35 Burst results for "Indiana University"

Supreme Court Justice Won't Block College Vaccine Mandate

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Supreme Court Justice Won't Block College Vaccine Mandate

"Supreme Court justice Amy Coney Barrett has refused to block a plan by Indiana University to require students and employees get vaccinated against covert nineteen its action was in response to an emergency request from eight students who wanted the High Court to issue an order barring the university from enforcing the mandate the policy does have religious and medical exemptions in seven of the eight students qualify for religious exemptions however exempts students must be tested twice a week students who don't get vaccinated will have their registration cancelled and workers who don't comply will lose their jobs the plan requires about ninety thousand students in forty thousand employees and seven campuses to get vaccinated for the fall semester my camp in Washington

Justice Amy Coney Barrett Indiana University Supreme Court High Court Washington
Supreme Court Declines Request by Indiana University Students to Block COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

Coronavirus 411

00:18 sec | Last month

Supreme Court Declines Request by Indiana University Students to Block COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

"The supreme court said yes. Universities can impose a vaccine mandate on students and faculty it declined to block a mandate at indiana university or provide emergency relief requested by some students who said the mandate violates their constitutional right to bodily integrity under the fourteenth amendment

Supreme Court Indiana University
Supreme Court Asked to Block Indiana University's COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

AP 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | Last month

Supreme Court Asked to Block Indiana University's COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

"The Supreme Court is being asked to block a plan by Indiana University to require students and employees to be vaccinated against Covid 19. It's the first time the high court's been asked to weigh in as more companies and governments mandate covid safety measures for workers and

Covid Indiana University Supreme Court
This week on "Face the Nation," August 8

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | Last month

This week on "Face the Nation," August 8

"The Supreme Court is being asked to block a plan by Indiana University to require students and employees to be vaccinated against Covid 19. It's the first time the high court's been asked to weigh in as more companies and governments mandate covid safety measures for workers and customers.

Covid Indiana University Supreme Court
Study: Only Half of American Households Donate to Charity

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Study: Only Half of American Households Donate to Charity

"For the first time in nearly two decades a study released Tuesday shows only half of US households donated to a charity in twenty eighteen the findings by Indiana university's Lilly family school of philanthropy confirm a trend worrying experts donations are reaching record highs but giving is done by a smaller slice of the population experts say many factors are contributing to the decline the percentage of Americans giving to religious causes decreased in tandem with attendance at worship services in part the Great Depression made it difficult for some younger Americans to establish a habit of giving the study doesn't measure contributions of goods and services or donations made through crowd funding Julie Walker New York

Lilly Family School Of Philant Indiana University United States Depression Julie Walker New York
Indiana University Can Require That Students and Employees Be Vaccinated

The Dana Show

00:10 sec | 2 months ago

Indiana University Can Require That Students and Employees Be Vaccinated

"This was last night can require, according to a judge. They ruled this yesterday. They can require it's 90,000 students and 40,000 employees to get vaccinated.

Hewitt: Military, Any Government Arm Can Require COVID-19 Vaccines

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Hewitt: Military, Any Government Arm Can Require COVID-19 Vaccines

"Indiana university yesterday Got the green light from federal. Judge saying it can require kobe. Nineteen back scenes and by the way any arm of the government can indeed require. Koga vaccines for those who use its benefits or who are in its employ. I personally believe the military ought to have done this a long time ago in the national guard. It's a national security issue. Ted nolan the great water polo coach at uci. Irvine used to scream at his players to get the flu shot in the off-season saying if we're in the finals and you get the flu. I eight say at very colorful. Because he had a language like a sailor you will never be in my presence again and it seems to me that if you're a warfighting unit you have to be wore ready you can't risk getting the delta you need to be vaccinated and sorry. Join the military. You don't have any rights. But i would extend that to government employees and yes and matija indiana university. If i'm a college and i make that choice and it's up to them. Some don't wanna do that. That's fine but if they do it there can any private business can do. It doesn't violate your rights as an employee. The only thing that can happen is that the government can't make you do it. There would be some legislation possible. It would then be subject to constitutional stress test depending on the exemptions that allowed and and whether or not it was uniformly applied We would take a look at that point but you certainly could have the military do it in the military

Ted Nolan Koga FLU Indiana University Matija Indiana University UCI National Guard Irvine
"Whispers to God": Islam and Mental Health

Immigrantly

02:13 min | 2 months ago

"Whispers to God": Islam and Mental Health

"Hi everyone be back in the studio. It's crazy to be back here. Slowly returning back to recording are episodes. In which is create because now i can share the same physical space with my guests and colleagues and today. I'm here with sarah. She is one of our writers alot. Everyone so sad. I'll why don't you introduce yourself to our listeners. Yeah hi guys. I'm sarah and i am the content and media editor for immigrants. I've been here for quite some time now. Almost two years right. Yeah it's crazy time flies. So what is today's episode about sara. Yes so we partnered with indiana university's muslim voices project and we decided to get together and make an episode about the relationship between islam and mental health. And we did that. Because in my opinion spirituality is really just about knowing how to stay in a good state of mind throughout the entirety of just you know existing as a human so i feel like it makes complete sense for us to explore how religion can be a part of that. Because i feel like on this show. We've done a lot of talking about religion as an institution and from a historical place. But i feel like it's time to really delve into how it affects. People and also the concept of spirituality. Right it applies to everyone. Everyone who follow organized religion braces people. Who don't follow religion at all. At least if not spirituality than mindfulness right. Yeah definitely. Sarah tell us a little bit about our guests. Yes so our guests are heather. Coup who is a professor at indiana university and hanan moawad who is a friend of muslim voices and they are both practicing muslims Heather is from wisconsin and she actually converted after meeting her now ex husband and after starting a family with him. Her relationship to islam really strengthened. And she really became a fully practicing muslim when she had her miscarriage at a relatively early age and that really set her into a place where she needed that sort of guidance.

Sarah Indiana University Sara Hanan Moawad Heather Wisconsin
Charitable Giving in the U.S. Reaches All-Time High in 2020

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Charitable Giving in the U.S. Reaches All-Time High in 2020

"Charitable giving hit an all time high in twenty twenty Americans gave more to charity last year than in twenty nineteen despite an economic downturn due to covert nineteen the record total was four hundred and seventy one billion dollars that's according to Indiana university's Lilly family school of philanthropy which research and wrote the report it's the first study to provide a comprehensive look into how donors big and small stepped up to meet the increased needs brought by the economic crisis racial unrest and global pandemic giving by individuals which made up most of the donations last year rose by about two percent the biggest object came from foundations they increase their giving by seventy percent I'm Shelley Adler

Lilly Family School Of Philant Indiana University Shelley Adler
"indiana university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Chest pain Rob ekg changes in perry I think the difference there is to highlight with a post. Cardiac injury syndromes. It's really more for diffuse And can't more commonly have pulmonary involvement with plu writings and or even pommie infiltrates which i learned. only recently. in the reason i think it's predominantly clinical is because with guidelines need to build extrapolate to areas that maybe don't have advanced multi modality imaging available but in centers like indiana university..

indiana university Rob
"indiana university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:06 min | 3 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Affects the lives of hundreds of millions dedicated cardio nerds everywhere are working hard to fight this global epidemic. These are their stories. Hey everyone join us on a trip to join the hoosier. Cardi nerds in the beautiful state of indiana today. We get to discuss a phenomenal case with colleagues from indiana university. With a release of this episode. We are so thrilled to invite the indiana university cardiology fellowship to join the cardinals healy on the list of programs who support our mission to democratize cardiovascular education so we thank dr deepak and the rest of program leadership for joining us elevating the platform as well as for nominating dr assad harambee to be the ambassador to represent their program friends we thank you for subscribing to and supporting the cardi learns this podcast is not meant to be used for medical advice. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of employers speaker. Disclosures are available in the episode description. There is no commercial or in kinds of for this activity. Be sure to claim free. Cme credit using the link in the episode description. And now it's time to get nerdy cardi nerds. Welcome back to another fabulous cnc. Our thanks for joining us for a great trip to indianapolis as we're joined by our colleagues fellows from indiana university cardiology fellowship training program. We have with us. Doctors assad tourabi. Sujoy fukien and morris. I want to welcome you to the show. And i have to say. I'm so excited for this discussion. My connection to indiana university is when we stole dr michael emery from your program and he's been such a great addition especially towards sports cardiology program learning so much from him but from everything. He's told me about indiana university. We're in for real treat sa- guys go ahead and introduce yourselves to our audience. Guys my name is said. I'm a first year fellow here at a u been. Hoosier my whole life Trains here for residency here from medical school and or state on fellowship. Really interested in interventional cardiology and Happy to be on the podcast guests guys. Thanks for having us my name. Sujoy fuqing. I'm one of the third year cardiology fellows. Also serving as one of the chief fellas hear this year at indiana. I'm originally from muncie indiana. Which is about one hour northeast of indianapolis. But i went to med school in albany new york. And then i did residency in atlanta at emory university. Before returning home here at indiana. And i'll be staying on as one of the interventional fella starting this july indianapolis a great city. I love running along the canal and just trying out a lot of the restaurants with this great group of fellows have here. Hey everyone. I'm michelle morris like assad i am also an are you life for. I've done all my training at. Iu including medical school and residency. I will be serving as one of the chief fellows next year and will also be staying on for an interventional year after that..

indianapolis albany michelle morris Sujoy fukien next year atlanta morris assad tourabi hundreds of millions Sujoy fuqing michael emery assad indiana third year first year muncie indiana emory university today dr indiana university
Brad Stevens Says He’s Not Leaving Boston Celtics For Indiana Hoosiers

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

Brad Stevens Says He’s Not Leaving Boston Celtics For Indiana Hoosiers

"Brad stevens and the celtics have been struggling this season for boston. Standards and the head. Coaching job at indiana is wide open. Stevens has denied one job right now but burning you know this. Some of the biggest sportsbooks taken the odd off the boards. You can't even bet it anymore. Rob you know vegas no trona rolling brad. Stevens will be the next coach indiana university.

Brad Stevens Celtics Stevens Boston Indiana ROB Vegas Brad Indiana University
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 7 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Greg Colton Aaron Perkins Ten Percent Wilson Two Years Five Years Forty Days One Hundred Percent Fourteen Sixteen Months Simmons Five Step Five Less Than Eight Hundred Bucks TWO Today Twenty Five Years Twenty Five Will Simmons Both Seven Seven Hundred Eighty Buc VA Greg Navy Gregg Golden Simmons Law Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 7 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Greg Colton Aaron Perkins Ten Percent Wilson Two Years Five Years Forty Days One Hundred Percent Fourteen Sixteen Months Simmons Five Step Five Less Than Eight Hundred Bucks TWO Today Twenty Five Years Twenty Five Will Simmons Both Seven Seven Hundred Eighty Buc VA Greg Navy Gregg Golden Simmons Law Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Health Equity Advocate On Black Doctor's Video Of Treatment For COVID-19

All Things Considered

04:42 min | 9 months ago

Health Equity Advocate On Black Doctor's Video Of Treatment For COVID-19

"Dr Susan Moore has become a hashtag on social media. More of family physician died of covert 19 and an Indiana hospital last week. She was 52 days before she died. She posted a video on Facebook in which she said her doctors treated her as if she were a drug addict. She said they were planning to discharge her from the hospital too soon. People get killed. When you send them home, and they don't know how to affect for themselves. In that video, which has no circulated all over social media doctor more maintained that if she were white, her care for covert 19 would have been very different. Enjoy a career. Perry is president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative. She joins us now. Thanks for speaking with us. Thank you so much for having me. What went through your mind when you first watch that video of Dr Moore speaking from her hospital bed, You know, it was so deeply saddening and very familiar asses. The world watch the murder of George Floyd and it stopped the world in its tracks because, although we'd heard about police violence before, and we knew it existed, and we've seen data and reports That's the same way that I felt watching. Dr Susan Moore described what was happening to her instead of the hospital. It was a glimpse into side of what we all know to be true what we've experienced as members of the black community. Inside of health care is health care providers. There's an O B g Y n And also just knowing that it was not going to end well, knowing that she was begging and pleading and wanting to be seen and valued is fully human, and that wasn't happening. You I know have worked with hospitals on anti racism training. Is there data Do we know how common what Dr Moore described as her experience was? Well, we do know from the data. We work in the black maternal health space, and there's been some studies. That show that medical students believe that black patients don't feel pain the same way that they believe that black patients have thicker skin. There were also a study that was done out of university, North Carolina that showed that if there was a black preacher and white patient asking for a pain treatment toe You have to after having that major abdominal surgery that the black patient got it in a less timely manner and less frequently and with the less amount so every time that we have worked with hospitals, and I've said Okay, well, maybe it's not you. Maybe that's just that hospital that group run your own data Look to see by race. If you're managing your patient's pain equally, if when they come in, they get the same treatment and I've yet to have a hospital come back as a C I told you we're doing it all the same. And so I'm looking forward to that day. You're making a point that Dr Moore herself made in that video. She said she believed she was denied more pain medication or as much as she needed because of her race. I want to mention that the hospital where she was treated Indiana University health Has put out a statement. They say they can't come in on her specific case because of privacy laws. But they say the hospital is committed to equity to reducing racial disparities. They say they're going to do a full investigation. What will you be watching for in that investigation? I'm excited to hear that they want to investigate. It was a little traumatizing for communities. I know that these privacy laws are important. But if you've been a community like the black community, or LGBTQ community or indigenous folks who've been had mistrust from the health care system, because we've been abused by it and lie to and not treated well, when we hear things like we can't comment that doesn't engender trust going forward. Some people listening might be wondering Hang on over prescription of pain. Meds of opioids has been a huge problem. Doctors and hospitals have struggled with how to balance Against overprescribing with obviously the very real need for care and pain relief. Do you think that was at all in play here? Yes, I'm sure that the providers in that hospital or were hypersensitive and very aware of the pain issues and the pain still issues, But unfortunately, when you are from a community that has been that Centered and has been marginalized. There's something is well, you must be pill seeking, like these other people, and we must then count, so the assumption is really real, that I've experienced it by himself, where family members are assumed to be drug seeking pills seeking and never, just looking at the person is individual saying what I want my 52 year old friend as Dr Susan, where could be any of our friend? Be lying here in pain. Don't I want to address her pain? Don't I wanted to be pain free, but I value her, and that's what we're asking for. Dr Joya career, Perry. She heads the National Birth Equity Collaborative. She was speaking about the experience of Dr Susan Moore, who died of covert 19 on December 20th. Dr. Crew, Perry. Thank you. Thank you so much air in patient.

Dr Moore Dr Susan Moore National Birth Equity Collabor George Floyd Perry Indiana Facebook North Carolina Indiana University Dr Susan Dr Joya Dr. Crew
"indiana university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"They are highly creative people more prone to madness. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute mark canada professor of english at indiana university. Kokomo explores the brain to find out. Artists have long been considered well. Different writers. painters musicians tend to all even nervous. Some of these creative types have embraced this image of the eccentric outsider. After all emily dickenson put much madness is divined sense. Is there something different about artists. Modern science allows us to go beyond our impressions and identify possible. Factors that distinguish highly creative people in my research on that most tray of artists. Edgar allan poe. I used the modern model of the divided brain to explain his method and effect on readers. Poll showed remarkable predilection for functions inclinations associated with the right side of our brains the pit and the pendulum the mask of the red death and other works team with striking often. Surreal images as well as appeals to negative emotions particularly horror and grief some portrayed character sabotaging themselves much as po did in his own life when he picked fights and blue opportunities in light of these parallels. I believe that posed right. Brain played a crucial role in his life and literature. Po- of the political portion of his brain and claimed to have drawn literary material from his dreams discovered a way to reach our right brains by mining and employing his own. Perhaps artists are not mad after all. Maybe they are the ones in their right mind. That was mark. Canada of indiana university. Kokomo you can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot. Org production support for the academic. Minute comes from a and you advancing liberal learning and research for the public good..

dr lynn Pascarella president associati mark canada emily dickenson Kokomo indiana university Edgar allan poe Canada
"indiana university" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:04 min | 10 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Following is from Indiana University, Indiana University. It's sort of like the University of Wisconsin and that there's one large campus and that they have other campuses around the state. It's not his Big Wisconsin it's 26 campuses. In Indiana University has just a few. The main one, of course, is in Bloomington, but they got a couple of other so anyway. The total enrollment at Indiana University across the various campuses is about 70,000. What they did. Was once in person learning started They tracked. All of the credit hours taken by all of the 70,000 students spread at all of their campuses. And they then correlated that against The students who became positive for covet. Let me quote from the release of Indiana University. The study reviewed data for more than 70,000 undergraduate student said All I you campuses and compared the number of positive tests with the number of in person credit hours taken by the students, not let me interject what's a credit hour? Because that Some kids take a lot of credit hours Credit hour is you get a certain number of credits for each class that you take so back in my ear. I think 16 was a standard load. I think it's slower than that now, but it usually amounts to the number of hours that you're in class. In a given week and that you get that number of credits for the years so Student whose only doing a couple of classes might only have five or six credits, and somebody who is a nut trying to graduate in three years might have 22. The point is is that they're comparing here the number of credit hours and the rate of covert infection back to the story. Quote what we found that actually. The more in person credit hours a student had The less likely they were to test positive for covert 19. Said Dr Letter to Bible assistant professor of clinical medicine and medical director of infection prevention at the Indiana University School of Medicine and a key member of the IU medical response team quote. The analysis gives us even more confidence that the safety measures I, you put in place in order to resume in person instruction. Provide a benefit to the students. Now the story goes on. And they quote another doctor here, Rosenberg and I you saying the idea that if I you classrooms were risky for Copan 19 transmission. We'd expect to see higher numbers of cases among students who spend more time and classrooms. Rosenberg said. It would be what we call a dose response relationship. In fact, we saw the opposite, Fred That's fascinating stuff. The more time the Indiana students spent in class, the less likelier they were to get covered. Now, I think If you think this through it with the guy do all these studies that we have it all the information and covered almost everything When you think it through, allows you to learn. Here's how I take this information. First of all, everybody has to be somewhere. Let's imagine you're 20 and you're going to IU Indiana University. If you're not in class, you're going to be somewhere else, right? That's the whole problem with these lack downs. It presumes that someone was locked down from something isn't anywhere else that they're in some sort of Vapor shield where they're not interacting with another human being. In fact, where do you figure a college student would be at the college student visiting class? I'm guessing hanging with other college kids in probably not with the type of distancing normally in place of a classroom. Most college students live in either dormitories. Or apartments. Generally dense close in living. So if they're not in the classroom If they're in the Dharma toy. Or they're in the apartment. Or going off into another things because they got nothing to do because there's no class. Logic would tell you that it probably makes sense that maybe that's why they're more likely in that scenario to get covered. The point is, is that if it Indiana they set out to reduce the number of kids to get covered, they'd have have been class even more than they currently are. We certainly have noted That in many of the cities that have done lockdowns, the covert right has not gone down. York, said he's been locked down for a year nearly They can't kill off Corbett over there. It's because when people aren't meandering around the city There's still add whole, meandering around their homes and meandering around their neighborhoods and meandering around their family members. We act is, though, and now let's talk and take this beyond the university level and talk about public schools. The kids that aren't in public school have to be somewhere else, probably at home, probably running around the backyard. Probably going doing this stat of the other thing. There's still going to be somewhere. And it's still going to have the same opportunity to catch and transmit the virus. The other. One thing you could say about the Indiana University study is that they're focused on students and not the professor's. Perhaps you could make the case that the professor's they're less likely to get called it if they're not in the classroom. Because they're just going to sit there and their own house with their spouse or by themselves or wherever they are. It never go to work. But as for the students, the people that you are presumably running these institutions for At the college level. At least they're not a greater risk of getting cold. But if they are in class it again if you think it through any of you have a college kid. You do, don't you? She's still in college. I keep forgetting you tell me the stories and then I forget. He's got a mask. Is she doing any in classroom learning? Or is she It's all field where that's a bad. That's a bad example then. But okay, let's imagine she was still a senior. And if she wasn't in class, she'd have to be somewhere else. Where would she babe hanging her with other students, Right? In other words, she wouldn't be any less likely to get Co vered not being in the classroom. She might actually be an environment for the students. Were there even closer physically together, that you would be in a classic. You know where your desk and just gotta spread out or a lecture hall so forth, And so what? This is the folly of shutting down the schools thinking you're protecting the students because the students are all going to be somewhere. My guess is and I haven't practiced that the rate of covert, for example, in our company that there's no difference between those of us who bet at work and those of us that are working from home in terms of the rate. I don't think it is one thing to do with. It doesn't have anything to do with anything else because everybody has to be somewhere. The one group that might be protected is the employees who don't have killed interact with the people that would be at the university or the high school of the great school or whatever it is. So if that's what the priority has just come out and say it, come on and say that at the university is that you're shutting everything down that we're screwing the kids who are paying a fortune into wishing to protect Bunch of tenured faculty members and just say at the public school level that the Children who really need to learn are being screwed. In order to protect some $75,000, a year public school teacher gets to retire at the age of 53 go to Florida and pay their tax don't pay their taxes down there at the expense of those Children. Just come right out and admit that you're doing it for the employees and not for the people that we actually built these institutions for Fight it interested? You know, India is big university. There's a study done by their school of medicine fight it interesting that this story hasn't gotten a lot of coverage. And again that the way the approach that is interesting, they found But the more credit hours the students talk, the less likely they were to get covered. Was always exceptions..

Indiana University Indiana Indiana University School of M IU Indiana University Rosenberg University of Wisconsin professor Wisconsin Bloomington India school teacher York Florida assistant professor of clinica Dr Letter Copan Corbett medical director
The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:08 min | 10 months ago

The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

"Our guest today again is peter. Mb he's the president of the regan streep institute and he's going to be here today to talk to us about all in. And i can't wait to hear what that's about. But before even that peter if you could just give our listeners reminder of what. The reconstruction institute is considering the president of it. You should be best able to answer that. Sure happy to do it. And it's great to be with you again So the regan. Streep institute is an applied research institute in indianapolis indiana. That's a affiliated with and a support organization to indiana university and the indiana university school of medicine. We've been around for about fifty years and we do research and innovation in the areas of biomedical informatics. Health services research in aging research with the intent of really improving health and health care through innovation primarily in the areas. I've described that relate to how we better use technology data information science and improve the practice of healthcare in order to improve the lives of people everywhere. So what is all in. Yeah so all in is is an initiative that started with the indiana clinical translational science institute or see. Tsi which has the goal of really engaging with the residents of indiana to improve their understanding of health issues so health literacy. We often call it to better understand the role of research in Improving our ability to take care of people to make discoveries to improve healthcare and to give people the opportunity if they volunteer to be a part of research studies and so we do that. A number of different ways through this initiative call in. Is this something that it's an issue. Do people not have a good sense of health. And what's going on and had to be involved. i mean. certainly. There's some people who have a very good understanding of health issues and and certainly their own health but there's a lot of folks who you know may not understand a lot about the health and also the The rapidly developing science behind. What we think of as modern day medicine and healthcare and so as part of the indiana see. Tsi we work across the state to improve how we can take better care of people through research through discovery and part of that involves a we believe very strongly engaging with the popular engaging with people and making sure that they are not just a. We do not want to think of people who participate in research as so-called research subjects that you know that's not really the goal. The goal is to have participants. The goal is to have people who volunteer. Who understand what it is that we are studying and And then volunteer to be a part of those research studies and there are several reasons for that number one the more engagement. We have the science that results from that will actually be applicable to our population. Right so the more people from indiana from our communities that represent the diverse communities here across the state the more of them that are engaged the more likely the results are going to benefit them in their communities. And we think that generally speaking the impact of that is not only going to be felt by the kinds of therapies and resources that we bring to help people get better when they get sick but also just generally having a better understanding of health issues. will probably result in a healthier population. And that's an area where indiana traditionally hasn't done very well so we want to improve that. So how do you get people more involved. How do you get them linked in so. There's a number of different ways we've gone about. This one is that we've got these days of course websites and apps and other solutions where people can engage so for instance in the all in for health dot info website. People can go and read about health issues. They can learn more about the kinds of studies that are going on across our universities and our academic health centers across the state. They can volunteer to participate in those studies so we have a volunteer registry. Where at this point. As of last month we have over thirty thousand hoosiers that have signed up to be a part of the registry and that's pretty substantial in addition to that we broadcast information in different ways. Sometimes we do things like this with podcasts. Sometimes we do advertising and other kinds of activities all with the goal of trying to get people in our state to understand the important medical research. That's happening understand the kinds of discoveries that are being made to help them in their families and then giving them opportunities to connect so what happens when someone registers. What's the next step. so they register. They will get confirmation that they've registered and then there Depending on what they've agreed to they'll start to get information about health issues so we send out periodically newsletters and other kinds of information from a lot of the science. That's being done here across our different university partners at indiana university and purdue and notre dame and otherwise across our health system partners so they'll get that information and in addition they'll get notified and have the opportunity to see information about research studies as well when they become available and that can happen again in various ways that we can reach out to people so good example recently was giving people the opportunity to sign up for studies around covert as an example.

Indiana Regan Streep Institute Streep Institute Indiana Clinical Translational Peter Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Regan TSI Indianapolis Purdue
"indiana university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:43 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Developing a daily digital habit could be key to your wellbeing. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute paul cook associate professor of english. indiana university. kokomo explained how to do so. The web and social media have become absolutely central to how we learn work play share and communicate in the post digital era. Nearly everyone has heard of fake news. But fewer people are aware of digital information plentitude which refers to the sheer proliferation of information and the superabundance of perspectives in online environments the overload we experienced daily impacts democratic engagement and our ability to make informed decisions. We get forced into silos a retune out altogether while a healthy democracy does not require that we all think our vote the same way it does demand that we share basic assumptions about the way the world works without common facts or understandings about where we are. And where we've been. We are rudderless on a vast sea. Miss framed information internet flotsam and outright lies. We wait for our political institutions to catch up. But that may never happen. We could rely on twitter and facebook to sift through false or misleading information for us or we could do the heavy lifting ourselves by becoming attuned to what we consume how much time we spend writing the flow of social media and making healthier choices about our daily media habits. I everyone should track how much time they spend online. Keep a job or set up your phone to keep track for you. Second when post sets you off check your emotions and use mindfulness techniques like deep breathing to calm yourself before you react. Third be aware of cognitive traps. Like confirmation.

dr lynn association of american colleg Pascarella associate professor indiana twitter president facebook paul
"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:28 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And then what we did when we found the results and You know the correlations between transparency particularly and Dana came out in two very clear clusters. Gwen you look at the. At the I don't think we even drew circles around them now sometimes when you're doing you know like. Minimum Distance Cluster calculations, and you're trying to share the visualization. So you put a circle around and. I don't think we did that we look here's clusters When So we, we did this work we did the correlations and then we did the. Cluster analysis and some of the. Some of the correlations seem to predict. For seemed to predict is Wayne too strong word seem to indicate. that. We could not reject the hypothesis that this is for criminal. Four prophets. Activity. Driven by. Routine activity theory that is e crime is kind of socially acceptable in available in a way to make money. And then the second smaller cluster when we looked at the nose in that cluster. They were. All places. That had active civil conflict. So I, feel that that was. Very hard to figure out. What is driving? Everything on the network. And We can use very traditional tools like. anti-smuggling efforts, interventions into communities, ican economic constraint economic controls. Because to fight. Global. Organized Crime. We need to use on the possible tools we have. At this goes back to so if it is possible to assign a probability. That a routing anomaly is is related to crime. Avaz. Dan. Just by happenstance then. Going back to what we're discussing before the devices becoming more ever and intelligent. Those types of attributes could be used to at least alert the user. Exactly. Absolutely. And then if you have a situation where what is driving a E crime is relative deprivation. So then you might say, all right we're going to try to create opportunities for the people who live here but if you have a situation where what is driving e crime is Hostile intelligence you absolutely do not want to have a policy of going in there and trying to train everybody to be better at competing. So, it can also drive higher level insights on how to deal with. A hot spots. That's very interesting. I. Want to touch another paper. Jane. Preventing, data, exfiltration. Via Political and geographic. Routing policies. So what exactly is? That is what happens when there's a militias hijack. So we talked about. You know the the attack to steal on encrypted bitcoins and we talked about the traffic that went through Iceland. So those are cases of information exfiltration where. People should not be able to access information as it goes across the network, but they are able to pull it off the network using an attack. And that's one of those things where we used very basic human observation. That is. If you're worried about crime. And Malicious intelligence agencies. Then you're worried about jurisdiction. So we asked the question. In that case in that paper. What if we just? Refused to. Route. Through certain jurisdictions what if we exchanged availability for confidentiality? Just like..

Dana Wayne Iceland Dan Jane
"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:18 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"But when you are taking these physical risks, you you have been acclimated to your your entire life people are are used to cars. And there is a lot of protection for you in the worst case. So in nineteen seventy length to to go with the metaphor of automobiles. And say the seventies you could get an accident. Where you know the people inside were. Literally. Killed Right. You know able would go through the windshield and it was like, hi, yeah man people just go through the windshield to about that. But. That's not going to happen and now automobiles collapse around the human. We're still allowed to take risk but if there is a problem, it collapses around the human and the Nice thing about automobiles in day are dealing with physical force, which is absolutely deterministic cray. Liquor all the machine learning models and I are fundamentally. About correlations. And and They're very casting so. When we don't have the certainty that you are definitely at risk, right? Right. So so in the again, going back to the Internet context community community base production. So so what does the what sort of the the kid line here a gene? Is it that Beacon if share some inflammation in this case, humans are making those decisions. The larger community It doesn't matter how you level of expertise might be doesn't matter how you know hog knowledgeable. You are how Internet works and so on it actually it'll sultan and overall benefit for the communities that argument. Yes that we are we are. So there are two things that we are not doing in security. We're not treating it like the humans were partners. in management, we're treating it like the human is at the tip of the pyramid and holding it all along. At this time they're not getting this imported they need. and. We. Are. Creating these. Crash conditions where. Once, a person makes one bad decision. The entire computer is. Is, damaged right. So if you if you so one of the things that I'm seeing I I don't know I admit I read this on twitter. Alright. How I know I know the person there is working for Google they may just be thinking out loud. You're talking about reducing functionality of unfamiliar sites..

twitter Google
"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Idea being that if we can. Determine the context that the person thinks they are in? Cher enough information about that context. Then the person can make the right decision because you don't want to tell people all. You don't ever want to go to an unfamiliar website because the the fundamental -perience of being on the Internet is one of discovery. But you don't want people to believe that they are in a highly familiar place that is very trusted. When they are in fact in some odd little. Malicious corner. And so says Oh correct me if I'm wrong gene so that we ended I think about this then is you know you'd be getting autonomous vehicles now increasingly the. Fleets. Autonomous Vehicles and idea would be that. Behavioral, to Waco. Communication would be sort of automatic as well. Right? So. So are. To would. Sort of machine to. Machine conversations. To be automatic and sort of optimizing for the entire community or. All these still people involved in this process. How do you think about this? Human and computer judgments are. Very, different and we have very different strength. Young so When You talk about something lake. long-haul automobile driving. I think that is a great place for computers too. You know going down the highway where there shouldn't be any. Movement perpendicular to the highway. So the computer should be able to detect the year or a dog or in the absolute worst imaginable case a human. And preventing. I-. Accidents between humans, I? Think that's great. But then. When you move into an environment where a lot of the interaction is just human. So if you're if you are driving down the street. and. You see two kids playing with a ball. You know to slow down because you know that kids who are playing will focus on their toy and when right out in the street running, right? Yes. You know I can't on a bike. You're like I'M GONNA I'm GonNa make a major give them a lot of space or somebody WHO's wobbling on their bicycle. And we do a lot of human in action when we drive. So when you are stopped and it stopped signing somebody walks up. You look at their face. To and their body language to decide if they're going to walk in front of you or not right. So, there's definitely going to be a component of human judgment in that. For a long time again in Dad's where people are very context..

Waco
"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:50 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. Gene Cam who's a professor at the School of Inflammation computing at a university she's a fellow of the Institute of Electrical Electrical Engineers had to fend off that Michigan Association for the Advancement of signs. Research goal is security that people need the privacy they won't insist they can trust that comes. Thank you for inviting me I appreciate it. Absolutely. I want to start with one of your papers Lee conceptualizing the role of security user. Invite you say the Internet is not totally not totally critical infrastructure that relies on the participation of on organized and technically INEXP- would end users. Transportation Health Waste Management a disaster preparedness. You say radius cooperation between unorganized citizens who lack expedients with domain has increased. Cillian see. Use Social 'cause at helped me shared goals. Kidding of community based production and management of the comments experienced this type of cooperation both offline and online you say. So. So what does community based production in the context of Internet? So the basic concept. With community based production is that you can have something that's perceived as a Commons and the classic example of that is a fishery. It is very hard to stop people from going out. And catching fish. So in economic terms, it's not excludable. It's hard to stop people. In a community from getting on their boat and going out and and catching a fish. In economic terms, it's also what's called rivalries, which means of I catch fish. You can't catch a fish and that combination of features. Is What defines a common pool. Good. So we're all used to the tragedy of the Commons and there's also this tragedy in common pool goods. So. What was saying in that paper? Is that we should look at the human component. Of Economics of security I mean off security using an economics Lynn's because. Right now, the focus on people is. They should be more compliant they should. They should be better at reading phishing emails. You know the general ideas that there's this huge pyramid of security above us, and then the temp of that pyramid is pointing down on the user's head and they have to do everything right and if they screw up the whole thing collapses, right And the rest is kind of. Alone in that you know you get your training. You should you know learn the twelve things that help you recognize phishing emails, but if we were able to work collaboratively. And share more information. then. We could have a better outcome for everyone. So a lot of my. Work is focused on on having the computer. Trying serve the individual. So.

Gene Cam Institute of Electrical Electr School of Inflammation computi Mike professor Cillian Lee Michigan Association Lynn
"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 11 months ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Playing to Win With Shawn Harper

The Authority Project

06:40 min | 11 months ago

Playing to Win With Shawn Harper

"We are back on the virtual state of the Authority projects. You are the project and we WANNA slept with thirty two your name so you can sell what you're great at in. We have a treat for you today and his name is Sean Hopper. He is a former. Nfl Player. I loved the failed love football all day every day. Like I said we can probably talk about that for an hour. But we're not here for that. We're here to to make sure that you finish off strong in twenty twenty but before we dive in. Please tell US Shawn first of all who you are personally and professionally personally. Shaun Harper personally a warrior. I'm a child of God. I don't hide that. I think that often is huge. And so what? I'll just you know go there you know speaking with. Your Voice of WHO? You are mentally spiritually socially is is is extremely important if you WANNA win in two thousand twenty and end in two thousand twenty one Born raised in the south side of Columbus Ohio Had had had a very interesting childhood. But I've learned how to rebrand my adversity By looking for opportunities in looking at it from a perspective of gratitude professionally like you mentioned plate seven years professional football with the rams with the colts retired. And now I Not only run. I have my own firm for almost twenty years. I teach people how to win. That's me I love it awesome. I am so excited So tell us right now before we go further in. Tell us what project. You're currently working on right now. We know what right yes short. I just finished my first Coaching course it's it's it's actually finished. It's so new that I'm not even gonNA advertise today. A Shaun Harper wins. Probably some time next week. It'll be up but I am so excited about that in house actually challenged because you know I cut my teeth on speaking so I travel in speak all over the world and people have been challenging me like you know what this great. You're able to speak great. You have a platform but you know what when you leave. You're gone you know where the books so I hadn't heard him get books like where's your courses and so I had my first course finishing s what. I'm working on right now. Okay great okay. So let's let's get into it. Let's get into it. Tell us where do you begin? Tell us your journey like what took it to this place where you're in the space of being on stage. You're doing courses now. You're you're writing books to inspire others the that all Derived FROM OKAY. So in order for you to For me to really explain that I have to give a little back story of my personal life of my upbringing. In a kind of forced a shift in my perspective ideology and my thinking born born and raised in the south side of Columbus Ohio. And most people think you know if you play professional football your business owner you must have had great opportunities growing up silver spoon in the mouth and you know nothing. Nothing I promise you. Nothing could be further than the truth. I struggle started early a as a a product of a single home environment. Mom was mom and Dad End in Butler made whatever you have as what she wasn't. She raised six of us all by herself. Amazing six kids. One house bathroom Mom did that. She's she's a remarkable woman Educationally I really suffered a had to repeat the first grade document with four to five learning disabilities by ten miles in the fifth grade. I was kicked out of two schools for disciplinary issues Left Highschool with the one point. Six two accumulative Jeff. Nine Alesi T. A. in fact I didn't even start in a well. I barely started in high school football. I wasn't honorable. Mention all conference all city allstate or intergalactic. None of that in fact I would. I would sit at the banquets now. The other way in the back eating at nasty court on blue and guys are getting into audience. Awards and I was just so upset. I wouldn't I wouldn't tell no one but I was extremely depressed. Angry in in fact. I was voted most likely to fail in. Know right here From graduating last in my class in academics I get a phone call from junior college two year school in Iowa. And you're like Sean. We want you to come to Mason City Iowa. Junior college to play football coach. Believes you have this thing called potential. You know what a that and a I go to the Cornfield. The cornfields of Mason City Iowa in the first year at the junior college. I sat the bench the entire season. Not One play and I remember calling my mom like mom I quit. You know I give up. I'm done know know I'm I'm expecting Montlake. Baby you try come on home the opposite boy state you. You Ain't coming home like what are you coming home to get violent. Just just things in home. No don't get stale way and sometimes that shift is good for kids and so going into the second year. I had a conversation with myself and the conversation was more on the lines of you're right or they're right. You don't have the education. You don't have the accusation. You horwood football you suck right now. Okay There's no way you can be successful right but you can win. You can win and the moment I made that paradigm that shift in my mind you can win. I begin to look at life differently. A beginning look at life as a challenge to begin to look at opportunities that I've never seen like I begin to macgyver. Life right and I went from sitting on a bench with the winning mindset that I was able to adapt if you want to expand on that to being you know junior college hall of Fame All Region Full Scholarship Indiana University draft any. Nfl Pick in fourth run to taking the same concept of winning and bringing bringing it to corporate America.

Football Junior College Shaun Harper NFL Sean Hopper Mason City Iowa Columbus Ohio Authority Shawn Fame All Region Full Scholarsh Alesi T. A. Butler Montlake Business Owner Jeff America Iowa Rams Colts
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing.

Indiana University Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana Bloomington Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Division Director Reagan Streep Harman
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive.

University In Thousand Bone Research Group Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana University Sharon Indiana Reagan Streep Chess Hamas Harman
"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And I want them happy I want this. I want them to have a flourishing city. And I want their mayor to smile, I wanna smile back on back on the face of Indianapolis. And and I also think that our mayor ought to have a lot of energy a lot of enthusiasm and and. We're not seeing it right now. Tell me a little bit about the city county council, and what you would like to see out of the city county council under your leadership as a mayor. Well, it's kind of interesting the mayor in his announcement. And and I think you both know I've known Joe for forty years we've been friends for forty years. Same college, right? Yes. Same college fraternity Indiana University, and we're in sigma alpha Epsilon fraternity together. And so I like Joe everybody likes Joe. And but but to get your point it, it it working with the city county council, the mayor in his in his announcement had talked about bipartisanship as being probably his largest accomplishment in there, and it takes time for things to to move along and be successful. Well, I I've been up for reelection sixteen times eight general elections and people demand that you work together and. In the Senate, and the Indiana general assembly, we have to have a balanced budget in we worked together, but that's a low bar that that bipartisanship, we expect that and and and what I've into state is working with the council working on for instance, unsolved crimes. I hear that all the time. We had one hundred sixty.

city county council Joe everybody Indianapolis Indiana Senate Indiana University forty years
"indiana university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"At home by telling Alexa, play S T on iheartradio. Yeah. Enjoy the stimulation twenty-five. Thank you for hanging out on this Monday gear Lewis with you. AM seven hundred Tucson's. Most stimulating talk. Going to be sixty five and partly cloudy today. It's partly cloudy right now, not quite sixty five yet. But we're edging close to fifty were forty eight right now now at Kanus dot com. I had the giancarl video where he breaks the hearts of all the Trump eaters that are out there. I also have the video just put up of Trump's epic response to Alexandria. Okay. Zero Cortez calling him a racist, which I'm sorry. We have we have to play it again, Jeremy up over there real quick. If you don't mind tough guy, you're going. Who did? Who cares? Who cares? That's going to be a that's going to be. Is it a differ a gift? I feel like I'm a thousand years old. And I say that is it a differ your. Yeah. We have we have a erica's training. Isn't it differ? Gif? I'm not sure how it is. You're young. I know it's bad. I think it's Jeff you fit right in. All right. Yeah. We'll go with the ages. You leave it alone. I'm in everything. When everything is, okay. All right. So this is this is epic Martin Luther King? Martin Luther King said judge people by the content of their character. Right. What are they about doesn't matter? If they're a man woman piece it up standing now, whatever standing up sitting down. Well. Sitting up. I love it. So that's what he was about. Right. Well, apparently on a college campus, and this is this is really incredible stuff. They are celebrating Martin Luther King day in a very unique way. Indiana University is hosting interactive privilege simulator. For more Luther King day. An interactive privilege simulator. I don't know. They're doing this. So students can experience how having different identities can allegedly impact their life for an individual's life and their opportunities. They can have. Yep. Oh, yeah. Interactive privilege simulator. I always think like flight, simulators, you know, you go up and you're flying. What what is somebody's stare at you? They know they look at you. Does it have artificial intelligence and ABC's if you're white male that you told no every time is that what it is. Now, you know, how it feels wait. What is going on here? You're ready. This MLK better be rolling over in his grave when he hears about this the events. Description says this year's program will include an interactive privilege simulator that'll provide participants the opportunity to gain perspective on how.

Martin Luther King Alexa Trump Cortez Tucson Lewis Kanus dot Indiana University Jeremy erica Jeff Alexandria ABC thousand years
"indiana university" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Archive that Indiana University can get a sense of the kind of work that a person with police training and this kind of international travel is qualified to do, and then you what you can see is people crossing all the borders that are supposed to contain policing. You can see them going easily over into military fears. You can see them continuing to travel abroad. You could see them coming home and going back to work in police forces or in police academies, or in prisons you can see them going into all the branches of the federal police. The US federal government has the number of police forces that operate there. And so you can see them violating strictures of scale in locality. Conc- them crossing the military, civilian blood brain border. You can see them crossing over into public and private works. Lots of private security industry work. So they do bring some of that stuff home and you take some of it abroad, but we shouldn't understand. It as a one time effects, right? Taking from a coherent well of US policing and just taking that abroad or borrowing counterinsurgency, which is created by the military and then bringing it home. We should see them instead as one phase of this constant cycle of police and military exchanging strategies of police going abroad and coming home and of government violence workers going over to the private sector, and then returning and kind of mixing up muddying the waters between public and private were your stars oppose? Their skills are fungible wherever the currency is violence. That's right. Yeah, I think that's true. That's a great way of saying it focus a great deal on the concept of Bill dean consent building consent for this racist violence. But the police in the United States seem to. Have long enjoyed massive, white political consent for the violence that they do to black communities. I mean, I think that part of the way white consent is secured is by doing violence to black communities because that is one of the most powerful ways that the US state gives value to whiteness creates a possessive investment in whiteness creates whiteness as property. It's very clear that the value of whiteness is enormous. When you see what happens to black people at the hands of police. So blatant, police violence, public violence against black people actually shows white people how privilege they are. That's right. I think it doesn't just show them something that already exist. I think it creates that privilege. It's one of the things that we can look at in order understand the process of racial construction and. And in the age of the war on terror, I think it shows us how racialism nation is shifting that now the category of blackness or the category of the hyper least is extending to people who could be understood as you know, Middle Eastern or Brown or Muslim or immigrant, and I think that the categories of racial relation are shifting subtly, but police remain one of the state's greatest engines of racial relation. And also I should say something about the violence work that police do. I'm not suggesting that police are constantly violent or that the only kind of violence work is the infliction of violence..

US Bill dean Indiana University
"indiana university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Well yeah i should say the primary argument in the quilt case for preventing state governments from just taxing all out of state vendors complaints costs the fear would be every state has different tax laws each localities have different tax laws there's potentially thousands of jurisdictions that have the ability to impose sales tax collection obligations on out of state vendors and the fear would be that that would be expensive in terms of compliance costs for vendors selling nationwide today that's somewhat less concern because software has resolved a lot of these problems david gamut is a law professor at indiana university of bloomington tax day is also tomorrow and while online retailers are not required to collect taxes you dear listeners and also me and anyone who bought something online are required to pay those taxes and to estimate how much we owe on our tax returns david did tell me however most of us don't do that i'm molly would this is a pm just as you count on marketplace for reliable in depth news and information we're counting on listeners like you to invest in what we do the more people who support marketplace the more we can do to raise economic intelligence across the country and don't forget your donation will be matched dollar for dollar when you give today thanks to a generous challenge from our friends at kindy to become a marketplace investor today at marketplace dot org and thank you.

professor david indiana university of blooming molly
"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Welcome to healthcare. Tree podcast episode was super interesting in long, and therefore I'm going to skip right past the news. If you go watch this week's healthcare triage news, otherwise let's jump right in our guest. This week is Dr Jonathan for Dell good friend of mine and also a transplant surgeon here at Indiana University school of medicine, so I'm going to let him introduce himself burst. And then I'm gonna ask him lots of questions. Hi, this is Jonathan Fidel am chief transplant at Indiana University. I mainly specialize in pancreas transplants. But I'm kind of jack-of-all-trades I do livers and males and used to do kidneys originally from Montreal. And I've been in Indiana now since two thousand and two so how do you get to be a transplant surgeon? So clearly, you went to college I and then medical school merger go to medical school. I went to medical school in Montreal. And then what did you do after that? So the training in Montreal Montreal's a little bit different because they have a different schooling system. So instead of going to great allow. Twelve and thirteen is glad she goes to grade eleven than we do two years ago college after that I went to an early acceptance program at McGill for medical school following medical school. It's a five year general surgery training for residency. There was an opportunity span extra time in the lab. And I took advantage of that. I did two years and then following that it's a two year fellowship in transplantation. And after that, you go look for work so to become a pancreas transplant surgeon is any extra training to specialize there or is that just part of the general transplant fellowship. So in order to become a pancreas transplant surgeon, specifically most people go through training for multiple organs and the program, you train, it has to have a certain number of pancreas transplants that they perform a year so that their fellows get enough experience. They can start. How do you know, you wanna be pancreas transplant surgeon piped internationally want to be a pancreas transplant surgeon? I think originally I wanted to do livers and intestines, and I really was interested in pediatric livers, and when ended up happening is when I came to India. Anna I noticed that like many other programs. They would only do pancreas transplants. When there was an ideal offer with an ideal recipient, and I sort of felt like there was a lot of Oregon's here that we're going to waste or were being sent out to other programs, and I originally became interested as an attending because I wanted to not waste those Oregon's. All right. So let's back up for a second. Can you explain what Panthers does? Sure pancreases an Oregon in the upper abdomen lives in the back of the belly. It's an organ that participates in digestion. And also participates in the endocrine system, and the part where interested for pancreas transplantation is the endocrine part pancreas makes insulin glucose gone mad at Staten a bunch of other hormones, particularly of interest is diabetes happens when you don't make enough insulin. So we transplanted pancreas. So that we make people who don't make insulin make insulin. So pinker transplant effectively would cure type one diabetes. It's sort of like ideal treatment for it. Why don't we do it forever? Everyone that that's a great question. Actually, most common consults. We get our patients that are well controlled diabetics, and they're sort of looking down the line in they're worried they're going to lose their vision or big develop neuropathy or kidney problems, and they want to just get a pay increase. But the the balancing act is you take a person who's taking lifelong medications and at risk for chronic diseases. You do a big operation. First of all second of all you put the money amino suppression medications for the rest of their life. So instead of being a diabetic patient. They become a transplant patient in. It's not really worth that risk unless there's something else that tilts the balance by far the most common reason to do a pancreas transplant is that they're already gonna get a kidney transplant for diabetes related kidney disease. So you might as well also put in a pancreas. So they won't be diabetic. And basically have taken all the risk of the immunosuppression off the table because they've already committed to lifelong immunosuppression for the kidney transplant. So it's it's like a plus one operation like as long as you're getting another kind of transplant. We. Might as well fix this at the same time. And while I while the patient survival is better if you get.

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"indiana university" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

"But then we go to these college campuses ravi and i were just at michigan state university and the university of michigan followed by indiana university in february and we have thousands of kids thousands of them many of them were not christians who came and almost all the questions we gotta the qna line were from skeptics and they were honest questions they weren't duchess there were actually honest questions so you know we we sense of despair that are college kids are you know not looking at true to looking at feelings and that's true but then i see these events happen where these kits common astor question that we've seen them come to faith we've led kits the lord ira at these events or right after these events and we've seen them come to faith in in such tremendous ways in their scepticism gives way to hope and to truth so i'm hopeful a despite where we see today i'm actually hopeful so we had a train them up there with the train our kids and also our parents to actually want our kids to discern and find the truth not just have their preferences matt exactly and i think that one of the things that so remarkable about what you and your team do you go to these college campuses that could be very hostile to your message but you're really going in there to listen and to ask questions and did talk deeply with these students and i think that's why you have standing room only which if somebody's said you know pastor is going to come and speak at yale are pastors going to go speak at and i know you're not pastor but at university of michigan people role the rising go good luck with that but you're coming and you are meeting a deep need in these kids and that's what i love so much about what you do and you talk about that in grand central questions you talk about fundamentally that there are four.

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"indiana university" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

"Yeah when when you know but my st great yeah i don't work yeah barnes he at indiana university of that i have absolutely no respect whatsoever could boast people and with that in mind have known for ever bump back there that you don't grips most people aren't and might aren't all those people there though coax not opener all that when i was so mobile more but i don't know might i had a lot of open let's no one goal i'd like to still see you on the court with that seventy six team rice is team i don't know maybe maybe we're where we want closure maybe you don't need to closure i don't know but and i'll like i still hope for one day for well i d put home and you stay east trouble you don't a name you not and fisher in doing anything in all of the you're not yeah eight points based wilkins you know what they about one eight your sport and it required a lot of in it the they are required you don't know we don't somebody okay appeared run the support the that's what it's you know so good and they yeah well conklin kane can't really put them so i've always great the you know he she knew what you should but it back and i don't know i'm not that was on the in the wider but it was going to always enjoyed better sherman or better coach no you weren't about you you might only one hundred and ninety nine games to well her not with that but he.

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