water. And so those were crucial, you needed to plan ahead for those seasons, right? So it just really reflects a very different understanding of not only time, but also of location. And it's just really develops out of this deep, deep knowledge of the land that the rocky creek people have. So yeah, it just makes us think differently about seasons themselves, I think. So exciting. Thanks. So with all of these stories, you know, coming back or being told again in various forms using technology, using picture books, or seeing more young people pick up these stories and tell them in their own way. What does this mean for the future of indigenous storytelling and in particular oral storytelling? I really, you know, I have my hopes, I think that this kind of work will inspire the next generation of creative indigenous people to come out with new versions of the story that I couldn't even imagine yet. And I think I really do see that the younger generation is so eager to learn about these traditions and to apply these stories in their own lives and to explore how they could maybe retold in different ways. So to me, I think there's so much we've already seen so much amazing productivity and brilliance in our indigenous literature over the last 30 or so years. But I think storytelling has always been there and I think our indigenous writers have always known about the importance of storytelling and referenced it in their books. But I hope there might be a time where the storytellers themselves can sort of step more into the limelight. And I think this kind of where hopefully will encourage that next generation of storytellers to maybe tell the stories in a different way, maybe through the Internet or some other technology that we don't even know about yet. To bring the stories to life in another future generation. Absolutely. We're going to do like 3D holograms and stuff, holodecks, going to be very Star Trek Warren. That sounds good. Thank you so much for your time today. Much appreciated. Great to talk to you. Warren Kerry, you co leads the story team for the 6th seasons of the acidosis within a walk, and he directs the center for creative writing and oral culture at the university of Manitoba. This hi, I'm Jamie Poisson host of front burner, the CBC's daily news podcast..

Dana walk rocky creek Trek Warren Warren Kerry center for creative writing an Jamie Poisson university of Manitoba CBC
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Accidental Gods

Accidental Gods

05:58 min | 11 months ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Accidental Gods

"I live at the end of a dirt. Road showed you speak surrounded on three sides by park Live next to the wild there amount. Lions and bob cats and failed these berg lighting. We are. I have a substantial. I've really thank you really substantial beautiful. And so from the weavings of that substantial life from childhood where you were nine and nineteen forty five in our in twenty twenty one you've written poetry and novels eve written plays you've created teachings you set up what seems to me to be an elder circle and you have from relatively white western jewish background immersed yourself as far as i can tell in the indigene ity in the first peoples of the americas. how did his rise. In my first marriage my husband was was a physician and he was in residency at the same time as as another man who decided to be a physician on On the reservation as opposed to being eligible for the drifts rights and so We went to visit him on the full corners reservation and the full corners. Reservation is the book is the setting for rain of night. Birds then other things brought me back to it. An extraordinary place. A it's it's the dna of the navajo station with the hopi reservation and the center of it and it's wow utterly utterly beautiful in a very non european wave beauty and the art is different in the way african art is i think it has a different understanding and It went into my heart. But i think and i don't know when this happened when i really begins understands as i read indigenous literature as i listened to what the people were saying that we have to step out of western mind. We have to step out of euro american mind. We have to change our minds and that if when the.

bob cats berg Lions americas
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Yeah, I think you know something that both of you said s so important. You know, you were asking about your own awareness of the fact that you so often make mistakes when you're thinking about how to identify or how to engage with people who are in need of American. And then Zubin was speaking about this idea of inclusivity. You know that I created a collection to which many, many people with very different experiences. Can belong and do belong. And I think that those two things are Inter related. You know, Part of the reason that I was that I wanted to do this book is because I think you know the way that Native Americans and first nations people in Canada are represented both in the mainstream education system and in mainstream media. So often is there are portrait of us that have sort of been stuck in the past. Right. And so people don't get like an education of what happens with Native Americans Post 1900. So then, when many you know settler people's come face to face with the modern, real life, indigenous person, they don't recognize what they're seeing, because they think that we're supposed to look like something else. Um, And so that was something that I was really aware of wanting to change. We're putting together this collection on guy. Think, Yeah. Stupid Use of the word. Um Synchronicity makes a lot of sense because it was. I think sometimes you know when you get onto the right path with something with work or with life, you know things just unfold in a really In a really special way, and that really began with me. This project began is part of my thesis work at Columbia and their oral history Master's program. I did a really specific kind of narrative arc of interviewing native Americans, in particular at that time from reservation communities who left to attend elite academic institutions like Yale and Columbia and Harvard. Then move home again to work for their nations and their very first person that I interviewed for that project. Her name is Ashley Hammers, and she's another narrator in the book. And the trip that I took to meet with her, Um, both in Las Vegas, where she had an apartment and at her home in Fort Mojave was I think just a really life changing event. You know, it was two days I spent with her. She hosted me in the most possible in the most generous possible way. Pick me up at the airport in Las Vegas, having met me once previously for two hours drove me out to Mojave spent the whole day driving me around explaining, you know where the Mojave believe they enter this world showing me the conditions in which they live today, then ending the day with at the site where the Mojave believe they Pass on to the afterlife. All the while, talking and talking and talking and sharing her story, and I left just feeling like I've been given the most the greatest gift and also the greatest responsibility to find a way to share this story in the best possible way on Go. I tell that story because I think had she not been the first person that I had met. Had she not been so generous. Had she not been You know, able to sit and to share such rich and intimate stories and also thought You know, maybe this wouldn't have. Maybe this wouldn't have unfolded in the way that it did. And then that just continued, you know, with each additional person that I met, all right, I have to admit, confess here, zoom in, and Sarah that I've made a mistake and I should have Plan this to be a lot longer segment. So let me do this now. Zubin and Sarah, could we do this again and and maybe bring another person or two from the book or other people You'd like to bring him will do it for an hour or longer, Because it's I mean this. This is that the core of a lot of issues being discussed. In Santa Fe right now. About identification about all these things that Sarah you talk about. You know your your trip to do a family gathering and believe the grandfather who was just kind of blind the whole thing. What was going on? Looked at Indians and one way wanted to quantify your your father's his blood and all of that, and you know, it's like, yeah, it's like I mean, but these are really important thing. Especially in the community like Santa Face. I'd like like, if you know what we'll communicate here, but maybe do do this again and maybe bring some other and do it for longer. Thing. Then we have time right now. So towards the back of the book, Sarah, you say 10 things you can do you meaning all of us, and you talked about digging deeper and Zubin brought this up. You know the timeline and the further reading and the depth of this and you go deeper and deeper and deeper into this you you talk about teachers to teach more indigenous literature like Hands got Mama Day, So maybe we get we get Scott involved in the next one there. Jill involved in the next one of these as well. Can you just give it a real quickly here? Some things that people in Santa Fe can consider between now and maybe make a New year's resolution around this. Sure. Yeah, I think my two favorite ones right now are you know and then one of them actually isn't in the book is buy books for a little kids that are by indigenous authors or by First Nations authors and then grow the reading that you're doing with your kids as they grow. Right. So imagine, you know if you bought little picture books for your little ones, and then they were You know, foreign six and you brought the next age appropriate material. And then you bought do it. Louise Erdrich has these amazing amazing syriza for like bigger kids like the 8 to 10 year olds, and then you know, by the time they're 12, they're ready for this book. And how different would the average settlers awareness V of the environment that they live in? If they had, you know just that little bit of the part of the huge consciousness that we're all capable of. Informed by native voices. That's one Give us another one. That's well. The other one for grown ups is just add a couple of native thinkers to your Twitter feed or your instagram. You know, there are amazing contributions being made. And find a corner to let some of that stuff and you're your own mind. Now it's not too late. You know, Even if you didn't have this as part of your formal education, you could make room for something of this learning now. It's pretty easy, you know, Just find a couple to Twitter handles to follow, and you'll.

Sarah Zubin Santa Fe Um Las Vegas Twitter Mojave Fort Mojave Canada Columbia Santa Face Louise Erdrich Ashley Hammers Yale Jill
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"See the in richard right okay. That's a hard read again. very well. written. Got the greek themes and make makeshift. Thank the language is. It's the one thing we didn't talk about it. All is also indigenous literature. Because i read a lot of indigenous literature this year as well. Will you tell us about because you know again. Being mixed with puerto rican. I have been exploring that indigenous culture. Because that's something that was not part of our language our heritage in our home growing up and is actually the counter narrative narrative right. So those were the Call the he both people who lived the those people and so being able to embrace that and pass it on to my children. I have been looking at some recommended. Authors and stories to talk about that and it's interesting too because this whole other conversation about Finals are not native. American or native indigenous caribbean. Yeah so then like there's no literature on the you know the rhythm people but then but but there is actually some literature out there because i have a good friend who actually did her dissertation on titan no culture and women of dissent lend me no were puerto rican yes who are who are playwrights and poets and she actually has been translating them from their original spanish text into more modern spanish text and then into english side by side and have individual copies of some of her works. I might send you a copy. Please but her name is. Miriam hayes. Thomson she's been a guest on my podcast as well and She's just dr. Miriam boras thompson. Sorry and she's just wonderful wonderful scholar so he has a lot to say absolutely true. Diary timing unfortunately you have to deal with authors laws. But i think that would be an excellent book to read an inkling ninth grade critique yearly here in northern virginia. Has we have this. We don't think about indigenous people and the native americans where we are here and it needs story that is dealing with white black or hispanic racism in hard to discuss on fear e four a level. That's not looking around at the rim edge. The reading about not only. Is it happening out west. But it's happening in california we can. We can pretend we know california. Can't pretend we know what is washington state at all and certainly not these little towns and in reading that book. I think it would get a chance to talk about. Racism were objectively and not. Is that where you're looking around the other kid. What is the black kit thinking. There's there's a space where alexi draws a picture of himself and the racist things that are sort of beads blogs around ten and lose worth like redskin and other slurs used the native americans and we can read that at our school. But i think about could we even read a book that had all the swear words against african americans in there. It would be very hard for us to discuss that. But we can discuss slurs against native american more readily because not what's happening in front of us now one thing. I want to just quickly draw. Your attention to though is that there is one particular author who doesn't excellent job. Talking about the tropes in literature in terms of how americans are portrayed or discussed in the literature and that is michael. Chang and his work is fabulous. He's done a lot in terms of writing about comics as a medium. Because i write for comics bookcase on the side. I do a lot of reviews of comex. And i've done a number of Reading lists related you Indigenous reading that is highly recommended. But i want to say that. His work is important to read for kind of a general understanding in terms of looking at individual mythologies within the different tribes and so forth. One of the best things. I've come across. Is this anthology called moonshot which actually has three separate volumes each of which has authors from various different tribes from across the us canada and mexico. All of which are very interesting images either of the past the future or the presence there. They're a very interesting collection of stories. That are mostly in comic form summer short stories but moonshot volumes one. Two and three volume three came out. This year hangs melville last name of the older. I talked about michael shea. Asha is s. h. e. y. a. s. h. e. h. I think wait forget about us. I think wait hold on. Let me look it up to me. I will send it to you. I will text you cut. But the other that i wanted to tell you is that indigenous artists have also it a little more mainstream this year with marvel. For example where marvel's now has a series of comics called marvel's indigenous voices for getting kids into looking at the works of indigenous authors and artists. And that's exactly what i was gonna talk about and i love just in having this conversation about when we're talking about stories people of color and people looking around the room wondering what the black kid is thinking. What let the next people are thinking that all comes from this mindset of uttering and so another conversation has come before that about again people and normalizing culture and normalizing games. And it's just what his name is. This is the land is what they you know. It's just other people living and so when that uttering comes into play basketball start of course the whole culture is more than a conversation. But what i think about those times when okay. We're sitting in a classroom and in his time to talk about enslavement rate and people are you know you have different types of structures and teachers who have these conversations but if you're in the suburbs more than likely there's going to be one or two black kids in the class versus classroom rehab classroom full of black people and the comfort in having conversations is about the teachers comfort right. It's about if you're talking the white person about the others. The kids are going to hear that. I if you're talking at the white person about this is what happened to. I know this is so idealistic. But this would happen to our native american brothers and sisters You know it's a whole different mindsets and a whole different way of approaching topic that has to come from the instructor. And so yes when marvel comes out with things like that. Yes that is attempting to normalize.

Miriam hayes Miriam boras thompson puerto rican california northern virginia Thomson alexi richard michael shea caribbean marvel Chang washington Asha melville michael mexico canada us basketball
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"That's embodied in the form of a haunted mansion. It's your typical horror trope. But it is ron with. It's such stunning lines. Spy joshua hickson and the writing team of marucci and daniel do a brilliant job with a and you have this beautiful bog and these incredible colors but the plot is really a wonderful horror story about family secrets in a haunted past where nothing really stays varied and it also happens to have some really great disability representation that is never specifically called out the son in the family has selected mute and it's very sensitively portrayed and of course i happen to love. That is a teacher. I also have been to love the fact that you have kids who are full bodied characters in the story as well as quite a lot of fabulous scarce. And there's another horror book. I want to quickly call out. That was fantastic escape. Another thing that i've been reading. A lot of is indigenous literature. And i got very into stephen graham jones who is a bram stoker award winner and he has a book out this year. Called the only good indian and it's a wonderful teacher supernatural mystery that i really loved. I read it on kindle this year and it was quite a delight to escape from the horrors of twenty twenty into other worldly horrors is too quick. Add on this was the year that ariel introduced me to graphic novels. I had never read one before. And so she gave me think. On mother's day wasn't the piece on the juvenilia that the three bronte's Had written as children and the graphic novelist sort of an exposition of of what those stories that they had written. Were actually all about. And i found it fascinating and more than just a sort of simplistic recounting of a story there. I thought it was extremely clever. Not just in terms of the images but also the language that was that was used in the graphic novel and then more recently. She gave me a copy of the muller report in graphic novel form which also was very well done. The original muller reported. I've now put this one the graphic novel next to it on my shelf and if anybody wants to ever know anything about the muller report in some future history that i cannot quite imagine but anyway Did i would give them the graphic novel because it's funny and satiric and but also dead on in terms of the interpretation. So i've enjoyed getting into graphic novels as a result of those two pieces given to me. Courtesy of aerial south. We're at the last part we've gone way overtime already. But if you don't mind giving some love to your treasures that are going to live in your heart going forward that you read this year that we haven't given a shout out to yet. I just wanted to quickly mention three quite But all related in in subject matter one is of by. Iran of simone. Believe are hobble. You are american liberator. i ready. It's after seeing the.

joshua hickson marucci stephen graham jones bram stoker award ron daniel bronte ariel muller simone Iran
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"So again. The film the documentaries called gather And the link will be in the show notes so you can find out how to find a screening For that Looks it looks very interesting. I think. I think it's i think it solid. I'm i'm not casting berge towards that at all. i think. I think it's i think it's probably good. It is i watched. I was i got in on the the opening and watched it. It's it's well done okay. You saw the whole thing did see the whole thing. Okay excellent good well done. As a matter of fact. I reached out to the young man the chef and one of the young fishermen i reached up to them to see if they'll be a guest on food water air. Okay excellent and if they get them there i'll get him before our podcast here as well. Sure oregon's try to for two. We're out of him. Yeah that works coping so there you go. There's a little little little insight for you guys. But but yeah. I recommend recommend the documentary. It's well done. I know to the schmitz. I'll applaud them for this. Because it was extremely well done very very had no colonial influence that i could detect and it was all about natives so the again and again. We're going to give credit where credit belongs in his do so again that was Funded and produced apparently from the smith family foundation. Or which is the Called the eleventh hour project Where they're funding projects like that now. The schmidt family foundation has also donated to first nations development institute The organization that actually funded the twenty nine thousand nine reclaim native truth project. We often quote that here on our show the mission of Of first nations development institute is strengthening american indian economies to support healthy native communities we invest in and create innovative institutions and models that strengthen asset control and support economic development for american indian people in their communities First nations is actually the most highly rated american indian nonprofit in the nation. So there's a little facts as well and and so again The eleventh hour project has donated I don't know how often i haven't looked into that deep enough but apparently have done some funding for first nations development institute so so those are all good things those are those are positive things right. Yes they are. Welcome abigail to the chat room. Good morning good morning. Good to see you. Oh she's an awesome or right east coast schools and thank you for being a listener. Yep excellent excellent all right. So i want to transition a little bit into what the article was talking about relevant to education and so it mentions an expanded curriculum for two thousand twenty one. That includes again. We're talking about princeton university. If anybody's joining late the university's indigenous scholarship and i'm reading the article again draws faculty for more than twenty academic disciplines from history to american To american studies and recent courses range from introductions to native american and indigenous studies to classes on indigenous literatures and languages of the americas so again this is worth scrutinized in just a little bit and give me one moment. I've got to get a swig of water. Swig away brother swig away. Which you need to do you know no problem. I'm trying to balance coffee and water. So all right so i up I wanted to take a look at. And i put the links to brother so you could You could follow along as well And these links. Of course they'll be in the shown outside and as well as i think they're in the article as well but so there's a there's a link there for the list of princeton courses and so one deals with if i can get this open really fast Deals with let me scroll down here and find it Native american indigenous studies an introduction at states and this is how it's described says discourse will introduce students to the comparative study of the indigenous peoples of the americas we will take a broad hemispheric approach instead of focusing solely on the experiences of any particular native community allowing students to both acquaint themselves with the with the diversity of indigenous communities and better understand the multitude of indigenous experiences. Or what is meant what it means to be indigenous across regional contexts. How'd you processes of imperial expansionism and settler colonialism's shape the conditions within which Which indigenous america's now live how native people relate to settler colonial governing bodies. Today it asks so when we read stuff like that you know we like to go in and try to find out about the instructors. Where did they get their education in order to turn around because there there are some things in there that they make connections to one a which is what is it like to be indigenous. That is you know more or less one of the areas that they wanted to focus on so the instructors. Name is tiffany kane and She actually has a website and the link will be here as well And she writes about herself on. Her website says in my scholarship. I draw techniques across anthropology archaeology and history to investigate the the durability of colonialism and other forms of political violence and how they inform present day political consciousness and imaginations of the future. I currently hold a causton postdoctoral fellowship in the society of fellows for the liberal arts at princeton where i also lecture in the anthropology department and humanities council i received my phd and anthropological at the university of pennsylvania from two thousand sixteen to two thousand and eighteen while completing the phd. I spent time as a visiting student with the department of anthropology at the university of michigan in ann arbor. I have a number of ongoing research projects but my primary field work is based in quintana roo mexico where he helped facilitate a community heritage initiative called the theo skull heritage preservation and community development project. I'm committed to opera. Opera can't speak today. operationalizing public history to meet social. Justice needs and to envision a practice of heritage as liberation beyond academics. I love traveling being outside cooking reading Reading black and indigenous speculative fiction making crafty things and family time you'll also see my work published and presented under again. Tiffany see cain So okay now. We often talk on the show about that. We to see Citizens of indigenous nations lead lead american indian studies programs..

smith family foundation schmidt family foundation Of first nations development i berge schmitz americas princeton university oregon abigail Swig tiffany kane princeton society of fellows for the lib anthropology department and hu roo mexico america theo skull heritage preservati department of anthropology university of pennsylvania quintana
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"There you go deeper and deeper and deeper into this you you talk about teachers to teach more indigenous literature like Hands got Mamady. So maybe we get we get Scott involved in the next one who Jill involved in the next one of these as well. Can you just give it a real quickly here? Some things that people in Santa Fe can consider between now and maybe make a New year's resolution around this. Sure. Yeah, I think my two favorite ones right now are you know? And one of them actually isn't in the book is buy books for a little kids that are by indigenous authors or by First Nations authors. And then grow the reading that you're doing with your kids as they grow right? So imagine, you know if you bought little picture books for your little ones, and then when they were You know, foreign six and you bought the next age appropriate material. And then you bought do it. Louise Erdrich has these amazing amazing series for like bigger kids like the 8 to 10 year olds, and then you know, by the time they're 12, they're ready for this book. And how different would the average settlers awareness the of the environment that they live in? If they had, you know just that little bit of the part of the huge consciousness that we're all capable of informed by native voices? That's one give us another one. That's well. The other one for grown ups is just add a couple of native thinkers to your Twitter feed or your instagram. You know, there are amazing contributions being made and find a corner. So let some of that stuff and you're your own mind. Now it's not too late. You know, even if you didn't have this as part of your formal education, you could make room for something of this learning now, and it's pretty easy, You know, just find a couple Twitter Twitter handles to follow and you'll get some like new curated thinking and indigenous perspectives on how we see the world to think. I would add Number three by the book, Zubin. You wanted to add one. Yes, that's mine. My name is by the book by the book, the book so much information. It's good for what it represents to me. With. There's so much sort of Hop into poverty. Porn important about Native Americans said the opposite. And it gives people hope and give people an understanding that there are people out there that have had struggles and they have come out the other side. And coming out. The other side is something that That needs to spread and it is spreading around this country Everywhere you look, it's spreading their people around there. Now he healing or healed from a lot of the trauma, the that we experience And that's the strongest idea. I like. I still like reading because I get happy after everything. After everything can't be story gives me a little bit of going and it's legal. No Yes. Oh, you know what I think is by the book, Okay, I guarantee it, So I invite you both back. We'll do this again because you know, it's Sarah's Zubin said. You know, there's a lot in here to to get to and we we haven't even well, we barely got to the title so far. So invite you both back Once again. The book is called how we go home. Sorry, Confined, aware we confined aware On the Haymarket website. Haymarket Publishing. Do you have a website for yourself? Do it, Sara. No Age ease in claire dot com. Okay? Sir. Thank you very much. Zubin. Thank you very much. Thank you. You take care, EADS E ds and you know, I saw you make a lot of mistakes. It's in spite of the factor because of the fact that I grew up in the Navajo nation in northwestern part of the state. So you know, it's it's I don't know Some of some of the president's is I think you're kind of innate and taught into me because of where I grew up, and I don't know. No excuse. No excuse. We can all do better. Thank you, Paul. Stay healthy, okay? Thank you. Thank you. Happy New Year. Bye bye. All right. Six minutes.

Zubin Twitter Sarah Santa Fe Louise Erdrich Hands Haymarket Publishing Scott Jill Paul president Sara
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Language and literature from the University of Amsterdam graduated two thousand one. And I have been taught English literature you s literature US Women's Literature Afro American literature. But there was no course on native American or indigenous literature then. And there still isn't one today neither at the other universities. Yolanda goes on to provide a description. The course offers an introduction until the disciplinary field of native American first nations studies. With an emphasis on literature and some visual art and film as important inroads into various crucial themes. You will explore the history of native American Indians in the US and Canada from earliest moments to contract I'm sorry mums contact with the present. I'd like to see that against this background of settler colonialism. You will study native peoples efforts to preserve them claim a lost and threatened cultural and political standing. Throughout the course, we will engage various case studies to explore themes like Kant contact settlers colonialism. historiographer identity siren t trauma survive will end revival. We will also analyze and discuss a variety of modes of literary and visual reputations of. Quotes Indians and non native North American culture, and explore the waves stereotypical and otherwise, and which in quotes again, the Indian has functioned in non native culture and consciousness. And there were list of authors. That she listener listed here, we'll post those in the show notes. And I can only do this. Thanks to online courses on zoom nowadays, and thanks to the Dutch government for giving us a benefit for covid and so excited to spend some of it on this course, although the rents have gone up already and our and our health insurance will rise next year. From the courts, we have to watch a couple of films of the first indigenous online film festival and write something sensible about them. Maybe you've heard about this already and perhaps other listeners overseas or non natives will like them to and find them educational. They are mostly documentaries and registration is by email and I'll try to drop this Lincoln there. Actually I, already dropped out. Tireless into the chat room and also vision maker media who've been around for a long time That's that is a good resource. Thank you, brother And Thanks again for your good work all the Best Yolanda. Brunt. Yet I Yeah. As I said, I posted a link to the authors that digging under head mentioned in her email What what I included was also links to either. places of their work or or their BIOS and things of that nature of A number of those folks idea dereck nuys some others I don't and for the ones that I didn't that I researched them not. Entirely sure about. but I'll I'll leave it at that. also anytime, there is a not that not that a student has control over this necessarily but I, always question you know who is delivering the content, right? You know when we're talking about a coke native. American. Studies program. know. I. I. Always. WanNa. Get up to speed on the bio the person where did they? Where do they study? You know who were.

Literature Afro American liter University of Amsterdam Yolanda US dereck nuys WanNa Kant Dutch government Canada
"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"indigenous literature" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Is Entitled We've already survived an apocalypse indigenous writers changing Sifi. Very. Very cool. In this this was produced by Alexandria alter. And four. I'm sorry whereas it at Yes with New York Times. And so Article here goes on to say excuse me. Long underrepresented in John. Rao Fiction native. American. And first nations authors are reshaping. It's other worldly but still often eurocentric world's. When Sherry dim lean was growing up near a penny a D.. N. Anyway. A small town in Georgian Bay and Antero. Her Grandmother and great aunts hold her stories about a were where wolf like monster called the Rue. It wasn't spoken of as a mythical creature but as an actual threat. The embodiment of danger in a place where indigenous women face heightened risks of violence quote. This wasn't like here's a metaphor. She said they would say the rue guru is out and he's really hungry close quote. Decades later dim lean. A member of the Matai nation in Canada was working on a novel about a woman who's missing husband reappears with no memory of her seemingly under a spell. She needed a charismatic villain and when the ruble ru a wily trickster figure in not oral traditions popped into her head she realized that creature had never been given its due in popular culture. That flash of inspiration. Turned into empire of wild. John, wall bending novel whose modern indigenous characters confront environmental degradation discrimination, and the threat of cultural racer all while battling a devious monster. De, malene along with a WAD GAE SIG Rice Rebecca Roan Horse Darcy Little Badger and Stephen Graham. Jones. Who has been called quote the Jordan Peele of Horror Literature. Close quote are some of the indigenous novelist reshaping North American science fiction horror and fantasy. John Morris in which native writers have long been overlooked. Their fiction often draws on native American first nations, mythology and narrative traditions in ways that up and stereotypes about indigenous literature and cultures. And the authors are gaining recognition in a corner of the leaders of the literary world that has traditionally been white male and Eurocentric rooted in Western mythology. Quote there's a big push now for the telling of indigenous stories dim aline said. Quoting again, the only way I know who I am and who my community is. And the ways in which we survive in adapt is through stories. As more indigenous authors break into the John Ras. There's been an explosion of novels, comics, graphic novels, and short stories from writers blending sci-fi fantasy with native narratives, writing everything from slipstream alternate realities to supernatural horror to post. Apocalyptic, stories, about. Environmental. Collapse. Some authors say that SCI FI and fantasy settings allow them to re imagine the native experience in ways that wouldn't be possible and realistic fiction. Writing Futuristic Narratives and building fantasy worlds provide a measure of freedom to tell stories that feel experimental and innovative and aren't weighted down by the legacies of genocide and colonialism. Little Badgers debut novel. and I'll. Try to promises. Out later this month. is a young adult fantasy about a seventeen year old Lee Pan Apache girl who can awaken the ghosts of dead animals and sets out. To solve her cousin's murder. Little Badger WHO's thirty two? who was a member of the lifespan? Apache tribe of Texas said she wanted to write about young indigenous characters in an alternate in an alternative magic filled contemporary America because so much fiction featuring native characters as historical and feels outdated. Quoting her she says a lot of times when there's an Apache main character it takes place in the eighteen hundreds. She says quote it almost feels like in fiction people think we didn't survive but we did and we're still flourishing close quote very important quote right there. Absolutely. And and a very important motivation factor. For For wanting to write you know we we had What am I trying to say we had Or should I say we presented Our counter arguments to another author that many of you guys probably heard it's woman is from Great Britain. And her name is JK rollings. And JK rollings. wrote something you guys might be familiar with call Harry Potter. and Harry Potter then spun off a series of of short stories on a blog. And proceeded to you take what she said were inspiration from native American mythology. About things like skin walkers and other stuff not her place to write about and then when challenged on it, she refused to take the post down. So. You know glad to see. You know some of our own people saying you know sure we can write fiction too but when we can base it on aspects of our culture that are accurate. And not reimagined if you will. By the by non native authors. All right. So Go go go ahead. No I'm sorry. I was in I saw this article in it. It on mmediately. Something that. I gravitated towards and I knew that you would as well because we were. We're trying to compile. List of native authors correct Yep. and. This? You know touched my heart. More so in the fact that. I, understand what? It's like try to do character creation and. to, write you know nonfiction and I'm working on a nonfiction novel now. And it's. It's been an interesting journey. Of because you're actually. Creating. From. Within your so. An entire. Won't say culture but it Tired. Entire existence of people that never existed before. So anybody that's a writer out there they'll understand what I'm trying to convey. But it takes a lot. To Create A. Even, if it's a fictional history or science fiction or it takes a lot to create a novel. And people just you know. Again, you know people will say native authors. That's that can't be real natives dump a lot to do that. But Oh yeah. There's lots of us out there. Absolutely, lots of us out there and I applaud these authors for. Denver's in their work and their dedication, and I'm going to do all I can to support them. All right. And there's a lot more in this article but unpreferred guys go out and read it and I just posted the Lincoln in the show not just there will be in the show nuts as well but in in the chat as well. So if you want to get a glimpse at it right now, if you're listening live it's there and by all means, please you guys check out these authors, check out their work and and because the links do.

John writer JK rollings New York Times Sifi Jordan Peele Sherry Alexandria SCI FI John Ras John Morris Texas Matai nation Georgian Bay Rebecca Roan aline Canada murder Antero
Why stories matter now more than ever

Unreserved

08:22 min | 2 years ago

Why stories matter now more than ever

"Can act as a comfort. They can explain transport record or act as a warning. They can help us. Imagine other worlds and futures the stories we take in have an impact they shape our inner and outer worlds and now maybe more than ever before stories matter today on unreserved in the time of the corona virus how indigenous people are looking to stories to deal with this challenging time. We're in a moment. That feels unsettling uncertain. Even scary. My next guest says this is why we need stories now more than ever Daniel. Heath Justice is the author of why Indigenous Literatures Matter? He's Cherokee and a professor and indigenous studies and English at the University of British Columbia. Daniel joined me from his home on the Sunshine Coast. Daniel Welcome to the show. Thank you so much. I am really honored to be here now. The last time we spoke your book why indigenous literatures matter had just been published and now we find ourselves in the midst of a pandemic. Why do you think indigenous literatures matter now? For so many reasons I think one of the main ones is stories help us carry on and indigenous peoples. Know what it is to face the end of the world many many times And I think our stories give us a lot of guidance that way and also speak to a life beyond the despair of the now How do you think literature can help us through this difficult time? I struggle with a little bit. Honestly it does it in a lot of ways. I think one way is to is to remind us that. There's something beyond the now but I think also just to articulate the the really mixed emotions of dealing with a time of real uncertainty and flux and chaos indigenous writers have addressed these issues. Well not just in writing but through story since time immemorial and I think especially since fourteen ninety two those have been really important testimonies of survival and reminders of where we come from and what we've struggled through and also a measure of hope for what what might still come When you think about the importance of stories You mentioned this briefly. Are you thinking about more than just written texts? Oh absolutely unthinking. Our traditional stories on thinking of our family stories The Dreams and fantasies and imaginings of of worlds that haven't yet come into being or may never come into being. I'm thinking of poems and songs. And all of the ways that we articulate our being in the world Past present and future. So what stories are. Are you turning during this time on turning to a lot of nonfiction actually You know so much work as in fiction and poetry. But I'm engaging a lot of philosophy about kinship and being in better relationship with the living world and thinking about what this time means in terms of of how we how we exist in relation with one another both in the positive and the negative ways. I think it's important to read both of those kinds of stories What about within within your own cultural framework understand there's a Cherokee story about how disease entered the world? There is an that has actually lingered with me. The Turkey story of how does came into world. Was that in the early times. Humans were very very fragile and very weak and the animals gifted their bodies and gifted themselves to humanity as their young species to help us survive so we didn't have claws. We didn't have great teeth. We didn't have for to protect ourselves so animals gave of themselves and sacrificed. Because we were. We were young and vulnerable but as we became more powerful we forgot those lessons and so we started to become much more abusive and we started to kill animals beyond our aid and finally the animals came together in council and each of the animal chiefs cursed us with disease as payback for the abuse that we had brought them in the in hospitality that we treated them with. And so that's one part of the story. That's how disease came into the world but this is also a story about how medicine came into the world because in council around the animal chiefs where the plant chiefs and that. He took pity on us. They also understood that we were very young and we were very ignorant than they had hoped that we could do better and so they gave us medicine for each disease that the animals cursed us with. And that's a pretty significant story in Cherokee tradition. It's a it is a story about. How generous the plants have been to us but it's also a warning that if we mistreat the plants. There's nobody to help us then. So it's a reminder that we have to be accountable for the way we treat our kin both human and other than human and there are consequences to not being in good relation with the world and that story has kind of been resonating in my in my thoughts and and thinking about what. What does it mean now to be in better relation in a world that is so out of balance a very powerful story what about other storytellers authors? Is there a book or passage that you've been finding helpful that you'd like to share with us? There's a passage in Leslie. Marmon SILCO's storyteller where she is talking about a story telling contest between a group of witches. This is before before fourteen ninety two. And they're all sharing these really horrible stories and in one of the witches who is unknown to the others shares. A story and it is so horrific. It's the story of colonization it's so terrifying and so terrible and the passage goes so the other witches said okay you win you take the prize but what you said just now. It isn't so funny it doesn't sound so good we are doing okay without it. We can get along without that kind of thing. Take it back. Call that story back but the witch just shook its head at the others and they're stinking animal furs and feathers. It's already turned loose. It's already coming. It can't be called back and that may seem like a very grim hopeless story for me. I actually find that a pretty powerful reminder that we have to be really careful especially in this time of of anxiety and fear what are we. What are we sending out into the world that we might not be able to take back and what is being sent out into the world by others. That is going to be very hard if not impossible for them to take back. It's not just about us. It's about the other people especially people in power. What are they? What stories are they putting out into the world that are going to wreak havoc on the world? I think it's really important to to think about those sorts of stories and those warnings reminders while we're also thinking about the ones that are very incredibly hopeful and so somebody likely and Simpson in her book. As we've always done toward the end she has really really powerful the powerful paragraph. It's just a few lines. I wanted to share. Indigenous futures are entirely dependent upon what we collectively do now as diverse indigenous nations with our ancestors and those yet unborn to create indigenous presences and to generate the conditions for indigenous futures by deeply engaging in our nation based grounded normativity we must continuously build and rebuild indigenous worlds and then she wraps up that paragraph by saying I don't want to imagine or dream futures. I want a better present and I think that for me is a real. It's a real call to accountability to call to love You know she talks about the colonial love. I'm finding that really helpful hopeful right now. We do have to think about the future. But what are we doing in our present as

Daniel Cherokee University Of British Columbia Heath Justice Turkey Professor Sunshine Coast Marmon Silco Leslie Others Simpson