35 Burst results for "Indiana University"

Parenting in The Time of Corona

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:08 min | Last week

Parenting in The Time of Corona

"For almost every working person in this country, what it meant to go to work changed radically in March and what it meant to go to school changed at exactly the same time between Graham Adams lives in Indianapolis she has four kids at home she is a single parent I have an eighth grader. I have a fifth grader in a second grader and then I have a one in Preschool Patrice works fulltime at Indiana University. School of Public Health it's a desk job so she can do it from home. That's all set at the same time though Patrice his four kids were all suddenly at home with her trying to go to class online and this presented a bunch of challenges. For Instance Patrice did not have five computers at home. We basically share it devices. If I didn't have meetings, I would pass my device onto whoever did have google meet for their class. The second issue was space there were five of Them in one house. So Patrice developed a system, my daughter WHO's in middle school? She's up in her room. My fifth grader sits at the bar in the kitchen I sit at the dining room table in have my work set-up Patrice was especially concerned about her second grader. He's a special needs student and structure and consistency are really important to him. Patrice says learning off screen and the whole idea of being at school while he's actually at home, which is really difficult for him and so Patrice says she needs to watch him all the time. Make sure he's focusing doing. Okay. Absorbing lessons I'm in I shot A. Fifth grader but I'm an ear shot and I shot of my second grader. So if I hear something I can jump up from where I am and go over to him to assist him with what's going on and to tell him to pay attention and then there's portrays youngest her preschooler there was no zoom class for him at all so patrice improvise I'm just going to be honest with you I turn on Youtube and say go elmo's teaching you today We're going to watch a loop of elmo videos and then I may take I will take a minute and may read him a book. So Patrice is trying to do her job in a house with four kids at the same time she's trying to make sure her second graders do milquet with the screen learning and she's trying to make sure her little is occupied and she's trying to make sure kids aren't like on their computers and phones all the time, and she's also trying to make sure that everybody gets in a little outdoor time like time to. Be a kid we actually go outside for recess we get some fresh air. We take a walk around the block or we have a basketball hoop in our driveway we play basketball, and of course, all of this is on top of you know regular mom stuff caring for the kids kissing booze wiping noses, rubbing the household cooking, the dishes, paying the bills all that stuff, and you know this has been patrice his life for six months. I'm extremely exhausted Friday will. After we got done with learning on Friday I, took a shower because I could not remember the last shower I took. I shouldn't say that on this interview but. I can remember the last. Hour and then I lay down in Saturday I didn't leave the house. I literally needed an entire day to recover. It was taxing like I literally felt it in my body. Like the how how the week wait on me It was a lot. For many people, it's too much millions of people are in situations like Patricia's and the job of parenting suddenly feels like it's not always compatible with a job in a lot of mixed gender couples where both people work women still take on the lion's share of housework and childcare, and so as a result of all these things coming together, women have been dropping out. Of the labor force last month six, hundred thousand men reentered the workforce at the same time five thousand women dropped out of the workforce meaning they stopped looking for jobs that today's indicator five thousand women leaving the workforce in August. So Patrice for her part says, she does not have a choice she has to work all of our kids are counting on her. And a third of children in the US aren't single parent households and those parents they have to make it work even if it's not working the bind single parent families are in right now is unreal and a lot of them even if they can't stop working, they are losing hours or having to cut back and losing income in that way. So I, mean in that way, Patrice just doesn't. Have a choice. She did have a choice about sending her kids back to school. So Patrice his district in Indianapolis. They said, you can send your kids back to school or you can continue with virtual learning for a semester at first patrice his choice teams really clear. The schooling from home working from home thing just didn't feel sustainable. It's almost like I had. PTSD. DidN'T WANNA go back there. I literally said. I am going to call the school and see if they have spots where the atoms children. When school opens up. We will it, but then you know her calculus really changed because there was a pretty serious cove outbreak. In Indianapolis, over the summer now bridges really had to worry about herself or her children possibly getting sick also just the quality of the Education Patrice as the school has actually done it miraculously good job it got laptops out to all the students. So now all of her kids have their own devices she says, the teacher is tried really hard. Even still she says the education everybody got. Nowhere. Near what it was when they were like in physical school. So she had this like really tough decision to make well to be honest it was an agonizing decision. It was a decision that I went back and forth. A couple of times and so patrice had to make this decision that millions of parents are having to agonize over. She weighed the pros and cons, and finally she made her call opted to keep them home and healthy, and so at least for the next six months, Patrice GonNa keep trying to do basically the impossible work parent teacher. Cook. Clean fix a sink. I may say these things in in exhaustion. Sin Them Back to school but in all honesty I'm in the virtual learning I'm in this actual any for the long haul she's in virtual learning for the long haul and on that is similar to decision you may to right right. So my preschooler is back in a classroom, which is great. Her School is licensed as a daycare center so it's able to open fulltime. My fourth grader isn't home working on her laptop, but she's pretty independent for the most part. Answer. And also, we indicator wanted to see if we could potentially help battle with the educating of children. So if your kids have questions about money. Or business please send it in. You can send US voice memo at indicator NPR DOT ORG that's indicator at NPR dot org just have your kids say their name and their age and the

Patrice His Indianapolis School Of Public Health Indiana University Google Graham Adams Middle School Basketball Ptsd United States Youtube Patricia NPR Dot Org
Coronavirus Outbreaks On Campuses

News, Traffic and Weather

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Coronavirus Outbreaks On Campuses

"There's a vicious victor a window. I think most of the people feel it's going to be November December. It is conceivable that you could have it by October, though I don't think that that's likely the race for a vaccine all the more urgent as new outbreaks threatened college campuses and towns more than 1000 cases and counting at the University of South Carolina at Indiana University. 30. Greek houses are quarantined, and the school is extremely concerned. It's seeing uncontrolled spread. I think you just hear around the grapevine people getting in and then you're like, Oh, this person came in contact with this person. Some students are worried. We have campus corner, which is the block right next to campus, and that's all of our bars and stuff on. There's no Mass there, so if you don't get it here, you're going to get it. Summer, Norman numbering into campus and just days after teams with rapid tests were rushed to SUNY Oneonta. To control the spread of hundreds of cases. The school's sending students home something Dr Fauci has warned against. We don't want to see college students who get infected gets sent home to essentially see the infection in the community. Where they live. The youngest and strongest among us not immune. Dwayne the rock Johnson revealing his whole family got infected. After we get together. We picked up coded 19 from very close family friends. On DH. These are people who love and trust their devastated that it that it led to the fact of our family. Johnson's daughters had mild symptoms and the family recovered. But he's putting in place new rules at his house testing before get together. You guys had family and friends over to your house. You know that we trusted they've been quarantined, just like you guys. You still know. In Texas Freddy Guerrero was the hardest hit of 20 family members who got the virus you've spent 62 days at the hospital had to learn to walk and talk all over again. But this week he could finally go home. Welcome home. You get to sleep in your own bed. Tonight we'll run some sobering

Johnson Freddy Guerrero Suny Oneonta University Of South Carolina Dr Fauci Norman Dwayne Indiana University. Texas
Big Ten isn't willing participant in Trump's game of political football

Howard and Jeremy

03:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Big Ten isn't willing participant in Trump's game of political football

"It's a very interesting thing going on these days with the big 10. It's confusing and Ah, politics is involved now because the story shifted to Donald Trump, calling the big 10 trying to get them to play football this fall. Here's the thing that's confusing to me. If if this Okay story is the big big 10 cancer Excuse me postpone their fall season. We're not planning on playing football until the winter. And then all of a sudden the story came out Well, maybe they'll try and get going by Thanksgiving and then story came out yesterday that the president had called the big 10 and talk to them about getting Bacchus soon as possible. Dan Patrick, on his show cited a source. Telling him they could start as early as October. 10th. Here's the thing that would be very surprising to me. First off at the end of the day, the president can call the entire Cabinet could call it will come down to the president's in the chancellor's at the various big 10 institutions who, just a few weeks ago, 11 of the 14 voted to not play football this fall. Concerns about testing concerns about my own card itis. To me, Nate. The thing that I have trouble getting past that it's funny when the big 10 announced they were postponing, they caught a lot of flak not just from parents and coaches in their league parents of players in the league but from people who are basically saying Hey, what happened three weeks ago. You just released your schedule. You know, we're going ahead with football in September and all of a sudden now you postpone the fall season. I didn't have a problem with that. So they gave out a schedule. Big deal. You are proceeding as normal. You're proceeding with plans. You put out your schedule. You got all this. You do all that you adjust. Okay, We're going to go conference on Lee. We're not playing you do everything as if you think you are going to start whenever they would have started Labor Day weekend or whatever it would have been. And then the president's get together. They meet they here for the medical advisors. They think. Oh, this could be really dangerous. We're not playing this fall I to me. I had no problem with the big The only problem I would have with the big 10 if I was in the room. Okay? If I were you, I would wait a few more weeks. You don't have to postpone. Today You can push camps. You can push the start your season like the sec. You khun by yourself. Maybe nothing would have changed in terms of your medical experts. But you could have bought yourself another 23 or so weeks. I don't think they're coming back. I don't think any pressure from the White House because if they come back, that's my first question. Credibility out the window thrown out three weeks ago. The presidents of these various institutions said it wasn't saving up for an athlete, he said. Basically, if you were in the room or if you heard what our medical experts were telling us You would understand why we voted 11 to 3 to not play football in the fall, So my big question would be in three weeks. What changed is there? I know they came out with it. There's a test now. A nasal swab test ID of a 15 minute turnaround. Okay, you'd also have to increase your testing. But what How do you get around the mile card itis, where they were, what At least five players diagnosed in the big 10 kidded Indiana University who's really suffering as health issues. Tied into covert and heart related issues. My question would be What changed? Over three weeks from your medical experts telling you it's just there. Too many unknowns. It's too dangerous. At a time when the virus numbers they're not exactly dropping across the nation. That's that's the thing I think, you know, in terms of the big day way we all wanted to play. We all want college football. To me. That's that the part I can't get past. I don't see how they changed their vote that fast unless the medical expert said, there's been this massive breakthrough and don't worry about my own card itis. It's not gonna happen.

Football President Trump LEE Donald Trump Dan Patrick Bacchus SEC Nate Indiana University White House Cabinet Chancellor
Who was Einsteins first wife

Science Friction

05:13 min | Last month

Who was Einsteins first wife

"Tashin. Mitchell here this week with a controversy that just will not be put to bed. What do you think Russia language of science? Form Language asked me are the narrowly and a fan figura. Can you guess who this is? How is it that fantastic difficult language if international think of wild wiry hair and dark penetrating is he's arguably one of the greatest original thinkers of all time and certainly in science in strive for. An outdoors. And clarity of. concepts. got. Their. Mutuel. Relation. Anti correspondent who sensory date it's L. Dan Stein yes. predicted the behavior of black holes and their immense gravitational pull through his general theory of relativity, which visualized gravity is warping of the fabric of the universe or space time around objects. But have you heard of a woman called Malaysia Malaysia Marriage Johnston to babies sauce she was his first wife and a promising scientist in the making in her own right when they met and fell in love. Now, there's been a vocal malivert fan club in recent years. It says she was fundamental to Albert's early scientific success, even a key collaborator on his theories and that her legacy was hidden. Will a brand new investigation strongly contests this climb and over the next two episodes I'm going to drilling into that evidence to let you decide buckle up. It matters just to know the truth I and Stein is portrayed as the great hero of Science and N Stein is seen as a god and you don't touch demand. For some people is just like attacking the the Cohen that the Bible, you don't touch those things. We try not to make up stories. And this story appears to be largely the hopeful story people hoped it was true they it was true but it doesn't seem to be true. She. Helped in a great. Measure. That Einstein became what he became. I. Have Serious doubts that he would have got where he is. If he did not have her supporters, he needed someone to discuss them. He needed someone to calculate them. Compare them. So she left us a genius that's her gift to the world. It's important that the truth be told when stories are based on very unreliable evidence. When you start to examine the sources, the stories just aren't hold out. And stories that matter. Mathematical abilities rivaled on stands that she co-authored on Stan's early research that they worked late into the not together blazing a trial for quantum physics. Malivert and our wits relationship really on the came to be understood at all in the nineteen eighty s when early letters between them were found in a family bank faulting California very little other material evidence remained then and physicist Dr. Pauline. Gang Gagnon believes they could a reason for that. Two people were really adamant that this story would not come out about manage. These were Helen Ducasse the personal secretary of Albert Einstein and these are two. Nedam. Both of them became, but they were the executors of his estate and these people were adamant that this story will not come. Polling is a particle physicist now retired in Germany she spent much of her career investigating dark matter at the European Laboratory, a of particle physics soon, and at Indiana University she's taken up. Malaya's 'cause and explains that even elbow full story was with health for a long time. The first biographies came out more than twenty years after the death of Albert Einstein the reason was that do not end for example, not allow anything in writing unless he would be righted himself. The everything that was in the possession of Albert Einstein was cleaned up it has to do with the fact that auto. Natan after the death of militia marriage. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, eight, or two thousand came to Zurich to her apartment. To search the apartment and probably took everything that he could fine of scientific merit. So these people made every effort to clean up what was there and to erase any trace of market right?

Albert Einstein Johnston Physicist Helen Ducasse Tashin. Mitchell N Stein L. Dan Stein Russia Zurich Natan Gang Gagnon Cohen Stan Malaya Malivert Scientist Indiana University Germany Secretary
What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

Healthcare Triage Podcast

00:43 sec | Last month

What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

"This episode, we're going to be talking to Tatyana for rude and Brooke pates about the Bio Bank. What is it? What does it do? How can we use it for research including COVID Research Brooke. Tatyana. Welcome, Brooke, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and what do you do? My name is Brooke pay I manage the operations of the. INDIANA. By obey can have been doing that for about seven years now. So all of our intake of samples are recruitment of subjects. That is all falls under what I do. Well, how did you get to this? What training via have? What did you go to school for degree to get what? What do you do to get this job? I have an undergraduate degree. Degree from Butler University in Biology, but always liked the ethical issues related to the technology of the science. So that landed me in the Masters Program at Iu, I have a masters in bioethics after I graduated. I. Took a position with a bio. Bay That was a nonprofit startup by obey associated with are you and then several years into that role the company. Became more associated with you and I began working for Tatyana Tatiana. You've been on the program before, but for those who might have missed that episode and they should definitely go back injured anyway, you tell us a little bit about yourself, your training of what you do, of course. So many Tatyana, food, I am the chair of the Department of medical and molecular genetics and. And I'm also now the director of the Indian Bio Bank. So I got here through have an undergraduate degree in biology and math I did that in Connecticut at a small liberal arts. College called Fairfield. University. And then I got a master's degree in something called bio mathematics put those two things together. I did that at Ucla and then I got my PhD. In Indiana University and loved it loved what I did and just stayed and never left. So I've been on the faculty now for over twenty five years. So let's strong with just the basics. What what is a bio bank? So I can start with that. So if you take the word apart bio meaning anything biological and Bank we all think of a bank is a place. You put your money. This is a case where this is a place where you put specimens or biological material. So if it was just Just Bank of biological material I. Mean it has some value, but it's really valuable when you link it to information about the individual from whom you got that biological sample. Typically, we do this for all kinds of diseases, but we're going to talk today about in particular people who were Kovic positive and it lets us ask questions about, for example, why did some people die? Why did some people improve after being in the hospital? Why did some people never end up in the hospital? Why do some people have long term complications? Complications and others not and this marrying of biological samples and clinical information lest you ask those questions. So it's a a bio bank I have so many questions about the logistics about it. So what what kind of samples first of do you take an house? One of the things that's really easy to be able to obtain relatively easy is a blood sample. So if you think about a people go to a doctor's office, you get kind of blood drawn for lots of different reasons. So it's a relatively relatively easy thing to. To, be able to collect, but there's lots of different things you can obtain an study from a blood sample. So one of the things that you can obtain from a blood sample is DNA. So that's our cinetic material allows us to ask all kinds of things about genetic people use the word genetic predisposition. Why do some people develop disease and you ask about changes DNA that might contribute to that? If you take that blood sample now and also do some other things to it. So for example, if you're able to. Literally spin a sample you to spin it in a machine that spins it really fast. You can actually get the blood to separate and it comes into these different parts of the blood. One of the things we study is something called plasma. So plasma and and kind of a partner to it, which is serum are really valuable because you can measure things called proteins in and proteins are things that our body has. A lot of people have been talking about like. Like, antibodies and things like that. You can measure antibodies, which lots of US have been hearing about in plasma and serum. So we collect that from individuals that are in the Bio Bay something else that we collect is something called Arnie. Now aren a simply tells us how much of a protein we make. So week study thing called expression, how much do we express it and so some of the things that can be important is if we make a lot. Lot of something or less of it, and could that be controlled by something, for example, in our DNA, those are things that some of the things that we study in our blood. The other thing that we've been studying particularly around cove it is we can take that blood sample and we can actually sort the different kinds of cells that we have in our blood. It's kind of amazing and we can collect one particular one called a Mon- and lots of people. People want to study the different components of our blood because we can also ask do we have more or less of them? Is that affected? For example, by having certain diseases, what it is that those products are able to make. So we've been studying that and the other thing that we've been collecting is not anything related to blood. So we've also been trying to collect urine from individuals who have had covert to try to understand what we can measure. Measure in the urine that might help us understand why some people are having kidney complications and some people are not.

Bio Bank Tatyana Tatiana Brooke Pates Indian Bio Bank Bio Bay Indiana Indiana University Butler University In Biology Ucla Fairfield Kovic Director Department Of Medical Connecticut Partner
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 2 months ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Indiana Ryan White United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine India New England Director Of The Division Of In Riley Marty Founder Stewart
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine Director Of The Division Of In New England India Riley Marty Founder Stewart
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 3 months ago

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"This healthcare podcast is sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient CARE I. I School of Medicine is leading Indiana University's burst grand challenge, the precision health initiative with bold goals to cure multiple myeloma, triple, negative breast, cancer and charts coma, and prevent type, two diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Jim Welcome. Thanks for for having me.

Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Indiana Multiple Myeloma Alzheimer's Disease
Canada, Australia will not send athletes to Olympics because of coronavirus

SportsCenter AllNight

05:37 min | 6 months ago

Canada, Australia will not send athletes to Olympics because of coronavirus

"If there are Olympic games this summer if Canada will be there the Canadiens grabbing headlines Sunday evening when their Olympic committee announced that they would not be sending athletes to any Olympics in the summer of twenty twenty Australia hasn't gone as far as Canada well the Australian athletes have been advised to prepare for the Tokyo Olympics to be in the summer of twenty twenty one because an Australian team quote could not be assembled in the changing circumstances at home and abroad the IOC's Sunday saying they will be exploring their options for the Tokyo games over the course of the next four weeks a worldwide group representing Olympic hopefuls and their supporters has been pushing the IOC to officially postponed the IOC's been steadfast in the past week plus saying the intention has been to hold the games are scheduled but there's been quite a bit of push back Sunday the IOC making its announcement that it would take a month to examine things Christine Brennan from USA today earlier on ESPN radio they had to do that by the international committee president Thomas Bach a former athlete himself actually with boy cut it out in the nineteen eighty Olympics so he he understands the plight of athletes including opportunities and and how difficult that can be now the president of the international Olympic committee and he has really lost the athletes shockingly as a former athlete himself he hasn't been responsive kind of Nero fiddling while Rome burns and he had to do this today and what what happened was that he thought a letter statement from the international Olympic committee basically saying that they will now be here the athletes to hear their concerns I think that the driving real difficulty training they're concerned about their health they're concerned about the well being of their family members and friends that they might be training with if if they're going for the Olympic Games what is the status of Olympic trials around the world a venue that the ability to even find a swimming pool to swim and that really came to time Olympic gold medalist kicked out of the Indiana University poll because they closed then kicked out of the YMCA three time Olympic gold medalist kicked out of the Y. is living in Indiana that's the plight of these athletes right now in the midst of all of our restrictions and understandable concerns about the pandemic and so Thomas Bach the IOC president finally got it and having lost the athletes you trying to win them back by saying he hears their voices he hears their concerns that it will be for weeks now that they will spend looking at the options the weather all the games this is another July twenty fourth August ninth in Tokyo which seems unlikely or postpone them which is kind of like turning a battleship not like postponing the NBA or the NHL or moving the masters and the British and the Boston Marathon guys this is a whole different thing to move an Olympics would be extraordinary and unprecedented but that's what they're looking at right now and look at themselves for weeks that decision do you think you made the right call Christine because I know that he use the word premature in terms of making a decision on whether the Tokyo games will be played but given the uncertainty around the corona virus and the number of leagues worldwide that have either postpone their seasons canceled their season said you know we're gonna put a pause on this and come back in twenty twenty one and we think this will be gone do you think that the Olympics should have taken that same approach are you where do you stand on the side of what Thomas Bach said today right Cordero I think I think that's the only decision you could make because they're trying to kick the can down the road a little bit and you're actually right other athletes who are endangering their health by continuing to train we don't know the answer to that will know if and when someone had positive for coronavirus and and that will probably be the definitive answer to your question that would be unfortunate to get to that point but you have to be NBA shut down when they had back with her to go there I think we may well see if that be the case even though it's a very different scenario because athletes are training all over the country all over the world and often they're by themselves or with just one or two people drive like they're in arenas that are full of fans it's it's a different scenario but I do think we cover the Olympics since nineteen eighty four our coverage you know never intern summer nothing surprises me about with the international Olympic committee will do and how to lead and to stand out of it they are and so with that in mind I think this is probably the only decision they were going to make because they want to take a little more time but my sense is postponement is on the horizon even though that is incredibly difficult for a city like Tokyo that they're preparing for what seven eight years for the moment obviously this is so much different than just moving a tournament a few months or even a year because of course as we know the Olympics are once every four years Summer Games once every four years later and often for those athletes at the once in a lifetime experience which I think is one of the positive body image on the committee might be trying to save the game even if it can be seen at that so negative in so many ways I understand those who defame postpone right now but we'll get there give you that answer very soon and hopefully all athletes will remain safe while they're continuing to train professionals say they'll take the next month and figure things out the Olympics if delayed for twelve months wouldn't be the first event pushed to twenty twenty one the Dubai World Cup is off until

Canada Canadiens
Learning Visiolinguistic Representations with ViLBERT w/ Stefan Lee

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:23 min | 6 months ago

Learning Visiolinguistic Representations with ViLBERT w/ Stefan Lee

"Art of one. I am here at nervous. Twenty nineteen and I am with Stephan. Lee Stephan is an assistant professor at Oregon State In the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Stephan. Welcome to the toy cast. Yeah thanks for inviting me absolutely. Let's talk a little bit about your background before. We dive into some of the many things that you're presenting here at the conference. Sure sure so I DID MY PHD at Indiana University. And most of my work there was sort of on the core computer vision side. So how do I use computer vision to help? Scientists do various tasks zoo. Lots of it was replacing. What would otherwise be human labeling tasks? Okay I I get bored quickly. So in my post DOC extended out to vision in language. So I'm thinking about Problems where an agent tasked to reason about visual input and linguistic input so it s not only understand the visual content to express that understanding by creating language or responding to language things like that and his visual question answering one of the tasks that is interesting. You Yep so. Visual question answering. I've got a number of pieces of work on topic. Okay there's also things like captioning or doing digital dialogues are multi-round Qa. Stylings dialogues. Okay and then. Lately I've been extending out to task that not only have vision language but also some form of action so he's our Language tasks situated and embodied contexts. Where an agent test to see and talk and move to accomplish some sort of task and are the agents that were referring to here they simulated agents mostly. They're saying Leonard agents but some recent work has sort of extended out of the simulator into physical platforms with some surprising success. Okay what's an example of a platform that you're using for simulation over the robotic further robotics on the body Saturday What's the kind of dimensionality? How Complex are they? Yeah so most of the workers even working on so far has been on this pie robot platform which is something that Facebook has recently released. Which is wonderful. Low cost robotic platform local. But I think they call it. That has a really nice interface for machine learning practitioners. Oh really so I have not come across. It's worth looking out so it's You know you can say from tyrod. Import robot and then robot go forward one meter and that sort of the level of the interface. So I'm real machine learning persons robot for things like navigation in grasping so here at the conference. You've got a number of presentations that you're and posters you're involved in Will talk about One of them in most detail. Vilbert about what are some of the others that you've been focusing on sure? So this year I'm presenting number things. He said One of them is one of these embodied tasks so it's a work on what's called vision in language navigation where an agent is sort of spun never before seen environment and given a natural language navigation instruction something like go down the hall turn left at the Wolf head and the Stop on the third bedroom the one with the yellow bedspread or something like this so instructions or this mix of trajectory clues like go forward and turn left and Works and visual grounding landmarks. Knuckling and then the goal is to have an agent that can reason about all of this while actually following that path in simulated world. What are the prior that the agents bringing into this environment? Does it already know what a wolf head is or is it need to figure that out from training so it's a tricky question A Lot of vision in language and we'll touch on this in Vilbert Sort of starts from a set of pre-trade image features instead of pre-trading language features what it doesn't have as a sense of grounding so it may be able to represent a wolf head visually and it may understand the word. Wolf head but the connection between the visual incarnation of a wolf head and then the term isn't there that you expect to learn during the specific task though in Vilbert. The point is that we're trying to P- retrain grounding itself and so you've got the agents paper Yup and then there's Vilbert and then I'm also giving a talk at a workshop on emerging communication. So if you have a agents that interact to perform some task and you want them to share information between each other or communicate How could you make that communication protocol? More interpretive Humans and one way to do that is to make them actually use sort of discreet symbols. So somebody that looks like a word More or less. That doesn't necessarily have that meaning and then the talk is about. How do we make these these communication protocols? Morte now this whole field was kind of. I don't know if popularizes the right word or Villain is a few years ago with the facebook Those two agents that said to develop their own coded language. Yeah Similar kind of vein of of research. Here Yeah except for the fact that we we want understand what the code is right. Yeah Yeah that was the dealer Nodia. Paper had some similar similar goals. Yeah Yeah And so it's an innocence. Kind of merging the field or the desire for explain ability into this emergent communication work. Yeah Yeah and it If you're thinking about building agent that eventually will work with the human communications up being a big part of that. That's how we organize ourselves so making sure that we understand what agent is saying What we're saying is sort of one of the goals my research but not constrained necessarily by English not necessarily an agent to come up with its own stuff if we can map it back some space that has human like structure. That would be fine right so rather than having a unique unique word for the concept of Red Ball would prefer the agent to have a word for red that modifies. A word for ball. So even if it's not English it's something we can map back to a way that we understand How language works so Vilbert What's over all about? Yeah so I hit on this a little bit ago but billboards about learning the associations between the visual incarnation of concept and the linguistic Concept and this is sort of tricky because most people instantly hallucinate the visual part of something whenever they hear the word. When it's when I said Wolfe had. I assume a lot of people immediately. Thought of like game of thrones type of things And there was some visual concept that got brought to mind but the machines don't buy automatically have you can you can learn language and just in a linguistic context and in fact that's what most of natural language processing does is just learning based on its association with other words likewise on the visual side. You're just sort of learning to represent some sparse set of classes and those classes often relate to specific nouns. But they don't have a sense of closeness right so there's new idea that the feature for a cat should be close to the future for Tiger because they're related linguistically or uncertain taxonomy so the point of Vilbert is to try to learn these associations between vision and language directly and this is something we usually call visual grounding out of worker. And so what's the the general approach there presumably in involves Burt transformer former models the name. Yeah so if you look at the Bert models and some of the big successes in NLP. It's these large self supervised tasks so they take a large language Corpus and they learn certain little things to build supervision from unlabeled data so they'll their mascot a few words and have them re- predict it based on the other linguistic context other Alaska sentence follows another sentence in text. And what we find analogues for that in the language space. So there's this data set called conceptual captions. That came out recently. Which is this massive out. On the order about three million Image text pairs where they just found images online. That had all text so some human had provided alternative text for people usually for people who visual impairment You might interact with us by melting over image and it produces some some tex tag. They did some processing on top of that. But is this sort of Webley supervised state where they scraped office down and now the images filtered for kind of symbol simple kind of image types of or are they just raw whatever's out there across the board from everything from flicker style images to pictures of maps. And things like that so it's pretty pretty broad but that's sort of where we start our data source and we perform similar self supervised trainings where we're masking out. Certain amid parts of the image just random and then asking it to reconstruct those given the rest of the image and language and likewise were asking does the sentence match with this image or not or masking out parts of the language and having reconstruct from the image on the text. So we're designing this sort of self supervised multi modal task with this large weekly supervised status. And what we get at the end is a model built some representations that bridge between vision language and then fine tune that for a wide variety of other

Vilbert Facebook Lee Stephan Indiana University Wolf Assistant Professor Oregon State Leonard Knuckling Webley Morte Nodia School Of Electrical Engineeri Burt Transformer Alaska Wolfe
Tracy Anderson - Fitness Pioneer

Mom Brain

09:24 min | 6 months ago

Tracy Anderson - Fitness Pioneer

"I'm Tracy Anderson. I created the Tracy Anderson fitness method. And I am a mom of two. You can find me at Tracy Anderson Dot Com and you can follow me at Tracy Anderson method. What is your workout? I mean everybody knows your name and not everybody might know they're like wow this really great workout. And maybe they feel like they don't have access to it or they don't know exactly what it is but they know that tons leverage are obsessed with tons of people are obsessed with it. And what's the? What is the philosophy? How did you develop it? And why is it taken off so much? So kind of you It the philosophy is that I. My mission is to continuously create balance where there's imbalanced in specifically in women's bodies. It does work great for men but all of my studies have been done on women so I don't feel like it's fair to say that I really know what I'm doing with any man quite honestly so I I went to college on a dance. Scholarship and I gained forty pounds at school for dance and My Dad has fought. He's battled obesity is whole life and my mom was a beautiful. Prima Ballerina and my genetics. Just weren't my mom's once I hit you know. Nineteen twenty twenty one and I felt ashamed in a lot of ways like I felt like this is unfair that I have to be. I'm barely five feet tall in a black leotard and pink tights and I'm like gaining weight and instructors are literally looking at me like why the officially in my class right now. And how does she have a scholarship kind of thing because of the way that I looked like I had some teachers like you have so much talent but like just don't have the body and so I felt like that was really unfair? Yeah so I really focused on Choreography. And I was like you know what I'll be behind the scenes all all learn really all of the elements of craigie really strong Sorry what was what was creating the waking though if you're working out all the time it doesn't matter if people work out all the time quite frankly just because you work out all the time does not mean you're going to make weight and come back in a heartbeat for sure and eat bagging heartbeat but also everybody's metabolic rate is completely unique and completely different. How we store fat. How we need fat. How we How stress affects us like there are so many factors that affect our engines as women too. I mean and our right to dress their children whether we want to have them or not like. It's just a human you know it's part of our system and how that system works for each of us is actually shockingly unique and wait has a lot to do with it. And I think that a lot of people when you're genetically predisposed to certain metabolic rate and you try really hard to fight at our becomes something else you can do a lot of damage to your body and your psyche on a lot of levels and so this is why. It's very important for people to know that my is about creating balance where there's imbalance in anyone's unique body. It doesn't mean I am trying to make you into a teeny tiny dancer or into somebody that you're not so it the I think the passion and the spark for me started then because the counselors it at my school. Where like you know you need to eat less and just eat? Sinoe or like you know your roommates. Do Coke every night. Maybe join them. You know like really know and I just you know for whatever reason my mom I I was raised in a way that thank goodness I never had an eating disorder. I it was never an option or a consideration for me and I never did drugs. I wasn't like in me to do it right I do drink though that anyway so I I felt the I felt what it felt like to not be able to get your body to be something else in a healthy way and I. My mom worked three jobs to put me through school and I had an I joined crunch. I I did pilates with Ron Fletcher. And I was like. She was like scraping. Pennies together. Knows a distinct. How pilates is going to help me if I do step aerobics. And this and that an and nothing would change my body to where I mean. Sure like fitness. When you're working out you feel good. A lot of things can happen but and I was a really good performer. Too so a lot of people. I think in fitness because they can't perform really well. They don't get the calorie spend that you would need to actually start burning real fat so the Diet and the workout have to go so so closely intertwined you know anyway so I tried all these things and then I MY SON. Who's twenty one? his dad played for the New York Knicks? And he was like I love your booty. I don't know why you need to be like. Let's have babies and I'm like yeah. Why always wanted to be a mom that was given and coming from Indiana? We've become moms at twenty three. Because that's what I and but actually it was such a gift because Eric you know when you play for the New York Knicks. If you have an injury you get the best treatment and the entire world. So he was sent we. I spent my pregnancy with Salmon Puerto Rico and with this league that he was rehabbing his back with and I met an incredible incredible doctor who was so passionate about sports and he was like Have you seen Concussion with will Smith Gasoline. Okay so the only difference between will Smith's character in that and finding that protection for NFL players was Desai was an avid basketball fan avid. And he was like these guys are going to end up in Lisi boy recliners for the rest of their lives. No one's thinking about their spines. You know there's a better way to train for the to support their spines BUBBA and I was like I was either going to rescue all of the homeless animals in Puerto Rico or I was going to figure out how to help this guy and I went to his little clinic every day and He had done a mind blowing research on the inner spine muscles. And how the brain is connected and how you don't have to to like if you go. After the transitional muscles in a healthy way like and all the strategic muscle exhaustion. And it's miraculous what we can do and it made so much sense to me because I was like well man if we can make ourselves freakishly large like these bodybuilders. Do or or then I went. I dissect it literally every pro sports like speedskaters for the Olympics or runners. Long distance runners. If you look at people at the top of their game their bodies start to look very similar. Because you're calling to action the same kind of muscles and if you've got that willpower behind it you can really do incredible things with your body. So I studied with him this whole time and I started creating the choreography to support his science and I was like this is incredible and I said wait a minute. Why are we stopping at the back? If you can do this for the back why. Why can't we create this kind of balance and symmetry for the whole body? And he's like no one's ever gonNA come up without much content and I was like I fully em and then I. I did a five year. Study on one hundred and fifty women that I went to Indiana University. I was like how do I do a study? How do I didn't know how to do things and I think one of the things that so corrupt about the fitness industry? Today is that people and I hate to even think that I would be part of this problem which is why I stopped training. Celebrities years ago I literally was like I'm not even higher help oversee their programming come to the gym just like every body else not because I don't love them as people or or what they can. The kind of awareness they can bring forward is so great too. It's because it sends a toxic message to everyone out there that you should want to do what they want to do. Because you want to be them instead of wanting to do what's right for your own health and your own body and In the industry now people think if there they can move or they look good and they get a celebrity all of a sudden they have a method. And I'm like you got method. You gotTA fitness met. The how'd you get word that words all that like research research and I know what it took me and how I was just think naturally without without my ego attached to it because I really didn't think I have permission to be doing this. I just wanted to go back to schools like juilliard or whatever and go. Here's a program you can give these girls where they're not stuffing suppositories up their bum at night and bleeding like you know like it's terrible. It's terrible environment and it's really toxic and So I did the five. You're studying throughout the five year study. I had asked one question. My question was can I take any woman from any genetic background and turn them into what a dancer like looks like so I started from a place that didn't end up wanting to I didn't end up there. But that's that was like this is my mission and as did it I realized. Oh My Gosh. Like all of these. Women are in so many different various levels of pain and they're also unique and then I was like well and also they don't all WanNa go dancers and they don't all they just WanNa you know feel good or on this or and also you can. You can put a bunch of people ask them to do a routine and the same thing is not going to happen to all those

Tracy Anderson New York Knicks Tracy Anderson Dot Com Obesity Indiana Ron Fletcher Salmon Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Juilliard Olympics Smith Gasoline Basketball Lisi NFL Eric Indiana University Smith Desai
Demand for ventilators spikes as coronavirus looms

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:36 min | 6 months ago

Demand for ventilators spikes as coronavirus looms

"This subject of ventilators has entered the conversation in recent days as hospitals prepare to treat people with coronavirus one of the biggest concerns is whether the US has enough ventilators to treat critically ill patients and peers Patty neighmond reports the vast majority of patients seconded by the corona virus will likely only have mild symptoms but adults over sixty especially those with underlying chronic conditions are at the greatest risk of complications like pneumonia and they may need a ventilator if the US experiences the severity of illness on a scale like what happened in China Dr Eric toner says the US is not prepared we are not prepared nor is any place prepared for a Wuhan like outbreak toner studies hospital preparedness for pandemics at the Johns Hopkins center for health security we would see the same sort of bad outcomes that they saw in Wuhan with a very high case fatality rate due largely to people not being able to access the needed intensive care all hospitals have ventilators the number depends on how many beds they have an average sized hospital for example might have twenty ventilators if more are needed they could be rented but if there's a high volume of illness in one area the local hospitals would be competing to rent from the same place there are emergency supplies there is a strategic national stockpile of ventilators numbers classified so it's not clear how many extra ventilators there are estimates range from four thousand to ten thousand well any number of extra ventilators could be an important addition Turner says it likely won't be enough to sustain the US through able him like experience he says hospitals could transfer Asians to other hospitals that have their employers available because not every community is going to be hit simultaneously some cities will be badly affected while others are not so badly affected and then the wave of disease will move on but if the system is still overwhelmed then toner says tough decisions would have to be made about who gets access to a ventilator and who does not for patients with severe pneumonia ventilators can be lifesaving pulmonary critical care specialist Dr William Graham Carlos with Indiana University School of medicine the corona virus like many respiratory viruses can cause inflammation in the lungs and when the lungs become inflamed the membranes that transfer oxygen from the air into the blood become blocked making it difficult to breathe then later is that you see in an intensive care unit can supply higher levels of oxygen and also helped push air into the lungs to open them up and afford more opportunity to get oxygen into the patient ventilators are a bridge to recovery and most patients do get better Dr Craig Cooper Smith is a critical care specialist at Emory school of medicine and a spokesperson for the society of critical care medicine he says it's important to remember than China only fifteen percent of patients with corona virus required hospitalization and only a small number of those ended up in the intensive care unit we are prepared I believe but it does depend upon the size of the scale the estimates are so incredibly wide ranging that it's difficult to know how broad the pandemic could theoretically bay and just how many people will get sick enough to be hospitalized and need a

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:07 min | 8 months ago

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

"Today we're GONNA be talking to Cherie Virago professor of medicine and medical molecular genetics and also director of the stem cell program. I use school of Medicine. He Generals General's GonNa talk to us today about stem cell. Therapy and car T.. Therapy in particular which you may have heard in the news but before we get to that. Let's start with some basics first of all. Welcome to the program program thank you. Can you tell us in general what it means to be not only a professor of medicine but a professor of medical and molecular genetics so medical Michael Molecular Genetics. It's a very broad term It's it's really looking at the molecular basis of disease Not just inherited a disease but Many of the diseases have a molecular basis. Even if they're not directly inherited had he actually look get to the molecular basis. What kind of research technologies are you using? The biggest technology at the moment is Sequencing genes particularly in in terms of Chewers in my area sequencing can cell's genome to identify particular mutations. That could be targetable identifying mutations Sion's that in future could be Way We could design drugs perhaps decided Also there are ways of personalizing Medicine in a way Way We can identify Because not all cancer even the same kind of cancer is not all Homogeneous there's a lot of heterogeneity so if you can identify certain mutations in a person's at cancer cell you may be able to target that specifically perfect for that person's cancer as opposed to all the people with that kind of cancer. So how do you train to do this kind of work so in your career career how what did you do to get to this point. Well I guess there are various ways of getting there the way I got there. I trained actually in Australia Did all my hematology. Aw called you training in Australia. And then I did a PhD. That was more related to stem cell transplantation rather than molecular medicine at the time and then I moved to Ohio state where I stayed there for about six years on faculty and then the opportunity came to lead the transplant program. Ram At Indiana University. So I moved there in two thousand six. So we're talking about treating cancer. Is it all kinds of cancer or specific kinds of cancer. Turner accident well as a stem cell transplant. we're really focusing on hematological. Kansas blood cancers So leukemia multiple myeloma lymphoma. These are the ones that are amenable really to stem cell transplantation. You talk about what the differences are between those three short so It's really the cell of origin or the origin of the cancer so leukemia we're really talking about Cancers of blood stem cells the bone marrow in multiple myeloma. We're really talking about Cancer cells plasma cells which really part of the immune system in lymph falmouth with talking about cancer cells that are also part of the immune system that the less differentiated cells than the Coloma. So what what causes these. What makes someone developed one of those types of cancer? Well that's a really good question and we don't know all the the answers to that but It the it's silly as with other Kansas to I'll just blood cancers there are Hits in the genome of the the cans of the cells that turns them on to become cancerous essentially and so once they become cancerous. They just start growing multiplying without controls trolls. That the gist of it. Or Yeah. That's basically it they. They're able to multiply without control but they're also able to survive better They have a survival advantage compared to their normal counterparts talking about the history of treatment of those types of cancer. Like what do we do. And what are we. What are we got into now? And specifically of course what is stem cell therapy. Happy at the end. Yes so you know historically the we have been treating and we still the do treat These cancers with conventional cytotoxic agents these agents are essentially cellular toxins that cause DNA damage to the cells and as a result they The cells sells died and they because cancer cells tend to divide more frequently or more rapidly than normal cells and these conventional channel cytotoxic target the proliferating cells more than the Doman cells. So we're able to Mo- selectively kill cancer cells. But they are. They also affect normal cells as well as things have evolved We are now able to. We learn more about the genetics of the Kansas. His when now able to design drugs that particularly targets in pathways molecular pathways. That these cancer cells depend on so Treatment has become Less toxic to the to the patient in general so we're trying to target specifically just killing the cancer while not killing other other rapidly or any other kinda cells in the body. So what is then stem cell. Therapy like what. What's the difference between what skyping there and then going all the way to say? We're GONNA do a stem cell. Trance have so in some cases not all Kansas but some Kansas are also amenable to stem cell transplant therapy. And they're really too broadly. Speaking to approach is one where we use. The patient's own stem cells called tolerance stem cell transplantation. And where we use dona cells or allogeneic stem cell transplantation so with autologous transplantation plantation would really reverting back to the classic cytotoxic approach way we give very high doses of chemotherapy to Kill Oh as many cancer cells as possible. One of the side effects of this is that it will also cools a permanent damage to the bone marrow of people without stem cell support report. They would Essentially die of marrow failure so to collect stem cells. I there on stem cells assuming their stem cells not diseased. Then when you can give high dose. Chemotherapy give back stem cells and allow the marrow to recover so I have a couple questions there first of all. How do you get the stem cells? Out So stem cells live predominantly in the bone marrow But they do circulate the blood so you can either collect directly from the bone marrow but more commonly family today in the autologous approach we give growth factors which can move stem cells to circulate more in the blood and then we collect them. I'm by a process called a ferocious. Where basically they are collected a blood donor machine essentially that will collect them from the blood? How do you how do you how are you sure? You're not collecting cancer cells at the same time you do Some of these stem cell products will be contaminated but to some extent by cancer sells but it seems that most relapses after autologous transplantation occur not because of contamination. But because you really the the chemo a high dose chemotherapy that you've given has not killed the last cancer cell in the body. So how are you also assured that the stem cells are not. Can't where's the cancer come from. If it's not coming mm from stem cells as the simpsons or what about the sort of the the. He met a poetic stem cells. That give rise to the sherm tie. He met a point system. MM-HMM SO For example in multiple myeloma these inadequate ext themselves are not cancerous. Okay and in lymphomas Somali. They are not not cancerous. Can you just give us just a brief description of what the poetic system is so the Humana poetic system is essentially all blood forming cells and immune cells so the very primitive stem cells that give give rise to the humanitarian existent. They give rise to white cells red cells platelets as well as the components of the immune in systems such as B. Cells. T. Cells natural killer cells. We're just trying to figure out in my head and where it comes from. Because if if the are the white blood cells coming from the bone marrow in the stem cells though in development I it depends on the Canada Essentially for example if we take multiple well my Lama so the Within the immune system one cancer cell becomes Transform to become malignant and phones a clone in that clone of actually expands and has sub clones of its own and that's really the cancer but that's not arising from a in the actual stem cell of the very primitive stem cell that gives rise to all the blood forming cells in the Merrill.

Cancer T. Cells Kansas Multiple Myeloma Michael Molecular Genetics Australia School Of Medicine Professor Of Medicine Cherie Virago Ram At Indiana University Myeloma Lymphoma Director Ohio Professor Sion
Kate Upton; Model, Actress, and Founder of Strong4Me

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:55 min | 8 months ago

Kate Upton; Model, Actress, and Founder of Strong4Me

"Welcome to skimp from the couch. I'm so excited to be here okay. So we're going to jump in Skim your resume for us. It's been a crazy awesome journey. I started modeling when I was fifteen. I am like a real adventure heart and convinced my parents Let me travel the world at fifteen and working to get yeah. I couldn't convince them to let me stay out to Oleg. I had like my big break at eighteen when I met with. MJ Day. Ah and was a part of the sports illustrated family and went to meet with and work with some of the most iconic people in the industry you know from Ana Wind Tour Tony Goodman Steven Meisel Corinne Rafael Steven Gan. It's just been an awesome journey and made me. I understand my body like I'm losing the skin part of my resume. Um made me really understand my body starting from the place ace of just being the typical model which was like skinny skinny skinny and I wasn't enjoying my life. I didn't have energy on set and I didn't have a whole life but I didn't have enough energy. Gee to go out with friends or be the best girlfriend. I could be so asserted working with Ben Bruno and we find the best way to ultimately love your body. Love your unique differences from everyone else and find your strongest bestself Matz ultimately why I wanted to launch strong for me is bring all that information to the everyday woman. So what is something that is not on your wikipedia page. We should know about you. There's a Lotta lies on I. Look Oh my God. What's the top lie that you're how did someone even make that up that I was a violin player and he's just own that for sure just I would hate to go to a party without a violin? They'd be very disappointed. Well lucky for you. Maybe not like he found while. I know you brought your sister here today and shouldn't have told us as your disturbed. So what is something. We should know about Kate. Sister did remember one thing that was on your wikipedia pedia pages that you graduated from Indiana University. which funny enough is where brother goes now? I didn't even realize that something that we should know about her. That like like no one else does. What was she an annoying younger sister? Oh Okay I was always motivated and driven and so sweet One thank you know. She did. HAVE MOM walk into school every single day. Try Yeah I mean at least fifteen into what do you mean literally until my mom was like I refuse to. IQ It'd be fifty. Yeah she's like you're embarrassing Scott. Housley I don't care where you and Marissa your mom then had to go to school every single day and like did you walk ahead while I was in college college. Yeah so yeah I mean. She's other people thought she's like come on mom. We're going to do you. I WANNA be the emotional support. Yeah I one of the most support I love just like you know having a little chat with her it has. It is one of the things that I don't often say that I have things in common with. I'm excited remodels. But before you were you. You were a competitive horseback rider. Yes and I couldn't compete but I grew up horseback riding and and love it. Yes she compete in college. I was on. I was on my college equestrian team for half a semester. So how old were you when you started competing. I think I was ten years old. When I started competing I really feel like the foundation of being around? Horses has helped me so much in my life. which is the hard work and being ready to get dirty and really put in the effort and learning about something new and the travel at winner on with competing? It's so cool at a young age that you were a pretty accomplished competitive horseback rider and then went on to have this career. Both things are very individual sports which interesting. Obviously there's a horse may have to have a connection. But how do you feel like that. Set you up to do what you went on to do. I mean I feel like it really helped because I was constantly meeting New People while traveling I was constantly out of my comfort zone in new cities. He's and competing. And then I did the same thing in modelling and I think individual sports which I've really learned from my husband is a whole different mindset. Where were you know I really had to get used to the whole team thing can be? Would you like to tell our listeners. Who Your husband is Justin Bieber Lambert? I feel like it's just a completely different mindset that I was able to fall right into and an individual sports jobs you have to represent yourself you are. You're you're only advocate and I was very used to doing that whether it was with horse trainers or judges or anybody in the industry so my modeling agencies definitely were a little shocked that a fifteen year old had as many opinions. I did especially where my career going before you were even able able to give those opinions to the agencies. You had to convince your parents that you're fifteen. You're getting literally walk to your classroom every day by your mom or your like totally really trust me to go across the world completely fine. How did you convince them to the greatest fun fact? I presented them with a five year. Plan I was like I am going to make a career out of this or go to college so I decided if I started at fifteen eighteen I was young for my grade and I could still be in my same age group going into call it a workout. Yep We're GONNA take a break from competing eating horses because it was very stressful a lot on the economy and everything and then that's when I was like great like I'll just go make my own money. Then ah I convince them and they came on a lot of jobs. My mom him down to Miami. I started in Miami with me a lot and she refused to go into my job though which was actually really great. Those probably the right. Yeah like she knew out but she was really wanted me to learn how to represent myself. If your mom's in a room you're going to depend on her we would have prep interviews or prep castings exactly how supposed to act or what I was supposed to say a walk with me so I could handle it myself and make it a career. I did she tell you to say I mean I was fifteen so from everything like how to be professional national how to respond like got into trouble like so. You're at an age where most people are in high school all but also starting to like go out and be social and you are living in an apartment with other models and your mom is there. Sometimes WHOA I was that age like for you because here you are doing something that is GonNa be the backbone into your career and you sound very driven and at the same time you are our young and beautiful and making money and living with a bunch of other girls away from your parents. What was your life like? I worked every single day and ultimately our still proving to my parents that I wasn't moving to Miami just to party so I was paying my own bills and working constantly and I always say models roles who get the reputation of partying doing drugs or either the ones not working or so rich. They're only working a few days year because otherwise you're so exhausted working working twelve sixteen hour days every single day. I remember asking to get days off when I got my period of like. I'm so tired. Tired conversations go agencies like just let us know if you need a day off. I'm like actually I need a week. I'm really curious because it is obvious. How driven you are in Daniel? Just said like clearly from your question career and into into modeling what obviously modeling is infamous for how harsh the criticism is internally. And you know this kind of striving for perfection and these ideals of perfection and we'll talk about the public criticism that you received which is ridiculous. I'm just curious what it was like for you emotionally every day at work to be told turn this way. Look this way. Don't smile like that like what did that do to you. It puts you in a different mindset mindset because suddenly you almost have to remove yourself from your body and just blackout and do what they say and it also leads. I think angrily young models to do that in their everyday life and just do what is being told of them because you can't really especially being a young model have have an opinion on set. It's it's definitely kind of a crazy mindset that puts you in a very very vulnerable place so when the outside critics came in it was so hard on me because mentally. I wasn't strong to handle when you think about you today as now a businesswoman. How do you translate those experiences at that? Young Age. Chew the businesswoman. You are today. Did it feel you did help you. compartmentalize where do you think it laid the foundation for you today. Yeah definitely only fueled me. It made me learn that I really need to speak my mind and that my opinion does matter because of all those experiences and you know there was so how many times onset when I'd be like way more efficient if they would just do this or if they would just shoot me from this angle. 'cause I already know that lightings bad it it's GonNa take three hours by would just keep my mouth shut because no one wants to listen to the model onset and now I'm like no. My time is worth something and I'm going to say it and we're going to move on. We're going to get this done right. Did you feel like you had a support system in those early years. You weren't the household name and you had those opinions. I mean my family was a huge support system for me but ultimately nobody in my family was involved in industry previously so they could only give me advice from their personal life experiences so I felt a little bit lost becoming well known it was like how do I deal with anything. Everybody was overwhelmed. No one really knew the advice to give me and then shooting the other woman cameron and Leslie gave me like just so many life lessons. That was such a fun movie to watch. I had fun and watching it and it seems like you guys had fun filming it so much fun. Filming US shade you find mentorship from Rotary with other models that were coming up at the same time or is it pretty competitive. I feel like it's not as competitive as people think because when you're a model it's up to the client. I'm maybe the only place that it gets competitive is your agents like Oh is my agent giving me those same opportunities or I should be doing this. I never felt like I was competitive. Have with other girls and you ultimately do work with other models so you become friends. You're in the same place. I mean everybody. She has jealousy but I didn't feel like it ran friendships or

Miami Tony Goodman Steven Meisel Cor United States Ben Bruno Indiana University. Matz Rotary Justin Bieber Lambert Marissa Kate Scott Daniel Cameron Leslie
Missile Strike Damage Appears Limited, but Iran May Not Be Done

The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee

01:08 min | 9 months ago

Missile Strike Damage Appears Limited, but Iran May Not Be Done

"Iran retaliates for the U. S. airstrike that killed its top general firing a barrage of missiles overnight at a rocky bases housing U. S. troops Iran's supreme leader told a chanting crowd the attacks or a slap on the face of America president trump later tweeted that all is well there have been no reports of casualties but damage assessments are still under way Iran says fifteen missiles were fired from its territory to bases were struck at Alice side and B. L. Hussein but not as a professor of International Studies at Indiana University the intensity of the attacks seem lower than had been feared which is good news in terms of the escalation CBS news military analyst my client this could be more less a show of force this could be more or less them trying to show that they can do this trying to show their people they want to respond to this but knowing full well that if they don't hit anything on the other end that the Americans probably won't retaliate Iraq says Iran notified it when the attacks began in Tehran said they would be limited all eyes this morning will be on the White House for president trump's

Iran America Donald Trump B. L. Hussein Professor International Studies Indiana University Military Analyst Iraq Tehran White House President Trump CBS
Professor keeps job despite "racist, sexist, and homophobic" posts

WBBM Late Morning News

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

Professor keeps job despite "racist, sexist, and homophobic" posts

"And Indiana University professor is drawing scathing criticism from the school for social media posts that are being described as racist sexist and anti gay WBBM smite crowds are with the store Eric Rasmussen a professor of business economics and public policy was slammed by the provost Loren Wrobel who wrote his user stunningly ignorant and bigoted but she says he won't be fired for the post saying quote as vile and stupid as they are because the first amendment of the United States constitution forbids us to do so I think I should be able to quote from an article without saying I agree with everything in the article Rasmussen told CBS four in Indianapolis academic freedom should protect him even if he believed all the things being attributed to him those include that women don't belong in academia because they're too emotional and either to gay men because they're promiscuous and that black students are inferior to white

Professor Eric Rasmussen Loren Wrobel CBS Indiana University Professor Of Business Provost United States Indianapolis
AP Top 25 Today

Lance McAlister

00:14 sec | 11 months ago

AP Top 25 Today

"In the AP top twenty five in USA today coaches polls in college football the Ohio State Buckeyes ranked second Indiana University enters both poles twenty forty eight P. twenty fifth in the coaches

AP USA Indiana University Ohio Twenty Fifth
Saguaro Boot

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 11 months ago

Saguaro Boot

"How is your chipped. The desert dawn tested a brought you something. I'll oh it's what is it A.. So all boot when it's aerobic dies. His flesh decays leaving behind the woody skeleton that supported the plant. What also remains are bootlace structures like this one has the combined creation of a scenario and Hilo. woodpecker woodpeckers pecked into CACTI with all those spines sure do averge got the building that somewhere and trees are scarce in the desert but studied CICERO. Zoe other the hand can grow as high as fifty feet. The bird begins by burrowing. Its way through the leathery skin of the CACTUS once inside the plant the digs downward hauling Hauling out a space for its nist woodenness sorrow. Lose water through evaporation arrived. Url Not only would. Such wounded caused a swallow to continuously lose. It was water but it will leave the plant susceptible to infection. That's why the Serov responds to the Hilo. Woodpeckers intrusion by secreting resonance sap all all around the hollow the sad hardens into a kind of permanent scab which remains intact wrong as swallows death. The woodpecker actually abandons endan Nunez then returns once sap is hardened was more. He'll woodpeckers typically build Nunez each year which means the oldness are then taken up by other feathered residents including desert owls. After this award dies it's boots may provide shelter to still more creatures such as snakes. Scorpions Scorpions and spiders. I hope nothing like that is currently residing in the boot you brought me. Hope not either. This moment of science comes from from Indiana University. We're on the web at a moment. Science Dot Org. I'm Don Glass. I'm Ya Cassandra.

Endan Nunez Hilo SAP ZOE Don Glass Cicero Indiana University Hilo. Fifty Feet
"indiana university" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"indiana university" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"And when they get on these runs, you know, he's been able to put a lot of teams on these runs. And the raptors are on one right now they, they would be fantastic, if they could get to the championship in and win it. Okay. So you, you played at Indiana University, but I it's, it's in, in Pennsylvania, and the other one, I you give the, the other one, how dare you call yourself, Indiana. When you're not actually Indiana who'd you play for right? I play for coaching. Kurt Naski who's been in college coach. Yeah. So Kurt was a big influence for me and, you know, now, he's an assistant at air force, then we're, you know, who's I really learned a lot from him really organized business like ran a program. And he's in one of those guys that's you know, was a Drake for awhile. Penn State has been in a couple of different stops. But just one of the good guys in the game. So when how good were you guys when you're when you're there? So my, my, you know, we were we I like to say, we kind of put UP basketball to the next level, you know, my first and second year freshman and sophomore year. We were let's say. Average made the made the conference play offs by junior year. We, we got up to number one in the nation division to we finished the season, you know, twenty seven and three and then the, the next year we went twenty nine and two we were number one team in the country, you know, wire-to-wire made the elite eight my junior and senior years. So, you know, just really really great college career. I was a program guy, not a great player, you know made made by you know Mark just in terms of leadership as a three year captain and just being the team guy. So from those standpoints points. Great cows career great experience, and, and I think those guys would tell you, hey, we knew this guy was going to be a coach, you know, following his father's footsteps really didn't turn out that way. Yeah. You talk about talk about your dad's. So, you know, my dad was was a high school coach before I was alive. And then a college assistant mostly before I was alive, and then he was a college head coach. And I was born at U W walkie. And then they I think they got fired because they went division three, and then he became an assistant coach at Long Beach state, and that was the last really in terms of his college experience. And so I wasn't around the, the, you know, you grow everybody goes up in a coaches household. Coach's background? I wasn't necessarily around a program growing up, even though we had a travel team program, and he was coaching some minor league stuff and he was doing the NBA summer league back when it was at Loyola Marymount, what was your childhood like in a in a basketball household? You know, Doug, that's one of the best memories that I have is. So my dad was the first you know, before I was born he was with Bob Knight at West Point. And then he was head coach at lock. Haven division two in Pennsylvania, when I was born, you know, of course, don't remember those young memories then he was an assistant for Willis Reed with the Knicks and Creighton university. And that's where I start to, you know, really remember being around the teams and being around the guys most of it when, when he went to clarion university of Pennsylvania, most.

raptors Kurt Naski Pennsylvania Indiana Indiana University Bob Knight clarion university of Pennsylv Penn State Willis Reed Long Beach Doug basketball NBA Loyola Marymount Knicks Mark Creighton university West Point three year
"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And I want them happy I want this. I want them to have a flourishing city. And I want their mayor to smile, I wanna smile back on back on the face of Indianapolis. And and I also think that our mayor ought to have a lot of energy a lot of enthusiasm and and. We're not seeing it right now. Tell me a little bit about the city county council, and what you would like to see out of the city county council under your leadership as a mayor. Well, it's kind of interesting the mayor in his announcement. And and I think you both know I've known Joe for forty years we've been friends for forty years. Same college, right? Yes. Same college fraternity Indiana University, and we're in sigma alpha Epsilon fraternity together. And so I like Joe everybody likes Joe. And but but to get your point it, it it working with the city county council, the mayor in his in his announcement had talked about bipartisanship as being probably his largest accomplishment in there, and it takes time for things to to move along and be successful. Well, I I've been up for reelection sixteen times eight general elections and people demand that you work together and. In the Senate, and the Indiana general assembly, we have to have a balanced budget in we worked together, but that's a low bar that that bipartisanship, we expect that and and and what I've into state is working with the council working on for instance, unsolved crimes. I hear that all the time. We had one hundred sixty.

city county council Joe everybody Indianapolis Indiana Senate Indiana University forty years
"indiana university" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Two season you recognize that ninety six team that Ninety-six team. Man. They were amazing that Ed ninety six and and, you know, of course, coach Pitino recruited those guys he built that team. They came within an eyelash of winning the national championship in ninety seven. I we they took they took. Syracuse overtime. In one thousand nine hundred ninety seven and again, you could argue. That it was Patino team. It was certainly betino's players in nineteen ninety eight that won the national championship. Would he moved on to Boston and tubby became the became the coach? I take nothing away from tubby on that. I'm not discounting his I'm not discounting his efforts. So I'm not discounting his. His contribution. But I'm just saying you you have to give Patino some credit for that ninety eighteen come on. You have to. And one other thing maybe I shouldn't bring this up. But there is a, you know, just a few miles to the north of us in Bloomington, and is such a different story coach Bob Knight. Who by all accounts was a great college basketball coach. Now, we can argue about you know. Whether or not coach night. What kind of what kind of an example, he set and there were all kinds of issues with coach night. But clearly a great basketball coach, and it is so unfortunate that he will not have any have anything to do with Indiana, all the people who have the people who fired him, they're all gone from Indiana University. There have been times when people have reached out to him. Trying to get him. To celebrate the the national championship teams from seventy six eighty one eighty seven he not only doesn't want to be there. He wants all references to him removed. Yeah. I can't stop you from celebrating this team. But don't mention my name. I just it is so sad that coach night. Who is so brilliant is just a bitter old, man. Who can't let it go. He might still be able to to to to be the governor of Indiana. He so he was so popular in that in that state. You know time has moved on. But I mean, there was nobody bigger in the state than Bob Knight. And he is so big and so small he just can't let it go. And it is it is so unfortunate for the fans in Indiana. It's so unfortunate really for coach night. Who should really be celebrated in and appreciated for what he did that. They would welcome him with open arms. They would love him. But he just can't let it go. Even though all the people who he think did him. He thinks did him wrong. All those people are gone. Doesn't matter. Well, five seven one eight four eight four and eight hundred four four four eight four eight four I sure don't want to see a situation like that in Kentucky and coach Pitino is is not that guy. Let's take a quick break. We'll come right back. We'll get to more of your calls after this NewsRadio. Eight forty W H A S,.

Bob Knight Indiana tubby Pitino basketball Patino Syracuse Indiana University Ed Bloomington betino Kentucky Boston Eight forty W
"indiana university" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Thank you. Doing that people are gonna have PTSD from the time. I had DJ Doug pound on the show. Popular episode. Hey, jesse. Who play in for? So I'm playing for padding, Tom. It's a photo of the poster for the first patented film, your airbrushed in their Doug ziti marvelloud sandwich. And you're eating souvlaki that doesn't have marmalade all sorts of candy around and it starred but bursts audit. It looks very festive. Okay. Good choice. Nice job. Adding Tom would you bring for the price bag? I brought a DVD of anchorman because today is Christina app. Thank you. It's Christina applegate's birthday. Time. Oh shit. I didn't send her any. So if you want to celebrate by watchers Roddick, according stone, it is it's the unrated uncut and uncalled-for edition, but it's still runs a titan idea. Eight minutes. A lot of bonus features that it'll be a good time fucking nerd seriously. But to no nice to just love trae. He knows I love we hug all that sounded weird. All right. But I just diversity. What are you up to about tenth grade? How old are you? Now. Actually, I graduated from Indiana University. The girl so fast. Yeah. Grow up right before is this is very exciting. This is. One of the movies babies. It's very much Douglas movie boyhood issue. Just check in with me every area. Oh, twenty two. You look like you tell people you're twenty two and a half. I also stand up out my chest. When I do that too. You know? Going to roast battle between these two. I love that. He brought anchorman, though, the sequel bombed anchor babies. Okay. While Aker Grover all the anchor babies. Yeah. See we'll Ferrell from the shins down. Very thought Cole. Brick like skater instead of scooter and anchor babies, there's stone instead of brick say thing. Say that joke again but slower than they're all gonna get it back with Alex. I forgot to mention I like Seth my last movie was romance that reindeer lodge, which is on the hallmark movie channel. And I wanted to point out the entire crux of the plot is a woman thinks she wins a free trip that Jamaica that being Jamaica Vermont. To make Vermont. I didn't make that clear. So. Then working for a writer director in Brooklyn. I've been as assistant for the last couple of months been learning a lot with some pre production stuff. And I spent a lot of fun. Cool. That's a cool. Plug. Does update. Plugger booby Plugger movie. What do you wanna plug? So I recently finished my last short film that I did it Indiana University. It's on my Twitter at Jesse pasternack. It's called pick. It's sorta thesis film. So if you wanna watch it, please watch. How long is it four minutes? Four seconds. Pay swirl say, it's fine. It's by last effort. Yeah. Why do you have to be so under five for Pasternak? You got that man. Kimberly. Grab that mic. So..

Jesse pasternack Doug pound Tom Jamaica Vermont Indiana University Christina applegate PTSD Christina Aker Grover Jamaica Roddick Pasternak Twitter Kimberly Ferrell Douglas shins Cole Seth Alex
"indiana university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg law. I'm june. Grosso ahead. Miss. Our chief Justice defend the independence of the federal courts amid renewed calls for term limits for Jones's this supreme court blocks, a deposition of commerce secretary Wilbur Ross in a politically charged lawsuit. The Trump administration warns a federal appeals court to issue an opinion on DACA or else and the dangers of diminishing oversight of Wall Street. Chief Justice John Roberts appeared at a lecture series. At the university of Minnesota last Monday and made a rare comment on quote, the contentious events in Washington in recent weeks, stressing the importance of an independent judiciary, we speak for the constitution. Our role is very clear, we are to interpret the constitution and laws of the United States and ensure that the political branches act within them that job, obviously requires independence from the political branches. Steve Sanders, a professor at Indiana University school of law, Steve after the bitter partisan fight over Kavanagh's confirmation. Other justices have also talked about how the court is not political not part is now the chief repeats the theme. He's spoken of many times before any quoted from Cavanaugh calling him our newest colleague will this do anything to reassure those who are. Concerned about the court. I'm not sure it will June only because probably relatively few people other than your listeners. And there's some people who catch it online. We'll even see the chief justices comments, you know, far more. Pervasive has been the fight over Cavanaugh. And and I think we have to draw distinction here between how the court operates and how it makes decisions. That's really I think what the chief Justice was talking about. And we can debate whether that's political or not. But you know, what we're really talking about is the expectation of who will get on the court, and what kinds of people we want on the court. I think the actions of President Trump been promising Justice who would vote a particular way on particular cases, as well as the actions of people like Mitch McConnell who prevented President Obama from getting a pick. And instead paved the way for President Trump now to have to think those actions, simply speak, much more. Loudly about the perceived politicization of the court, and unfortunately, do more damage and further undermine this idea that the supreme court really does accept arguments and consider law and make decisions without any sort of political preconceptions in answering the law students questions Roberts said that criticism of his opinions doesn't have an effect on him quote. The good thing about life tenure is it really doesn't bother you very much and that brings up the next issue. The renewed calls for term limits for the justices many legal scholars favorite term limits. How do you feel going back and forth? I have academic friends who are very much at the idea for a long time. I thought well it can't hurt the idea behind life tenure for all federal judges, including supreme court justices has always been understood to be to assure their independence to assure. They couldn't be voted out or removed. Because they do something that is unpopular term limits simply sets a set period of time. It doesn't make any judgments about a justices decisions. I think I'm coming to be persuaded though that if if it's intended to solve the problem of the politicization of the court, it could do more harm than good. What are the most common proposals as an eighteen year term, and that's designed to assure that basically during each four year presidential term, there would be to conceive each each presidential term would have to appointments to the supreme court. Well, then you know, we could be almost permanent state of chaos if you liked the cavenaugh a circus, then get ready for something. Like that potentially every two years. It seems to me perhaps in retrospect that the court has done the best or has been the least controversial in the public minds has been a political football less during periods when the membership of the court has been very stage. When we haven't had frequent turnover and frequent nomination fights. Let's talk about the ways to limit. The terms of Justice is a constitutional amendment or legislation and constitutional amendment would require two-thirds approval of the house and Senate as well as three quarters of the state see is that even plausible nowadays, we go onto the next thing. I don't think anyone thinks that a constant the nature of our politics seems to be such that I don't think anybody believes you could get two thirds of both houses congress and three quarters of the states to agree on anything the constitutional amendment process was intended to be difficult. We don't want to change a fundamental thing like the constitution lightly, but it's become virtually impossible. I'm just not really sure I'd there have been arguments made that you could do term limits through ordinary legislation just a majority of congress and the president's signature, I think that's. Highly debatable. I haven't looked closely enough for in-depth enough about it. I guess to determine the the argument is basically, well, it doesn't cut against the idea that the principle enshrined in the constitution tenure for good behavior. Generally understood to be life tenure was meant to assure independence term limits. Don't cut against independence. They just essentially define what the office is. That would certainly go against a sort of generations of thinking about what life tenure means for federal judges. You know, the argument may continue to be developed, and maybe maybe someone will be persuaded. You could do this through legislation. I think it would be a difficult argument though, Steve let's say if you did do it through legislation. How would it affect other lifetime judicial appointments? Would you have to do it across the board? Will you wouldn't have to, you know, given the number of judges that we have if you started term limiting them, the just the process. Yes. Of replacing the hundreds of federal judges, you have on a rotating basis on a regular basis would be so inefficient and would be so disruptive to the work of those courts. I don't know that anyone is posing that idea seriously that Steve Sanders a professor at Indiana University Mara school of law coming up on Bloomberg law. The Trump administration warns a federal appeals court to issue a decision or it will go to the supreme court on June Grosso. This is Bloomberg. It only.

supreme court Chief Justice John Roberts president Bloomberg Steve Sanders Cavanaugh congress Trump professor Grosso Wilbur Ross United States June Grosso university of Minnesota Pervasive Indiana University Mara school Indiana University school of l Steve let
"indiana university" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"But it's EJ Montgomery with fourteen points, nine rebounds. Coming off the bench to lead Kentucky's. They win their first exhibition game ninety four sixty six over Bryant lanes Transylvania pioneers. Ryan lemon Matt Jones here in the local Toyota dealers are post game show and we've got 'em release off this segment. Hello emory. Hey, how you guys doing? What's going on? I just wanted to say something about the kid Tyler he wrote he's gonna be great great learning experience for him tonight to get his first feeling breath arena, which has to be hard. And I think you'll be awesome. And I got a question about the next team. We play is not UP. You who is? Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Which makes no sense. But apparently, I think I ran a long time ago. It has something to do with like, not the state, Indiana. But something else if it has no affiliation with how you Indiana University. Yeah. There's a city it's Indiana, Pennsylvania. That's the city his name of the city is Indiana. And that's where this college is guys. Guys. Walker Buehler's only six outs away from winning the World Series game. Yeah, he's great. He's going to pay more though, because he's got a hundred pitches or something. Hey, did you see Ryan South Carolina lost to a division? Two team tonight Augusta. Frank Martin is in a very good mood as we all know that that is one locker room you do not want to be a part of if you lose an exhibition game to a division two team. I always love exhibition season because there's always big teams that lose gay, South Carolina. Of course, I learned many years ago when I said they were the worst seventeen.

Indiana Indiana University of Pennsylv Walker Buehler Ryan South Carolina Bryant lanes Transylvania Indiana University EJ Montgomery Tyler Kentucky Matt Jones Augusta Toyota Ryan Frank Martin emory Pennsylvania
"indiana university" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Archive that Indiana University can get a sense of the kind of work that a person with police training and this kind of international travel is qualified to do, and then you what you can see is people crossing all the borders that are supposed to contain policing. You can see them going easily over into military fears. You can see them continuing to travel abroad. You could see them coming home and going back to work in police forces or in police academies, or in prisons you can see them going into all the branches of the federal police. The US federal government has the number of police forces that operate there. And so you can see them violating strictures of scale in locality. Conc- them crossing the military, civilian blood brain border. You can see them crossing over into public and private works. Lots of private security industry work. So they do bring some of that stuff home and you take some of it abroad, but we shouldn't understand. It as a one time effects, right? Taking from a coherent well of US policing and just taking that abroad or borrowing counterinsurgency, which is created by the military and then bringing it home. We should see them instead as one phase of this constant cycle of police and military exchanging strategies of police going abroad and coming home and of government violence workers going over to the private sector, and then returning and kind of mixing up muddying the waters between public and private were your stars oppose? Their skills are fungible wherever the currency is violence. That's right. Yeah, I think that's true. That's a great way of saying it focus a great deal on the concept of Bill dean consent building consent for this racist violence. But the police in the United States seem to. Have long enjoyed massive, white political consent for the violence that they do to black communities. I mean, I think that part of the way white consent is secured is by doing violence to black communities because that is one of the most powerful ways that the US state gives value to whiteness creates a possessive investment in whiteness creates whiteness as property. It's very clear that the value of whiteness is enormous. When you see what happens to black people at the hands of police. So blatant, police violence, public violence against black people actually shows white people how privilege they are. That's right. I think it doesn't just show them something that already exist. I think it creates that privilege. It's one of the things that we can look at in order understand the process of racial construction and. And in the age of the war on terror, I think it shows us how racialism nation is shifting that now the category of blackness or the category of the hyper least is extending to people who could be understood as you know, Middle Eastern or Brown or Muslim or immigrant, and I think that the categories of racial relation are shifting subtly, but police remain one of the state's greatest engines of racial relation. And also I should say something about the violence work that police do. I'm not suggesting that police are constantly violent or that the only kind of violence work is the infliction of violence..

US Bill dean Indiana University
"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Visually impaired, Indiana University, spilling the promise is what we do when a student discovers new passion. Well, I'm packs their bags in a new country walks across the stage to the climate. Promise. Promise. You'll find you're looking for here. Take the first step towards your Jerry, his Indiana dot EDU. Indiana, University fulfilling the promise. Seven thirty seven left here at Ohio stadium in the third quarter as Indiana trails, Ohio State, thirty five to twenty and the hoosiers will have a football as play resumes here after stopping Ohio State on for them. Third time's obey the buckeyes have gone on fourth down. But they made it the first few times this time not so much Welker job. I'm third down to sit up that fourth minute really strong effort on four th so a good job. And you know, who was involved in both plays while I would like no rake watch Jones. Well, he's played. Well this year he has there's no question about it. I would say if you looked at his performance this season, you'd have to say he's been Indiana's best linebackers PA I would say that is absolutely correct. For now. The office comes out for the hoosiers. I instead of a forty two yard line to roof played. Well, he'd has on the early in this ball game early. Haven't heard much since. Ramsey is on now, a Stevie Scott to his left three receivers left side one to the far Ramsey. Takes the snap. This time. He gets away with the long Bob down the field with Westbrook, and he makes the catch neck Westbrook. The Alabama they say was out of its holy cow. He was fighting over there. With KENDALL Sheffield. He's been badly him all day long. And he's won most of those battles. But this time apparently stepped out about well,.

Indiana University Indiana Jones Westbrook Ramsey Ohio State Ohio stadium KENDALL Sheffield Welker Jerry Stevie Scott football Alabama Bob forty two yard
"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"In a clinical study with various biomarkers in. We will learn a lot more about Alzheimer's disease in general in the state of Indiana such big efforts are rarely done. So we'll be on the forefront of being able to accomplish a lot in and contribute towards really defeating this disease. Ultimately, look, I'd love to ask you one or two more questions about that. First of all what what do you mean by precision health initiative? So this is a major Inish. From Indiana University school of medicine focusing on several critical disorders Alzheimer's being one of them. Multiple myeloma is another and there are a few more as just a way that the school has prioritized those research initiatives, and these conditions is the ones being most critical to right now invest in and find that you're four. So clearly there are details to work out on how a lot of the precision health initiative. Studies are going to work, but can you give us some of the broad thoughts on how you might be moving forward to to try to to do research on Alzheimer's disease through the initiative. Yeah. So we will be targeting individuals in their fifties and older from the Indiana, Indianapolis greater area, but also probably statewide, and we will focus on clinical exams and some in a very creative way to assess cognitive function by using online tools for. Testing for cognitive testing. And in addition to that, they'll be blood collection DNA collection..

Alzheimer's disease Indiana Indiana University school of m Alzheimer Multiple myeloma Inish Indianapolis
"indiana university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Well yeah i should say the primary argument in the quilt case for preventing state governments from just taxing all out of state vendors complaints costs the fear would be every state has different tax laws each localities have different tax laws there's potentially thousands of jurisdictions that have the ability to impose sales tax collection obligations on out of state vendors and the fear would be that that would be expensive in terms of compliance costs for vendors selling nationwide today that's somewhat less concern because software has resolved a lot of these problems david gamut is a law professor at indiana university of bloomington tax day is also tomorrow and while online retailers are not required to collect taxes you dear listeners and also me and anyone who bought something online are required to pay those taxes and to estimate how much we owe on our tax returns david did tell me however most of us don't do that i'm molly would this is a pm just as you count on marketplace for reliable in depth news and information we're counting on listeners like you to invest in what we do the more people who support marketplace the more we can do to raise economic intelligence across the country and don't forget your donation will be matched dollar for dollar when you give today thanks to a generous challenge from our friends at kindy to become a marketplace investor today at marketplace dot org and thank you.

professor david indiana university of blooming molly
"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Welcome to healthcare. Tree podcast episode was super interesting in long, and therefore I'm going to skip right past the news. If you go watch this week's healthcare triage news, otherwise let's jump right in our guest. This week is Dr Jonathan for Dell good friend of mine and also a transplant surgeon here at Indiana University school of medicine, so I'm going to let him introduce himself burst. And then I'm gonna ask him lots of questions. Hi, this is Jonathan Fidel am chief transplant at Indiana University. I mainly specialize in pancreas transplants. But I'm kind of jack-of-all-trades I do livers and males and used to do kidneys originally from Montreal. And I've been in Indiana now since two thousand and two so how do you get to be a transplant surgeon? So clearly, you went to college I and then medical school merger go to medical school. I went to medical school in Montreal. And then what did you do after that? So the training in Montreal Montreal's a little bit different because they have a different schooling system. So instead of going to great allow. Twelve and thirteen is glad she goes to grade eleven than we do two years ago college after that I went to an early acceptance program at McGill for medical school following medical school. It's a five year general surgery training for residency. There was an opportunity span extra time in the lab. And I took advantage of that. I did two years and then following that it's a two year fellowship in transplantation. And after that, you go look for work so to become a pancreas transplant surgeon is any extra training to specialize there or is that just part of the general transplant fellowship. So in order to become a pancreas transplant surgeon, specifically most people go through training for multiple organs and the program, you train, it has to have a certain number of pancreas transplants that they perform a year so that their fellows get enough experience. They can start. How do you know, you wanna be pancreas transplant surgeon piped internationally want to be a pancreas transplant surgeon? I think originally I wanted to do livers and intestines, and I really was interested in pediatric livers, and when ended up happening is when I came to India. Anna I noticed that like many other programs. They would only do pancreas transplants. When there was an ideal offer with an ideal recipient, and I sort of felt like there was a lot of Oregon's here that we're going to waste or were being sent out to other programs, and I originally became interested as an attending because I wanted to not waste those Oregon's. All right. So let's back up for a second. Can you explain what Panthers does? Sure pancreases an Oregon in the upper abdomen lives in the back of the belly. It's an organ that participates in digestion. And also participates in the endocrine system, and the part where interested for pancreas transplantation is the endocrine part pancreas makes insulin glucose gone mad at Staten a bunch of other hormones, particularly of interest is diabetes happens when you don't make enough insulin. So we transplanted pancreas. So that we make people who don't make insulin make insulin. So pinker transplant effectively would cure type one diabetes. It's sort of like ideal treatment for it. Why don't we do it forever? Everyone that that's a great question. Actually, most common consults. We get our patients that are well controlled diabetics, and they're sort of looking down the line in they're worried they're going to lose their vision or big develop neuropathy or kidney problems, and they want to just get a pay increase. But the the balancing act is you take a person who's taking lifelong medications and at risk for chronic diseases. You do a big operation. First of all second of all you put the money amino suppression medications for the rest of their life. So instead of being a diabetic patient. They become a transplant patient in. It's not really worth that risk unless there's something else that tilts the balance by far the most common reason to do a pancreas transplant is that they're already gonna get a kidney transplant for diabetes related kidney disease. So you might as well also put in a pancreas. So they won't be diabetic. And basically have taken all the risk of the immunosuppression off the table because they've already committed to lifelong immunosuppression for the kidney transplant. So it's it's like a plus one operation like as long as you're getting another kind of transplant. We. Might as well fix this at the same time. And while I while the patient survival is better if you get.

Montreal Oregon Panthers immunosuppression Indiana University school of m Dr Jonathan Jonathan Fidel Indiana Indiana University Dell India Anna I Staten neuropathy two years five year two year
"indiana university" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Love Your Work

"As two thousand eight right block gains the whose son newsday anyway i was kind and answered but in my mind all that's a really isn't isn't talks about very much for were both of the united states which is great for uh by for on from nebraska you're from indiana adams which is kind of tough to make it in silicon valley or whatever when he comes in those places is it is it's a different environment it totally is i actually grew up near philadelphia pennsylvania i went to school in india not but even the fact that i believed in indiana for the rest of my days i had venture capitals for example call me they're far away were i always tried to be really ethical i was very honest with people in in business and and they'd say to me almost kind of smug like oh you all there's those farm values on is in fact you isn't you're going to get shoot up instead hour indiana university interlinked in profile in it's not harvard it's not anchored or whatever so which was you know i had to even had to convince like the program that are went to it are you was the third ranked in the country it was ahead of those are some of those ivy league schools but of course nobody ever believed that and there was such a coast kind of a prejudice about at the even if i brought up a look at the ranking of the program i went to the date still going oriented shoot for what's funny is there a lot of successful entrepreneurs slash uh engineers came from illinois the oscar illinois university a whole yelled seeing pretty much was from mayor more greece's okay which at least they're.

united states nebraska indiana indiana university greece philadelphia pennsylvania india harvard illinois oscar illinois university
"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"First half never came back in the second half but he did not factor in in the first half at all taken away by michigan state how does indiana worked through that situation here in this falls in which one's going to have its hands full because he's going to have to guard this michigan state front frontcourt and this really tough nick ward took a lot of energy out doina early in the ball game in the first match chip this season so that's number one number two and catch the ball down he's got to be aggressive you take the ball the basket put your shoulder into this michigan state defense and foresees officials to blow the whistle and i think if you can get the front court of michigan state in a little bit of foul trouble that makes them a lot less effective defensively eight blocked shots per game to this team they along and athletic the best team in college basketball blocking shots jaunt cannot shy away from that he's got to be aggressive you get your shot blocked a couple of times that's okay but virtual on he's got to be the guy for this indian offense inside the pain in he cannot allow the size of michigan state to deter him away from being aggressive just notice the starting lineup of banda pulled out our street up here and frederic shwain is going to get the first started his career at indiana university outlined fred he's going to be really important to he cannot do to watch here offensively it's going to be a game authority's going to be an thought to do a lot what he catches it predator a nice job last few ball games played good defense inside the pay rebound in the basketball when he catches the ball fifteen feet from the basket he's looks for opensea makes and then he goes in screens away that's gonna be the recipe here for friday's get a lotta minutes tonight he can't try to be too much offensively because he's getting a stark michigan state will make you pay with you take that shots or turn the ball over that's how they get easy buckets in transition and fred he's got to be a kind of keep his head cool make sure makes the right way not the.

nick ward basketball banda frederic shwain indiana university opensea michigan indiana fred fifteen feet
"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"By fast track plumbing heating and air conditioning in green wibc rob kendall infertility cats good morning thanks for joining us i'll be with you on hold next week so and coming up in just a little bit there is a study out from indiana university that puts me in line with the majority on a very controversial topic tell you about that just a little bit but first boos in indiana it's all the rage these days right what is this nineteen 35 at coming up in the two thousand eighteen legislative session booze is going to be on the front of every bodies mind and right now over w idc dot com our own eric berman the best order in the business houses story out that says bin schmalz republican from auburn has put forward a bill which would make it legal to buy of beer on sunday oh my gosh yes howell may be freezing over we're moving forward with sunday sales however his bill does not allow youtube by cold beer and that my friends is where the fight will be can i just be candid with you it's the other day stop me and said hey man you're you're starting to sound like an alcoholic as much as you talk about alcohol on wibc said it stinks but it's a very important issue look for me i i am not going to buy cold beer there's a good chance i will by cold beer whether it's legal oh or not there is also good shared a lot of the time they won't buy beer on sunday it's not about the law itself it's about what it represents because i believe that you as a responsible adult can make the decision on whether something that's legal on monday through saturday i believe you should be able to buy it on sunday and you can make that decision that you're matureenough that you're responsible enough you're able to drive a car you're able to serve your country in the military i think you can handle whether or not you want to purchase alcohol on sunday i also believe me be go going out on a limb here but i also believe the you are responsible enough to be able to buy a cold beer and that you would have enough selfcontrol to put it in.

indiana university eric berman auburn youtube wibc indiana howell
"indiana university" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WLOB

"We'll according to the new york post drinking diet coke may not be so bad for your health after all and they quote some sort of a paediatric pete pediatric researcher at the indiana university school of medicine so this is it some like you know guide them resident on a you know a doctor's office in an apartment complex behind a seedy motel in the alleyway no this is like a legitimate school of medicine of the indiana university school of medicine and he wrote a new book called the bad booed bible how and why to eat simple oh we need to get a copy that book british frankly dale they can we need to have him on yet we should have done this before thanksgiving but he says the occasional diet coke is not so bad by the way he says you know what's worse the diet coke he says is drinking the real coq which i always thought of as the opposite i thought if you were going to have one of the other drank the real thing and not the dive so confused well i am too you know i don't understand these doctors of these researchers one day copies good for you the next day is going to kill ya we actually there was actually a sign old than on the subway the beach trained that i take back home to my neighborhood of brooklyn that does said sweet tea would kill you it would cause you to have a stroke you never see those signs down southward you no of course not you know i was thinking of will i'm looking at that signed thinking you know what we're calls give me a stroke as having no level megobroba new york saturday await you anyway interesting so odd that so president trump drinking all that diet coke he's trying to set a good example for the children of america todd he wants him to be healthy todd yes the stretch that's why he wants them to ethiopia the big mac to all beef patties special sauce let us cheese pickles iranians on assessing bc bonn that's what the president what's were american schoolchildren instead of beating ferment at soy sandwiches and chugging down kale jews like michelle obama no offence to the first light all right so moving right along so go ahead pop open a diet coke.

researcher brooklyn todd president michelle obama new york post indiana university school of m bible thanksgiving new york america ethiopia bc one day
"indiana university" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on WCTC

"Of the lead stories of the daily caller run by my good friend tucker carlson involves a story out of uh indiana that broke yesterday i'm sorry probe this morning eleven thirty one am sunday morning the following in indiana hospital no longer employs a nurse at the center of outrage over a tweet calling for white mothers to kill their cell phones the hospital announced on sunday today listen to this the nurse question ty you should baker is no longer an employee at indiana university health don't know much about it but sounds like in the anniversary held is a big facility after tweet of hers blaming white mothers for the evil the world surface this week hurt according to a statement from the hospital on sunday quote a recently hard i you health employee tied troubling post on social media this weekend uh no longer an employer by you health this is what she said listen up this is indiana university health law i think that's a huge facility mabian bloomington quote this what the nurse said ornate she's africanamerican or namus taser baker quote every white woman races a detriment to society when they raise a white sun someone with the higher propensity to be a terrorist rapist racist killer and domestic violence star historically every sign you had should be sacrificed to the wolves then she used the b word tisha bake uh posted over twitter while she was an employee at the hospital so why deep in the hospital is encouraging believe it or not the massacre of white babies a hospital spokesman confirmed over the weekend the baker was recently hired at indiana university health and that baker will not be able to work patiently any longer jelly so a black nurse calls for the genocide of white babies killed by their white mother what is that in her life what is it and our mentality early background the indiana university too hard earned cash place and has there been any deaths of white babies under her care when you with there wasn't at what does it near culture now would cause her to say such things while at work and in any versity put that in your pipe and smoke it most continue glucose your calls in fact take holes we have a two lines open at eight six six six four seven seven three three seven.

tucker carlson indiana indiana hospital social media twitter indiana university health baker indiana university bloomington domestic violence
"indiana university" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"indiana university" Discussed on Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

"But then we go to these college campuses ravi and i were just at michigan state university and the university of michigan followed by indiana university in february and we have thousands of kids thousands of them many of them were not christians who came and almost all the questions we gotta the qna line were from skeptics and they were honest questions they weren't duchess there were actually honest questions so you know we we sense of despair that are college kids are you know not looking at true to looking at feelings and that's true but then i see these events happen where these kits common astor question that we've seen them come to faith we've led kits the lord ira at these events or right after these events and we've seen them come to faith in in such tremendous ways in their scepticism gives way to hope and to truth so i'm hopeful a despite where we see today i'm actually hopeful so we had a train them up there with the train our kids and also our parents to actually want our kids to discern and find the truth not just have their preferences matt exactly and i think that one of the things that so remarkable about what you and your team do you go to these college campuses that could be very hostile to your message but you're really going in there to listen and to ask questions and did talk deeply with these students and i think that's why you have standing room only which if somebody's said you know pastor is going to come and speak at yale are pastors going to go speak at and i know you're not pastor but at university of michigan people role the rising go good luck with that but you're coming and you are meeting a deep need in these kids and that's what i love so much about what you do and you talk about that in grand central questions you talk about fundamentally that there are four.

michigan state university indiana university ira yale university of michigan university of michigan